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Alas, poor shrimp. The BP Gulf Rupture will not be easy on these tasty little invertebrates.

It's hell being a bottom feeder with Homo sapiens running the place as it is. Let alone a bottom feeder invertebrate.

News below the bloggal partition.

Louisiana closes area to shrimp harvesting

AP

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) - The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries has ordered the immediate closure of shrimp harvesting in an area that may be vulnerable to an ever-widening oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico.

Secretary Robert Barham issued an emergency closure, effective at 6 p.m. Thursday, in territorial seas from the south pass of the Mississippi River to the eastern shore of 4 Bayous Pass.

Barham says the closure was suggested after the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's projections indicated the area might become vulnerable to oil, which began spewing when a drilling rig exploded and sank in the Gulf of Mexico last month.

A Threat Creeping Toward the Pantry

NYT

NEW ORLEANS — Margie Scheuermann, who has lived here for 78 years, went over her list as she waited in line Tuesday to buy local seafood at the Crescent City Farmers Market: a pair of soft-shell crabs, a pound of lump crab meat and five pounds of unpeeled white gulf shrimp.

"This could all be gone next week," she said. "And if we don’t get fresh seafood, what are we going to do? You can’t cook."

In good times and bad, New Orleans has always had a talent for living for the moment. So with oil from a gushing well in the Gulf of Mexico looming offshore, people here are buying and eating as much seafood as they can as fast as they can. At last Saturday’s farmers’ market, an entire load of 350 pounds of fresh shrimp, at $5 a pound, sold out in an hour.

Fort Smith Seafood Merchants Say Don't Panic Over Oil Spill

Arkansas

People are rushing to local seafood merchants, afraid their favorite dishes may be off the menu because of the gulf coast oil spill.

Right after the oil spill happened, customers at See's Seafood in Fort Smith had a lot of questions about how that would affect their purchases, but the owners are saying the most important thing is not to panic.

"When that first happened the customers started calling and everybody wanted to buy up a whole bunch of shrimp at one time, because they were worried they were never going to get shrimp again," said Sandy See.

According to Sees, her shrimp suppliers aren't in the direct line of the oil. They're located in Texas, and the weather has been pushing the growing slick away from that area.

Cold Winter Kills Shrimp And Trout

South Carolina

Charleston, SC - A cold winter kills off two major catches for local fishermen. The DNR estimates up to 70 percent of spotted sea trout have been killed off. The white shrimp population took an even bigger hit at 90 percent.

The DNR has been checking the stock to make sure it's ready and this year's numbers are way down.

"I went out with them, we saw nine or 10 shrimp where we should have had 150. It’s down," said Tommy Edwards, a shrimper.

Crab, shrimp prices rising in Lebanon County

Pennsylvania

Joe Church says he's never seen so much volatility in seafood pricing.

Church, who has owned Cheyney Seafood in North Cornwall Township for 14 years, said Thursday that crab and shrimp prices are rising and will likely continue to do so.

"There's going to be a shortage of shrimp," Church said. "There are not a lot of large shrimp available."

Prices rose this week, and Church expects next week's prices to be "significantly higher."

Maine

New England shrimp fishermen have solid season

PORTLAND, Maine — The combination of a healthy shrimp population, favorable weather and stable markets have made for solid shrimp fishing in New England — so solid, in fact, that the season is closing early because fishermen have caught so many of the small, sweet crustaceans.

So far they've caught nearly 11 million pounds. That's the biggest seasonal harvest since 1997. Because the harvest has exceeded the recommended maximum catch, regulators are closing the season Wednesday, more than three weeks earlier than originally planned.

Even so, the shrimp markets have rebounded from last year when the global recession dampened demand, said John Norton, CEO and president of Cozy Harbor Seafood Inc., a seafood processing company in Portland. Last year's shrimp season began just two months after the financial markets collapsed in October 2008, causing seafood buyers to pull back on their purchases, he said.

Special La. shrimp season closing 6 p.m. Tuesday

BATON ROUGE, La. — Louisiana's Department of Wildlife and Fisheries says a special shrimp season will end at 6 p.m. Tuesday.

