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I do not often recommend that folks head over to the WSJ for anything, but today I make an exception. As BP continues to spin this disaster as a failure of technology - the BOP's failure. Someone from the oil and gas industry has finally come along and declared Bull Shit!

Terry Barr, the writer of this letter to the editor in response to Hayward's WSJ Op Ed on June 4th, is President of Samson Oil and Gas Limited  which is a Australian based oil & gas company holding extensive development and exploration acreage in the USA. So I think the man knows of which he speaks.  He clearly lays the blame on BP and the failure of it's people to follow standard industry practices that could have prevented this disaster BOP failure or not.

Just one of the money quotes:

WSJ.com

   

Mr. Hayward and BP have taken the position that this tragedy is all about a fail-safe blow-out preventer (BOP) failing, but in reality the BOP is really the backup system, and yes we expect that it will work. However, all of the industry practice and construction systems are aimed at ensuring that one never has to use that device. Thus the industry has for decades relied on a dense mud system to keep the hydrocarbons in the reservoir and everything that is done to maintain wellbore integrity is tested, and where a wellbore integrity test fails, remedial action is taken.

   This well failed its casing integrity test and nothing was done. The data collected during a critical operation to monitor hydrocarbon inflow was ignored and nothing was done. This spill is about human failure and it is time BP put its hand up and admitted that.

I strongly suggest every one head over to WSJ and read the whole play by play as laid out by Mr. Barr. It's clear, concise and lays the blame squarely where it must be put. BP!

Yes this diary is more than a tad short, but I really could not think of a thing that I could say that would make Mr Barr's words and information more powerful.

Originally posted to jsfox on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 10:22 AM PDT.

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Comment Preferences

  •  funny....at first glance, (5+ / 0-)

    I thought BOP stood for Barack Obama Problem.
    geez...probably need a break, huh?

    ;)

    "Toleration is the greatest gift of the mind; it requires the same effort of the brain that it takes to balance oneself on a bicycle." -Helen Keller

    by ridemybike on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 10:32:28 AM PDT

  •  Would you expand BOP at the beginning? (5+ / 0-)

    I couldn't recall what BOP meant, and it's not expanded until late in the diary.

    That might help readers get your point quicker.

    Cheers

  •  Ideology failure... (5+ / 0-)

    ...caused the blowout

    •  Reckless abandonment of safety procedures. (4+ / 0-)

      That's an ideology?

      you (Repubs) lie down with "Nazi"-chanters, you get up with a responsibility for what they might do. -David Corn

      by Gorette on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:03:57 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Humans (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Catte Nappe, Deep Texan

      Caused the blowout.

      The human species is responsible for this--especially those of us that use oil and plastics in large amounts.

      We all need to take responsibility by reducing our consumption of same as much as possible, and by demanding an oil-free energy policy.

      Otherwise things are going to get much, much worse before they get better.

      Save the parrots: Drink shade-grown coffee!

      by oscarsmom on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:11:49 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Two different issues (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Catte Nappe

        That we need to reduce fossil fuel consumption is obvious - it just has nothing to do with BP using sloppy, unsafe procedures.

        Essentially you're saying that if a surgeon amputates the wrong foot, we're all collectively guilty because we all use medical services (and of course we could reduce the demand for medical services through diet, exercise, safer workplaces and lots of other practices).

        Blaming medical consumers for a surgeon's carelessness makes no sense, and neither does assigning collective blame for what is BP's failure.

        If you want to blame us all for climate change, go for it - we're all responsible to some extent. But don't make illogical leaps.

        We are here as on a darkling plain Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,

        by badger on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 12:00:13 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Not the human species as a whole. The greedy ones (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        never forget 2000

        forcing the operations without regard for safety or accepted practices.

