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I was going to try and write a diary soon about how much I enjoyed meeting new friends and catching up with old friends in Minneapolis.  I still hope to do so, even as it seems most folks are already posting theirs and I have no time to write mine.  It's just part of the general situation in which I find myself.  I've been so busy work wise that (as everyone knows) diaries are now far and few between from me.  Even comments are becoming something of a hit and miss proposition, an endangered species.

Speaking of endangered species, let's rap for just a minute about Black people in America.

Because 1 in 6 of us don't have a damned job.

This is a mostly-cheat diary in the sense that I'm not going to engage in my usual approach of exhaustive analysis, or lots of links.  I'm just going to (largely) repost this comment I just wrote in the diary MB put on the main page about the fact that the recession officially ended 2 years ago.  I am also going to keep it short (think of it as a long comment) because I always get folks who say I take too long to get to the point.

So here's the point, in the tradition of my profession that says when writing you tell them what you're going to tell them first, then you tell them, then you tell them what you told them.

Nearly 1 in 6 Black people DO NOT HAVE A JOB.

I just looked at BLS, dreading what I would see, yet deep down knowing what I would see given the conversations I've been having from my little house in the 'Hood.

The OFFICIAL unemployment rate for Black Americans is 16.2%. (To confirm, click on the link, select the check box marked "Black or African American" and select "Retrieve Data."  The official unemployment rate for Black people has increased back up to the 16.2% level from its 18-month low point of 15.3% in just 3 months.  

In other words, we have had NO improvement in our collective jobs situation in the past 18-months for any sustained period of time, just continuing deterioration.

We are the ONLY group of Americans that has seen that big of an increase in our demographic's unemployment rate in the past 18 months.  The white unemployment rate continues to hover around 8% having plummeted from 9% (its 18-month peak, in April, 2010).  Things were also a lot better for Latinos although not great:  they have a current unemployment rate of 11.9%, with its 18-month peak in November, 2010 at 13.2%.

Adding insult to injury, the official Black unemployment rate is now HIGHER, for the first time, than the U6.

(Go to this screen, check the boxes labeled "Unemployment Rate - Black or African American - LNS14000006" and "Alternative Measures of Labor Utilization - U6" and click the button at the bottom labeled "Retrieve Data" to confirm this.)

Looking at the Current Population Household Survey data for 2009 and 2010, you can see that unemployment for adults over 25 either decreased or remained statistically flat year to year between 2009 and 2010 except for ONE demographic group for which these numbers are collected:

Black people over 25.

Things are marginally more "fair" if you roll down the age to adults over the age of 16.  Then, there were indeed increases in unemployment for whites, and Latinos, too.

Of 0.2%, each.  (The unemployment rate decreased for Asians over the age of 16.)

Meanwhile, during that same period the unemployment rate increased for Blacks over the age of 16 by nearly a full percentage point (from 17.5% to 18.4%).

Household data not seasonally adjusted year to year from May 2010 to May 2011 also help demonstrate the trend:  Black folks are more likely to be on the dust heap, as opposed to in the hiring queue at the same time that other racial demographic groups are seeing at least some improvement.  

Hell, only 51.2% of us are even considered to be employed/part of the labor force.

I guess I should sing hallelujah, looking at these numbers, that the U-3 only has us at 16.2% now, given all that.

Or I would sing, except that number is changing in the wrong direction.  It's going up, not down.

It seems to me that Black Americans are being, unintentionally perhaps but systematically nonetheless, labor arbitraged out of the job market in favor of everyone else.  That's bad enough - but it's worse when I consider that there appears to be no notice apparently paid by anyone who actually is running around says they give a damn about unemployment.

And no, I'm not just talking about Republicans.

No doubt I'll be hearing the usual stereotype defenses about how Black people "need to get a better education" and "turn off the Nintendo" and "shouldn't have babies they can't afford" soon.

This is nothing short of a human catastrophe and I don't see anyone noticing anymore, including those who say they are our allies.  Our causes as a people are out of fashion, when it comes to talking about politics.  For those that want to pretend that African-American perceptions that we are being systematically marginalized out of the country we built for hundreds of years, and that immigrants have it just as bad as we do, please take a look at those numbers and think again.  I resent the unconscious racism it takes for us as so-called progressives to decry how horrible everyone else in America has it by name and how we have to do something for them right away by name BUT US.

I'm a big believer in being a team player politics-wise but at the same time, from all I can see given how much voice and text has been dedicated to this in the past 2 years, nobody running around saying how important politics are appears to gives a damn about what is happening collectively to Black people in America still, and still again.

Not even the Black people that supposedly represent us as politicians at the state and federal level.

IMO, if those who can't get elected without our votes collectively don't make addressing this jobs catastrophe in the Black community RIGHT NOW (not by jettisoning a whole generation of us in favor of spending money on better early childhood education, since I'm sorry but these numbers are as bad as they were when most of us didn't even graduate from high school in the 1960's) their most immediate priority, I'm on the verge of just refusing to encourage any of them to vote next year.  As it is, encouraging them to hold out for an honest living has been hard enough.

I used to pray all the time for my people.  Not that I don't pray for everyone or love everyone, because I do (except for my first MIL; I truly hate that woman.)  But I pray for Black people in particular because it seems more and more every day that we are being erased from the Blackboard that is American consciousness - except as "subject" when people want to pontificate about crime and ignorance, or about Black dysfunction, or about turning off the Nintendo.  We are being "erased" even though this country still has never done right by us collectively and the majority still keeps trying to pretend it really doesn't see us, deep down, as deserving of our condition because they believe the lie that it is mostly self-made injury rather than the natural product of hundreds of years of white supremacy and anti-Black hatred that had at its center the idea that we were less than human, therefore deserved nothing more than we got from America (which was, other than reduced life expectancy and a disproportionate likelihood of getting caught up in the criminal justice system even though others commit more crimes, a whole lot of nothing).  I keep expecting the "lazy" meme to resurrect itself any day now - and not just on the Right.  Black folks' current disproportionate suffering is certainly are not discussed in any plain sight I can find as those who are bearing an unfair share of what has been done to our country as a whole, with no end in sight.  

First they took our historic neighborhoods, with the predatory lending and subprime lending and all that.  Now, they appear to be coming after our human dignity as well, when we appear to be back to the bad old days of "first fired and last hired" - and continually fired even after everyone else is getting hired.

Eventually, if things keep going the way they are, Black folks unemployed, angry and desperate (but not desperate enough to demand our due from the country we largely built through our enslavement) may well become the new norm.  And thus, our collective condition will become invisible and irrelevant, because it will be expected by America and much of its melting pot of other, non-Black peoples.

So, in the hope that all this can be avoided, I still pray.  But I also chant.  I meditate.  I bust my ass, locally.  I do whatever it takes.

But I don't write enough diaries like this, written in the hopes that people Never Forget.  Written in the hope that maybe just one more person will realize how bad it is out there.  Bad for people like my son, who hasn't had a job on the grid in more than 2 years despite resumes, beating the pavement, etc.  He is becoming an Angry Black Man, for all that I try and steer him right.  My arguments simply don't resonate like they used to, when I could point to something "objective" to show him that yes, it will get better for men like him soon.  

Nobody gives a damn about what is happening to Black people in America.

Not even most of us.

They can't, when 1 in 6 Black people don't have a damned job.

I do need to add one thing, because it's very important.

There is indeed one group who deserves more attention than we do, by name, because they have it worse than we do and have for a very long time:

Native Americans.

The invisible, born of this land throughout, Americans.  

Yet the unemployment situation with Native Americans has been rendered even more invisible than ours, where the adult unemployment rates in some reservations well exceeds 50 or 75%.  Indeed, the collective unemployment situation of Native Americans makes the disgrace of a 16.2% unemployment rate for Black Americans look positively luxurious.

Funny, isn't it, how the unique needs of the two groups ever legally enslaved in this country for any meaningful period of time somehow are the last folks our own allies usually bother to even mention publicly when it comes to discussing how to best solve our political problems?

Yes, I am feeling bitter right now.  And my heart is exploding with pain and despair, and helpless anger.

Originally posted to Maat's Feather on Mon Jun 20, 2011 at 09:39 PM PDT.

Also republished by Anti-Capitalist Chat, ClassWarfare Newsletter: WallStreet VS Working Class Global Occupy movement, Progressive Policy Zone, Income Inequality Kos, DK Poli, White Privilege Working Group, and There Are No Nobodies (Anti-Rankism Group).

