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Gail Collins:

One thing that never changes in Washington is the difference in metabolism between the House and Senate. Have you ever watched pet-rehabilitation shows like “The Dog Whisperer”? The House is the deranged Pomeranian that yelps and throws itself against the window and tears up the upholstery 24/7. The Senate, meanwhile, is like a narcoleptic Great Dane you can hardly rouse for dinner.

New York Times:

A warning to all women whose mammograms show an abnormality: If your surgeon says you need a surgical biopsy to determine if you have cancer, be sure to get a second opinion. The odds are good that you should get a needle biopsy. That is safer, less invasive, and cheaper.

Tzipi Livni:

Current events in the Middle East highlight the urgency of adopting at the global level what true democracies apply at the national level - a universal code for participation in democratic elections. This would include requiring every party running for office to embrace, in word and deed, a set of core democratic principles: the renunciation of violence and the acceptance of state monopoly over the use of force, the pursuit of aims by peaceful means, commitment to the rule of law and to equality before the law, and adherence to international agreements to which their country is bound.

Such a code could guide election monitors and individual nations in deciding whether to grant parties democratic legitimacy. It would put all societies on notice that electing an undemocratic party would have negative international consequences.

The intent here is not to stifle disagreement or to suggest that democracy be uniform, disregarding local cultures and values. The goal is to advance a democratic process that is inclusive but that cannot be hijacked for non-democratic ends.

Dana Milbank:

There have been worse times to start a new job in Washington. When Abraham Lincoln arrived in the capital 150 years ago this week, for example, the South had already seceded.

Jay Carney, the new White House press secretary, didn't have anything quite so dire on his hands when he took over the briefing room podium last week. But President Obama has put his new spokesman in an unenviable position: He is the mouthpiece of an administration that has painfully little to say.

Matt Miller:

[Gov. Chris Christie] Christie's big straight-talk credential so far is his willingness to stare down the teachers unions. Their archaic practices need to be challenged, and Christie deserves credit for taking them on. But is it really "courageous"? Courage is when a politician tells his strongest supporters things they don't want to hear. I'm a little tired of Republicans calling for an "adult conversation" that mainly takes things away from adults who don't vote Republican.

E.J. Dionne:

Mayor Rahm. It will be a hoot. It could even be good for Chicago.

And in a way he has never had to do before, Rahm Emanuel will finally reveal who he really is.

One of the many dramas of a Rahm mayoralty - roll over, Fiorello La Guardia - will be its status as a controlled (or, perhaps, uncontrolled) experiment in how a brilliant political operative translates campaigning skills into governing achievement. Bill Clinton was an elected official who happened to be one of the country's smartest consultants. Rahm is the go-to adviser who happens to be good at running for office.

But first, a word of warning: All columns about Rahm should carry a consumer advisory. No person in public life has been more assiduous about courting journalists, and he is an aficionado of the column-writing trade.

Fareed Zakaria:

Both George W. Bush and Barack Obama deserve some credit for what has happened. Bush put the problem of the Middle East's politics at the center of American foreign policy. His articulation of a "freedom agenda" for the Middle East was a powerful and essential shift in American foreign policy (as I wrote at the time). But because so many of Bush's policies were unpopular in the region, and seen by many Arabs as "anti-Arab," it became easy to discredit democracy as an imperial plot. In 2005, Hosni Mubarak effectively silenced a vigorous pro-democracy movement by linking it to Bush.

Obama has had a quieter approach, supporting freedom but insisting that the United States did not intend to impose it on anyone. As unsatisfying as this might have been as public rhetoric, it has had the effect of allowing the Arab revolts of 2011 to be wholly owned by Arabs. This is no small matter, because the success of these protests hinges on whether they will be seen as organic, indigenous, national movements.

Washington Post:

PRESIDENT OBAMA and Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. declared on Wednesday that the Justice Department would no longer be an advocate for the indefensible - a law that relegates the nation's gay and lesbian citizens to second-class status.

It was a decision as bold as it was risky.

...

The administration is right to question a law that singles out a group of people for discriminatory treatment. But the best way to eliminate its invidious effects is to work with lawmakers to erase the law from the books.

