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Topics: BOEMRE Atlantis report released; NASA Data Strengthens Reports of Toxic Rain on the Gulf Coast From BP Spill; BP buys marine mammal scientists; In Devastating Complaint; Louisiana Demands $1 Million a Day from BP & Others; Oil Platform Fire In The Gulf of Mexico; Flaring but no production impact at BP Whiting refinery; BP Shuts Hydrocracker for Work at Carson, California; Refinery, BP wants the "right regulatory environment" for additional investment in South Africa; RIL-BP deal to concretize in next 6 months

You are in the current Gulf Watchers BP Catastrophe - AUV #484. ROV #483 is here.



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The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE)Atlantis Report (PDF) that Lorinda Pike covered in her Gulf Watchers Sunday - It Was Dangerous Paperwork - BP Catastrophe AUV #483 diary has been released. The report states that there is no regulatory requirement that deepwater rig operators must have correctly labeled, accessible engineering documents available.

Whistle blower Ken Abbott, a former safety consultant, filed a lawsuit against BP under the federal False Claims Act alleging that they did not have drawings that accurately showed how subsea parts of the Atlantis platform were built. "As-built" documents can differ dramatically from original design documents.

Food and Water Watch later joined Abbot in his suit.

After reviewing the actual report any rational person would fully agree with the plaintiff's comments cited in Lorinda's diary.
BP Atlantis platform cleared on safety issue

Abbott said in a statement that he was "disappointed but not really surprised." He took a jab at the ocean energy bureau, previously known as the Minerals Management Service, which he said aims first "to protect themselves and then the oil companies."

"They may have changed their name, but not their way of operating," Abbott said. Abbott vowed to continue pressing his case, which has been joined by Food and Water Watch, an environmental advocacy organization.

The group's executive director, Wenonah Hauter, said the bureau's report was "seriously flawed" and showed the agency was "protecting the interests of its industry cronies, rather than the public."

"The federal government dragged its feet on this investigation, and its findings are appalling - like a doctor's note for a truant student," Hauter said. "They are a weak attempt to cover BP's foul play. After all this time, the public deserves better."

BOEMRE concludes that the engineering documents on the Atlantis are a disorganized mess but seems to take the word of people still collecting BP paychecks that everything is perfectly safe. Despite claims that they reviewed 3,400 engineering drawings and related documents I could not find any evidence in the report itself that the BOEMRE even knows what documents should be on the rig, let alone whether or not they are actually there and readily available to the people who need them.

This bizarre quote is from the Atlantis Documents Investigation BOEMRE Press Release.

Based on a thorough review of the evidence, the investigation found the majority of the allegations to be unfounded, but did find that there were a number of problems with the way that BP organized, stored, and labeled engineering drawings and documents.  BOEMRE found no evidence that these documentation deficiencies created specific unsafe conditions on the Atlantis production platform.

BOEMRE seems to think that BP's Guidance on Certification and Systems Handover Packages provide an adequate and safe substitute for having engineering documents properly organized, labeled and readily available. However, there is no mention in these procedures stating that people on the rig should have ready access to properly labeled original design documents, all subsequent changes and "as-built" documents.

According to the BOEMRE report, they have not worried their pointy little heads in requiring deepwater drillers to have properly labeled and organized engineering documents. Only in BOEMRE's and big oil's universe would any sane human consider tolerating this sorry state of affairs to be safe.

