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EPA turns off monitoring of radiation, air radiation in tokyo poor, Soil Radiation not good at all, corium outside of reactor, dosimeters not being
distributed, radiation in plants, TEPCO seeks to scapegoat employees for reactor loss

H/T to Ex-skf who is totally on this.  


Lyrics | Thomas Dolby lyrics - She Blinded Me With Science lyrics

http://www.reuters.com/...

The magnitude 9 earthquake that struck a Japanese nuclear plant in March hit with almost 30 percent more intensity than it had been designed to withstand, raising withstand, raising the possibility that key systems were compromised even before a massive tsunami hit.

Embattled operator Tokyo Electric Power said Monday that partial data recovered from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi plant showed the ground acceleration during the quake exceeded its design specifications at three of the six reactors.

"This was clearly a larger earthquake than we had forecast," said Junichi Matsumoto, a Tepco spokesman for nuclear issues. "It would have been hard to anticipate this."


true if you are ignorant of japanese history, like the http://en.wikipedia.org/...
apanese officials have previously said the meltdown that took place in three of the reactors at Fukushima was caused by the loss of power to cooling systems when the tsunami knocked out backup diesel generators. Tepco has repeatedly called the combined disaster an event "beyond expectations."

But new details released this week have called some of that account into question. At the same time, new data and inspections at the site have shown that the reactors suffered far more serious damage than previously thought and forced officials to abandon their initial approach to bringing the plant to a shutdown.

Officials said it was not clear whether the Fukushima plant had been damaged by the quake and said an immediate inspection was impossible because of the all-hands effort to stabilize the reactors.

But a finding that the reactors or key safety equipment were damaged by the quake itself could complicate the growing debate on the future of nuclear power in Japan at a time when Tokyo is under pressure to tighten safety standards.

Officials have said they will stick with a goal of shutting down the reactors by January. At that point of "cold shutdown," the fuel in the reactors would be cool enough so that it would not be at risk of boiling off the water being pumped in as a coolant and radiation barrier.

Once workers have gained control of Fukushima, attention could shift to the effort to retrieve the fuel from the site, including the melted uranium in three of the reactors, and send it to a more permanent storage site. Experts have said that could take a decade or more.

9 months just to get to cold shutdown?  I"m not sure if they ever will,
and a decade to clean the site?  NFW.  It took 14 years to break down TMI and that was one unit 30% melted.  Figure this is 7 times worse.  so more like a century to get the site cleaned.

Hosono said outside experts had also told him that the fuel in the No. 1 reactor appeared to have leaked out of the steel vessel designed to contain it at the core.

The effort to shut down the plant has also been complicated by the growing pool of radioactive water backing up inside the reactors and attached buildings because of leaks, officials have said.

Japan's government has promised an independent audit of the Fukushima disaster, including whether a faster response or a quicker venting of radioactive steam could have prevented powerful hydrogen explosions and the meltdowns.

"We can certainly say that if the venting took place a little earlier, we could have prevented the situation from worsening," Nuclear Safety Commission Chairman Haruki Madarame told parliament.

In another instance of an apparent error in judgment, Tepco said that a worker may have shut down a cooling system known as the isolation condenser shortly after the earthquake when he saw that the No. 1 reactor was losing temperature quicker than the utility's guidelines allowed.

"At the time, we could not have known that the tsunami was coming and that we would lose power," Matsumoto said.

I once saw a pretty bad movie with Jeff Bridges called "The Door in the Floor", now
we expect there will be a sequel, The corium in the floor.

http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/...

40,000 units of Geiger counters and dosimeters donated by the United States, France, and Canada after the Fukushima I Nuke Plant accident still sit in a warehouse at Narita International Airport, according to a Japanese blogger (yougen).

The blogger says in his/her post (in Japanese) these Geiger counters and dosimeters are under the jurisdiction of the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency. Donations from foreign countries are handled by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Distributing the Geiger counters and dosimeters to the plant workers is done by the Ministry of Health and Welfare.

Distributing the Geiger counters and dosimeters to civilians is done by the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency under the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry.

http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/...

One of the readers of my Japanese blog that has the Japanese translation of the video got curious and did some research using the data from the government agency (the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan), and came to a conclusion that the area where the plant sits may indeed have moved quite a bit, not just vertically but also horizontally.