L.A. Times:

The firestorm ignited in Wisconsin over public employee unions is now spreading to Indiana and Ohio, and will probably spark elsewhere before it's extinguished. As union members man the barricades to protest efforts to strip them of collective bargaining rights, Democratic lawmakers flee their home states to forestall action and conservatives vow to prevent unions from sucking government treasuries dry, what's striking about the debate is how little the opposing sides seem to understand or acknowledge each other's arguments. Wisconsin's approach to unions is decidedly the wrong one, but that doesn't mean the status quo is sustainable.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Explosive Rolling Stone Article (15+ / 0-)

    Rolling Stone does it again.  Michael Hastings reveals how the US Military actually used Psy Ops tactics to trick US Senators into supporting the war.  This time, the General's name is Gen. William Caldwell, a three star general.

    I'm not afraid of guns! I'm afraid of the people that obsess over owning them.

    by Detroit Mark on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 04:33:44 AM PST

  •  Might I just observe that the Washington (6+ / 0-)

    Post has its collective head up its sizable ass?

    But then, it is the voice of the villagers.

    "A free society that will not help the many who are poor, cannot save the few who are rich." JFK, January, 1961

    by rontun on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 04:35:52 AM PST

  •  AP says there is a deal (4+ / 0-)

    in Wisconsin! Really? After Walker  and his rethugs were busted for plotting a trap for the Dems. hmmmm

    "If you do not change direction, you may end up where you are heading."- Lao-Tzu

    by Pakalolo on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 04:35:54 AM PST

  •  OT. Mika is MIA on MoJo today. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sherri in TX, FistJab, DRo, MartyM

    Coincidence?
    That bogus phone call have anything to do with it?  :)

    Whatever the Foxteapublicans say, the opposite is the truth.

    by Forward is D not R on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 04:40:20 AM PST

  •  As usual, Zakaria trying to straddle (5+ / 0-)
    Bush put the problem of the Middle East's politics at the center of American foreign policy. His articulation of a "freedom agenda" for the Middle East was a powerful and essential shift in American foreign policy (as I wrote at the time).

    Baloney.  The only causal relationship between the Bush Administration's policies and what is occurring now in the Middle East is the fact that the global meltdown wrought by Bush's cronies has led to staggering levels of youth unemployment.

  •  Protests in North Korea? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Pakalolo, DRo, Forward is D not R

    Excerpt from an article, "N.Korea on Alert for Signs of Resistance", saying their have been clashes with security force in Sunuiji:

    Sinuiju is North Korea's main gateway to the outside world. "People can watch Chinese TV in Sinuiju and defectors can communicate with their family there," a North Korean source said. "Most people in Sinuiju probably know about the protests in the Middle East." Some experts believe North Korean authorities began cracking down on open-air markets in Sinuiju to prevent news about the Jasmine Revolutions from spreading across North Korea through gossip in the markets.

    worth the short read

  •  I just heard on Morning Joke that Wisconsin (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    FistJab, StepLeftStepForward, DRo, MartyM

    reached some kind of "deal" and that there will be a vote today of some kind ... can't find any further info on the webs ... anybody know anything about this ????

    Don't cry for me, Mr. Boehner. Cry for yourself and the Republican Party. -- psusennes, DK

    by RhodaA on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 04:43:41 AM PST

  •  I wonder why (8+ / 0-)
    Wisconsin's approach to unions is decidedly the wrong one, but that doesn't mean the status quo is sustainable.
    .

    Why is it that when the status quo becomes unacceptable it's always the unions and working class that have to change, give something up or come down upon.

    There was no defecit before and unioned employees were areound.  There is a defecit now and union employees are actually making less and paying more out of their own pockets for benefits.

    That being the case when is someone going to point out that maybe the unions are NOT the problem?

    How about for once coming down on the real culprits of all these defecits, the Wall Street vultures who caused this recession, the greedy free traders who shipped our jobs overseas, the politicians who enabled all this to go on until it imploded and the rich who supported all this.

    How about making the rich who are NOT suffering pay for once?  How about making them change the way they do things.  Why is it that status quo is okay for them but not for the worker?

    This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

    by DisNoir36 on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 04:45:36 AM PST

  •  GM makes first profit since 2004.... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes, shenderson, FiredUpInCA

    http://twitter.com/...