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  •  Tip Jar (255+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    oysterface, gravlax, pat of butter in a sea of grits, Susan Gardner, psychodrew, soothsayer99, scribe, poligirl, priceman, navajo, blueoregon, Agathena, tardis10, chuckvw, greengemini, wyldraven, Patriot Daily News Clearinghouse, Kitsap River, goinsouth, TheMomCat, Futuristic Dreamer, Shockwave, Meteor Blades, ThisIsMyTime, basquebob, icemilkcoffee, oldcrow, Maori, ActivistGuy, Pam from Calif, TealTerror, Jim P, boriquasi, srkp23, buddabelly, WheninRome, FrugalGranny, jennybravo, Mber, trashablanca, bruddaone, Ekaterin, angel d, LaFeminista, sfarnell, BigAlinWashSt, cai, mbayrob, elfling, FogCityJohn, bobswern, Kaili Joy Gray, Lefty Mama, Tookish, joedemocrat, Jimdotz, blueoasis, ciganka, expatjourno, TheHalfrican, Michellebird, dov12348, Burned, Deoliver47, Mariken, Actbriniel, RhymesWithUrple, klingman, Fire bad tree pretty, NY brit expat, International Progressive, mimi, GenXangster, HCKAD, emal, aufklaerer, sayitaintso, Clues, blindyone, mallyroyal, libnewsie, Larry Bailey, mim5677, Chi, Dom9000, Ginger1, JayinPortland, BYw, ItsSimpleSimon, PhilJD, cybrestrike, wishingwell, Lightbulb, brown and blue all over, jnhobbs, Jantman, lostinamerica, historys mysteries, raboof, terabytes, yuriwho, barbwires, gmb, Gooserock, coppercelt, multilee, Pinto Pony, BlueDragon, Nina Katarina, gulfgal98, frandor55, TFinSF, TexMex, cassandraX, bronte17, whoknu, puzzled, Kristina40, TarheelDem, stegro, Curt Matlock, Imhotepsings, StPeteDave, GoGoGoEverton, missLotus, howarddream, triv33, Statusquomustgo, catilinus, begone, blue jersey mom, mconvente, PBen, ban nock, h bridges, profh, shevas01, kck, bmor, Philoguy, anodnhajo, cloudbustingkid, Geekesque, dinotrac, mali muso, second gen, enemy of the people, fcvaguy, asterkitty, Ahianne, Avila, One Pissed Off Liberal, GreyHawk, Julie Gulden, northsylvania, smartdemmg, paradox, dotsright, TexH, ribletsonthepan, anastasia p, wader, smoothnmellow, Brit, Ana Thema, rosabw, Nulwee, Broke And Unemployed, esquimaux, sethtriggs, Ezekiel Zachariah Foster, stonedoubt, zerelda, ivorybill, Betty Pinson, Lost Left Coaster, pino, seeta08, Noddy, linkage, psilocynic, luvmykona, Satya1, Mylies Voice, A Siegel, Debby, Mlle L, rubyr, Paul Ferguson, Deep Texan, sberel, freeport beach PA, Renee, Pilkington, bullyness, eru, milkbone, TomP, marketgeek, tytalus, unspeakable, icebergslim, RadioGirl, Mogolori, smellybeast, sostos, Ace Nelson, SoCaliana, Corporate Dog, joe shikspack, taylormattd, Sychotic1, leonard145b, DebtorsPrison, Matt Z, Alfonso Nevarez, HoundDog, vcmvo2, Dauphin, Odysseus, NearlyNormal, Ray Pensador, LEP, An Affirming Flame, princss6, marina, roses, sideboth, raina, allie123, ZhenRen, Larsstephens, 3goldens, MKinTN, pat bunny, a small quiet voice, TiaRachel, Sofjwoman, JekyllnHyde, millwood, BeninSC, Oke, roystah, Yasuragi, radical simplicity, jeannew, JoanMar, Funkygal, slatsg, worldlotus, Geminijen, Oh Mary Oh, awesumtenor, Rashaverak, evergreen2

    If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

    by shanikka on Mon Jun 20, 2011 at 09:39:56 PM PDT

    •  helpless anger..that says it (49+ / 0-)

      My heart just aches, and I feel  absolutely powerless to help fix any of this. And that brings the anger, and the rage..at the cruelty of a country so willing to abandon it's own people.  And if an old white woman feels this, then omg..how much more awful it has to be for our young people of color, and all who love them..and for you shanikka, having to see your boy grow so angry and discouraged.

      I can only speak out where I can, and try to wrap my heart around yours and all the other hurting hearts in full acceptance of your anger, pain and bitterness.  I see you. I hear you. And I care, deeply, about all my relations.

    •  If if's one in six officially (55+ / 0-)

      How high must it be unofficially?

      I know the employer of last (and often first, because there aren't any damned jobs) resort in my neck of the woods takes an awful lot of our young, and ships them off to bring truth to the words of the old bumper sticker:

      Join the [military]. Travel to distant lands, meet interesting people, and kill them.

      Thank you for this diary, Sis. Important stuff to reflect and work on as we get back to our daily lives after NN11. Something's got to give. For the young Black men. For the old white women. For every minority who knows all too well that the only thing worse than having a vagina when you're trying to get hired for a good paying job is having a brown skin. Something's got to give.

      Organ donors save multiple lives! A donor's kidney gave me my life back on 02/18/11; he lives on in me and in others. Please talk with your family about your wish to donate and sign up to give others the gift of life.

      by Kitsap River on Mon Jun 20, 2011 at 10:32:58 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I do love your words, Shanikka! (48+ / 0-)

      You ARE my favorite diarist in this community. Period.

      And, dammit all, I've been saying this--specifically about black Americans--on countless occasions, in numerous diaries, for a VERY long time.

      You left out one more demographic group with VERY high U.3 numbers: the 16-24 age group!

      There are, EASILY, 100,000,000 Americans living at or near poverty, and very much in an ECONOMIC DEPRESSION. (I've stated this in at least a half-dozen diaries in the past few weeks, alone!) For the other 200,000,000-plus, mostly white Americans to be prancing around even using the word, "Recovery," to describe our economy, is an outright freaking travesty and gross insult to the rest of us!

      When at least one-third of a society is living in an economic DEPRESSION, it is a DEPRESSION FOR THAT ENTIRE SOCIETY!

      (I have diaries going back 2-3 years ago, with this story WRIT LARGE, by the likes of noted economists such as Simon Johnson and Joseph Stiglitz, telling us about our two-track economic: one economy for the haves, another for the have-nots, taking shape before our very eyes.)

      I'm glad to see you using these words, however...

      ...Not even the Black people that supposedly represent us as politicians at the state and federal level...

      Why? Because it's the inconvenient TRUTH!

      In D.C., it's not about black or white; it's about the green (and I'm not talking about the environment)! The very WHITE, status quo money rules. Period.

      The demographic groups at the bottom of the economic ladder are getting crushed.

      To scream about these things is about as traditionally Democratic as it gets, dammit!

      (Then again, Ben Bernanke is a Republican. And, Tim Geithner is a Republican-turned-Independent. Go figure?!?!)

      "I always thought if you worked hard enough and tried hard enough, things would work out. I was wrong." --Katharine Graham

      by bobswern on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 12:19:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I remember having read numbers (14+ / 0-)

        for the age group of 18 to 30 year old male afro-americans being much higher than one in six, but don't remember anymore where. I believe it was in one of your diaires.

        And I would love to see these numbers again, because I still believe that Shannika's numbers are conservative. And it is so important to address that specific age group.

        :-(

      •  yup there are a lot of ...... (18+ / 0-)

        Inconvenient Truths out there.

        Like why the hell were US companies recruiting foreign teachers in 2008?

        Foreign teachers ease shortages at U.S. schools
                     
        BAY MINETTE, Alabama — The school system in coastal Baldwin County was short on teachers, especially in courses like math and science.

        So short, in fact, that district officials went around the world last year, with expenses paid by a teacher recruiting company, and brought back Michel Olalo and 11 other Filipinos.

        That raised some eyebrows in Baldwin County. Nine out of 10 people here are white, just one in 50 is foreign-born, and, as the county's teacher recruiter, Tom Sisk, noted recently, "Many of our children will never travel outside the United States."

        Yet school administrators throughout the United States are plucking from an abundance of skilled international teachers, a burgeoning import that critics call shortsighted but educators here and abroad say meets the needs of students and qualified candidates.

        http://www.nytimes.com/...

        What the pols are doing or even what the pols are letting US companies do is not helping anyone who's already here and needs a job. This is just fucking insane.

      •  Could I just point out (11+ / 0-)

        that one of the REASONS some blacks may not prioritize "getting a better education" and girls may be having 'babies they can't afford" is because THEY SEE NO REALISTIC OPTIONS FOR THEMSELVES. I recall, for instance, seeing a study years ago that said the best way of preventing teenage girls from getting pregnant was giving them hope for a better future. In my upper-middle-class white school, NO girl got pregnant because they were all going to college and hoping to be teachers and marry a doctor or lawyer and have kids they could afford (earlier generation, sorry — I know now girls of my background are becoming  the doctors and lawyers). If a girl looks around and she sees no one gainfully employed, and her only shot at attaining "status" among her peers is having babies, well, why not? What else does she have to look forward to? And if girls AND boys see no examples in their neighborhoods of where an education can take them, and the drug dealer is the most affluent person around, well, what's the point of staying in school?

        To me, anyone who says "But they should just get a better education and stop having babies" is pulling that old request that people without shoes pull themselves up by their bootstraps.

        Jennifer Brunner for Governor of Ohio 2014

        by anastasia p on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:13:42 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  It's also one of the few paths out (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          worldlotus

          into the real world (aka, away from their parents) available to girls who grow up in poverty.

          It's pretty common for a teen to assume their life sucks because their parents suck, and thus it becomes easy for them to believe that the aid that enables them to get an apartment of their own will make their life suck less - even though there will be a baby in that new life. Kids who see other options for their futures are less likely to choose this particular option.

        •  No girls were pregnant? (0+ / 0-)

          or no girls delivered children?  

          I do agree with your larger point that those who have an incentive to gain from our society, will see the options.  Those who are in the group are are last hired and first fired or underemployed if the can find a job that doesn't have them commuting two hours each way on public transportation will make different decisions.  

          I for one am tired of pandering to perpetrators --- many of whom are opposed to any discussion however it comes. -- soothsayer99 DPK Caucus

          by princss6 on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:39:33 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Here's another inconvenient truth. (8+ / 0-)

        Politicians will act only when the MASSES push them.  

        What will it take?  I dunno.  Perhaps people are adjusting to the new paradigm of being part of the have-nots and have-nones.  

        That is exactly what the power elite wants.

        Lone voices or one or two brave pols will not get it anymore.  The same forces who have more influence over our institution of government also has the money, power and influence to stifle the few who dissent.