Secretary Robert Barham opened the season last Wednesday to let trawlers harvest marketable white shrimp before any possible effects of the oil spill showed up in state waters.

A news release says department biologists find that marketable white shrimp have been taken, leaving only juvenile brown shrimp. It says the only reason for closing the season is to let the brown shrimp grow.

The area that will close Tuesday includes Zone 1, from the Mississippi-Louisiana state line to the western shore of South Pass, and inshore waters of Zone 2, from South Pass to the western shore of Vermilion Bay.

Originally posted to The Miep Channel on Thu May 06, 2010 at 07:29 PM PDT.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Dreadful (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pico, DrJeremy, allep10, EdgedInBlue, Miep

    I am glad I have several bags of shrimp frozen in the freezer..right off the boat, frozen in their own water.

    What will we do without seafood..a close friend is a shrimper..what will he do?

  •  Will this oil spill be the tipping point (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pantherq, Miep

    to get people to turn veggie ?

    "I've reported you. Enjoy your ban or suspension." I'm loving it !

    by indycam on Thu May 06, 2010 at 07:51:28 PM PDT

    •  no (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cosette, Calamity Jean, psilocynic

      But we can surely use the outcome as educational material.

      It definitely is getting people thinking about using petroleum to drive personal vehicles. And that's good.

      "Drill, Stupid, Drill!." -McJoan

      by Miep on Thu May 06, 2010 at 07:54:13 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You know that a veggie driving a hummer (5+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cosette, DrJeremy, allep10, pantherq, Miep

        has less of a foot print than
        a meat eater driving a prius ?
        If you want to cut the need for oil ,
        changing to a veggie diet
        has more of a real impact than
        selling your old car and buying a prius .

        "I've reported you. Enjoy your ban or suspension." I'm loving it !

        by indycam on Thu May 06, 2010 at 07:58:42 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I almost never eat meat (6+ / 0-)

          though I do feed my dog chicken.

          Neither of us have children, or ever will.

          Failing to reproduce is by far the best points for reducing one's carbon footprint.

          I also don't drive a car, I've never driven a car. I bicycle. I rarely buy a complicated new item of any sort. I've been on an airplane about twice in the last 20 years.

          I have a small life. So I hang around here and guilt-trip people about it :-)

          Thanks for your comment. These things are worth looking at, all of these angles.

          I've often noted that people who drive a lot, travel on longer trips by plane, have kids, and recycle their trash are way too complacent about that last bit about the trash. It's a drop in the bucket.

          "Drill, Stupid, Drill!." -McJoan

          by Miep on Thu May 06, 2010 at 08:03:04 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  You see, this is why your first comment (0+ / 0-)

          pissed me off. You're being dishonest. You intentionally said that to provoke people so you could hammer at them with even more snottiness when they objected. If you were simply honest and respectful, and made this sort of argument from the start, it'd be one thing. But you didn't. You just wanted a chance to talk down to people you disagree with.  

          -8.50, -7.64 "We could certainly slow the aging process down if it had to work its way through Congress." - Will Rogers

          by croyal on Thu May 06, 2010 at 08:13:19 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  I (0+ / 0-)

          will never own a Hummer or a Prius, and I won't stop eating meat. I am an omnivore. I eat more vegetables than meat, but every one of those vegetables has been grown, weeded, harvested, cleaned, packaged and brought to market, bought and transported home and then stored and cooked using petrochemicals. I cannot grow all of the vegetables I can eat. Therefore I must rely on growers who do it for me. I cannot afford nor can I get all organic vegetables even though I try as hard as I can. If you want to cut the need for oil, making fewer babies has a hell of a lot bigger impact that driving a Prius and eating only vegetables. Notice I spelled out the word "vegetables".

    •  Having steak tonight. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wwjjd

      And I don't think not eating meat would have saved those oh so succulent shrimp.

      •  The damage the meat industry has (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        greengemini, DrJeremy, Miep

        on the oceans is real .
        Your steak has a high price to the environment .
        The oil need from a meat based diet is much much greater .