        Texas is NO Bush League! LBJ, Lady Bird, Sully Sullenberger, Ike, Molly Ivins, Barbara Jordan, Ann Richards, Drew Brees -7.50,-5.59

        by BlackSheep1 on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 12:24:50 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Not humans (0+ / 0-)

        As I mentioned yesterday, these guys are not of our species. They are homo avaritia maximus. They feed on humans to satiate their greed. everything is a cost benefit, breakeven, zero sum. They are amoral.

        Never underestimate the ability of the Right to over reach.

        by never forget 2000 on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 01:41:18 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Fits right in with this: (17+ / 0-)

    OSHA records indicate BP ran up 760 "egregious, willful" safety violations.  Other oil campanies, such as Sunoco and Conoco-Phillips had eight violations each.  Citgo had two and Exxon had one comparable citation. That's well in excess of 90% of the OSHA violations being handed out to the entire industry, which kind of speaks for itself.

    There seems to be little doubt that BP is a wantonly reckless corporation concerned with the bottom line -- far, far more than employee safety and the environment.

    I'm going to be very disappointed if someone at BP doesn't go to jail.

  •  criminal charges a brewin. . .nt (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jsfox, eXtina, princesspat

    All liberal values can be summed into a single issue: The dismantling of the American Middle Class. Publicly Funded U.S. Politics NOW!!!

    by innereye on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 10:42:28 AM PDT

  •  Thank you for the link to the WSJ..... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Angie in WA State, jsfox, miss SPED

    Mr. Barr spells it out....It is a powerful account indeed.

    Love is the lasting legacy of our lives

    by princesspat on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 10:45:53 AM PDT

  •  Just needs a little more colorful language (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Timaeus, BlackSheep1, semiot, jsfox, eXtina

    Then the whole letter would read like a Fishgrease diary. Straight and to the point, informative, and damning.

    Legalism: strict conformity to the letter of the law rather than its spirit

    by Catte Nappe on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 10:55:19 AM PDT

  •  Failure is a sequence (9+ / 0-)

    ...rather than a single event.  As the author stated, the BOP was simply the last failure in the sequence.  It never should have gotten that far.  But one by one, BP ignored every step that was designed to prevent just such a failure.

    BP's excuse is equivalent to having a car repaired cheaply and not replacing a deployed airbag, then getting in the car, not buckling up, talking on the cel phone while drinking a beer, running through red lights and stop signs...then when one T-bone's someone and one's face bounces off the windshield, complaining that the air bag didn't work.

  •  Not a human failure either, really. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Catte Nappe, Actbriniel

    It's not like any one person screwed up- a piss-poor management decision was made, and nobody was willing to say " No".

    Once the unstated policy that stopping work for safety reasons would reflect poorly on whoever called the stop, this or something like it was inevitable.

    Organization failure, not human.

  •  It's highly possible (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Icarus 66

    that a number of things caused this tragedy, including those mentioned AND the failure of the BOP. And other factors that haven't yet made it to the public sphere.  It may well be that BP AND Transocean AND Halliburton AND others all had a hand in causing this tragedy.  We just don't know anything for sure yet, until the investigation is completed.  

    And frankly, I'm not sure it's all that helpful for people who weren't there to be speculating that this or that caused the tragedy. Until we know for sure, speculation that it's "all" BP's fault may serve to let some other parties off the hook, and I think that's not serving us here in South Louisiana at this point.  Yes, BP is absolutely the responsible party here -- that's a matter of law, under OPA.  But why are some people so eager to try to exonerate everybody else at this point?

    We all want to know what caused this tragedy, of course.  That's what we have govenmental (and federal criminal) investigations for, it seems to me.  

    •  Point taken (0+ / 0-)

      But I haven't exactly seen anyboy eager to "exonerate" Transocean or Halliburton, either. And on that score, I'm not sure I can expect to live long enough to see the end of all the blame that will be passed around in the court system like a hot potato.