From the BOEMRE report:

BP’s efforts to organize and track Atlantis drawings and documents were further complicated by BP’s practice of not labeling certain drawings “as built,” even when those drawings depicted a structure or system as it was installed. BP decided that it was unnecessary to update drawings with an “as built” stamp or label if the drawing had not been revised from earlier versions (e.g., Issued for Design, Issued for Construction, etc.).
We found that BP’s engineering drawings relating to the Atlantis facility, which were prepared by a number of different contactors, were inconsistently labeled.    BP acknowledged these labeling problems in a letter accompanying its submission of documents to BOEMRE. The letter, dated August 9, 2010, stated:
Because the enclosed drawings were prepared by several different engineering firms, the nomenclature used to indicate the revision status of drawings differs among the numerous drawings contained in the enclosed books. For example, drawings by DSME used “Rev. 60” to denote an “as built” drawing, while “as built” drawings by FMC Technologies were typically labeled “design” because FMC builds equipment and structures to design.
Our review of the Atlantis engineering drawings also found that some drawings had inconsistent, undated, or missing engineer stamps.    Other drawings had missing drawing numbers. We found that at least one of the subsea field architecture drawings was inconsistent with a subsea start‐up chronology provided by BP.

These problems arose because BP did not require its Atlantis subsea contractors to conform engineering drawings and documents to a single, uniform set of standards established by the company. BP instead allowed its contractors to develop drawings and documents under their own respective documentation systems. Because there were a significant number of contractors involved in the Atlantis project, this led to a proliferation of inconsistent labeling conventions and the other document identification problems that we observed.

These labeling and documentation problems alone do not constitute a violation of BOEMRE’s regulations. Current BOEMRE regulations do not address how engineering drawings are to be stamped, organized and labeled.



‘Red flag’ in oil-spill health study

The Louisiana Bucket Brigade has just published BP Oil Disaster: Results from a Health and Economic Impact Survey in Four Coastal Louisiana Parishes (PDF) which has turned up some troubling results. Neither health nor economic needs of BP's victims are even close to being met.

The Bucket Brigade site is well worth a visit. Environmental activism is in short supply in Louisiana and they do it very well.

A survey of select coastal communities, including Chauvin, Dulac and Grand Isle, found that almost half of residents experienced ailments that could be oil-spill related.

The survey, which questioned 954 residents in Terrebonne, Jefferson, Plaquemines and St. Bernard parishes, was conducted between July and October by volunteers from the Louisiana Bucket Brigade, a New Orleans-based environmental nonprofit, Tulane University’s Disaster Resilience Leadership Academy and Patagonia Clothing Company. The survey sought to determine if Gulf Coast residents experienced health and economic impacts because of spill.
...
Among the findings, 48 percent of those surveyed by the Louisiana Bucket Brigade reported an unusual spike of at least one health symptom. The most frequently reported symptoms were coughs, sinus problems and eye and skin irritation, which are consistent with chemical exposure, according to the Bucket Brigade. A third of respondents reported using over-the-counter medication more often since the spill. They also reported scant access to health care and medical professionals versed in toxicology and chemical exposure.

In addition, 44 percent of survey respondents said the spill put their household’s primary provider out of work. Nearly a quarter reported needing, but not receiving, economic assistance due to lost income.

Betty Doud, a resident of Grand Isle who worked with the Louisiana Bucket Brigade on the survey, said she’s concerned for the health of her community.

“There’s this hacking cough everyone has, a sore throat, itchy eyes. Nothing’s effective. I have one friend who’s been to the doctor four times and nothing helps,” Doud said. “We need to get testing for these people so we can find out what’s causing the problem.”
...
The majority of respondents, about 64 percent, in Jefferson, St. Bernard and Plaquemines, expressed concern about seafood contamination.
...
Forty-four percent of Dulac residents and 37 percent of Chauvin residents said their livelihood was impacted by the spill, and 22 percent of Dulac residents and 12 percent of Chauvin residents said they needed but hadn’t received economic assistance.

In addition, 30 percent of residents in Dulac and 34 percent of residents in Chauvin said they experienced an unusual increase in symptoms like cough, skin irritation and nausea. About 15 percent of residents in both communities believe they were exposed to crude oil, and 10 percent of residents in both communities said the spill made them consider moving.


NASA Data Strengthens Reports of Toxic Rain on the Gulf Coast From BP Spill Warning graphic photo of dead dolphin. It is well worth the effort to disable loading of pictures in your browser to read the entire article.