    GM reports net income of $510 million for 4th quarter and $4.1 billion for full year; 1st annual profit since 2004 - AP

    Thanks Obama, for saving the US car industry - contrary to what "true progressives" wanted, and contrary to what teabaggers wanted.

    I'm gonna go eat a steak. And fuck my wife. And pray to GOD - hatemailapalooza, 052210

    by punditician on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 04:45:49 AM PST

  •  Kristof on what to do about Libya (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    StepLeftStepForward

    I explore  and offer some comments of my own in this diary

    I urge you to read his column

    I invite you to read my diary

    peace

    "what the best and wisest parent wants for his child is what we should want for all the children of the community" - John Dewey

    by teacherken on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 04:49:08 AM PST

  •  Tzipi Livni? Is this snark? (4+ / 0-)

    Israeli democracy is real and admirable but it only applies to certain people living under Israeli control, and even among nominal Israeli citizens it's not exactly uniform.  The substance of what she says may be fine but she's not really a compelling spokesperson if the goal is to move the discussion along rather than blow smoke.

    Todo tiempo pasado fue mejor. I don't believe that, but I hear this sig is permanent.

    by Rich in PA on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 04:55:20 AM PST

  •  I think we should arrange house-swapping. (4+ / 0-)

    Dem representatives who need to flee Wisconsin could stay in the homes of Indiana Dems who need to flee -- Ohio could swap with Michigan ... this could work!

  •  Apparently Gay Ski Week caused the NZ earthquake! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tobendaro, skohayes

    lolol! Gawd bless religious bigots.

    http://www.pinknews.co.uk/...

    The ChristchurchQuake.net website, hosted in Utah, lists a number of the major incidents that have taken place as a result of the devastating quake and blames them on gay people.

    One page describes the fire pouring out of the Pike River Mine ventilation shaft that it says has left 29 men dead and 13 children orphaned.

    It says this was vengeance for lesbian paedophiles: “The fire on the left is pouring out of the Pike River Mine ventilation shaft. The explosion orphaned 23 children, and killed 29 men. It happened in the heartland of NZ’s Labour Party, in the West Coast Mining area of the South Island. Why? Because the wicked, wicked women, who headed NZ’s Labour Party, conspired to orphan a little refugee girl – a little girl those lesbian paedophiles wanted to molest. The punishment was measure for measure – they tried to make an orphan of a little girl, so a Divine curse made orphans of 23 children in Labour’s heartland.

    “The men who died were not guilty of the conspiracy to murder a child. But they could see what was going on, what had happened to the Labour Party. Anyone could see it – the squadron of butch women, with deep voices, dressing like men, walking like men, talking like men, taking lesbian lovers, who had taken over NZ’s Labour Party.”

    The website goes on to say: “The miners were not guilty of child murder – but the whole of New Zealand was guily of turning a blind eye to the evil, to the perversion that was governing the country. A Labour Party was meant to be about protecting hardworking families. It is not meant to be a ‘fag and hag’ club for perverts, who want to exploit the rest of the population, and to molest and prey upon their children.

    I'm gonna go eat a steak. And fuck my wife. And pray to GOD - hatemailapalooza, 052210

    by punditician on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 04:58:22 AM PST

  •  I know Rahm is viewed as a corporatist.... (0+ / 0-)

    ...opportunist in these parts but, even if he is, he can't be worse than Daley, who rivaled Bush as the biggest corporate whore I'd ever seen.

    Fox News is a Religion.

    by Bush Bites on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 04:58:27 AM PST

  •  LOL at the Dick Whisperer (4+ / 0-)
    He is the mouthpiece of an administration that has painfully little to say.

    I assume he wrote this before the DOMA announcement yesterday.

    ....no longer in SF.... -9.00, -7.38

    by TFinSF on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 05:01:07 AM PST

  •  That's what he's doing in Wisconsin too. (4+ / 0-)
    Obama has had a quieter approach, supporting freedom but insisting that the United States did not intend to impose it on anyone. As unsatisfying as this might have been as public rhetoric, it has had the effect of allowing the Arab revolts of 2011 to be wholly owned by Arabs. This is no small matter, because the success of these protests hinges on whether they will be seen as organic, indigenous, national movements.