      Legalism: strict conformity to the letter of the law rather than its spirit

      by Catte Nappe on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:11:55 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Don't forget Cameron (4+ / 0-)

        Cameron made the BOP.  The design is not sufficient for the job:  that much was known before the blowout because the shear rams were known to be incapable of cutting ~10% of the pipe.  Yet Cameron was selling them, regulators were allowing them, and many were using them.  

        I agree that we shouldn't give anyone a pass on this.  The failures were system wide, including the regulators/auditors.  

        •  oh, well, w/that, blame DICK CHENEY for making (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          miss SPED

          the rule that the $500-k remote switch for the blowout preventer (sonic switches) was an unnecessary expense for BP, Exxon, Shell & so on ... we don't know that such a switch would have stopped this, but having it there wouldn't have hurt.

          Texas is NO Bush League! LBJ, Lady Bird, Sully Sullenberger, Ike, Molly Ivins, Barbara Jordan, Ann Richards, Drew Brees -7.50,-5.59

          by BlackSheep1 on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 02:42:40 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  My point is at there seems to be a rush (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Catte Nappe

        towards concluding that it's BP, and only BP, who caused the problem.  It's as if the stories were being written by the allies of those other companies.  

    •  Who is doing that? (0+ / 0-)

      But why are some people so eager to try to exonerate everybody else at this point?

      Many people and many entities had a hand in allowing BP to wantonly and illegally take the extreme risks they took in this case.

      Some people even go back as far as Reagan, Nixon, Milton Friedman in the search for the roots to this problem.

      While it's a systemmatic problem, BP is probably the only party one may directly and easily hold responsible.

    •  yeah, it does usually take a committee (0+ / 0-)

      to turn out a clusterfrack this thorough ...

      Texas is NO Bush League! LBJ, Lady Bird, Sully Sullenberger, Ike, Molly Ivins, Barbara Jordan, Ann Richards, Drew Brees -7.50,-5.59

      by BlackSheep1 on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 02:40:57 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Tipped and rec'd. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Gorette, Knarfc, jsfox

    You know, it's even worse than that.  BP's Tony Hayward has even referred to the oil gusher as a "natural disaster"!

    I don't think BP will survive this.

    Force Tony Hayward to do clean-up duty in the Louisiana marshes in his best suit.

    by Timaeus on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:02:24 AM PDT

  •  I agree with this analysis. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BlackSheep1, jsfox, miss SPED

    However...the BOP did indeed fail, even if it should never have been put in the position to do so.

    Considering that this piece of equipment is the only thing standing between human error and catastrophe, I think it is pretty damn important that we figure out why the BOP failed, and engineer (over-engineer) new ones that are much more robust, with many more redundant operations built-in.

    These things needs to be a zero-failure technology.

    "How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?"

    by Cure7802 on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:04:11 AM PDT

    •  Yes (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      BlackSheep1, Cure7802

      and maybe the headline should have read BP failed long before the BOP failed.

      In the choice between changing ones mind and proving there's no need to do so, most people get busy on the proof.

      by jsfox on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:07:05 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Of course, there was the 1/2 million switch (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Angie in WA State, miss SPED

      that would have been a fail safe if the BOP didn't work.

      The one used in Europe.

      The one they were too cheap to install.

      Sorry, I keep forgetting what it's called.

      you (Repubs) lie down with "Nazi"-chanters, you get up with a responsibility for what they might do. -David Corn

      by Gorette on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:09:10 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I think you mean an acoustic switch... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Catte Nappe, Gorette, miss SPED

        but so far, the evidence points to a failure within the BOP itself. A different triggering mechanism (i.e. another switch) doesn't look like it would have made any difference.

        We'll know for certain once they raise it to the surface and take it apart.

        "How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?"

        by Cure7802 on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:17:06 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Thanks, that's it. I don't understand what (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          miss SPED

          acoustic means in this case and that's why I keep forgetting it, it makes no sense to me.

