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I am a Christian... a Catholic Christian to be precise.  I take my faith pretty seriously, and I try to live what I believe.  Allow me to share some of that with you...

Welcome to Brothers and Sisters, the weekly meet-up for prayer* and community at Daily Kos.  We put an asterisk on pray* to acknowledge that not everyone uses conventional religious language, but may want to share joys and concerns, or simply take solace in a meditative atmosphere. Anyone who comes in the spirit of mutual respect, warmth and healing, is welcome.

People subscribe to a particular faith (or none at all) for any number of reasons. I haven't always been a Catholic, or a Christian.  But I discovered wonderful Franciscans in Providence, Rhode Island, and was immediately enamored with what they did with faith.  And I really mean it-- they DID faith.  Being holy was about making the world a better, more just place.  I was hooked...

The way I see my faith is as something to be lived-- we are meant to care for each other.  It is not about ME and MY God-- it's about all of us.  

Some of the Themes of Catholic Social Teaching:

Rights and Responsibilities
The Catholic tradition teaches that human dignity can be protected and a healthy community can be achieved only if human rights are protected and responsibilities are met. Therefore, every person has a fundamental right to life and a right to those things required for human decency. Corresponding to these rights are duties and responsibilities--to one another, to our families, and to the larger society.

Option for the Poor and Vulnerable
A basic moral test is how our most vulnerable members are faring. In a society marred by deepening divisions between rich and poor, our tradition recalls the story of the Last Judgment (Mt 25:31-46) and instructs us to put the needs of the poor and vulnerable first.

The Dignity of Work and the Rights of Workers

The economy must serve people, not the other way around. Work is more than a way to make a living; it is a form of continuing participation in God’s creation. If the dignity of work is to be protected, then the basic rights of workers must be respected--the right to productive work, to decent and fair wages, to the organization and joining of unions, to private property, and to economic initiative.

Solidarity
We are one human family whatever our national, racial, ethnic, economic, and ideological differences. We are our brothers’ and sisters’ keepers, wherever they may be. Loving our neighbor has global dimensions in a shrinking world. At the core of the virtue of solidarity is the pursuit of justice and peace. Pope Paul VI taught that “if you want peace, work for justice.” The Gospel calls us to be peacemakers. Our love for all our sisters and brothers demands that we promote peace in a world surrounded by violence and conflict.

Care for God’s Creation

We show our respect for the Creator by our stewardship of creation. Care for the earth is not just an Earth Day slogan, it is a requirement of our faith. We are called to protect people and the planet, living our faith in relationship with all of God’s creation. This environmental challenge has fundamental moral and ethical dimensions that cannot be ignored.

From the United States Council of Catholic Bishops,
Justice, Peace and Human Development resources

One does not have to Catholic or a Christian to work for justice, but for me it just seems to go together. I work for progressive causes because I am a Christian-- it is my faith in action.

Peace...

Originally posted to mommyof3 on Sun May 15, 2011 at 05:00 PM PDT.

Also republished by Street Prophets and Spiritual Organization of Unapologetic Liberals at Daily Kos.

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