        "I've reported you. Enjoy your ban or suspension." I'm loving it !

        by indycam on Thu May 06, 2010 at 08:02:17 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  you are right (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          murasaki, crose, DrJeremy

          I find it frustrating when people write about how we all should be on high protein diets.

          It's really a smaller argument, what the diet of humans should be. Once we figure out how to stop overrunning the planet like the locusts we are, maybe we can talk more about worrying about how to keep ourselves healthy enough to survive.

          I'm gonna get slammed for this, you know. Thanks for your comments.

          "Drill, Stupid, Drill!." -McJoan

          by Miep on Thu May 06, 2010 at 08:06:19 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Miep (0+ / 0-)

            there is no "one diet for humans". Humans have evolved to eat almost anything that grows where they happen to have been living.

            An extreme example of this would be (for instance) expecting Inuit peoples to fare well on beans and rice without some major metabolic adjustments, not to mention cultural ones.

            Applying the "Shock Doctrine" concept to this, starving humans will eat almost anything, and even come to adjust to it in time.

            don't always believe what you think...

            by claude on Fri May 07, 2010 at 05:58:25 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  well, the shrimp kinda do it on their own (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        greengemini, DrJeremy

        long as we don't poison them to death.

        But cows require a lot of plant food, and all that plant food requires a lot of fertilizer, which requires fossil fuels to manufacture.

        The energy need quotients are real and demonstrable and many have written about them.

        "Drill, Stupid, Drill!." -McJoan

        by Miep on Thu May 06, 2010 at 08:04:50 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Actually that's not necessarily the case. (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          crose, Calamity Jean, Miep

          That has more to do with our current methods of raising livestock: but there are ways to raise them with a zero to negative footprint involved.  Granted, that's not including other related footprints (shipping meat over long distances, refrigeration, etc.) but overall it can be very sustainable.

          Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

          by pico on Thu May 06, 2010 at 10:42:28 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Oh, the meat market would probably be a lot (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            crose, Miep

            smaller, too.   We wouldn't be gorging on all-you-can-eat barbecues.  That's not necessarily a bad thing, heh.

            Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

            by pico on Thu May 06, 2010 at 10:47:15 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  barbeque is wonderful (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              claude, pico, crose

              for starters, we all need to admit stuff like that.

              I've been pretty much a vegetarian from when I was a teenager.

              But I still hunger for barbeque.

              Humans are pretty primitive critters. We are apes. We are a species of chimpanzee.

              We don't like to admit this.

              Mostly we need fewer H. sapiens. That would help all of this.

              We need to focus constantly on the fact that fewer H. sapiens is the way to go, that's the fix.

              And we need to work out how to do it without oppression, war, viciousness, bigotry, etc.

              Bitch of a problem, really.

              "Drill, Stupid, Drill!." -McJoan

              by Miep on Thu May 06, 2010 at 10:52:48 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  You've got that right. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                JeffW

                Mostly we need fewer H. sapiens. That would help all of this.

                We need to focus constantly on the fact that fewer H. sapiens is the way to go, that's the fix.

                And we need to work out how to do it without oppression, war, viciousness, bigotry, etc.

                Bitch of a problem, really.

                Makes the "sapiens" in our species name look more and more like an overstatement.  ("Sapiens" means "wise" in Latin.)

                Renewable energy brings national security.

                by Calamity Jean on Fri May 07, 2010 at 01:49:37 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

          •  yes, but it's always about (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            pico, crose

            our wanting to have a lot of protein in our diets and endlessly reproduce.

            Everything else can be fixed if we back off on these.

            But I'm all for flexibility. Encouraging flexibility, imagination, ingenuity; all of this could do a good job of decreasing pain in the short run.

            But in the long run, we are going to have to either deal with limits, or suicide. And that suicide will take down a lot of other critters, too.

            "Drill, Stupid, Drill!." -McJoan

            by Miep on Thu May 06, 2010 at 10:47:55 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  Not really. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          JeffW

          But cows require a lot of plant food, and all that plant food requires a lot of fertilizer, which requires fossil fuels to manufacture.