        But they cannot stifle the MASSES who dissent.

        Until Progressives understand that the options on the table are few, until the MASSES wake the fukk up... then...

        it continues.

        "The bottom line is, we've got to wake up. We can't allow our disappointment in Obama to lull us into allowing a truly dangerous strain of conservative philosophy to gain any more traction than it already has." --ObamOcala 4/5/11

        by smoothnmellow on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:26:54 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  We have to start getting crazier, and get less (5+ / 0-)

          shrill towards our own.  Unpredictable behavior puts fear into the hearts of the enemy.

          I notice that many recommends are given to the person who has a good answer, with hardly any given to the person who asks the right question. That is backwards to me; without that question, the good answer might never have come.

          by Nulwee on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:36:32 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  You (0+ / 0-)

            let these white folks talk you into getting shot if you want to lol

            What do you honestly think will happen to a group of black people 'crazily' demanding anything, as a group?

            This isn't a "Let my people go" moment, the world is changing.

            Peace Shopper- Saving more than pennies :-)

            by Maori on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 08:31:04 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Not crazier, just much more (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            cai, stargaze, princss6

            active and persistent.  It's time for the masses to go all in.

            "The bottom line is, we've got to wake up. We can't allow our disappointment in Obama to lull us into allowing a truly dangerous strain of conservative philosophy to gain any more traction than it already has." --ObamOcala 4/5/11

            by smoothnmellow on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 08:32:01 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  No, crazier. If they don't goddamn fear us, (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              princss6

              they won't start doing anything.

              I notice that many recommends are given to the person who has a good answer, with hardly any given to the person who asks the right question. That is backwards to me; without that question, the good answer might never have come.

              by Nulwee on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 10:21:36 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  They do fear us... (0+ / 0-)

                but they know we won't do anything.  We are too tied to our conveniences.  When we stop questing for what they use as leverage against us, nice cars, homes, etc. and live more practically, they will come a knocking.  We have the leverage but we fear using it.  A national strike?

                I for one am tired of pandering to perpetrators --- many of whom are opposed to any discussion however it comes. -- soothsayer99 DPK Caucus

                by princss6 on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:44:53 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

            •  I'm white (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              worldlotus

              I actively read what black/hispanic/first nations activists have to say because I figure they have a lot to teach me about tricks the racists-in-power will do & how to mitigate what bad's coming down, and how "reasonable' stuff is not at all reasonable (but I don't have the life experience to see the traps).

              There's too much "law & order!" fear mongering. The police & the government are mostly about protecting property. As the income gap keeps widening the police are going to be more & more enforcers of bad law.

              The boss needs you, you don't need him. -- France general strike, May 1968

              by stargaze on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 11:49:16 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  I don't think we have to get crazier... (0+ / 0-)

            I think we have to put our money where our moth is.  One example...who has moved their money out of corporate owned banks among us here?  Do we support institutions that use corporate owned funding?  There are things that we could do right now that would send a ripple wave to the higher ups.  Practical things.  Small federal credit unions would love to have our money and this is at the end of the day a very powerful tool.  

            I for one am tired of pandering to perpetrators --- many of whom are opposed to any discussion however it comes. -- soothsayer99 DPK Caucus

            by princss6 on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:42:36 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  Here's the link to that diary (11+ / 0-)

      I did on Pine Ridge Reservation's unemployment and suicide crisis.

      I notice that many recommends are given to the person who has a good answer, with hardly any given to the person who asks the right question. That is backwards to me; without that question, the good answer might never have come.

      by Nulwee on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:26:14 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  One in six? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cai, 3goldens

      That's just amongst those who in the labor force and/or actively searching for a job. For me, the most damning statistic is that the majority of black men in America do not have a full-time job.

    •  This diary is HINTING HINTING HINTING HINTING (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      princss6

      that the Dems and OBAMA is at fault for a lot of the pain of Black Unemployment...it's not as if Blacks hadn't been suffering before this President took over. I find it odd that all of a sudden there is such great, GREAT, outrage when blacks have been suffering for so many years. For example a study:

      in 2007 revealed that only 50 percent of Black men in New York City were employed and that, nationally, 72 percent of Black male high school dropouts were unemployed.

      Blaming Obama and Dems has an important outcome: Tamp down support for a Democratic sweep in 2012. We need to take over the Congress from the tea critters if we are going to do anything about continuing to improve the economy which the President has started even through obstructionist Republican policies.... This diarist is laying the blame at the President and Dems, and to me, it is quite clear what his/her objective really is....

      •  I have to respond to this. (0+ / 0-)

        NedSparks, I really think you're not understanding what shanikka, the diarist here, is saying.  You are making assumptions (based, perhaps, on your own desire to defend the President) that simply aren't there.

        This diary is a cry from her own heart about the joblessness within the Black and Native American communities.  This situation is a horrific injustice that we all need to be reminded about and that we need to become better and stronger activists for solving.  The situation she highlights is a great wrong.  It should not be tolerated as it has been far too often in this country.  And she IS right dead-on with pointing out that it has been a very, very long time since we've heard a single word about tackling this problem head on and making a concerted effort to FIX it.  It is a disgraceful scar on this country that the Black and Native American members of our populace are being ignored, marginalized, and over-looked.  There was a time when at least this country tried to do something via job-training programs, incentives to businesses to hire and train those who were looking for employment, and community colleges were the vehicles to at least act as education centers to help provide guidance and coursework for entry-level jobs in given areas.  There is a great void in this effort right now and she is correct in pointing that out.

        There are a lot of great voices on this blog, and shanikka's is one of those.  LISTEN to her and her message.  She knows whereof she speaks and as the mother of a young Black man who can't find employment, she is speaking truth that we ALL should hear and respond to.

        Objecting to our governor’s policies does not make a citizen of Wisconsin a criminal. Not yet, anyway. ~ nelangst

        by 3goldens on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 12:03:07 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Let's take your defense of the diary through this (0+ / 0-)

          reminiscent thought:

          There was a time when at least this country tried to do something via job-training programs, incentives to businesses to hire and train those who were looking for employment, and community colleges were the vehicles to at least act as education centers to help provide guidance and coursework for entry-level jobs in given areas.  There is a great void in this effort right now and she is correct in pointing that out.

          This is a valid point, the only issue here is that even in his 2012 budget, the President earmarked funding for some of these very same bygone policies, which I also posted downthread:

          The Budget proposes a series of coordinated investments around four key objectives: creating jobs and enhancing economic competitiveness, building 21st century infrastructure, making our
          communities stronger, and educating and training our workforce. Specifically, the Budget proposes making the following investments:

          Support Business Growth and Lending in Low-Income and Minority Communities. Even in this constrained budget environment, the Administration continues to support robust funding for programs that improve the availability of credit in underserved and lower-income
          communities, and includes initiatives that target financial literacy and increase the availability of healthy foods in areas now lacking them.  For example, the Budget provides $227 million for the Treasury Department’s Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) Fund, which provides capital to low-income communities across the Nation and is targeting a portion of its
          funds to help bring grocery stores and other healthy food retailers to underserved urban communities.

          To help entrepreneurs start businesses and create jobs in inner cities, the Budget also includes $13 million to continue the Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Emerging Leaders (formerly Emerging 200) initiative. The Budget also funds several initiatives designed
          to promote entrepreneurship in underserved areas including the Small Loan Advantage and Community Advantage programs and the Impact Fund within the Small Business Investment Company (SBIC) Impact Fund debenture program, which will support impact investments that target residents of economically distressed regions or owned by a socially or economically disadvantaged group.

          Provide Small Business Access to Credit and Technical Assistance. The Administration is taking a series of steps to improve the access to capital for small businesses. First, the Budget supports $16.5 billion in 7(a) loan guarantees, which will help small businesses operate and expand. This includes an estimated $14.5 billion in term loans and $2 billion in revolving lines of credit; the latter are expected to support $48 billion in total economic activity through draws and repayments over the life of the guarantee. The Administration also supports $7.5 billion in guaranteed lending for commercial real estate development and heavy machinery purchases; $3 billion in SBIC debentures to support new businesses and new jobs through early-stage and mezzanine small business financing; and $25 million in direct microloans, for intermediaries to
          provide small loans to emerging entrepreneurs and other borrowers unable to receive credit elsewhere.

          Modernize Urban Mass Transit. In order to spur job creation and lay a foundation for future
          economic growth through greater and safer transportation choices for Americans and increased
          business development in communities, the Budget proposes an additional upfront boost of $50
          billion in transportation infrastructure investment, as part of its 6-year proposal for surface transportation reauthorization. More than 20 percent of this funding will go to supplement urban mass transit programs, traditionally funded by surface transportation authorization legislation.

          Consistent with the Administration’s commitment to mass transit, the Budget 3 includes increases in several Department of Transportation (DOT) grant programs dedicated to mass transit investment, including Transit Formula Grants, Bus and Rail State of Good Repair
          Grants, Transit New Starts Capital Grants, and Greenhouse Gas/Energy Reduction Grants.  These investments will increase transportation options, cut commuting time, ease congestion, reduce oil consumption, lower greenhouse gas emissions, and expand access to job opportunities and housing that’s affordable. In addition, the Administration’s reauthorization proposal will adopt a ―Fix-It-First‖ approach, to emphasize the importance of preserving and improving the condition of existing transportation infrastructure.

          Establish a National Infrastructure Bank. The Budget provides $30 billion over six years to
          fund a National Infrastructure Bank (I-Bank) which will invest in those projects nationwide that
          have the most significant impact on our national and regional economies.  For example, a
          project to improve road and rail access to a West Coast port would not only improve West
          Coast shipping capacity, but also improve market access for farmers in the Midwest. A cornerstone of the I-Bank’s approach will be a rigorous project comparison method that transparently measures which projects offer the greatest return on investment to taxpayers and
          our economy. Eligible applicants will include States, localities, transportation agencies, and private entities.