    Fox News is a Religion.

    by Bush Bites on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 05:03:20 AM PST

  •  Yeah, well... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Heart of the Rockies
    The Senate, meanwhile, is like a narcoleptic Great Dane you can hardly rouse for dinner.

    If everyone's job reviews were six years apart the economy would collapse. Oh.

  •  Tzipi Livni???? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Heart of the Rockies

    Tzipi Livni is the former Israeli Foreign Minister, current head of the opposition.  

    The Palestine Papers recently revealed a comment she made during negotiations in 2007:

    "I was the minister of justice. I am a lawyer ... But I am against law – international law in particular.

    This is the person you choose to feature as a commentator on, basically, which Arabs should be allowed to vote?

    It might be interesting for readers to know that Israel has applied this doctrine at home. It is illegal for a political party to run candidates in Israel if it disagrees with the principle that Israel is a Jewish state.

    I know the excuse is that the FP is supposed to feature 'differing points of view". In fact, the FP rarely posts commentary with which it disagrees except to make some kind of obvious point.  Unfortunately that doesn't appear to be the case in this instance.

    Right wing Israeli "expert" opinion is not uncommonly spotlighted here. It's counterpart is not.  I disagree with this.
     

  •  If Illinois has to take all the neighboring Dems.. (4+ / 0-)

    ....can we give Wisconsin and Indiana some of our Repubs in exchange?

    Fox News is a Religion.

    by Bush Bites on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 05:06:19 AM PST

  •  my advice for Livni is Israel should (3+ / 0-)

    implement those standards first.....or are we too special to follow those standards as we to international law.
    for a political leader of a country that disregards International convention and common civilized standards Livni has a Chutzpa, in her attempt to make the world lecture other nation on what they should do, and what kinds of political parties that should exists be legitimate or not.

    Israel is a pariah nation party because people like Livni believe that the Jewish Nation is too good to follow the standards that is applied to everyone else.

    stop the apartheid laws in Israel first...then we can talk about your paranoia about the Muslim Brotherhood and Islamist Parties in the middle-east. The only way to make the Middle east safe for Israel is by making Israel realize that it is not a Jewish Ghetto in Manhattan but a nation state, mend fences fast because the days of the autocrats are coming to an end and government all around the Middle East will be expressing the will and desire of their people.

    but I doubt there will be any change of behaviour.

    •  Which Israel do Knesset politicians want? (0+ / 0-)

      It's very difficult for many politicians to separate the religious portions of Israel portrayed in the Torah; with the secular and multicultural portions of Israel in the current day.  

      Is it Israeli positions or Jewish positions?....They're not always the same thing...

      (runs and hides since he's opened an I/P can of worms)

      "now this is not the end, it is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning." W. Churchill

      by Thor Heyerdahl on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 09:52:39 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Polite golf clap for the NYT (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes, shenderson

    The needle vs surgery is exactly the kind of thing we need to do if we are going to improve health care AND cut costs.

    Best medical practices should win out over country club dues every time, but...

    there is the little matter of the question the NYT doesn't ask:

    WHY IN HELL does a needle biopsy cost $5,000 and the other $10,000?

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 05:14:53 AM PST

    •  The other is more invasive? n/t (0+ / 0-)
    •  I don't know (0+ / 0-)

      what hospitals or doctors they've talked to, but I've had several needle biopsies and they didn't cost anywhere close to $5000 (not NYC, that's for sure).
      For one thing, there's no anesthesia, so no anesthetist. No surgeon, most any well trained ob/gyn can do the needle biopsy, though some areas prefer a "surgeon". and then of course the lab fees for examination of the biopsied material. I think the last one I had two years ago was about $2000 (still ridiculous, but there it is).
      The worst part was fighting my insurance company, because they determined over the phone that I didn't need a biopsy and refused to pay for it (I changed their mind after a 3 month back and forth).

      How come the dove gets to be the peace symbol? How about the pillow? It has more feathers than the dove and doesn't have that dangerous beak. Jack Handey

      by skohayes on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 06:54:54 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  You are right on the money... (0+ / 0-)

        Glad to hear $2,000 is closer to reality, but that still seems like a fortune for a simple procedure.  When I think of the dental work I can get from highly skilled and trained dentist (they're doctors, too ya know) for that money, it makes me cringe.