Reports of it raining oil and dispersant in the Gulf were generally pooh-poohed by the Very Serious People. However, Dr. Ira Leifer, a world-class scientist with impeccable credentials, has published data that would lead one to conclude that such claims have a scientific basis.

...
Government data collected during the oil spill last summer, which is now being released by one of the scientists on the NASA team, strengthens claims that oil and dispersant was brought onshore in rain during the spill. The Chief Mission Coordinating Scientist on the NASA remote sensing mission to the BP oil spill in the Gulf Of Mexico was Ira Leifer, Ph.D from University of California Santa Barbara. Dr. Leifer has been working with natural oil spills and natural methane bubble flows for the last decade. He is in the process of releasing some of the government data collected during the spill; the vast majority of this data has been suppressed and is not available to scientists, the media, or the general public. The data was collected on boats at the sea surface, in airplanes over the Gulf, and by satellite.
...
After spending some time together in New Orleans I spoke to Ira Leifer at length in Mexico City.

IL: I think it is important to establish for the record that the unique aspect of this [BP blowout] is that the volatiles were continuous, it was not a one-day exposure. The chronic nature of the spill and the therefore chronic nature of its health impact is a pretty unique aspect of this event. The reason I think it's important to call it unique is that it gives a way to explain why various government agencies using protocols developed for a single coast spill didn't get it right because it's not the same. I think it's important to give the people we really want to take responsibility a way of saying ah, yes, you're right and jump on the bandwagon with us. We need NIH to fund a 50 to 60 million dollar study because this is something that had never happened before.

The data we collected in the atmosphere shows a very high hydrocarbon load and we were able to identify more than 100 compounds in it. Many of them have health implications. There were large amounts of them and they have similarities to gasoline. In that regard the modeling I did seems to suggest that there are reasons for concern. There are reasons to do additional research.

JC: How was the data you are referring to collected, and based on that data, what degree of concentration did you find of what you would consider toxic compounds?

IL: That is a top question because realistically they are probably all toxic to some extent. But for so many compounds I do not think the studies have been done to say what precisely the threats are -- it's a mixture. The way we did the measurements we had evacuated stainless steel 1 liter cylinders opened up to very gradually and gently allow air to enter into the container and then sealed. These were collected on a boat and also in NOAA airplanes and then analyze by a scientist Don Blake at his laboratory at UC Irvine. The concentrations of any one compound were very low in the parts per billion (PPB) or even less. But many of these concentrations were at sea and this is a good comparison, higher -- much much higher than in Mexico City where I am now and is one of the standards for the worst air pollution in the world.
This is what is being experienced or observed and breathed by people on site. The response workers were not wearing a mask [respirator].

JC: What about the population along the coast in the areas where there have been so many reports of people complaining of health problems, specifically Southern Louisiana, Mississippi, the Orange Beach/Gulf Shores area of Alabama? Do you think the data you collected has a direct correlation to those populations and what they were inhaling?

IL: ...The other way is the aerosols. The aerosolization are really tiny droplets smaller than a hair but still pretty large, and they can not stay airborne for very long before they will fall back down to the ground. Maybe a couple of miles inshore. So you would expect people right near the beach would be at risk from aerosol related problems....Aerosols and their effects are a little uncertain, exactly what it is going to do. We know that aerosolization in past spills always cause a lot of people to get sick. In this spill, probably the same. They are droplets that are large enough that if they get into your lungs your body can potentially remove them, or maybe not because they are tar so it may get stuck in there.
...

JC: Part of the data set you collected definitely showed that it (VOCs) was present in precipitation?

