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In 2001-2, the Democratic Party was out-maneuvered by the Republicans during the 2010 Census restricting fights. Because the Republicans controlled so many state houses during the restricting process, they were able to create gerrymandered districts that resulted in historic gains for the Republicans in the 2002 midterms. The Democratic Party is determined to not let that happen again. The Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee (DLCC) (help elect state Reps/Sens), The National Democratic Redistricting Trust (legal team to fight redistricting) and Foundation for the Future (a 527 funded primarily by unions to provide data to the Democratic Party on how to draw maps to favor Democrats). However, they will need our help to GOTV and raise money for the 2010 midterms.

In 36 states, the redistricting process is controlled by the state legislature (information on the redistricting process in all states). Additionally in some states, Governors have input into the redistricting process. However, due to the bad economy, the enthusiasm gap between Democrats and Republican voters, and the likelihood of the party in the White House losing seats during the midterms, the Democrats are facing an uphill battle to GOTV this November.

How can you help?

National:
On a national level, Organizing for America's Get Out the Vote Operation is up and running. They have a huge canvas going on this Saturday. Click to sign-up or donate money to OFA/DNC.

Click to Volunteer/Donate:
Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee.
Democratic Governors Association

Below is a list of the 10 key states for the Democrats in redistricting are:

  1. Florida. Florida is likely to gain 1 congressional seat during redistricting.  The GOP holds sizable majorities in both chambers and the governor’s seat. Gov. Crist (R) is not running for re-election and the Democratic candidate, Alex Slink, is ahead in the polling due to the nasty GOP primary.

Donate\Volunteer: Alex Sink’s campaign or the Florida Democratic Party

  1.  Colorado. Redistricting is approved by the State Senate and House, but can be vetoed by the Governor. It takes 2/3rds to override a veto. Democrats currently hold slight majorities in both state chambers and the governor’s seat.  Governor Ritter (D) is not running for re-election and polling has the Democratic candidate, John Hickenlooper, ahead of the GOP and the independent candidates.

Donate\Volunteer: John Hickenlooper’s campaign or the Colorado Democratic Party

  1. Minnesota. Minnesota is likely to lose 1 congressional seat during redistricting. Redistricting is approved by majority of State House and 2/3 of State Senate, but can be vetoed by the Governor. It takes 2/3rds to override a veto. Democrats hold sizeable majorities in both chambers, but not the governor’s seat. Gov. Pawlenty (R) is not running for re-election and polling has Democratic candidate, Mark Dayton, slightly ahead of the GOP and independent candidates.

Donate\Volunteer: Mark Dayton’s campaign or the Minnesota DFL Party

  1. Michigan. Redistricting is approved by majority of both state chambers, but can be vetoed by the Governor. It takes 2/3rds to override a veto. If the congressional map is not enacted by 11/1, then the Michigan Supreme Court may enact its own plan (see diary for more details). Democrats hold a sizeable majority in the House and the governor’s seat, while the GOP holds a slight majority in the State Senate. Gov. Granholm (D) is not running for re-election and polling has Democratic candidate, Virg Bernero, way behind the GOP candidate.

Donate\Volunteer: Virg Bernero’s campaign or the Michigan Democratic Party

  1. Wisconsin. Redistricting is approved by majority of both state chambers, but can be vetoed by the Governor. It takes 2/3rds to override a veto. Democrats hold slight majorities in both chambers and the governor’s seat. Gov. Doyle (D) is not running for re-election and polling has Democratic candidate, Tom Barrett, behind the GOP candidate.

Donate\Volunteer: Tom Barrett’s campaign or the Wisconsin Democratic Party

  1. Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania is likely to lose 1 congressional seat during redistricting. Redistricting is approved by majority of both state chambers, but can be vetoed by the Governor. It takes 2/3rds to override a veto. The Democrats hold a slight majority in the House and the governor’s seat, while the GOP has a sizeable majority in the Senate. Gov. Rendell (D) is not running for re-election and polling has Democratic candidate, Dan Onorato, way behind the GOP candidate.

Donate\Volunteer: Dan Onorato’s campaign or the Pennsylvania Democratic Party

  1. Ohio. Ohio is likely to lose 2 congressional seats during redistricting. Redistricting is approved by majority of both state chambers, but can be vetoed by the Governor. It takes 2/3rds to override a veto. The Democrats hold a slight majority in the House and the governor’s seat, while the GOP has a sizeable majority in the Senate. Gov. Ted Strickland(D) is running for re-election and polling has him behind the GOP candidate.

Donate\Volunteer: Ted Strickland’s campaign or the Ohio Democratic Party

  1. New York. New York is likely to lose 1 congressional seat during redistricting. Redistricting is approved by majority of both state chambers, but can be vetoed by the Governor. It takes 2/3rds to override a veto. The Democrats hold a slight majority in the Senate, a huge majority in the House and the governor’s seat. Gov. Paterson (D) is not running for re-election and polling has Democratic candidate, Andrew Cuomo, way ahead of the either of the GOP candidates, but there is a good chance we may lose our majority in the Senate due to scandal.

Donate\Volunteer: Andrew Cuomo’s campaign or the New York Democratic Party

  1. Texas. Texas is likely to gain 4 congressional seats during redistricting. Redistricting is approved by majority of both state chambers, but can be vetoed by the Governor. It takes 2/3rds to override a veto. If redistricting is not enacted in time, the Legislative Redistricting Board will re-draw the map, which is not subject to the Governor’s veto. The Board is made up of Lt. Governor, Speaker of the House, Attorney General, Comptroller, and Land Commissioner.  The Republicans hold a slight majority in both chambers and the governor’s seat. Gov. Perry (R) is running for re-election and polling has Democratic candidate, Bill White, close to Perry.

Donate\Volunteer: Bill White’s campaign or the Texas Democratic Party

  1. California. Redistricting is approved by majority of both state chambers, but can be vetoed by the Governor. It takes 2/3rds to override a veto. The Democrats hold a sizeable majority in both chambers, but the GOP holds the governor’s seat. Gov. Schwarzenegger (R) is not running for re-election, and polling has Democratic candidate, Jerry Brown, tied with the GOP candidate.

Donate\Volunteer: Jerry Brown’s campaign or the California Democratic Party

Update: California has now switched to a non-partisan commission.

Update 2: Would people be interested in helping out in making this a series where each diary would discuss races on a state-by-state basis? (h/t to drache for suggestion).

Originally posted to askew on Thu Aug 26, 2010 at 06:59 PM PDT.

Poll

Will you be GOTV for the Democrats this fall?

74%79 votes
18%20 votes
6%7 votes

| 106 votes | Vote | Results

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