          And yes, I wondered if in this case it might not have made a difference but remembered that I'd read that it was a way of clamping the whole thing shut in such a powerful way that it would work no matter what.

          you (Repubs) lie down with "Nazi"-chanters, you get up with a responsibility for what they might do. -David Corn

          by Gorette on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 12:06:58 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  will they ever do that, Cure 7802? (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          miss SPED, Cure7802

          Will the remains of that blowout preventer stack ever see the light of day again?

          Texas is NO Bush League! LBJ, Lady Bird, Sully Sullenberger, Ike, Molly Ivins, Barbara Jordan, Ann Richards, Drew Brees -7.50,-5.59

          by BlackSheep1 on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 02:44:34 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Remains? (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            miss SPED, Cure7802

            Actually the BOP is fully intact. It failed to operate properly it did not blow up or get destroyed.

            So I cannot think of a reason once the well is shut down via relief wells that the BOP cannot be pulled up.

            Now if some one knows why couldn't be chime in.

            In the choice between changing ones mind and proving there's no need to do so, most people get busy on the proof.

            by jsfox on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 02:49:49 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Yep. Once they kill the blowout, they'll... (0+ / 0-)

            detach the BOP and winch it up to the surface.

            ...in fact, there is still talk of raising parts of the Deepwater Horizon rig for examination. That is a much dicier proposition though...

            "How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?"

            by Cure7802 on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 03:13:21 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  yet another reason to oppose the bombers (0+ / 0-)

              who want to "blow it shut with a nuke" or a conventional explosion.

              Texas is NO Bush League! LBJ, Lady Bird, Sully Sullenberger, Ike, Molly Ivins, Barbara Jordan, Ann Richards, Drew Brees -7.50,-5.59

              by BlackSheep1 on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 09:03:39 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  There will never be failsafe oil drilling (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Catte Nappe, jsfox

      Time to wean ourselves off of it completely.

      Save the parrots: Drink shade-grown coffee!

      by oscarsmom on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:13:50 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The problem is that we don't... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Catte Nappe

        have anything to replace it (yet). We are utterly dependent upon petroleum, and it is going to take us decades to make the clean-energy transition.

        Drilling is going to be around for the foreseeable future. As long as that's true, we need to make it as safe as humanly possible.

        "How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?"

        by Cure7802 on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:20:44 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  We're never going to seriously fund research (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          BlackSheep1, Catte Nappe, Cure7802

          until people realize that oil IS going to run out, and that problems like this will continue to happen.

          If it's going to take decades, why the hell aren't we starting now?

          Save the parrots: Drink shade-grown coffee!

          by oscarsmom on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:27:28 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Rhetorical question (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Cure7802

            Why the hell didn't we start decades ago?

            Had we buckled down on this in 1980 we'd be a lot nearer to the goal today. Better late than never, of course. But it is frustrating to see how slowly the collective "we" is about getting to that point.

            Legalism: strict conformity to the letter of the law rather than its spirit

            by Catte Nappe on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:52:10 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Well... (0+ / 0-)

            we have started. This Administration has put tens of billions into clean-tech R&D. The problem is one of scale. We're going to need hundreds of billions (if not trillions) of dollars to make the transition.

            That's why carbon-caps and a carbon pricing mechanism are so important in any energy/climate legislation. Without that, there will never be enough incentive to make the switch.

            "How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?"

            by Cure7802 on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 03:25:04 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  There have been reports (4+ / 0-)

      The BOP was damaged a month prior to the blow-out.

      Williams says, during a test, they closed the gasket. But while it was shut tight, a crewman on deck accidentally nudged a joystick, applying hundreds of thousands of pounds of force, and moving 15 feet of drill pipe through the closed blowout preventer. Later, a man monitoring drilling fluid rising to the top made a troubling find.