IL: Not in precipitation. I know there were clouds filled with hydrocarbons. This is from the remote sensing data showing that a cloud -- maybe it is 1/2 mile thick -- had about .1 or .2mm of oil equivalent in it spread out through the whole thing. When it rains, whatever is in it is going to come down, that is just how clouds work. I don't have documentation on the rain. On the other hand there are quite a few anecdotal reports of people saying it's raining oil. What was missing was any explanation of how that could be happening, a scientific mechanism. What my data does is that it elucidates the mechanism scientifically so we can explain exactly how this could happen.
...
We live in a global world and society, it is silly for us not to learn from the experiences of our friends in Europe who have also experienced oil spills in recent years and documented widespread health impacts. As Americans, if we can learn from them we can avoid the mysterious Gulf Coast Health Syndrome appearing five years from now that nobody figures out what it is until 10 years from now with a lot of people getting sick and very ill in the interim.


It doesn't take much digging to discover that the scientists who have been about the business of blowing off the alarming increase in dolphin deaths are beholden to their BP paymasters.

The Marine Mammal lab at Texas A&M University was run by Dr. Graham Worthy until 2001 when he moved it to University of Central Florida. I can't find where Worthy was getting the money to run his lab at Texas A&M but their Marine Biology Lab is currently being funded by BP.

Dr. Gilbert Rowe
Department Head, Department of Marine Biology,
Texas A&M University at Galveston

...
Dr. Kim Larsen is a research fellow in the Marine Biology Lab funded by BP Petroleum under the deep-sea Biodiversity program

UCF uses dolphins to research effects of gulf oil spill - Orlando Sentinel

Dr. Rowe's current work is being funded by a BP grant being funneled through Florida Institute of Oceanography and he is very anxious to get his hot little hands on even more BP money.


UCF biology Professor Graham Worthy and Ph.D. candidates are studying dolphins in the Choctawhatchee and Pensacola bays to find out how safe and edible the fish are in the wake of the recent oil spill.

Worthy is the director of the Physiological Ecology and Bioenergetics Lab at UCF. The lab moved from Texas A&M University at Galveston in Texas in 2001, joining forces with UCF's biology department. The research conducted at the lab concentrates on marine vertebrates and how those animals cope with disturbances in their environment.

With the funding of a Florida Institute of Oceanography grant, Worthy's team started observing changes in the gulf after the Deepwater Horizon spill spewed between 186 million to 227 million gallons of oil into the Gulf.
...
On May 24, BP announced it would donate $500 million throughout a 10-year span to research efforts. Among the recipients was the Florida Institute of Oceanography.

Zenaida Gonzalez Kotala of UCF News & Information said the lab received a grant of $205,000 from FIO. After the spill, BP donated $10 million to FIO. The institution dispersed the money to 27 scientists from universities across Florida. The grant is good for one year. Worthy hopes the grant will be renewed, as the current results are not an accurate indication of how the spill affected the marine life.

Cold water influx in Gulf may have delivered fatal blow to dead dolphins

Here is Dr. Worthy claiming we will never know what killed the dolphins. More horrifically, he is being sent tissue samples from the dead dolphins to analyze. Anybody want to bet against the chances that his findings will prove to be quite helpful to BP in court?

NOAA scientists have nearly universally attempted to minimize and blow off any serious scientific work that shows harm being caused by BP's black monster.However, even a No Oil At All (NOAA) scientist isn't buying into the notion that cold waters are responsible for the dolphin kill that has been prominently trotted out in the press by the Dauphin Island Sea Lab. They are a big oil beneficiary which includes BP largesse.

Dauphin Island Sea Lab statement of research funding from oil and gas industry
Historical and current funding and their sources


Dates Funding Source Amount Purpose
2005-2007 Conoco Phillips $2M Prepare baseline for LNG terminal
2010-2011 Northern Gulf Institute (BP) $970K Rapid response to DH oil spill
2010-2011 BP through State of Alabama $5M Distribution to MESC member institutions
Graham Worthy, a University of Central Florida researcher who ran the state of Texas’ dolphin research program for a decade, said it may be impossible to pinpoint the exact cause of death for the 90 animals that have been recovered this year.
...
Federal officials said they would be supplying Worthy with tissue samples from the dead dolphins and relying on his laboratory analysis as they try to determine what killed the animals. It is unclear when Worthy and other scientists will receive tissue samples so that they can begin their research.