        You hit, btw, on one of the little free market aberrations with your comment of people who prefer a surgeon to do the biopsy.  It's bad enough that medical schools form a choke point on the supply of doctors, but add in overly restrictive licensing and hospital policies, and you've got expensive people doing things that perfectly skilled less expensive people can do.  I'd want a great cardiac surgeon to do my heart transplant, don't want one to take my EKG in a checkup.

        As to your insurance company: Giant boo and hiss to them.  If anybody were serious about bringing a true element of free market forces into medicine, that would have to maintaining some kind of authoritative source on best practices.  Such a thing, combined, perhaps, with truly onerous penalties for willfully refusing to honor one's obligation to insure the application of best practices, might go a long way towards preventing that.

        Or ditch insurance altogether.  It's a terrible distortion on medical pricing as it is.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 07:08:22 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I can't see (0+ / 0-)

          ditching insurance altogether, because who has $30,000 sitting around for a quadruple bypass?
          My girlfriend was in a terrible wreck a few weeks ago, but she's got insurance that paid for her intensive care stay and the months ahead of rehab she's going to need.
          And the surgeon requirement differs by state, so it might be a law or regulation imposed by the state, I don't know.

           It's bad enough that medical schools form a choke point on the supply of doctors, but add in overly restrictive licensing and hospital policies, and you've got expensive people doing things that perfectly skilled less expensive people can do.  I'd want a great cardiac surgeon to do my heart transplant, don't want one to take my EKG in a checkup.

          Absolutely. When I lived in North Carolina, I was right near a medical school and teaching hospital. Often you were seen by multilple doctors, residents and interns, but they gave great care, and yes it was expensive.
          Now I live out in the back of beyond in western Kansas, and the closest trauma center is over 150 miles away (survival after a big heart attack or trauma can be iffy out here).
          My health care provider is a PA, a liscensed Physician's Assistant, because we only have one GP at our local medical clinic (and the next closest doctors are 40 miles away in the next town), and visiting specialists once or twice a month. It is a hell of a lot cheaper, but if you need to see a specialist it can involve driving long distances to get there. I was seeing a pain specialist because of my back and it was a 3 hour trip (one way) to see him.
          And as I said above, they don't do trauma or heart attacks or any kind of serious medical issue out here, so those are flown by helicopter to Wichita or Amarillo, so it can get very expenisve out here very quickly.

          How come the dove gets to be the peace symbol? How about the pillow? It has more feathers than the dove and doesn't have that dangerous beak. Jack Handey

          by skohayes on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 03:10:53 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  Making the case now! and sticking to it. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Heart of the Rockies, tobendaro

    Progressives are notoriously bad at the KISS philosophy. But the case against the Wisconsin Republicans and Walker can be put on a bumper sticker. They should stick to one issue, recall those who can be hit now with it and keep it on the backs of their ("imported from Detroit") cars for the next ten months.

    Walker and the Republicans slipped a give-away clause for Wisconsin's natural gas into a totally unrelated bill. His faux Koch phone call isn't just funny, it is prima facia evidence of collusion. It may be a crime.

    But to the guy at the 7/11 it is recall bait for sure. The average guy who may not know what he thinks about public sector unions certainly hates it when people try to slip something by him. And putting oil and gas give-aways in a budget bill is obvious to anyone.

    One clear message. One clear offense.  One slogan. One bumper sticker. Nine (at least) recalls.

    KISS!

    Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum viditur.

    by MrMichaelMT on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 05:32:42 AM PST

  •  Does the LA Times not read the newspapers? (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wsexson, bartcopfan, skohayes, shenderson

    They say "that doesn't mean that the status quo is sustainable".  Hmmm.  I guess that's why for days and days and days now the union has agrees to ALL the financial demands of the Governor.  Just not taking away collective bargaining.  Is this unclear to the LA Times?

    •  That struck me too (0+ / 0-)

      Salaries make up less than 10% of most states budgets, makes me sick how the media just laps up the "unsustainable" meme without any attempt to actually verify it.  States could chop workers' salaries in half and  it would barely have an impact on the budget crisis.

