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I have never been that interested in immigration laws.  Can't really say I was for or against it.  I always just saw both sides, rule of law vs. recognizing reality that illegal immigrants are here and aren't going to leave.  I just never felt the need to spend the mental bandwidth to work through those two competing values and come up with a position.  Two things have changed my attitude from apathetic to something close to crazed activist.  AZ's new law, and adopting a son, who happens to be of Hispanic descent.

Arizona's law states that a person can be detained for questioning if a police officer suspects that person is here illegally.  Police already have the right to arrest someone for breaking the law, any law.  Why did Arizona feel the need for a new law?  To provide cover for rounding up Hispanics for questioning.  The state is not allowed to demand your papers in this county.  Walking down the street while being brown does not constitute reasonable cause for harassment.  Except for Arizona now.  

I have a few suggestions that may help Arizona solve some of the legal issues associated with the new law.  They could provide a special card for people of Hispanic descent describing there immigration status, what activities they can legally do, and where they can legally go throughout the country.  Then to save time for the police officers, once you are properly registered they can issue you a special symbol you can wear to identify yourself.  (I hear a yellow star has worked in the past.)  Of course wearing the symbol could be faked so there may still be the occasional questioning by the well meaning police officers.  Just fewer questions than if you didn't wear the designation.

This constant policing of Hispanics would quickly become a burden on the tax payers of Arizona.  Leading to resentment of Hispanics, we wouldn't want that.  Probably should set up some designated housing for them.  These camps should probably have controlled access as there may be a bad element in the camps or looking to go to the camps.  Hey its a gated community.  Every ones dream home I am sure.  Plus, these camps would provide work opportunities for Hispanics.  I mean who wouldn't want work in this economy.  I mean someone has to clean out the ovens.

People ask how the Holocaust happened in Germany.  People ignored the preceding steps.  It wasn't the biggest problem of the day.  They didn't have the bandwidth to think about an issue that didn't affect them.  (Guilty)  This is how it starts.

I don't live in Arizona.  I go to Spring Training one weekend a year.  Not going until this is fixed is really the extent of what I can do to boycott the state.  (I am sure my 2 nights of hotel, meals, and tickets to the Giants games will break them.)  I can also ask others to do there little part and not spend one dime in Arizona until this is fixed.

Thank you

Originally posted to Edge PA on Wed May 05, 2010 at 02:20 PM PDT.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (9+ / 0-)

    "I will fight for the American people with my last breath. My opponent will destroy civilization making us long for the days when we had fire." - Any politician

    by Edge PA on Wed May 05, 2010 at 02:20:54 PM PDT

    •  Better to jail employers who (0+ / 0-)

      bypass U.S. workers in favor of luring undocumented.

      •  To me this is irrelevant to the new law (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Timaeus

        The new law demands people prove they are not breaking the law.  That is not right.

        I will not step foot in or do any business with AZ until they respect human rights!

        by Edge PA on Wed May 05, 2010 at 02:42:37 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I am agreeing with you. (0+ / 0-)

          Instead of this law, they should have instead created a law to punish the employers with serious jail time.

        •  What is the Difference Between This and... (0+ / 0-)

          DUI?  Don't you have to "prove" you are sober if you are stopped?

          •  You were stopped for a reason (0+ / 0-)

            (I am not going to defend check points, as those are wrong too, actually for the same reason.)

            If you are pulled over, you committed at least a traffic infraction.  That is different from being Hispanic, or not speaking English well enough.  Big difference.

            I will not step foot in or do any business with AZ until they respect human rights!

            by Edge PA on Thu May 06, 2010 at 11:09:14 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  If You Are Pulled Over For Speeding... (0+ / 0-)

              and you can not provide a valid driver's license, you should expect to prove who you are.

              I have driven to the store in the past and realized I left my wallet with my drivers license at home.  A policeman would be within his authority to "take me in". It would be inconvenient for me, and expensive, but not anything I would be mad at the cop for.  I made the mistake.

              This law will put pressure on States that do not require proof of citizenship to change their practices so that their citizens don't have to carry a birth certificate on vacation through Arizona.