          Expand Access to Rail.  The Budget proposes to invest $53 billion over six years in passenger
          rail, from a new dedicated rail account of the expanded Transportation Trust Fund.  This program will provide competitive grants to fund the development of a robust intercity passenger rail network comprised of core express (over 125 mph), regional (90 to 125), and
          emerging (up to 90 mph) corridors. These investments will support the President’s goal of providing 80 percent of Americans with convenient access to a passenger rail system within 25 years.

          The Budget also proposes to merge Federal support for Amtrak into the larger rail
          program, so that the Federal government takes a coordinated approach to rail issues. Improve the Condition of Key Highways.  The Budget includes $69.9 billion in 2012 (an increase of 70 percent from 2010 levels) and $336 billion over six years (an increase of 48 percent over SAFETEA-LU) for the Federal Highway Administration. The proposal includes a new
          livability grant program ($4.1 billion in 2012 and $28 billion over six years) for projects like
          multi-modal transportation hubs (where different forms of transportation converge) and streets
          that accommodate pedestrian, bicycle and transit access.

          We are going through some rough times, but this is not because the President isn't in there trying his best to address this issue. This diary hints that the President and Democrats are the problem.... It is false and it is an anti-Obama vehicle.

      •  You're Full of It (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        slatsg

        I don't "blame the President" for anything that the President is responsible for and when I do, I say so.  I definitely don't HINT.  You made a claim about me having "definite antipathy" towards President Obama and then when asked to back it up or own it, you posted a lengthy irrelevancy about the 2012 budget.  A fine deflection, but one that highlights that you're defensive on behalf of the President and as a result talking out of your ass trying to delegitimize what I am saying in this diary.

        The amazing thing is that I believe that President Obama himself would reject your approach to dealing with folks viewing his record.  He's less defensive and himself has said that we are to hold his feet to the fire.

        If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

        by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 01:41:09 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Look your diary mischaracterizes the President's (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          BarackStarObama

          plan on jobs as just having black folk put away their nintendo.... You are deliberately trying to paint a portrait of Barack Obama as uncaring about jobs in the black community.  In the past you have made the suggestion that the President was lying when he said he gave up a career on Wall Street to become a community organizer. Is this not so? You have an issue with this President and it is echoed loudly and clearly in your diary. By the way my post on the President's budget you say is irrelevant, of course it's irrelevant, it counters your portrait of Barack Obama. Let's not play fair....

          •  I Didn't (0+ / 0-)

            Say anything at all about the President's plan on jobs.  Or his budget.  And as far as the "put down the Nintendo" line goes, he's said it on SPEECHES, regularly, when talking to folks.  Look the damned line up yourself if you don't believe me.  

            I also didn't call the President a liar.  I pushed back on someone else's conclusion that his resume would have led to a successful career on Wall Street, and I definitely pushed back against the asserted chronology of events by the person making the claim, and I stand by that.  Because those are things that someone who chose to disbelieve anything I said could confirm independently of anything I said, including by beginning with President Obama's resume (which is public.)

            As I said, if I want to say something, I say it.  Directly.  I believe I've been clear about President Obama, how I feel about him, how I feel about his policies, and the complexities and nuances of each.  I am so sorry you can't grok that.

            But I strongly recommend that you either learn how to read and research or stop debating on the internet.  It just makes you look ignorant.  And our President deserves better defenders than the ignorant.

            If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

            by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:34:34 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  "I pushed back that his resume would have led him (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              BarackStarObama

              to have a successful career on Wall Street." The President has said he turned down a career on Wall Street to work within the Black community in Chicago and you "pushed back" at the President for saying that.... He is smart enough, he graduated Magna Cum Laude from Harvard Law School and yet you just "pushed back" that he could have had a sucessful career on Wall Street.... You call me ignorant and yet you seem to think one has to Graduate with some specialized degree to work on Wall Street, I live in Brooklyn, New York and, yes, have worked on Wall Street. And I can tell you, I am not half as brilliant as this President.... By the way, there are also lawyers working on Wall Street. But, sure, I'm ignorant.... I have stated all I needed to say here...I have nothing more to add to your diary....

              •  As I Said (0+ / 0-)

                The truth of what I said, and the reasons I conclude as I do, are all readily findable for those who would rather learn than argue.  I don't care if you don't like that.  But we don't have to agree.

                BTW, nothing I have ever said has anything to do with the intelligence that President Obama has.  I believe he is a brilliant man.  And have said so repeatedly on this blog.  Once again, you can't read.  Or you just read what you want to because you're fighting a battle on behalf of someone else with your own projected shadows of fear (but doing so in a way that I personally believe would embarass that very person) rather than an objective eye about what I have, and haven't written.

                We can agree to disagree since I agree we've both made our point.

                If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

                by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:33:43 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

      •  What I fear... (0+ / 0-)

        two things...there is less recognition that black elected officials are still working in a white supremacist society.  

        Second, the real actors in white supremacy will be so relieved to absolve themselves of their duty to work on ridding this country of white supremacy.  

        Black elected officials can't do it.  I've not read all the comments so I don't know if shanikka addresses this so I'll wait to see.

        I for one am tired of pandering to perpetrators --- many of whom are opposed to any discussion however it comes. -- soothsayer99 DPK Caucus

        by princss6 on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:50:00 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I'm starting to hear statements on business (10+ / 0-)

      channels like CNBC from executives that there are jobs available, but the jobless do not have the tools for the jobs.

      That many manufacturing jobs today require good math and other skills to run the new sophisticated, computerized equipment. It's not just turning a screw driver or wrench anymore.

      They're of course blaming the educational system and the inability of many to get to work on time and stick to the job for longer then it takes to get their first paycheck. Absenteeism is also something they  point to.

      I don't know how true this is. However this is the meme that's being spread.

      Progressives will win when we convince a majority that they, too, are Progressive.

      by auapplemac on Mon Jun 20, 2011 at 11:30:21 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  with single moms it is a truth (14+ / 0-)

        Now I'm mad.

        "Abenteeism" is pure code for something else, since there has been so much work done to outsource jobs by telecomuting from other countries. Imagine having somebody who can check on things remotely AND come in to be physically present too! Jobs need to be monitored 24/7 and families do also. Everyone is constantly trying to shuffle the two together via cell phones and the internet! It is management that is too old and ossified to learn how to integrate into modern life.

        In a democracy, everyone is a politician. ~ Ehren Watada

        by Lefty Mama on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 12:07:49 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  How many times will laid off people be told (19+ / 0-)

        to go back to school, before someone admits that they can't keep up, and the jobs won't be there if they do?  Or last very long, if they get them?

        •  So what is the answer? Not to develop new (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Nulwee, Utahrd

          equipment? Not to create new computers and systems?

          That's ludite thinking. What did the buggy whip makers do when there were no more buggies? What have people done when MS or Apple makes drastic changes to their operating systems?

          You have to adapt. You have to grow. I've used graphic design software since the first WSYSIWYG software. Each upgrade forced me to learn the tricks the new pony could do. After a learning curve, the new features usually made my job easier and made me more productive.

          I could create more advanced designs in a shorter period of time for more clients. That meant more dollars in my pocket.

          I'm not a company. I'm just me - a "lone wolf.'

          Progressives will win when we convince a majority that they, too, are Progressive.

          by auapplemac on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 02:45:37 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  However, the Luddites had a legitimate (17+ / 0-)

            point; working people are disemployed by the introduction of technology ... this was obvious back in the 19th century. The problem is not technology though, it is who owns the technology and why it is employed. Technology is owned and utilised by those that employ it to cut costs and increase output, in the hopes of achieving a higher profit upon sale of goods.

            There are things that can be done. Subsidise "non-competitive industries" to keep people employed, encourage workers to purchase companies going under and provide them capital (at least on loan from the government) to keep going,  direct and indirect government investment to create employment opportunities, government job creation. Since we know that permanent and persistent unemployment are part and parcel of the system, ensure that all citizens and residents have access to a guaranteed income.

            The capitalist system means that the needs of the people come secondary to the needs to the system for profit generation; if we are going to live in this system then at least cover those victims of the system.

            "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

            by NY brit expat on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 03:27:34 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Part of the issue is the loss of unions (5+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              tardis10, shanikka, Odysseus, cai, worldlotus

              technology has indeed increased productivity.  However, without bargaining power, vast swaths of salaried Americans work 50-60 hours a week without batting an eye or getting overtime pay. Thus it looks like productivity increases that are really only a facade.

              Americans have done it to themselves by electing an accepting the demagoguery of unions by the propoganda machine.  I don't totally blame citizens because the propaganda was strong since the 70s.  More than anything, I blame complacency of the Democratic party and labor unions for not being capable of devising a counter strategy with the last 40 years.

              "Senator McCain offered up the oldest Washington stunt in the book - you pass the buck to a commission to study the problem." - Senator Obama, 9-16-2008

              by justmy2 on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 04:37:29 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  I'm with Malcolm and taking care of business (0+ / 0-)

                within the black community.  With coops, where you share the resources of several people , people can create their own jobs and not wait for the government to subsidize them (though if they can get the subsidy, no sense turning it down.

                And I'm not talking only about idealitistic food coops. There is house weatherizing, laundries, the bean pie industry, etc. Also, at least one union (Steelworkers) has made a deal with the Mondragon coops that started in Spain to open a very few union coops here that are part of Mondragon.  In the Mondragon coops, boos make 4 times as much as workers (instead of 400 times as much), workers own shares in the coop, elect their own bosses, etc.