      Now if they'd quit handing out corporate tax breaks that would be another story, but don't expect to read about that in the paper.

  •  You almost never need surgical biopsy (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Heart of the Rockies

    I used to do cancer research until funding was cut and I'm here to tell you that I never heard of a case of doing surgical biopsy for prostate cancer. It was always a needle biopsy. While the breast is larger and therefore might need a larger number of samples, I really don;t see the need for many surgical biopsies.

    "Given the choice between a Republican and someone who acts like a Republican, people will vote for a real Republican every time." Harry Truman

    by MargaretPOA on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 05:52:47 AM PST

  •  I propose (0+ / 0-)

    From now on, when referring to Glenn Beck, Kossacks just call him "The Sick Fuck" because that's what he is.

    Glenn Beck is one sick fuck.

  •  Rahm Emanuel (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shenderson

    has campaigning skills?  I read he barely knew how to shake hands on the "El" platform and tell people his positions.  What he did have is high up connections and GOBS of money.  Some donors gave him $50k each. His opponents didn't have a chance.

    I do agree with Dionne that this could be interesting.  Because Mayor of Chicago is a very visible position and the needs of the city are diverse and complex.

  •  "Adult conversation" from a GOPer? (0+ / 0-)

    Translation: we'll off-shore your job, cut your benefits and otherwise drive you into penury if you happen to make under $50k per year.  If on the other hand, you make $500k per year, tell us what you want and we'll deliver.  

    In other words, deficits for working people and tax breaks for millionaires.

  •  Teachable Moment: Sexism in Language (0+ / 0-)
    As union members man the barricades....
    as I was taught in the 80s--substitute "staff" (hmmm, "attend" or "fortify" could work, too).
    As union members staff the barricades....
     Yeah, that's the ticket.

    "Push the button, Max!" Jack Lemmon as Professor Fate, The Great Race

    by bartcopfan on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 07:20:38 AM PST

  •  I have a different take on this than some: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pattym922
    But President Obama has put his new spokesman in an unenviable position: He is the mouthpiece of an administration that has painfully little to say

    The Republican meme is that the President is not leading, is not doing his job.

    I say that sometimes leading is getting out of the way and keeping your mouth shut, so that other people can do THEIR job.  The President, by his silence, is forcing the House to take direct responsibility for its own actions.

    I find it only slightly amusing that the same people who scream that this incompetent foreign born Muslim marxist whose defeat in the next election is their self-described priority, now, when hard decisions must be made and stood behind, look to this pariah for leadership.

    The time for Obama to speak publicly is after these 241 snarling, foaming at the mouth chihuahuas make their final decision, which we will know on March 4.

    They know full well that the White House is speaking to them in private every day, they just want a public stooge to bounce their ridiculous, whiny excuses off.

    If they reach a decision that averts a shutdown, Obama will graciously praise the outcome.  But if their intransigence and disingenuity cause a government shutdown, then the President will explain in his inimitable style exactly whose responsibility it was to keep the government functioning, and why they failed to do so.

    Will the Republicans be blamed, or will Obama and the Democrats?  That will depend on who can better make his case, Barack Obama, or John Boehner.

    I don't know the answer either, but my bet is on the Constitutional lawyer and professor, over the dry drunk who should go back to sweeping those floors that bring on that all too familiar flood of tears.  He's not going to be able to weep his way out of this one.

    The community of fools might be small if it were not such an accomplished proselytizer.

    by ZedMont on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 07:39:50 AM PST

  •  I wouldn't give this too much weight... (0+ / 0-)
    Michael Hastings reveals how the US Military actually used Psy Ops tactics to trick US Senators into supporting the war.

    The General's task was as difficult as luring a mouse with cheese.

    The community of fools might be small if it were not such an accomplished proselytizer.

    by ZedMont on Thu Feb 24, 2011 at 07:42:18 AM PST

  •  Question on DOMA. (0+ / 0-)

    Can a President really say a law is un-Constitutional and order his AG to refuse to defend it? I mean, suppose a Republican President said he believed Roe-v-Wade was un-Constitutional and ordered his AG to refuse to defend it. Wouldn't we rightly be outraged at that kind lawlessness? Just wonderin'.

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