His conclusion:

Vertical: - 50 centimeters (it sank 50 centimeters)
Horizontal: 220 to 250 centimeters to the east.

the units moved 8 feet...  wow....

[ corrected to 8 foot from 3 foot, Thanks for the comment pointing that out,
I was thinking 3 meters and then didn't bother correcting when i decided to
put it into english]

SKFs readers areawesome

http://www.nytimes.com/...

The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission said on Monday that its 24-hour operations center had stopped monitoring the nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi plant because the situation there had improved. “The conditions at the Japanese reactors are slowly stabilizing,” said William Borchardt, the agency’s chief staff official. “As conditions have continued to improve and the Japanese continue to implement their recovery plan, the N.R.C. has determined that it is time to adjust our response,” he said. The agency still has a team of engineers in Tokyo, he said. Mr. Borchardt said last week that the condition of the reactors was “static but not stable.”

wow, what horsehockey...

http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/...

As this blog has reported both in English and Japanese, the official number for the air radiation level in Tokyo is measured at only one location in Shinjuku, on top of the building about 18 meters from the ground.

However, there are many unofficial numbers, i.e. measured by concerned citizens and residents at the level where most people live and work - 1 meter above the ground.

Looking at the numbers in different locations in Tokyo (PDF file for download), the radiation level varies significantly. To measure only at the Shinjuku location and tell the residents in Tokyo that the radiation level in Tokyo is back to normal range is highly misleading.

Here's some numbers from the "Environmental radiation monitoring" latest PDF file that exceed the "official" number (0.0629 microgray/hour, or microsievert/hour, 5/17/11)

Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku: 0.124 microsievert/hour, 100 cm above the side walk, 5/10/11

Kyobashi, Chuo-ku: 0.071 microsievert/hour, 100 cm above concrete, 5/10/11

Hongo, Bunkyo-ku: 0.14 microsievert/hour, 100 cm above asphalt, 5/10/11

Kanamachi, Katsushika-ku: 0.359 microsievert/hour, 100 cm above sand, 5/10/11

he number in Kanamachi, 0.359 microsievert/hour, would translate to more than 3 millisieverts per year. (8.61 microsieverts per day x 365 = 3.142 millisieverts per year)

http://xkcd.com/...

3millisieverts is like giving everyone in kanamichi a CT Scan....

http://takedanet.com/...

Fukushima measured using an image of it, "eyes" and "guy" Take a look. First, the ground one meters. Is approximately 2.7 microseconds.

Second, increasing radiation dose and gradually closer to the ground, five micro- 10 micro and, placing their equipment on the road measuring 20 micro- (19.9) was.
"He" was on the ground is! !

in Fukushima prefecture its 60X higher ....

so thats a CT scan wekly in Fukushima and schools still open...

http://moribin.blog114.fc2.com/

the above is a semi busted blog post by professor binmori.  He's
taken new plants and is running radiographs on them.  
i wish the jpgs were working,  but something broke the links to them SKF says they
are very disturbing.  The JPGs work on SKFs blog, but, I'm just too lazy to
put up the images.  But anytime you can take plants, lay them between film
and they self develope, has to be awful.  

http://mainichi.jp/...

workers enter Unit 2 for the first time in 8 weeks. Oh boy, it's probably going to
be a shambles in there.  I expect there will be lots of radiation, lots of damage,
and, no chance they can get the cooling systems up there.Oh they are wearing
Tungsten suits, so they must look like knights.

http://www.tepco.co.jp/...
http://www.tepco.co.jp/...

TEPCO has a roadmap and plan.  I am reminded of the military axiom, a average plan violently executed now beats a great plan in two weeks.  

TEPCO has spent 8 weeks designing a plan. What a joke.

If they had stopped lying at the start, they could have gotten a lot of help from the outside.

http://www.jaif.or.jp/...

TEPCO reports 70 Generator trucks proved worthless at getting power back up
at the site.

About 70 generator trucks from the Self-Defense Forces and other entities
headed to the plant after the quake knocked out external power and the tsunami
disabled the facility's backup generators.
But plant operator TEPCO says debris strewn across the compound and flooded
switchboards hampered the trucks' set up.
The utility says a switchboard for the No.2 reactor was finally wired to one of the
generator trucks about 24 hours after the disaster.
But moments later, a hydrogen explosion  at the neighboring No.1 reactor fried
the wiring and cut off the power supply from the truck.
Another hydrogen explosion 2 days later at the No.3 reactor damaged generator
vehicles with chunks of flying concrete.
Electricity was finally restored to the  plant through the regular power grid on
March 21st --- 10 days after the quake and tsunami.