      "He discovered chunks of rubber in the drilling fluid. He thought it was important enough to gather this double handful of chunks of rubber and bring them into the driller shack. I recall asking the supervisor if this was out of the ordinary. And he says, 'Oh, it's no big deal.' And I thought, 'How can it be not a big deal? There's chunks of our seal is now missing,'" Williams told Pelley.

      And, Williams says, he knew about another problem with the blowout preventer.

      http://www.cbsnews.com/...

      Legalism: strict conformity to the letter of the law rather than its spirit

      by Catte Nappe on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:16:52 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  BOP's need to be beefed up (4+ / 0-)

      BOP's need to beefed up in several ways.  Here are some that are obvious to me but by no means complete.

      1.  Shear rams must be capable of shearing all sections of the drill string in the hole.  Presently they can't through about 10% where the joints are.  They should be overdesigned so that they can cut through several times what is required in the worst case--especially since during a blow out some of the pipe might be shot up through the BOP before the rams close.
      1.  BOP's should be redundant--if one fails, there should be another.
      1.  Acoustic or other switches on the bottom should be able to activate them automatically.  

      No rig should be allowed to operate without a fully 100% certified operational BOP...or probably two, stacked.

      But the real problems in BP's case appear to be the casing, the cementing, number of sections, failure to react properly to test results, and their inability to understand how to use mud for pressure management.

      •  Beyond BOP redundancy (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        miss SPED, Trotskyrepublican

        I'm for one or more relief wells ready and waiting, too. As that seems to be the only solution if all else does fail.

        Legalism: strict conformity to the letter of the law rather than its spirit

        by Catte Nappe on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:54:30 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  For deep wells (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Catte Nappe, miss SPED, Cure7802

          Yes, relief wells should probably be required for deep wells.

          •  I tend to agree with you... (0+ / 0-)

            although looked at another way, having a relief well for every actual well could double the chance of a blowout.

            "How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?"

            by Cure7802 on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 03:30:32 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Depends on percent completion (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Cure7802

              I've not worked in drilling, but I suspect that it would be possible to drill say 90% of the relief well.  As a job it would be underway from early on, but always lagging the production well, and end up terminated short.  If the stuff hits the fan on the production well, this would make the response time for a relief well much shorter. Perhaps a drilling industry person knowledgeable about relief wells can comment.

              My first take on it was that it could increase the chances of a blowout considerably, but I got to thinking about it and concluded that the drilling doesn't have to be done in a way that increases the risk.

              •  That is a good point. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Celtic Pugilist

                Having a partially drilled relief well would cut a lot of time off the process.

                I'm still not convinced that this is the be-all-end-all solution to the problem though. Frankly, I'm not sure there is one...

                "How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?"

                by Cure7802 on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 10:02:14 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

  •  Failsafes exist because human failure exists (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Catte Nappe, jsfox, miss SPED, princesspat

    Barr is right.
    Barr is also fatally and fundamentally wrong.

    BP should have followed procedure. They made an tragic error when they didn't.

    But any engineer knows that human error is possible. Indeed, any engineer worthy of the name knows that sooner or later human error is inevitable.

    That's where the BOP comes in. It's supposed to provide the safety net and the backstop. When everything else goes FUBAR, it is supposed to save the day. That's why every well has to have one and why it costs a half million $ and up.

    The BOP failed for at least 2 reasons:

    1. Current BOP designs are a proven joke - even whenproperly maintained.
    1. The BOP on the Deepwater Horizon had maintenance problems and BP/Transocean did little about them.

    If you drill with a flaky BOP, you are always one bad human decision away from disaster.