Temperature and river flow gauges show that melting snow flowing into the rivers that drain into Mobile Bay caused a sudden and sharp drop in water temperatures shortly before dolphin carcasses began washing ashore, first in Alabama, then Mississippi.

Scientists from the Dauphin Island Sea Lab have speculated that one particular 15-degree drop in water temperatures within a 24-hour period may have killed many of the dolphins.

“Wow. That’s a significant drop,” said Blair Mase, the senior National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientist investigating the dolphin deaths. She called the relationship between the cold plumes and the dolphin deaths “interesting” and said it was among the factors researchers would probe.

However, Mase said, the region has experienced cold winters in the past, such as last year, without an associated rise in dolphin deaths.


In Devastating Complaint, Louisiana Demands $1 Million a Day from BP & Others

Louisiana politicians are among the most enthusiastic drill, baby drill crowed completely ignoring the fact that BP hasn't come close to stepping up to the plate to pay the state damages.

NEW ORLEANS (CN) - Louisiana demands more than $1 million a day from each of the companies responsible for the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, in accord with the Louisiana Oil Spill Prevention and Response Act of 1991, the Oil Pollution Act, and the Louisiana Environmental Quality Act.

In his federal complaint, Louisiana Attorney General James "Buddy" Caldwell outlines BP's and the other defendants' disregard of safety practices and regulations every step of the way.

The attorney general says that before the Deepwater Horizon exploded, "warning signs of well flow were being transmitted to the rig, to Halliburton's Houston office and BP E&P's Houston office in real time for almost an hour before hydrocarbons reached the rig, alerting rig workers to shut down the well. Nevertheless, the rig workers apparently ignored these warning signs until it was too late. Moreover, during the critical hour before the well blowout, there was no one at the Halliburton or BP E&P offices to monitor this data and issue the appropriate warnings."

(BP E&P stands for BP Exploration & Production.)

The complaint continues: "The initial explosion on the Deepwater Horizon on the night of April 20, 2010, was caused when an engine in the rig's engine room sucked in the gas vapors from the MGS vent pipe, causing the engine to overspeed.

"Gas sensors designed to help avoid explosions by shutting down these engines and closing air intake manifolds when flammable gas is present were not operational on the night of the incident. Gas alarms which would have alerted the crew to shut down the rig had been intentionally disarmed."
...
"At the time of the incident, the Macondo well was months behind schedule and significantly over budget. Defendants made and/or authorized a number of reckless decisions concerning well design, cementing, and integrity testing in the interest of speed and cost savings, at the expense of safety and industry best practices," it adds.

"BP E&P knew, or should have known, that the cement design and implementation had a very low probability of ever becoming an effective barrier to well flow.

...
Named as defendants are BP Exploration & Production Inc., BP Corporation North America Inc., BP America Inc., BP plc, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, Anadarko E&P Company LP, Transocean Holdings LLC, Triton Asset Leasing GmbH, Transocean Deepwater Inc., Transocean Offshore Deepwater Drilling Inc. and MOEX Offshore 2007 LLC.


Spill no reason to halt deep sea drilling: BP

BP's Svanberg is doing the same tired, old BP song and dance they do every single time they kill people and/or do inflict yet another insult on the environment. How many encores does BP have to take with their lies about learning their lesson and promising to do better before governments decide that it would be wise to just put BP out of business.

This was a UN sponsored conference. Shame on them for inviting BP and giving them a PR platform.

MALMOE, Sweden — Last year's massive Gulf of Mexico oil spill sparked by an explosion on a BP-leased platform is no reason to stop deep sea drilling, the group's chairman Carl-Henric Svanberg said Monday.