                Main problem is Americans have so long thought individualistically, its hard to change gears and get people working together. Some coops are getting more and more popular.  We now have more coop members than union members.

            •  Let's subsidize up-and-coming, entrepreneurial (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Odysseus

              industries (GREEEEEEEEN), instead of industries that aren't competitive and don't make something people want, just so we can "keep people employed." I'd rather just send them a check and open up casinos than uphold failing industries.

          •  It's not being Luddite to notice that the (0+ / 0-)

            "new technology" workers retrain is likely to be outsourced to India.  (I am not blaming India or Indians for that, btw.)

          •  The problem is that (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            princss6

            everyone is not able to do what people like you and I do.

            I have been a UNIX Engineer for 15 years. I have taken no classes; my college computing course work centered around big iron mainframes and the languages and JCL used to program and operate them. Everything I have learned about UNIX, Linux, Open source web and app servers, fibrechannel storage, volume managers, load balancers etc has been because I, like you, took a book and learned it or when asked if I could configure and deploy a new OS or application my answer was always 'yes' even if I'd never seen it before.

            Over that time I have found that changing computing paradigms wait for no man... and plenty of very competent and very able programmers and engineers have found themselves left by the wayside because they are not able to grasp new software and new technology without having formal instruction.

            Fear doesn't just breed incomprehension. It also breeds a spiteful, resentful hate of anyone and everyone who is in any way different from you.

            by awesumtenor on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 09:55:02 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  The reason I actually never supported Hillary (8+ / 0-)

          Maybe it was quirky, but when I went to a forum in June 2007 and she was pushing retraining and more education and then started citing examples of enormously trained, very highly specialized people she had met whose jobs went overseas who could not possibly have retrained for a similar job in a reasonable length of time at a reasonable cost and continued to support their families (the one I recall in particular was a radiologist who had lost his job because, she said, they could read X-rays and do diagnosis overseas around the clock and cheaper). And then all of a sudden she kind of stopped and veered into another subject as if she realized she wasn't realistically talking about people with retraining potential but an outsourcing issue.

          Jennifer Brunner for Governor of Ohio 2014

          by anastasia p on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:24:45 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  For me it was her willingness to showboat (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Futuristic Dreamer, Odysseus, Matt Z, zett

            on violent video games and other completely phony crisis.  When in doubt, blame young people. It'll get the votes of the cynical segment of older Americans, and older Americans do vote.

            I notice that many recommends are given to the person who has a good answer, with hardly any given to the person who asks the right question. That is backwards to me; without that question, the good answer might never have come.

            by Nulwee on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:38:18 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  crises* (0+ / 0-)

              I notice that many recommends are given to the person who has a good answer, with hardly any given to the person who asks the right question. That is backwards to me; without that question, the good answer might never have come.

              by Nulwee on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:38:38 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  Not buying it without specific (11+ / 0-)

        factories and jobs being cited.

        "George RR Martin is not your bitch" ~~ Neil Gaiman

        by tardis10 on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 03:03:29 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Me either. That shit was ridiculously racist (17+ / 0-)

          on its face.  Anecdotal at best.  No way is there reliable data showing that people not showing up on time for work is the reason for massive unemployment.

          “Do not think that I came to bring peace on Earth; I did not come to bring peace, but a sword. For I came to set a man against his father, and a daughter against her mother, and a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law." - Jesus

          by Jose Bidenio on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 04:26:16 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Well It Feeds the Neoliberal Free Trade Meme That (5+ / 0-)

            for developed countries like the US, unskilled work must leave while the skilled jobs are what will employ everyone.

            The  US is a marching band that will have 100 Drum Majors, while the audience will be streaming the rest of the music online as we march past.

            We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

            by Gooserock on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 04:49:54 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  But the Truth is that (14+ / 0-)

              The skilled labor is leaving, too.  As much of it as can possibly be done.

              There was a fucked up story in the New York Times a few weeks ago that lent further evidence to the idea that the entire end game was to permanently re-stratify this country economically, with the vast majority permanently wage-enslaved.  Those in the legal business know that, with the blessing of the American Bar Association, a significant amount of entry-level legal work normally done by 1st and 2nd year lawyers at commercial law firms was offshored on the grounds that it was just as good and cheaper for the clients.  Well, according to this article, the same outsourcing companies that were shipping off entry level legal work to India are now bringing jobs back to America:

              They are going to employment depressed towns where the expected wages are a fraction of what commercial lawyers will earn and hiring all those young lawyers laid off in the past few years as well as all those young lawyers who have graduated with no jobs in site - and paying them pennyante wages (compared to what their resumes and backgrounds would require at a mainstream firm.)

              Once hired, these offshoring companies are then re-selling these lawyers' work to the same commercial law firms that laid some of these people off - and making a profit.

              But will the firms hire these folks directly? Hell no.  There are few ways to kill a legal career dead but being a temp lawyer is one of those ways.  These lawyers are no longer "good enough."  They are no longer "the best and the brightest."

              Even though, of course they are still doing the work........just through the legal sector's equivalent of Kelly Services or Manpower.

              If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

              by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:11:52 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Do you have a link? I'm asking because (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Nulwee, shanikka, worldlotus

                I just don't trust what the NYT prints these days. And I'm very skeptical about anything "legal" being outsourced to places like India or China.

                I mean, how on earth can they look up source material for cases when the majority of the references are located in law libraries within the Unitied States? Maybe the article is referring to firms dealing in International Law?

                Still, I just can't see firms outsourcing, business, domestic/family, civil, criminal, patent, contract, tax law, etc. under any circumstances to save a few pennies.

                I'm a woman of color, who grew up in the north (Detroit, Michigan)

                by Boris Badenov on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:38:49 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  Damn. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                shanikka

                That's just fukked up.

                We are becoming a slave nation.  Flat out.

                "The bottom line is, we've got to wake up. We can't allow our disappointment in Obama to lull us into allowing a truly dangerous strain of conservative philosophy to gain any more traction than it already has." --ObamOcala 4/5/11

                by smoothnmellow on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 08:36:37 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  Did temp work and survived, but . . . (5+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Deoliver47, shanikka, zett, cai, worldlotus

                it was, as you say, always a black mark on my resume.  Had to do it, though, because it was all that was available to me during the recession of the early 90s.  So while I wasn't officially an associate at the firm where I worked, I went out and took depositions, drafted discovery, researched and wrote motions and memoranda, and basically performed all the work you'd expect from an associate.  

                Except I wasn't one.  I got paid far less, had no benefits, and when they let me go, I got no unemployment benefits because technically, I had been "self-employed."  (The local department of employment services later got wise to that scam, but it was too late for me.)  I also had to pay the full Medicare and Social Security taxes on my own with no employer contribution.  

                I know a couple of lawyers stuck doing that kind of work right now.  It just goes to show that having an advanced degree is no guarantee of stable employment.

                "Ça c'est une chanson que j'aurais vraiment aimé ne pas avoir écrite." -- Barbara

                by FogCityJohn on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 09:52:02 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

          •  But Nonetheless (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Nulwee, soothsayer99, Deoliver47

            If you go by comments made in response to those types of articles, folks would rather believe that than the truth......

            If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

            by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:12:31 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  Agree (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          tardis10, Nulwee

          Show me the data.

          "My father always told me that all businessmen were sons of bitches, but I never believed it until now." - JFK during the 1962 Steel Crisis

          by Betty Pinson on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:18:02 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Are you from Texas? (0+ / 0-)

        “Do not think that I came to bring peace on Earth; I did not come to bring peace, but a sword. For I came to set a man against his father, and a daughter against her mother, and a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law." - Jesus

        by Jose Bidenio on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 04:22:18 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Maybe they should pay some taxes so public (8+ / 0-)

        education doesn't have to cost what private universities cost two decades ago.  12k-20k a year for public universities seems crazy to men.

        "Senator McCain offered up the oldest Washington stunt in the book - you pass the buck to a commission to study the problem." - Senator Obama, 9-16-2008

        by justmy2 on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 04:28:20 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  and of course (5+ / 0-)

        THEY have no responsibility to provide the training needed!

        Loyalty to petrified opinion never yet broke a chain or freed a human soul in this world--and never will. Mark Twain

        by whoknu on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 05:30:38 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  That's BS from execs on CNBC (11+ / 0-)

        they mean they can't find people with the right skill set at the wages they wish to pay.

        You offer enough money you can fill any job in America.

        "Don't fall or we both go." Derek Hersey 1957-1993

        by ban nock on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:06:27 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Exactly! (7+ / 0-)

          You can pay a person to do anything, but you can't always get a person to do a given job for whatever low wage you wish to offer.

          If they're complaining that they can't attract qualified employees, what they're really doing is confessing that they do not pay enough. Period.

          "As the madmen play on words, and make us all dance to their song / to the tune of starving millions, to make a better kind of gun..." -- Iron Maiden

          by Lost Left Coaster on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:47:26 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  More phony excuses (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        sethtriggs, shanikka, cai

        Again, we should be holding the news media and political leaders to a higher standard by asking them to verifying these claims.

        Most Americans today know how to operate their laptop computer, iphones, etc.  There's no way there are large numbers of unskilled workers who don't know basic math or have the skills to use computerized equipment.

        That may have been the case 15 or 20 years go, not today.

        "My father always told me that all businessmen were sons of bitches, but I never believed it until now." - JFK during the 1962 Steel Crisis

        by Betty Pinson on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:16:57 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Why not today? Look at some of the kids (0+ / 0-)

          graduating from high school who can hardly read. What kind of decent job can they get. How about the dropouts?