              •  Alturnatively (0+ / 0-)

                People against discrimination will not travel to Arizona.  That's my plan.

                Hope Arizona doesn't rely on tourism as a major industry.

                Oops, that might be a problem.
                 

                I will not step foot in or do any business with AZ until they respect human rights!

                by Edge PA on Thu May 06, 2010 at 11:39:15 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

  •  Nice allegory of the risk of ignoring (6+ / 0-)

    history...

    Best of luck on a great life with your new son!

  •  The Nazi argument isn't a winning (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    IT Professional, LEFTYFRIZZLE

    one.

    •  Neither are any of yours (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Timaeus

      from what I've seen...

      Must we play dredge up your HR history AGAIN.

      I didn't think so :)

      "Human salvation lies in the hands of the creatively maladjusted." -- MLK Jr.

      by mahakali overdrive on Wed May 05, 2010 at 02:35:21 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The Nazi argument is the correct one (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Timaeus, marina

      or you could use Apartheid
      or Jim Crow
      or the Native Americans
      or the Irish Troubles
      or Pakistani / India
      or Darfur

      Its all the same.

      THEY are different than US.

      WE must protect ourselves from THEM.

      By any means necessary.

      That's their argument. They can dress it up however they want, that is it.  

      I will not step foot in or do any business with AZ until they respect human rights!

      by Edge PA on Wed May 05, 2010 at 02:40:19 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Tipped although I have (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Timaeus, marina, deep, Edge PA

    some qualms with a few of your conclusions, I really appreciate your working through your previous indifference -- something that many people face when it doesn't "concern them."

    My son is also half-Latino, although he looks Caucasian and wouldn't be racially profiled in Arizona. Ironically, I'd be more likely, as a Jewish woman.

    Thank you for supporting the boycott.

    The economic impact is already showing as stated in numerous stories today on this matter. We're doing great!

    Keep pressing your local city officials to JOIN the boycott where YOU live! That's one thing that could put an end to this law even more quickly.

    "Human salvation lies in the hands of the creatively maladjusted." -- MLK Jr.

    by mahakali overdrive on Wed May 05, 2010 at 02:37:57 PM PDT

    •  My shame (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Timaeus, marina, deep, mahakali overdrive

      is that i didn't work through my indifference until it mattered to my family.

      I hope others are better about that than I was.

      I will not step foot in or do any business with AZ until they respect human rights!

      by Edge PA on Wed May 05, 2010 at 02:44:41 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  It's a good shame, I think (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        marina, Edge PA

        In my case, I gave it very little thought until I moved to a largely Latino "barrio" area and saw racial profiling here in California first hand.

        So, if you are ashamed, I should be as well. I think it's what they call an awareness of white privilege, actually.

        Waking up to it is always to be commended.

        "Human salvation lies in the hands of the creatively maladjusted." -- MLK Jr.

        by mahakali overdrive on Wed May 05, 2010 at 02:54:49 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  It's just not true . . . (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    in the Trees

    Arizona's law states that a person can be detained for questioning if a police officer suspects that person is here illegally . . . Walking down the street while being brown does not constitute reasonable cause for harassment.  Except for Arizona now.

    The law states very clearly that it by itself does not provide cause for a stop. The law only kicks in if there has already been a stop unrelated to immigration status.

    The law also does not make "being brown" a "reasonable cause" for questioning. In determining "reasonable suspicion", the law explictly states that race, color, national origin, etc. cannot be used as a factor except to the extent already permitted under existing federal and state law, which is not very much.

    It also provides that legal status must be presumed if the person has any ID on them for which legal status is required, this includes a driver's license from Arizona or the vast majority of other states.

    There's been a lot of misinformation about the law. You may still not like it even given what it actually says, but don't be ignorant and talk about a law that doesn't exist.

    •  Jim Crow laws did not discriminate against anyone (0+ / 0-)

      They just made things separate, but equal.

      The intent of the law is to give legal cover to the harassment of people who look different. A police officer can already start an immigration inquiry without the law.  Why the law, it creates a legal burden on the accused to prove their innocence.  

      I will not step foot in or do any business with AZ until they respect human rights!

      by Edge PA on Thu May 06, 2010 at 11:07:03 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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