"If we truly learn from this accident, I see no reason to close off the deep water as an area for future oil exploration and production," Svanberg told a conference in the southern Swedish city of Malmoe on oil spill risk management.

"All energy extraction has its risks and it is our task and our contract with society to make sure that we can take these risks responsibly," he said.
...
Svanberg stressed Monday that the spill was "an accident that should never have happened," but insisted that continued exploration and production in deep waters was needed.
...
"We do know that we can learn from this, that we can move forward, do everything we can to prevent that it happens again," he insisted.
...
Six Greenpeace protestors, wearing white jumpsuits soiled with black and surrounded by a few fake oil-soaked birds stood outside the conference centre.

They held up a banner reading -- "Save the Arctic, No more spills" in a bid to draw attention to the industry's heightened interest in the largely untapped riches of a region where the ecosystem is already under stress from climate change and ocean acidification, they said.


In Devastating Complaint, Louisiana Demands $1 Million a Day from BP & Others

Louisiana politicians are among the most enthusiastic in the drill, baby drill crowed completely ignoring the fact that BP hasn't come close to stepping up to the plate to pay the state damages.

NEW ORLEANS (CN) - Louisiana demands more than $1 million a day from each of the companies responsible for the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, in accord with the Louisiana Oil Spill Prevention and Response Act of 1991, the Oil Pollution Act, and the Louisiana Environmental Quality Act.

In his federal complaint, Louisiana Attorney General James "Buddy" Caldwell outlines BP's and the other defendants' disregard of safety practices and regulations every step of the way.

The attorney general says that before the Deepwater Horizon exploded, "warning signs of well flow were being transmitted to the rig, to Halliburton's Houston office and BP E&P's Houston office in real time for almost an hour before hydrocarbons reached the rig, alerting rig workers to shut down the well. Nevertheless, the rig workers apparently ignored these warning signs until it was too late. Moreover, during the critical hour before the well blowout, there was no one at the Halliburton or BP E&P offices to monitor this data and issue the appropriate warnings."

(BP E&P stands for BP Exploration & Production.)

The complaint continues: "The initial explosion on the Deepwater Horizon on the night of April 20, 2010, was caused when an engine in the rig's engine room sucked in the gas vapors from the MGS vent pipe, causing the engine to overspeed.

"Gas sensors designed to help avoid explosions by shutting down these engines and closing air intake manifolds when flammable gas is present were not operational on the night of the incident. Gas alarms which would have alerted the crew to shut down the rig had been intentionally disarmed."
...
"At the time of the incident, the Macondo well was months behind schedule and significantly over budget. Defendants made and/or authorized a number of reckless decisions concerning well design, cementing, and integrity testing in the interest of speed and cost savings, at the expense of safety and industry best practices," it adds.

"BP E&P knew, or should have known, that the cement design and implementation had a very low probability of ever becoming an effective barrier to well flow.

...
Named as defendants are BP Exploration & Production Inc., BP Corporation North America Inc., BP America Inc., BP plc, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, Anadarko E&P Company LP, Transocean Holdings LLC, Triton Asset Leasing GmbH, Transocean Deepwater Inc., Transocean Offshore Deepwater Drilling Inc. and MOEX Offshore 2007 LLC.


Oil Platform Fire In The Gulf of Mexico

Yet another sterling example of the Cracker Jack job BOEMRE is doing of keeping oil rigs safe for the people who work on them.

U.S. Coast Guard officials confirm two people were rescued after an oil production platform caught fire in the Gulf of Mexico Sunday.

The platform is located about 50 miles south of Grand Isle.

CBS Affiliate WWL reports a Good Samaritan vessel rescued the two workers, according to officials.
...
The two were believed to be the only people on board the platform.

A spokesperson for West Jefferson Medical Center said the two men did not suffer any injuries and walked out of the hospital on their own.