          Beef raised on pasture will fertilize the grass with manure, no artificial fertilzer required.  Fertilizer can be manufactured with electricity, water, and nitrogen from the air, no fossil fuels required.  

          People like beef, and saying "You have to give up beef" is counterproductive.  Saying, "Eat beef raised in a more responsible way" is more likely to get co-operation, besides being more truthful.  

          Shrimping isn't some marvelous height of ecological virtue either.  Too many shrimpers refuse to use Turtle Excluder Devices on their shrimp nets, and drown lots of endangered sea turtles.  I love shrimp, but have refused to eat them for over twenty years because of that.  

          Renewable energy brings national security.

          by Calamity Jean on Fri May 07, 2010 at 01:44:50 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Don't go there (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Calamity Jean

      This is not the time for some glib vegetarian sanctimony. It is off-target and a distraction, AT BEST. The problem isn't the shrimping industry or the regional food culture that depends on that industry, both which were great incentives for sustaining and protecting the Gulf environment. It's about off-shore drilling.

      -8.50, -7.64 "We could certainly slow the aging process down if it had to work its way through Congress." - Will Rogers

      by croyal on Thu May 06, 2010 at 08:07:37 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  disagree entirely (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        greengemini, DrJeremy

        it's all interrelated. Fossil fuels are used to a great extent in modern agriculture. And the lower one eats on the food chain, the less of that fuel is involved.

        Off-shore drilling is about our fuel-hungry culture. We are not going to be able to indefinitely just mine stuff like natural gas and petroleum. It's going to get harder. It's going to take more work. And we're going to have to stop being so freaking sloppy and self-indulgent about how we run agriculture.

        "Drill, Stupid, Drill!." -McJoan

        by Miep on Thu May 06, 2010 at 08:10:24 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  "Don't go there" ? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DrJeremy

        Who are you again ?

        "glib vegetarian sanctimony"
        Nothing glib or sanctimonious about it .
        Its deadly F'ing serious !

        "I've reported you. Enjoy your ban or suspension." I'm loving it !

        by indycam on Thu May 06, 2010 at 08:19:52 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  I've Eaten Gulf Shrimp On the Dock Hauled Up (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    murasaki, pico, psilocynic, greengemini, Miep

    from under our feet and dumped into the boiler still swimming. Unbelievable.

    Hopes and wishes for the Gulf, its ecology and all the people who depend on it.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Thu May 06, 2010 at 07:54:55 PM PDT

    •  they are best when really fresh (5+ / 0-)

      definitely.

      And oil-free.

      But we really need to think about keeping the bottom clean for the bottom-feeders. And this latest disaster is miserably far from being progress in that direction.

      "Drill, Stupid, Drill!." -McJoan

      by Miep on Thu May 06, 2010 at 07:56:41 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I've eaten a dish that was called (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Miep

        Baby eels cooked in oil. It was possibly the slimiest, greasiest dish I've eaten. Also quite delicious. But that was a somewhat different kind of oil. ;D

        Wal*Mart isn't the root of all evil but you can buy the plastic, cadmium-tainted, Chinese knock-off of it there for $4.27

        by ontheleftcoast on Thu May 06, 2010 at 08:20:27 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Problem w Shrimp for Food Is That Either Wild (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Miep

        or farmed, they're mostly real rough on the environment.

        I reluctantly stopped eating shrimp some time ago.

        We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

        by Gooserock on Thu May 06, 2010 at 08:59:19 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Why are they rough on the environment? (0+ / 0-)

          I see them as being toxic because they pick up heavy metals & other noxious stuff, because of being bottom feeders.

          But they evolved for a long time before we showed up; how does that make them hard on the environment?

          It's us that are hard on the environment.

          "Drill, Stupid, Drill!." -McJoan

          by Miep on Thu May 06, 2010 at 09:06:57 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  So as to the heavy metals, would (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Miep

            shrimp from certain areas be safer than others?  I'm thinking North Atlantic might be cleaner?

            "I can't go to sleep. Someone on the internet is wrong!"

            by DrJeremy on Thu May 06, 2010 at 09:17:01 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I don't have the expertise to answer your (0+ / 0-)

              question.