          There are people who are functionally illiterate. At one time they could get a factory job, or in the mines but hardly likely today. Especially with factory jobs on the decline.

          Progressives will win when we convince a majority that they, too, are Progressive.

          by auapplemac on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:10:15 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  It's largely false (8+ / 0-)

        It's a way of dismissing the problem. I have heard that the number of "unfilled" jobs is anywhere from 250,000 to three million. We need something like 14 million jobs just to get back on solid footing; we probably need double that to get the economy back in gear.

        But are some of those "unfilled" jobs the result of being in places people can't get to or employers unwilling to pay for the skills? I don't know. And sure, there are problems with absenteeism and work ethic (among college-educated white kids too), but that is a different problem.

        This is more blame-the-victim shit. Unfortunately, a huge swath of jobs in the middle have vanished. So you have low-paying, dead-end service jobs and jobs requiring high levels of specialized technical skills and training that many don't have the talent or access for.

        Jennifer Brunner for Governor of Ohio 2014

        by anastasia p on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:17:46 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  "employers unwilling to pay for the skills?" (6+ / 0-)

          THIS.  My mom was laid off back in Feb 2009, got a new job with the state in Jun 2009 and received a huge raise the next year.  Now her old job that laid her off in 2009 is calling, wanting her to come back in an engineering position, but they are offering peanuts for that type of work, so she said hell no.

          Everyone wants a college educated 3.90+ GPA to work for $12 an hour and it just isn't going to happen.  Until they offer competitive salaries those jobs are going to sit vacant because employees KNOW their worth and know that for all the hard work they put in during their schooling they are not going to settle for chump change.  Seriously, an electrical engineer making $25k a year is a joke.

    •  Nobody does it better! And here she is... (12+ / 0-)

      Photobucket

      What if the hokey pokey is what it's all about?

      by Julie Gulden on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:52:04 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Thank You (5+ / 0-)

      That's kind of you to say.

      If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

      by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:14:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Excellent diary, as usual. Thanks. (26+ / 0-)

    "Such is the irresistible nature of truth that all it asks, and all it wants, is the liberty of appearing." - Thomas Paine

    by blueoregon on Mon Jun 20, 2011 at 10:12:44 PM PDT

  •  Thank you my sister (57+ / 0-)
    I do need to add one thing, because it's very important.

    There is indeed one group who deserves more attention than we do, by name, because they have it worse than we do and have for a very long time:

    Native Americans.

    The invisible, born of this land throughout, Americans.  

    Yet the unemployment situation with Native Americans has been rendered even more invisible than ours, where the adult unemployment rates in some reservations well exceeds 50 or 75%.  Indeed, the collective unemployment situation of Native Americans makes the disgrace of a 16.2% unemployment rate for Black Americans look positively luxurious.

    Funny, isn't it, how the unique needs of the two groups ever legally enslaved in this country for any meaningful period of time somehow are the last folks our own allies usually bother to even mention publicly when it comes to discussing how to best solve our political problems?

    I appreciate this so much.

    While I was reading I was formulating my comment which
    I didn't need to write since you closed with what I block quoted above.

    I'm finally home here back in the Bay Area.  Can you believe how hot it is?

    It was so great to see you at NN11.  I loved having you at our tables and the terrific dinner and breakfast time will always be memorable. Lots of facetime with you.  Love it.

  •  I expected exactly that when progressives (36+ / 0-)

    continue to undermine and tar Democrats and our Democratic President non stop and hand over the House to Republicans in 2010...of course to "teach Obama a lesson".  

    Instead of building on the progress we have made and electing more and better Democrats, vocal progressives are still on a mission to continue to tar Democrats and this Administration so that we can hand the Senate and White House to Rethugs. Well, wait until that happens and you will see Black unemployment will be 1 in 4 or 1 in 3.  Which is all a path to the moderner day enslavement pipeline ALEC and them racists are designing.

    I am darn angry of what the Republicans are doing to reverse progress. We need to work hard to register more folks to vote and get them out to vote to retake the house and build on the progress we had made in the first two years. We need to own the agenda by keeping the majority in all chambers. That is the path to how we will solve the economic and unemployment issues we see today.

    A reminder...

    ...We have many more issues that bind us together than separate us!

    by ThisIsMyTime on Mon Jun 20, 2011 at 10:35:49 PM PDT

    •  Exactly! (21+ / 0-)
      I am darn angry of what the Republicans are doing to reverse progress. We need to work hard to register more folks to vote and get them out to vote to retake the house and build on the progress we had made in the first two years. We need to own the agenda by keeping the majority in all chambers. That is the path to how we will solve the economic and unemployment issues we see today.

      I can only agree with this as it is much more succinct and to the point than anything I might have said. The only people in this country with an unemployment problem should be Republican politicians, and I'd like to see as many of those unemployed as we can possibly manage.

      Organ donors save multiple lives! A donor's kidney gave me my life back on 02/18/11; he lives on in me and in others. Please talk with your family about your wish to donate and sign up to give others the gift of life.

      by Kitsap River on Mon Jun 20, 2011 at 10:47:55 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  That's always a good chart to show... (45+ / 0-)

      ...but it should be accompanied with another to show the continuing pain Americans are suffering in the aftermath of a recession that was "officially" over two years ago this month.

      This chart:

      That shows the number of underemployed workers, including those unemployed, part-time for economic reasons (that is, they want and need a full-time job), and marginally attached, 1994 - 2011.

      Don't tell me what you believe. Tell me what you do and I'll tell you what you believe.

      by Meteor Blades on Mon Jun 20, 2011 at 10:55:20 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Bullshit (7+ / 0-)

      You're either delusional or just plain fulla dem/BO crap.
      The dems controlled the Senate since 2007. They controlled all three branches for a few years. They still control the white house and senate. They have done absolutely jack shit. Nothing. NADA!
      I am as sick of their bullshit excuses as I am hearing and reading it from the apologist!
      There are no god damn progressives in congress, none. I don't wanna hear about kucinich. When it came time to put his money where his mouth was, HE FAILED. Remember all the bulshit (though correct) about how obamacare sucked. He then turns around and votes for it anyway. They are all fulla shit.

      Don't call any of these god damn dems liberals or progressives. They are at best useless but most likely represent the touchy feely wing of the repub party.

      We don't have to prove anything to these corrupt bastards. It's on them to show why they should earn our vote, PERIOD!

      And if you wanna change things, calling, writing, etc means nothing to this gang of dems. Vote for someone else in a different party without fear. Unless you've got megabucks to corrupt them, your only power is the vote.

      At this point though they can all go to hell!

      •  Remembeer when Puffy said vote or die (12+ / 0-)

        This time it's for real.  I want to prove to my nephews and little cousins that the ballot works better than the bullet. What our alternative, Palin? This is the one thing that Malcolm said that I want to prove wrong. It shouldn't have to come down to the bullet or the ballot.

        Think...It ain't illegal yet ! George Clinton

        by kid funkadelic on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 01:34:36 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Stop being a scaredy cat (0+ / 0-)

          These punk ass dems are counting on their voter being afraid of repugs when they are repugs themselves.

          Look, vote Green or Peace & Freedom or Socialist.
          Unless you are willing to show you don't give a damn about them and the risk, they sure as hell will continue to not give a damn about you or the average american.

          •  Not.very.helpful.here. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            doroma, ThisIsMyTime

            "The bottom line is, we've got to wake up. We can't allow our disappointment in Obama to lull us into allowing a truly dangerous strain of conservative philosophy to gain any more traction than it already has." --ObamOcala 4/5/11

            by smoothnmellow on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 08:42:26 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  You probably never heard of the Koch brothers (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ThisIsMyTime, worldlotus, princss6

            You didn't see the guns they brought to the President rallies. You probably didn't see the signs calling for the deaths of his family on live TV.

            They only treated HIS ass like that. The Unions in Ohio are behind him. the people of Ohio aare behind him. My state legislature are making laws TO GO AFTER MY VOTE. The Republicans already took my vote away in 2004.  Learn what you're talking about.

            "As long as they're trying to kill him, I support him."

                                                                     Ismael Reed , Author

            Think...It ain't illegal yet ! George Clinton

            by kid funkadelic on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 11:29:03 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  I have my doubts about voting vs direct action (0+ / 0-)

          Early 20th century (& currently in many nations and probably with undocumented farm workers) the way the owners stopped labor organizing was a lot of extra-legal intimidation with large dose of killing.

          I love it when, for instance, enough housing activists show up that the auction of the foreclosed house doesn't happen and the Sheriff (pushed by the mass action) turns to the bank and says "you prove you own this house before I help you."

          The boss needs you, you don't need him. -- France general strike, May 1968

          by stargaze on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 12:28:34 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  The idea that there are no good progressives (8+ / 0-)

        in congress is a about as much of a lie as anyone could muster without their pants indeed bursting into flames.  

        Don't fucking fool yourself into thinking that progressivism is the answer, jobs are the answer.

        Congress people are lazy, even the progressive ones.

        Who shot ya? Seperate the weak from the ob-solete Hard to creep them Brooklyn streets It's on ____, f**k all that bickering beef I can hear sweat trickling down your cheek

        by mim5677 on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 02:45:51 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Soo, Exactly WHO are these Good Progs (0+ / 0-)

          progressives in Congress?

          Tester? HAH HAH HAH HAH HAH HAHHHH!!!

          that's a good one.

          Sanders, Kucinich, Udalls, Franken.

          WHO else??

          "I don't feel the change yet". Velma Hart

          by Superpole on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 05:51:10 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  You don't get to define that. (5+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Nulwee, Ana Thema, shanikka, doroma, princss6

            don't you get it?  You don't get to define a good progressive based on your specific guidelines and it doesn't even matter in the end.  Progressivism, a political agenda is not the answer.