Arena, the rig's owner, reports the platform had been shut two weeks ago and was not producing product at the time of the incident.



No production impact at BP Whiting refinery

The story says the flaring was caused by adjustments being made on a unit. Given BP's atrocious maintenance it wouldn't be surprising if we find out later that the flaring was actually caused by something falling apart.

Production was unaffected and no units were shut Friday when BP Plc's (BP.L) (BP.N) 405,000 barrel per day refinery in Whiting, Indiana, reported flaring, sources familiar with refinery operations said on Monday.

BP Shuts Hydrocracker for Work at Carson, California, Refinery

It's a miracle! BP is actually doing scheduled maintenance unless they are just joshing us about the "planned work" part.

BP Plc (BP/) shut a hydrocracker for planned work earlier this month, according to a person with knowledge of the project.

The effort is expected to last at least several weeks, said the person, who declined to be identified because the information isn’t public.
...


BP to invest $200m in SA energy infrastructure

BP doesn't seem to be shy about holding the South African government hostage for friendly regulation so they can continue to foul the environment and kill their workers.

Energy group BP would invest $200-million in infrastructure development in South Africa over the next two years, CEO Sipho Maseko said on Tuesday at the opening ceremony of the company’s rail gantry expansion in Pretoria.
...
BP and Shell, which coown what is currently South Africa’s largest refinery, reportedly approached the Department of Energy last year to take up a position in the refinery in Durban, rather than proceeding with a proposed investment into a greenfields refinery at Coega in the Eastern Cape.
...
Currently, South Africa’s demand outstrips its supply, creating serious challenges in supplying the country’s busy inland area, especially owing to logistical constraints.
...
Maseko said that the secure and consistent supply of energy was crucial for South Africa’s future, but added that a secure regulatory environment was needed to ensure increased investment into the country.

He noted that BP head office was ready to invest above and beyond the $200-million that it would spent in the next two years in the right regulatory environment, saying that they considered South Africa as a key growth market.


RIL-BP deal to concretize in next 6 months; benefits attract both

Very scary that anyone could possible think that BP represents "superiors [sic] technical excellence."

Reliance Industries Limited’s chairman Mukesh Ambani signed a deal last week that may just tread enroute a promising path for not just the company but for all its relative associate stations.  Just a few days after (RIL) and British Petroleum (BP) announced their $20 billion “transformational” deal; many of the future operational details are finally being inked in specificity.

The RIL-BP deal primarily focuses on an arrangement between the two parties whereby BP- world’s largest energy enterprise- will be shelling out $7.2 billion for a 30% stake in 23 exploration blocks of Reliance, plus an additional sum of $1.8 billion for future explorations, leaving RIL with a 60% stake in blocks.
...
A deal of such nature will ensure three major future outcomes- One that Indian energy reserves will be explored through superiors technical excellence, Two- the output in terms of resources employed to that of resources generated will be significantly marginalized and three, national economy will boom due to large FDI’s that will follow in future to come.

PLEASE visit Pam LaPier's diary to find out how you can help the Gulf now and in the future. We don't have to be idle! And thanks to Crashing Vor and Pam LaPier for working on this!

Previous Gulf Watcher diaries:

3-06-11 11:35 AM Gulf Watchers Sunday - It Was Dangerous Paperwork - BP Catastrophe AUV #483 Lorinda Pike
3-04-11 07:13 PM Gulf Watchers Block Party - Eye of the Beholder ursoklevar
3-04-11 08:01 AM Gulf Watchers Friday - The Drilling Clock is Ticking - BP Catastrophe AUV #482 Lorinda Pike
3-02-11 06:04 AM Gulf Watchers Wednesday - BP Partner Gets 1st Deepwater Drilling Permit - BP Catastrophe AUV #481 peraspera
The last Mothership has links to reference material.

Previous motherships and ROV's from this extensive live blog effort may be found here.

Again, to keep bandwidth down, please do not post images or videos.
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