EDIT:  FOYI has some very cool video of the reactor site.  

http://www.dailykos.com/...

Note the extensive non structural damage in the buildings.  Busted windows,
busted ceilings,  etc...

Also the scale of operations are way too small.  They need an army.
Look at Chernobyl the Russians sent in thousands of men to shut in the racs,
the Japanese have dozens.  Now the water damage inside the site is pretty amazing.
4-5 feet of water in the turbine buildings?  

The trick is they need to focus on fixing systems and trying to get a handle on this.

Spraying resin everywhere won't help.  the resin breaks up and gets thrown around later.  

I do like the positive pressure rooms and the workers have dust suits.  

They need to start ripping out the damaged stuff, so that they can clean and cap the site. Instead of resin they need to cap with 4 inches of concrete.

now given there is a core melt and we have corium in the basements, they
need to get the robots a free path so they can try scooping up the corium.

If the reactors are burned out, they should stop screwing around and open them up.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Sandia meltdown model (14+ / 0-)

    The worker's actions made no difference. Unit 1 would have melted down quickly no matter what he did.
    64 pg doc

    UCS discusses the meltdown model. Unit 1 had a design that was very vulnerable to station power loss.

    look for my eSci diary series Thursday evening. "It's the planet, stupid."

    by FishOutofWater on Wed May 18, 2011 at 05:31:32 AM PDT

  •  psst: 250cm = 8 feet (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    nathguy, FishOutofWater, blueoregon

    yea, metric to english units takes a second to get right.

    But thanks for the very informative diary.

  •  A decade or more.... (14+ / 0-)

    Try much, much more.

    Michio Kaku, a Japanese American physicist,  was recently interviewed by Bill Maher when he estimated it would be a minimum of 30 years to clean the site. If you didn't see it, I recommend his sober take on the current state of FUBAR at Fukushima. Maybe youtube has it.

    I suppose the long term effects on the Japanese people will be the only truth we will know, if that is even honestly reported in the future. We live in a world where the obfuscating voices and noise of lying liars drown out any illumination.

    Thanks for continuing to shed a bit of light.

    As all the while the plane lumbers on into its postmodern manifest destiny -a bird with two right wings- LF

    by cosmic debris on Wed May 18, 2011 at 06:06:09 AM PDT

    •  Japan is screwed (9+ / 0-)

      but places like the west coast of the US is not going to be untouched.  This event is going to touch the whole world at different levels.

      Its ongoing, Reactor 1 looks like its fully melted down and reactor 2 and 3 may be following it.  They have no way to cool this mess at this point, hell they dont even have instruments in place that can accurately gauge the real temp.

      This is the worst possible nuclear nightmare imaginable, and its ongoing, and our media,    ...silence.

      The silence should scare the hell out of you, it means, its out of control and we havent a clue as to how to get it under control, so you should be very concerned, but as a gov and corp all we are mostly concerned with now is stopping a panic, and saving face.

      Its a PR operation more than anything else.  

      They need to be building pyramids over this site to spare the rest of the world, and as for the ground water and so forth,  Japan is screwed for centuries.

      but instead of pyramids over the site, we get tents.  wtf..

      but then again, this country doesnt care if 45,000 people die each year simply because they cant afford a doctor, what does it care if cancer rates increase etc...

      my god, in 200 years , we managed to do what humans couldnt do in 200,000 years.  We fucked up this planet good.

      Bad is never good until worse happens

      by dark daze on Wed May 18, 2011 at 08:22:47 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  see my diary 3 meltdowns (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        oortdust, Jim P, dark daze

        it's 3 full bore meltdowns.

        what's interesting is rac 3 is continuing to heat up
        and when the RPV cracks wide open, we will see
        a steam explosion.

        George Bush is Living proof of the axiom "Never send a boy to do a man's job" E -2.25 S -4.10

        by nathguy on Wed May 18, 2011 at 10:00:15 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  The water tables. Anyone got info on (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        nathguy

        where the water tables lie in relation to these breached reactors? I think I saw someone with this in the first week of the catastrophe, but I've not since. But it would seem to be a major concern, no?