    -2.38 -4.87: Damn, I love the smell of competence in the morning!

    by grapes on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:14:54 AM PDT

    •  A valid and important point n/t (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      grapes, miss SPED

      In the choice between changing ones mind and proving there's no need to do so, most people get busy on the proof.

      by jsfox on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:22:33 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  No. Not nine bad decision against best (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      badger, grapes, Knarfc, miss SPED

      practices in a short amount of time at crucial stages, knowing they should have at various points have shut things down. That is in my book willful, criminal negligence because they had many lives on that rig at risk. As well as the Gulf of Mexico at risk.

      you (Repubs) lie down with "Nazi"-chanters, you get up with a responsibility for what they might do. -David Corn

      by Gorette on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:36:55 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I agree ... but BOP should still have worked (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Gorette, jsfox, miss SPED

        No argument that BP's procedures and decision-making were dangerous and probably criminal.

        That shouldn't be confused with the issue of whether the industry's failsafe system is fatally flawed.

        I am floored by both of these revelations. I am just slightly more floored that the key backstop device for a whole industry should be so absurdly pathetic.

        -2.38 -4.87: Damn, I love the smell of competence in the morning!

        by grapes on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:42:17 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Right. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          grapes, miss SPED

          I have heard two places that tools had fallen into the well head, not sure that is the right term. And there were pieces of rubber in there where they shouldn't be. So workers noticed various things that might have given them an idea it might not have worked, no?

          you (Repubs) lie down with "Nazi"-chanters, you get up with a responsibility for what they might do. -David Corn

          by Gorette on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 12:02:53 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  They had big red flag events - several (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Catte Nappe, Gorette, miss SPED

            The 60 Minutes story and several written reports since have identified a bunch of events that should have brought the drilling process to a screeching and safe halt.

            When the final report is written, it will be devastating to BP and a wakeup call to the entire oil industry.

            Some of the many failures will be strictly due to BP's management.

            Some of the failures will be due to inadequacies in the standard-issue equipment that the industry relies on.

            Just wait. Its gonna be a doozy.

            -2.38 -4.87: Damn, I love the smell of competence in the morning!

            by grapes on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 12:48:35 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  No. (0+ / 0-)

      It was a systemmatic failure. Within BP, to manage risk. BP is the leader in this project. Their management....this Hayward fool...is responsible.

  •  From the evidence in this letter, it's clear (5+ / 0-)

    that BP failed to do at least nine things in this short amount of time that could have stopped the disaster. I went through and counted the number of times they did not follow normal, standard procedures given the situation.

    That is truly incredibly damning.

    The fact that had they decided to follow best procedures (their own, presumably) at any one of those points they could have stopped this from happening, but didn't in a rush to finish and save money, that's mind-boggling.

    BP should just admit it as this Terry Barr says. The evidence was presented to Congress. It's in the record, and doubtless any expert would agree to Barr's interpretation. I know I've read parts of this before, said by different experts. Therefore continuing to deny it merely makes them look like the liars they are. It's the opposite of good PR. And the opposite of integrity.

    you (Repubs) lie down with "Nazi"-chanters, you get up with a responsibility for what they might do. -David Corn

    by Gorette on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 11:34:53 AM PDT

  •  WSJ's coverage of BP gusher (4+ / 0-)

    has been very good. I still subscribe (over 20+ years). The Op-ed page is heavy on the "keep hands of the market" stuff and critical of most anything Dems promote as policy..(of course)

    Terry Barr's letter cuts through the baloney and spells it out clearly. Kudos to T. Barr.

  •  Interesting (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jsfox, miss SPED

    BP's willful abandonment of industry safety procedures may very well save deep water drilling. It has become the poster child for the need for regulation and the 'safety' of deep water drilling in 'responsible' hands.

    Never underestimate the ability of the Right to over reach.

    by never forget 2000 on Fri Jun 11, 2010 at 01:36:47 PM PDT

  •  Many years ago as a grad student (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jsfox, miss SPED

    I taught a petroleum engineering course. I cannot completely evaluate all of it, but I believe everything Terry Barr says is correct. This disaster would clearly not have happened without the persistent chain of human error that he documents. How could they have been so stupid? These are not subtle things and all they needed was a little common sense applied at any point. There would seem to be a case for a finding of criminal malfeasance.

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