            I'll ask you too.  How many black or unemployed people have you hired in the past 20 years?

            Seriously, how many? If that is the defenition of a good progressive then I probably rank among the top and there is a long list of people that would disagree with that.  

            Jobs is the answer, hiring people is the answer, not a political party.

            Who shot ya? Seperate the weak from the ob-solete Hard to creep them Brooklyn streets It's on ____, f**k all that bickering beef I can hear sweat trickling down your cheek

            by mim5677 on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 05:56:23 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  WRONG-O!! (0+ / 0-)

              Uhhhh, it's not me tying job creation to what makes a good progressive democrat-- that's you doing that.

              we've got at least a DOZEN crucial issues that need immediate congressional attention and results; job creation is merely one of those issues. Clean air legislation would be another.

              I'm speaking to the point the one person was implying; that there are many progressive democrats in congress-- if that is so, I'd like to know who they are.

              "I don't feel the change yet". Velma Hart

              by Superpole on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 10:38:23 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

        •  We judge people by their deeds, not by their words (0+ / 0-)

          So a "lazy" progressive who does nothing to further the progressive cause is just as good as a "lazy" conservative who does nothing to advance the conservative agenda, which is to say that they are basically the same. They are neither liberal, nor conservative, but rather just "lazy."

          But don't forget that most men without property would rather protect the possibility of becoming rich, than face the reality of being poor. (1776)

          by banjolele on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 05:53:58 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  whatever (0+ / 0-)

            we judge people by all kinds of things, including their words.

            Who shot ya? Seperate the weak from the ob-solete Hard to creep them Brooklyn streets It's on ____, f**k all that bickering beef I can hear sweat trickling down your cheek

            by mim5677 on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 05:57:43 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  I stand by what I said (0+ / 0-)

          There are ZERO liberals or Progressives in congress. Talk doesn't impress me. Actions do. People can talk bullshit all day long. It's their heartfell actions that show who they truly are. I've seen the actions of these people in congress. There are no liberals there!

      •  Sigh (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shanikka, smoothnmellow, Nulwee, cai

        The problem is that people keep thinking politicians are heroes because they smile and look good on a poster.

        Unfortunately, politicians are, first, politicians. If people remembered that we would be a little more on top of them.

        We used to be. All you have to do is download the pdf of a newspaper from the 1860's to 1950's to see the difference in the way politics are covered and discussed.

        Now we don't really watch what they do at work anymore; we're too obsessed with their personal behavior and scandals.

        Unfortunately anyone likely to run for president will be a politico-

        •  Some really think that elected Alan Grayson (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Ana Thema, bruddaone

          and Dennis Kucinich and the other token couple of "vocal", loud progressives is going to accomplish anything. There's hundreds and hundreds of congressional seats, but good luck with that one.

          I notice that many recommends are given to the person who has a good answer, with hardly any given to the person who asks the right question. That is backwards to me; without that question, the good answer might never have come.

          by Nulwee on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:46:50 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Trolls like you have a fucking platform spewing (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Ana Thema

        their shit in this community. It is sad you are still allowed to stay in this community UID 6580 who sounds like a covert RW troll who just found his/her voice as if s/he cares.

        7 years as a member and 1100 comments says much about your commitment in this community.

        Thank you for your drive by comment. I am sure it has impressed a lot of folks.

        ...We have many more issues that bind us together than separate us!

        by ThisIsMyTime on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:39:00 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Troll? (0+ / 0-)

          Are you an idiot or just a fool who will be just another lemming of the dem party.

          Look, had McCain increased the number of wars after getteng a Peace Prize, increased unemployment, restarted the nuclear industry, dropped drones left and right, hired every Wall St banker he could find, rewarded donors with administration jobs at a pace faster than bush, golf more than bush, etc, you'd be going ape. Because you're a simple idiot tool of BO and the dems, it's all good though, right!

      •  Water over the bridge now... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Ana Thema, worldlotus

        Because re-engaging in this debate is both pointless and useless now.

        I want to talk about where we go from here.

        "The bottom line is, we've got to wake up. We can't allow our disappointment in Obama to lull us into allowing a truly dangerous strain of conservative philosophy to gain any more traction than it already has." --ObamOcala 4/5/11

        by smoothnmellow on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:41:16 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Where we go is simple (0+ / 0-)

          At the very least if you want to change the dems and have them return to being the peole's party you have to stop voting for them. They have no incentive to change unless dem voters show they are not captured by fear of the other.
          So what if we get dems for a few years. It's better than gradually being spoon fed repug policies with a dem label attached to it!

          •  Actually it's not that simple. Sry (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            worldlotus

            but that is not a solution.  Instead, the masses have to push whoever is in power to do their will.

            Because the reality that you cannot face is that only a minicule % of the masses will vote for a third party.  

            Certainly not enough to make a difference within the Democratic Party.

            And that approach was attempted in 1980 and as a result, we got

            -- a stolen national election;

            -- 9/11

            -- Iraq

            -- Homeland Security

            -- wholesale and blatant corporate deregulation at all levels

            -- overinflated housing markets due to GREED

            -- housing BUST

            -- financial market BUST

            No thank you.  If the masses want better jobs and health care and more responsible accountability from its politicians, then the masses need to rise up, and say

            I'M MAD AS HELL AND I'M NOT GOING TO TAKE THIS ANYMORE.

            Period.

            "The bottom line is, we've got to wake up. We can't allow our disappointment in Obama to lull us into allowing a truly dangerous strain of conservative philosophy to gain any more traction than it already has." --ObamOcala 4/5/11

            by smoothnmellow on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 08:50:33 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  We gotta pound this sh!t into them now (7+ / 0-)

      It cost $650,000,000.00 to get the POTUS into office. This is just chump change for the Koch Brothers. We gotta contact the entertainers, executives, clergy, and the rest of the community to get busy trying to "take" our country back. I seen how ALEC want to drive the undocumented workers out of Georgia and replace them with people that have went to jail. They said that they will give them a salary, they will after they paid off all their court cost. Sstoping the Republican Party should be a national movement. You don't want the U.S. to wind up like Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin.

      Think...It ain't illegal yet ! George Clinton

      by kid funkadelic on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 01:30:35 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  And killing our federal government is not helping. (10+ / 0-)

      For a long time now, federal jobs have provided minorities with an much more level playing field for getting jobs.  Our federal government hires in a way that tends to reflect the true demographics of America - something the private sector would benefit from aspiring to....so when the government lets jobs go - really dumb during a crisis IMO - this really, really hurts.  

      In any case, these numbers are disturbing.  It is a terrible attack on the most vulnerable groups in our society and it hurts all of us.  

      It gets on my nerves, and you know how I am about my nerves...

      by ciganka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 01:36:39 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The government (8+ / 0-)

        also tends to be a lot more color blind than many private employers about promotions.  Partly because most Federal employees have strong unions.  I say most, because TSA employees (who finally can unionize) have been hamstrung in what the unions are allowed to do.

        Partly because many in government were in the military first, and the military from my experience really is color blind (gender blind not so much, but that is a different issue).

        Democrats give you the Bill of Rights; Republicans sell you a bill of goods!

        by barbwires on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 05:05:07 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  It's actually because (0+ / 0-)

          the POTUS can sign executive orders mandating hiring practices within the exec branch of government.

          "The bottom line is, we've got to wake up. We can't allow our disappointment in Obama to lull us into allowing a truly dangerous strain of conservative philosophy to gain any more traction than it already has." --ObamOcala 4/5/11

          by smoothnmellow on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:46:54 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Which is EXACTLY what (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        zett, stargaze

        the Thugs in Congress want to do next.  Thug Governors are already doing this at the State level.

        "The bottom line is, we've got to wake up. We can't allow our disappointment in Obama to lull us into allowing a truly dangerous strain of conservative philosophy to gain any more traction than it already has." --ObamOcala 4/5/11

        by smoothnmellow on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:45:36 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Yes because clearly the folks that didn't get (6+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      shanikka, banjolele, cybrestrike, Nulwee, zett, cai

      anything done the first two years because of blue dogs and filibusters would have changes their excuses after 2010.

      The joke is on us.  It has zero to do with who we elected or didn't elect.  The fact is Democrats didnt care about UE 2 years ago and they don't now.  If they did they would take actions that made sense instead of paying off donors and fishing for campaign dollars.

      Fix campaign financing and you fix America.   The question is will the public realize it before it is too late.

      "Senator McCain offered up the oldest Washington stunt in the book - you pass the buck to a commission to study the problem." - Senator Obama, 9-16-2008

      by justmy2 on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 04:45:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  That's a helluva (7+ / 0-)

      method to get folks to vote for you.  "Vote for me or it'll even be worse".  Great bumper sticker.  What happened to the jobs programs?  

      ~War is Peace~Freedom is Slavery~Ignorance is Strength~ George Orwell "1984"

      by Kristina40 on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 05:34:57 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  If only the continuing destruction of Black (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      shanikka, bruddaone, princss6

      America could be solved by simply voting....

      As diarist correctly pointed out, elected officials find it easier to ignor the systematical, historical & continuing destruction than to even attempt to address the issue.

      Our misguided elected officials would sooner be caught on camera talking about reparations to Iraq (which they'd never be caught at anyways) than discussing reparations to our own citizens.

      Meteor Blades seems to do an outstanding job of community moderation despite the abject failure to be perfect.

      by catilinus on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:02:58 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  It's exactly the opposite (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cybrestrike, esquimaux

      TiMT.  I know you believe Obama is royalty, but this administration and our democrats are undermining us.  Their economic policies are contributing directly to this.