        Until we break the corporate virtual monopoly on what we hear and see, we keep losing, don't matter what we do.

        by Jim P on Wed May 18, 2011 at 11:31:04 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  These reactors are above a small, artificially (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          nathguy, Jim P

          generated water table. They scooped out part of the cliff to create the site so water under it does not communicate with other water tables. It does obviously connect to the sea, alas.

          Is it true? Is it kind? Is it necessary? . . . and respect the dignity of every human being.

          by Wee Mama on Wed May 18, 2011 at 03:05:55 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  We are dumping so much water ourselves (0+ / 0-)

          that it almost does not matter about the water tables.  We have seen radioactive water waste already in storm/sewer drainage system miles away already.  The quake almost certainly created at least a few routes for the highly contaminated water that has been building up in every tunnel, basement, and low area on the plant site for weeks to migrate into Japan's fresh water.  In terms of corium melting into water creating a hydrogen-steam explosion event... seems we have plenty of water for that to happen as well.  So, whatever the local hydrology was when they built the plant, I think that the potential exists for far worse problems.

  •  Companies the world over (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Russgirl

    will scramble to blame anybody else when everything goes to crap. That's what regulation is for. Great diary, thanks.

    "Such is the irresistible nature of truth that all it asks, and all it wants, is the liberty of appearing." - Thomas Paine

    by blueoregon on Wed May 18, 2011 at 06:22:22 AM PDT

  •  9 months (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Russgirl, dark daze

    i can't help but wonder if the plan somehow involves avoiding a steam explosion until the cores melt there way past the water table.

    http://www.aeinstein.org/organizations/org/FDTD.pdf From Dictatorship to Democracy, Guide to Non Violent Protests.

    by sdelear on Wed May 18, 2011 at 06:27:08 AM PDT

    •  It should be obvious that the "plan" (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Russgirl, California06, dark daze

      is being driven not by engineering considerations, but by what keeps TEPCO in existence as a private corporate entity, and hence keeps the Japanese financial system alive in something resembling its state pre-March.  At least until the elites figure out some way to insulate themselves from this.

    •  they'll just call (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      nathguy

      they'll just call these explosions some bullshit like they did the earlier explosion.

      you know, the nuclear explosions they called hydrogen, and tried to smear anyone who said otherwise.  Now we know, yep, they were in fact nuclear explosions.

      Bad is never good until worse happens

      by dark daze on Wed May 18, 2011 at 08:24:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Generally, the term "nuclear explosions" (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Tomtech, Wee Mama

        is applied to explosions caused directly by neutron-induced fission chain reactions in a highly supercritical assembly of fissile material, which proceed to completion in about a microsecond or so. You generally get a lot of vaporization of whatever material is in proximity to such an explosion, a strong shock wave that destroys things for a large distance surrounding that, a double flash, etc.

        However, I suppose you could also apply the term to criticality accidents involving moderated assemblies. Much slower and less immediately destructive than the usual nuclear explosions, but plenty bad.

        Applying the term to a hydrogen-oxygen explosion in a nuclear power plant could also be done if you want to broaden the definition.

        Moderation in most things. Except Reactors. IFR forever!

        by billmosby on Wed May 18, 2011 at 09:35:11 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  it's prompt criticality. (0+ / 0-)

          A proper nuke blast is a Supercritical event, the chain reaction builds enough energy to release a thermal wave.

          prompt criticality is sort of a nuclear squib.

          Hell of a mess, but only destroys a city block or two.

          George Bush is Living proof of the axiom "Never send a boy to do a man's job" E -2.25 S -4.10

          by nathguy on Wed May 18, 2011 at 10:01:57 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Or less. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Wee Mama

            Prompt criticality means that the assembly is critical without the delayed neutrons. Having to depend on the delayed neutrons to make an assembly critical means that the doubling time of the reaction is measured in seconds or minutes rather than much smaller time scales. I think of criticality accidents as being prompt critical, yes. But their energy releases are, at least historically, only enough to bend metal or boil liquids; the reacting fissile material is pushed away almost as fast as the reaction starts and not that much energy is generated.

            The term I have heard for a nuclear explosion that destroys a block or two is "fizzle".

            But as I said above, the terms are somewhat flexible. I myself have occasionally referred to an unauthorized nuclear explosion as a "severe criticality accident", even if only in a jesting way.