              One would have to look into where substances with heavy metals had been dumped, what the currents were, how all of this would travel and subside, and where the sea life was, that might be feeding in such areas.

              It's complicated. But mercury is turning up in all fish now, including fish that live in freshwater.

              First it was shrimp. Now it is all fish everywhere.

              Stands to reason that bottom feeders in oceans that have been dumping grounds, the deepest places...stands to reason that our oceans are getting pretty toxic for the animal life there. The further up the food chain the worse, and the more involvement with feeding on the bottom where heavy stuff sinks to, the worst.

              That's how I see it. Feedback is always appreciated.

              "Drill, Stupid, Drill!." -McJoan

              by Miep on Thu May 06, 2010 at 09:23:33 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  I think (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            claude, Miep

            they aren't so much bottom feeders as they are low on the oceanic food chain--they don't eat muck. They eat algae, plankton, carrion etc. and in that case they might be concentrating heavy metals, especially since the offshore delta muck is where all of the nasty land-based runoff settles. In reality the Gulf has been filthy for years. Louisiana has some of the worst environmental doings in the country. I don't trust Gulf shrimp any more that I trust farmed shrimp. Until we clean up the sea and reduce our population, I don't think continental shelf seafood is a good bet. We seem to shit in our own gardens without thought. I love clams, oysters and shrimp and I would eat them every day if I could. But they are all either farmed or taken in nearshore environments that concentrate all the worst chemicals and I also don't trust the FDA to figure out how much cadmium, PCBs, zinc, benzene etc. will give me cancer.

            We are on the same page, Miep. Population must fall to beneath 3 billion for the planet to recover and sustain itself.

            •  wow, great comment (0+ / 0-)

              You know this stuff better than I do.

              I think the seafood angle is a great way to get in people's faces about this. Just another tasty thing people take for granted.

              Would you like to get together and write a piece here about seafood? I think you'd write the content, and I could maybe write the commentary. We could give it to the Ekos people, the greenroots people here.

              We could frame it around the BP Gulf Rupture.

              Let me know if you're interested.

              "Drill, Stupid, Drill!." -McJoan

              by Miep on Fri May 07, 2010 at 12:57:46 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

  •  I'm with Margie Scheuermann, (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    texasmom, Miep

    "This could all be gone next week," she said. "And if we don’t get fresh seafood, what are we going to do? You can’t cook."

    "I can't go to sleep. Someone on the internet is wrong!"

    by DrJeremy on Thu May 06, 2010 at 08:45:33 PM PDT

  •  why oh why - if there is a good fishery in the NE (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Gooserock, Miep

    and (ok, soon go be gone fishery) in the Gulf of Mexico - why is it when I go to the market they're mostly selling shrimp from Thailand (which I refuse to buy)? And I'm in the SF Bay area which means I would EXPECT to see alot of Mexican shrimp, but we do not.

    "I have ferrets with fins" - African Cichlids. And 3 pooties too! Ren, Stimpy (15 yrs) and Rocky (3 yrs)

    by mrsgoo on Thu May 06, 2010 at 08:58:19 PM PDT

    •  Same Reason Americans Flee to Thailand for (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      mrsgoo, Miep

      medical care.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Thu May 06, 2010 at 09:00:01 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  LOL! sigh. And I've been worried about buying (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Miep

        seafood from countries that don't have an EPA or Clean Water Act. silly, silly me.

        "I have ferrets with fins" - African Cichlids. And 3 pooties too! Ren, Stimpy (15 yrs) and Rocky (3 yrs)

        by mrsgoo on Thu May 06, 2010 at 09:07:27 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  hell, Mexico (0+ / 0-)

        people where I live go down to Juarez to get their teeth fixed. Lots cheaper. Maybe a magnitude cheaper. Reports are that the quality of the work is pretty good, too.

        Now, if we could just get this drug fear thing worked out, Mexico could have a new profitable industry!

        "Drill, Stupid, Drill!." -McJoan

        by Miep on Thu May 06, 2010 at 09:15:28 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  and what's with all that garlic from China? (0+ / 0-)

      Inquiring minds want to know.

      "Drill, Stupid, Drill!." -McJoan

      by Miep on Thu May 06, 2010 at 09:12:02 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Not to mention (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Miep

        cheap pine nuts. Between the drought killing millions of pinyon pines and the collapse of the market for domestic pine nuts due to cheap Chinese imports, the Native Americans of the Southwest have lost yet another semi-viable natural industry.

        •  that was awful, I heard about that (0+ / 0-)

          years ago.

          I think it's inevitable that our ecology and environment will change over time. But what is NOT inevitable, is our ongoing inability to keep track of this, to work with it, to try to smooth out the changes.

          We CAN learn. We CAN get smarter about all of this. We CAN figure it out that this is the most important priority.

          But how? How can we get there?

          We're so freaking lost, crose.

          It's all so obvious, and we are so lost, and in so many cases, such tools.

          Miep

          "Drill, Stupid, Drill!." -McJoan

          by Miep on Fri May 07, 2010 at 12:45:03 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Thailand (0+ / 0-)

      has been farming shrimp for decades and it is now one of their biggest exports. Southeast Asian intertidal zones are perfect for shrimp production. Before exporting shrimp became such a big deal, the coastal dwellers used the mangrove swamps as is--netting the shrimp that fed in among the mangrove limbs during the incoming tides. As their and the region's population increased, creating external markets for shrimp, the coastal areas were secured by landowners who ripped out the mangroves and built shrimp pens that were floodable by the tides. With a huge global market, Thailand, Viet Nam, India, Indonesia and the Philippines produce millions of pounds of farmed shrimp per year, causing untold environmental damage. The mangrove swamps, which have protected the estuaries and intertidal zones of the South Pacific for thousands of years from hurricanes and tsunami, have mostly been obliterated for shrimp farms, which are now huge operations involving concrete tanks, canals, flood gates, tons of fish waste pouring into the sea and coastal dwellers being pushed out of their homes. This is the reason Red Lobster can offer "all you can eat" shrimp.

  •  Poor shrimpies (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Miep

    I don't eat them, though. Shrimp don't taste good to me, and I love most other seafood.

  •  South American and Asian shrimp farms will see (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pico, crose, Miep

    booming business. Sold cheap, in 2-pound bags, at a grocery store near you.

    These critters are fed who knows what, and their cages disrupt coastal areas that we do not see.

    I grew up with the kids of fishermen. Nothing beats the real thing coming right off their boats. But the lives of fishermen are the last in line when it comes to environmental impacts  

    There is a special annex in hell being built right now, especially for BP executives.

    •  yeah, this is all a royal mess (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bleeding blue, Calamity Jean

      I do like the idea of the fisher people getting hired to help clean up the mess. I like the idea of those people being up there right in front seeing what's really happening. Seeing exactly what has been happening, that is destroying their sustainable seafood livelihood.

      I want all those guys and girls right out there on the forefront of this.

      "Drill, Stupid, Drill!." -McJoan

      by Miep on Thu May 06, 2010 at 09:19:02 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I'm very curious to see what happens (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bleeding blue, Miep

      to the New Orleans restaurant business.  A lot of restaurants try to avoid buying frozen, foreign seafood in favor of encouraging local fisherman with fresher produce.  But if there's no fish... do you change your menu in solidarity, or sell your soul to the frozen packaging?  How will that affect tourism, another industry the city absolutely relies on?

      Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

      by pico on Thu May 06, 2010 at 10:44:42 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Yes, They'll be in (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bleeding blue

      the Monsanto Wing.

  •  Food. Maybe we'll notice the devastation... (0+ / 0-)

    ... when it hits our (collective) bellies.

    If nothing else, that little oil spill in the gulf will impact our food supply. And please don't forget - it's not a food chain. It's a food web. Meaning that what affects tiny sea life affects organisms all throughout the area, large and small, since they all rely on each other for (and as) food - and we rely on all of them for food.

    Spring! Birds are tweeting, ticks are starting families, skeeters are starting families, skunks are starting families, flies are starting families...

    by SciMathGuy on Fri May 07, 2010 at 03:39:49 AM PDT

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