            Moderation in most things. Except Reactors. IFR forever!

            by billmosby on Wed May 18, 2011 at 10:11:42 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  just to show how baseless your fear mongering is (0+ / 0-)
    he number in Kanamachi, 0.359 microsievert/hour, would translate to more than 3 millisieverts per year. (8.61 microsieverts per day x 365 = 3.142 millisieverts per year)

    and in the xkcd link

    Background dose received by an average person over one normal day ( 10 uSv )

    so the maximum reading you've got is below the natural radiation background.

    So much for the Tokyo radiation scare.

    •  Write a diary . (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      A Runner, Russgirl
      frankenstein monster's Profile

      Diaries published: 0

      Comments posted: 172 (0 days since last comment on Wed May 18, 2011 at 07:34 AM PDT)

      Diary frequency: never

      Comment frequency: frequent

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      Total Comment Ratings: 0

      People Following frankenstein monster: 1
      frankenstein monster's Most Recent Diaries:
      This user has not yet authored any diaries.

      "Drop the name-calling." Meteor Blades 2/4/11

      by indycam on Wed May 18, 2011 at 08:11:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  you are clueless (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Russgirl, nathguy

      really. no amount of radiation is safe, especially if you are now getting more than your body as adapted too.  Secondly, we are getting very limited amount of test results, there is a media blackout.  Third, radiation via food and water is what is a major concern.

      You are obviously a shill , or more likely a troll.

      Bad is never good until worse happens

      by dark daze on Wed May 18, 2011 at 08:27:06 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  ok maybe I am totally clueless (0+ / 0-)
        no amount of radiation is safe

        Now show me how clueless I am.

        I dare to challenge you to support the statement above.

        Do you really think that any radiation, included natural radiation background is not safe ?

        We would get extinct long ago, or more likely, we would not evolve in the first place if we were that fragile.

        especially if you are now getting more than your body as adapted too.

        Oh, and we are adapted to withstand almost two orders of magnitude more than just that.

        check this

        Some areas around Ramsar have the highest level of natural radioactivity in the world, due to the presence of radioactive hot springs. The dose of radiation received by a person living in Ramsar for one year can be in excess of 260 mGy.

        from the same article a little down the text

        This high level of radiation does not seem to have caused ill effects on the residents of the area and even possibly has made them slightly more radioresistant, which is puzzling and has been called "radiation paradox". It has also been claimed that residents have healthier and longer lives.

        Now go on, explain, prove, how no amount of radiation is not safe.

        Or just take the shorter route and hide rate each one who disagrees with your radiation phobia.

        •  FMonser - throwing red herrings again and again - (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Jim P, dark daze

          to change the subject will NOT make this disaster go away.

          Find another blog to dump on for a change.

          Find a way to safely contain the ongoing disaster in Japan - to safely store wastes - to safely de-commission our rapidly aging nuke plants w/GE and others picking up the costs - not taxpayers for a change.

          We have no healthy or positive future without changing from nukes to alternate energy solutions.  

          Other countries are successful TODAY - while you and your minions keep your hands out for more taxpayer cash.

          NO MORE POISON POWER - This planet cannot support it any longer - we can't even CONTAIN WHAT WE HAVE!

          Stanford Ovshinsky: Pursuing solar electricity at a cost equal to or lower than that of coal electricity

          The inventor and industrialist--whose materials-science discoveries more than a half-century ago and subsequent inventions led to broad advances in photovoltaics, batteries, displays, and computer memory--describes his new efforts to develop cheaper and more efficient photovoltaic technology.

          http://bos.sagepub.com/...

        •  here (0+ / 0-)
          Washington, DC July 30, 2005 The National Academies of Science released an over 700-page report yesterday on the risks from ionizing radiation. The BEIR VII or seventh Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation report on "Health Risks from Exposure to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation" reconfirmed the previous knowledge that there is no safe level of exposure to radiation—that even very low doses can cause cancer. Risks from low dose radiation are equal or greater than previously thought. The committee reviewed some additional ways that radiation causes damage to cells.

          You fail, want me to embarrass you further?

          Bad is never good until worse happens

          by dark daze on Wed May 18, 2011 at 11:48:50 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  No; no amount of radiation is safe. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          dark daze

            Radiation is particle flux from a source [alpha (helium nuclei), beta (simple electrons), and gamma (photons=particles of light)] of varying energies.  When high energy particles penetrate tissue, they interact with cellular structures in two ways: damage-(it hits structures in the cells and smashes stuff) or no damage(luckily passed thru without hitting anything).  Given the density of tissue, the particles will pretty much all hit something at some depth in your body, dump all their energy into your cells, and cause varying amounts of damage.  Your personal tally for how much of what damage you accumulate determines your likelyhood of resulting disease.  
             You are not adapted for radiation, this is a foolish concept.  Your cellular mechanisms for scavenging the dangerous cellular breakdown products (e.g., denatured proteins, corrupted free radicals) and the error-correcting mechanisms of the mRNA-to-protein production within your ribosomes (rated only as good to 1 in 10 to the 14th power!) will provide the only protection you may have.  It's a roll of the dice.  
             All radiation is damaging.  The mechanisms are obvious; they have been exhaustively studied.  Now what are you demanding for proof, and more importantly, why? Seeking truth or instigating denial?  I'll order mine without, thanks just the same.

    •  2 pieces of FM BS (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Jim P

      1) this is a 30% increase to normal background radiation.
      so it's not 3 vs 10 it's 13 vs 10.

      2) the radiation is settling into the soil and the soil levels are
      running 60X higher.

      those soil exposures are a real runup.

      George Bush is Living proof of the axiom "Never send a boy to do a man's job" E -2.25 S -4.10

      by nathguy on Wed May 18, 2011 at 10:06:14 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  O RLY ? (0+ / 0-)
        this is a 30% increase to normal background radiation.
        so it's not 3 vs 10 it's 13 vs 10

        [citation needed]

        the radiation is settling into the soil and the soil levels are
        running 60X higher.the radiation is settling into the soil and the soil levels are
        running 60X higher.

        There is a reason why radiation background is always measured above ground at standard height. Go. Google it. If you can.

        •  send a link (0+ / 0-)

          please.

          George Bush is Living proof of the axiom "Never send a boy to do a man's job" E -2.25 S -4.10

          by nathguy on Wed May 18, 2011 at 11:33:08 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  if (0+ / 0-)

            if this troll keep hijacking your diaries, just spam him with this

            Washington, DC July 30, 2005 The National Academies of Science released an over 700-page report yesterday on the risks from ionizing radiation. The BEIR VII or seventh Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation report on "Health Risks from Exposure to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation" reconfirmed the previous knowledge that there is no safe level of exposure to radiation—that even very low doses can cause cancer. Risks from low dose radiation are equal or greater than previously thought. The committee reviewed some additional ways that radiation causes damage to cells.

            Bad is never good until worse happens

            by dark daze on Wed May 18, 2011 at 11:52:56 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  yeah riiiiight (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Wee Mama

              even natural radiation gives us cancer.
              That is, why mountain dwellers have higher cancer rate than those on sea level. Oh wait, they don't.

              That is why radiation induced cancer kills airplane pilots in droves... oh wait, neither that is the case.

              That is, why ramsar, iran, is a lifeless lunar landscape roamed only by horribly deformed, cancerous mutants... But don't tell that to the inhabitants. they might freak out.

              •  LOL (0+ / 0-)

                I'll wait for you 700 page 7th report scientific paper to come out and go through peer review then that disputes what I just linked.

                Washington, DC July 30, 2005 The National Academies of Science released an over 700-page report yesterday on the risks from ionizing radiation. The BEIR VII or seventh Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation report on "Health Risks from Exposure to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation" reconfirmed the previous knowledge that there is no safe level of exposure to radiation—that even very low doses can cause cancer. Risks from low dose radiation are equal or greater than previously thought. The committee reviewed some additional ways that radiation causes damage to cells.

                Among the reports conclusions are:

                There is no safe level or threshold of ionizing radiation exposure.

                Even exposure to background radiation causes some cancers. Additional exposures cause additional risks.

                Radiation causes other health effects such as heart disease and stroke, and further study is needed to predict the doses that result in these non-cancer health effects.

                It is possible that children born to parents that have been exposed to radiation could be affected by those exposures.

                The "bystander effect" is an additional, newly recognized method by which radiation injures cells that were not directly hit but are in the vicinity of those that were. "Genomic instability" can be caused by exposure to low doses of radiation and according to the report "might contribute significantly to radiation cancer risk." These new mechanisms for radiation damage were not included in the risk estimates reported by the BEIR VII report, but were recommended for further study.

                The Linear-No-Threshold model (LNT) for predicting health effects from radiation (dose-response) is retained, meaning that every exposure causes some risk and that risks are generally proportional to dose. The Dose and Dose-Rate Effectiveness Factor or DDREF which had been suggested in the 1990 BEIR V report to be applied at low doses, has been reduced from 2 to 1.5. That means the projected number of health effects at low doses are greater than previously thought. RADIATION RISKIER THAN THOUGHT-- RISKS TO PUBLIC and NUCLEAR WORKERS

                The BEIR VII risk numbers indicate that about 1 in 100 members of the public would get cancer if exposed to 100 millirads (1milliGray) per year for a 70-year lifetime. [1] This is essentially the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's allowable radiation dose for members of the public.

                In addition, 1 in about 5 workers [2] would get cancer if exposed to the legally allowable occupational doses [3] over their 50 years in the workforce. These risks are much higher than permitted for other carcinogens.

                Specifically, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission allows members of the public to get 100 millirems or mr (1 milliSievert or mSv) per year of radiation in addition to background. The BEIR VII report (page 500, Table 12-9) estimates that this level will result in approximately 1 (1.142) cancer in every 100 people exposed at 100 mr/yr which includes 1 fatal cancer in every 175 people so exposed (5.7 in 1000).[4]

                The risk of getting cancer from radiation (in BEIR VII) is increased by about a third from current government risk figures (FGR13): BEIR VII estimates that 11.42 people will get cancer if 10,000 are each exposed to a rem (1,000 millirems or 10 mSv). The US Environmental Protection Agency Federal Guidance Report 13 estimates that 8.46 people will get cancer if 10,000 are each exposed to a rem.

                The Nuclear Information and Resource Service interprets this as further evidence that unnecessary radiation exposures should be avoided.

                "This means that the government is not justified in deregulating nuclear power and weapons waste—releasing it to regular trash or "recycling" it into everyday household items as proposed by 5 US federal agencies at the behest of nuclear waste generators hoping to save money," stated Diane D'Arrigo, Radioactive Waste Project Director at Nuclear Information and Resource Service Radioactive (NIRS). "This also means that remediation of radioactive sites should be done to cleaner levels and that nuclear transport standards should be strengthened."

                Cindy Folkers, NIRS Energy and Health Project Director stated "These findings confirm that all levels of radiation are harmful. Since nuclear power routinely releases long-lasting radiation into the air, water and soil, we must avoid a new generation of nuclear power to prevent unnecessary exposures."

                -30-
                [1] NAS Report in Brief June 2005 BEIR VII: Health Effects from Exposure to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation pp 2-3 (for 1 cancer in 100 people exposed to 100mSv or 10 r ).


                Bad is never good until worse happens

                by dark daze on Wed May 18, 2011 at 12:55:57 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

  •  Please keep posting on this (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Russgirl

    This is the only place I can find any information.  I am continually impressed by the level of expertise in the opinions posted in these diaries.

    It reminds me of truly fine senior engineers I used to work with at a well-known engineering company years ago.

    Facts are facts.  The fact that staggering incompetence seems to have guided the actions of the top TEPCO management and their toadies is made plain by the clear comments here.

    Please keep posting - we need to hear this.

  •  Thanks for an excellent diary, nathguy. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dark daze, Russgirl, RWood

    I really appreciate what you have been and are doing.

    Stonewall was a RIOT!

    by ExStr8 on Wed May 18, 2011 at 07:52:18 AM PDT

  •  No one could have predicted a breech of the levees (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dark daze, Russgirl, Magster

    TEPCO is acting exactly like a sociopathic entity, which is how most companies operate.

    Mission accomplished, WMD's, no one could have predicted a breech of the levees, mobile weapons labs, aluminium tubes, yellowcake, I just dont think about him that much, 1% solutions, trust Curveball, Saddam harbors Al Qaeda, mistakes were made...

    by A Runner on Wed May 18, 2011 at 08:29:09 AM PDT

    •  Right - the big problem is "the people" (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      nathguy, dark daze, A Runner

      ALWAYS PAY - with our lives, health and money.

      Co's like Nuclear, Big Oil, Wall Street, "health" care = nada.

      We the people are ALWAYS responsible while the psychopaths walk away with OUR $$$$$$$.

      •    Until the Nuclear Industry is ready to accept all responsibility and liability for any incident, then why should a Nuclear Power Co. be allowed to operate?

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