    •  Frankly (14+ / 0-)

      It is not just Republicans.  It just isn't.  The Democratic Party from leader on down has been just as complicit in allowing this situation to fester and exist for at least most of my lifetime (and I'll be 50 this year.)

      We do not help our people pretending differently, no matter who is currently occupying the White House.

      If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

      by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:03:54 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Why don't you just come out and say Obama and (0+ / 0-)

        stop with this "from the leader" down. You and I have discussed this President before, whom you have a definite antipathy for. I think you should just come out and say Obama is to blame and stop being circuitous....

        •  I Don't Have (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          doroma, slatsg

          "Definite antipathy" for the President and if you bothered to read the many things I have written you'd know that.  I plan to vote for the man, and think that as Presidents go he hasn't been too bad particularly given what he inherited.  I have been forthright in talking about my policy disagreements with some of his programs, however.  How that gets translated into "definite antipathy" for the President, however, is beyond me.

          Perhaps you are trying to use me as cover for your own schtick?

          If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

          by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 11:31:35 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Of course, you plan on voting for him even after (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            BarackStarObama, worldlotus

            writing this:

            It seems to me that Black Americans are being, unintentionally perhaps but systematically nonetheless, labor arbitraged out of the job market in favor of everyone else.  That's bad enough - but it's worse when I consider that there appears to be no notice apparently paid by anyone who actually is running around says they give a damn about unemployment.

            and this:

            IMO, if those who can't get elected without our votes collectively don't make addressing this jobs catastrophe in the Black community RIGHT NOW (not by jettisoning a whole generation of us in favor of spending money on better early childhood education, since I'm sorry but these numbers are as bad as they were when most of us didn't even graduate from high school in the 1960's) their most immediate priority, I'm on the verge of just refusing to encourage any of them to vote next year.  As it is, encouraging them to hold out for an honest living has been hard enough.

            And this:

            No doubt I'll be hearing the usual stereotype defenses about how Black people "need to get a better education" and "turn off the Nintendo" and "shouldn't have babies they can't afford"
            soon.

            Huh???? I'll post this the third time in your diary. The President who has been obstructed in every way possible, is not relying on African Americans to put away their nintendo (I have never heard this before) as a means of creating jobs.... Here is the President's Budget for 2012 which detailed policies on addressing this issue:

            The Budget proposes a series of coordinated investments around four key objectives: creating jobs and enhancing economic competitiveness, building 21st century infrastructure, making our
            communities stronger, and educating and training our workforce. Specifically, the Budget proposes making the following investments:
            Support Business Growth and Lending in Low-Income and Minority Communities. Even in this constrained budget environment, the Administration continues to support robust funding for programs that improve the availability of credit in underserved and lower-income
            communities, and includes initiatives that target financial literacy and increase the availability of healthy foods in areas now lacking them.  For example, the Budget provides $227 million for the Treasury Department’s Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) Fund, which provides capital to low-income communities across the Nation and is targeting a portion of its
            funds to help bring grocery stores and other healthy food retailers to underserved urban communities.

            To help entrepreneurs start businesses and create jobs in inner cities, the Budget also includes $13 million to continue the Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Emerging Leaders (formerly Emerging 200) initiative. The Budget also funds several initiatives designed
            to promote entrepreneurship in underserved areas including the Small Loan Advantage and Community Advantage programs and the Impact Fund within the Small Business Investment Company (SBIC) Impact Fund debenture program, which will support impact investments that target residents of economically distressed regions or owned by a socially or economically disadvantaged group.

            Provide Small Business Access to Credit and Technical Assistance. The Administration is taking a series of steps to improve the access to capital for small businesses. First, the Budget supports $16.5 billion in 7(a) loan guarantees, which will help small businesses operate and expand. This includes an estimated $14.5 billion in term loans and $2 billion in revolving lines of credit; the latter are expected to support $48 billion in total economic activity through draws and repayments over the life of the guarantee. The Administration also supports $7.5 billion in guaranteed lending for commercial real estate development and heavy machinery purchases; $3 billion in SBIC debentures to support new businesses and new jobs through early-stage and mezzanine small business financing; and $25 million in direct microloans, for intermediaries to
            provide small loans to emerging entrepreneurs and other borrowers unable to receive credit elsewhere.

            Modernize Urban Mass Transit. In order to spur job creation and lay a foundation for future
            economic growth through greater and safer transportation choices for Americans and increased
            business development in communities, the Budget proposes an additional upfront boost of $50
            billion in transportation infrastructure investment, as part of its 6-year proposal for surface transportation reauthorization. More than 20 percent of this funding will go to supplement urban mass transit programs, traditionally funded by surface transportation authorization legislation.

            Consistent with the Administration’s commitment to mass transit, the Budget 3 includes increases in several Department of Transportation (DOT) grant programs dedicated to mass transit investment, including Transit Formula Grants, Bus and Rail State of Good Repair
            Grants, Transit New Starts Capital Grants, and Greenhouse Gas/Energy Reduction Grants.  These investments will increase transportation options, cut commuting time, ease congestion, reduce oil consumption, lower greenhouse gas emissions, and expand access to job opportunities and housing that’s affordable. In addition, the Administration’s reauthorization proposal will adopt a ―Fix-It-First‖ approach, to emphasize the importance of preserving and improving the condition of existing transportation infrastructure.

            Establish a National Infrastructure Bank. The Budget provides $30 billion over six years to
            fund a National Infrastructure Bank (I-Bank) which will invest in those projects nationwide that
            have the most significant impact on our national and regional economies.  For example, a
            project to improve road and rail access to a West Coast port would not only improve West
            Coast shipping capacity, but also improve market access for farmers in the Midwest. A cornerstone of the I-Bank’s approach will be a rigorous project comparison method that transparently measures which projects offer the greatest return on investment to taxpayers and
            our economy. Eligible applicants will include States, localities, transportation agencies, and private entities.

            Expand Access to Rail.  The Budget proposes to invest $53 billion over six years in passenger
            rail, from a new dedicated rail account of the expanded Transportation Trust Fund.  This program will provide competitive grants to fund the development of a robust intercity passenger rail network comprised of core express (over 125 mph), regional (90 to 125), and
            emerging (up to 90 mph) corridors. These investments will support the President’s goal of providing 80 percent of Americans with convenient access to a passenger rail system within 25 years. The Budget also proposes to merge Federal support for Amtrak into the larger rail
            program, so that the Federal government takes a coordinated approach to rail issues. Improve the Condition of Key Highways.  The Budget includes $69.9 billion in 2012 (an increase of 70 percent from 2010 levels) and $336 billion over six years (an increase of 48 percent over SAFETEA-LU) for the Federal Highway Administration. The proposal includes a new
            livability grant program ($4.1 billion in 2012 and $28 billion over six years) for projects like
            multi-modal transportation hubs (where different forms of transportation converge) and streets
            that accommodate pedestrian, bicycle and transit access.

            The African American community still supports this President, because, well, he is simply not the cause to the years of institutional racism that has crippled this community for centuries and is still continuing. Still just for the record, I've posted again what is laid out by the President for the sake of balance.... No nintendo in sight....

    •  Sounds like you should (6+ / 0-)

      challenge the diarist directly, TIMT. She said this:

      I'm on the verge of just refusing to encourage any of them to vote next year.

      In any case, laughable that you think the President and other Democrats aren't partly to blame for the economic tragedy that's unfolding.

    •  I agree and I also agree with (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      sberel

      those Progressives who state that our side is anemic at best when going after the Thugs in office.

      I think that the APPROACH to how we deal with OUR side needs to IMPROVE.

      Agree to disagree, but continue to support the trench battles.

      But we need better candidates to run for office, period and we need to figure out a way to fund them and get them into office bottom up.

      We also need to start an aggressive campaign AGAINST CORPORATION MEDIA.

      Until we deal with the MEDIA issue, 'we the people' don't stand a chance.

      "The bottom line is, we've got to wake up. We can't allow our disappointment in Obama to lull us into allowing a truly dangerous strain of conservative philosophy to gain any more traction than it already has." --ObamOcala 4/5/11

      by smoothnmellow on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:39:16 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Also, let's not go there (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        zett, worldlotus

        with the pie fights today.  I mean really now.  We have screamed at each other until we are blue in the face as to who ani't doing what.

        Now it's time to discuss what 'We the People' can do.

        "The bottom line is, we've got to wake up. We can't allow our disappointment in Obama to lull us into allowing a truly dangerous strain of conservative philosophy to gain any more traction than it already has." --ObamOcala 4/5/11

        by smoothnmellow on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:53:05 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  I do have one question (10+ / 0-)

    Given the poverty and unemployment (and I don't for a second imagine that the poverty isn't driven by being unemployed or underemployed) statistics so hard at work in decimating the Black population of this country, who the hell imagines that unemployed Black people can afford Nintendos?

    Organ donors save multiple lives! A donor's kidney gave me my life back on 02/18/11; he lives on in me and in others. Please talk with your family about your wish to donate and sign up to give others the gift of life.

    by Kitsap River on Mon Jun 20, 2011 at 10:42:59 PM PDT

    •  people who (13+ / 0-)

      believe that welfare queens are driving around in cadillacs they bought with Uncle Sam's food stamps

      •  People who believe that the rich Indians (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shanikka, zett, stargaze

        don't work cause they get the good money from casino checks, welfare and "free" healthcare.

        People who believe that there's jobs for anyone willing to stop being an idiot bastard.

        People who believe that Mexicans won't speak English, which is supposed to be because cause they're lazy and racist.

        I notice that many recommends are given to the person who has a good answer, with hardly any given to the person who asks the right question. That is backwards to me; without that question, the good answer might never have come.

        by Nulwee on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:52:18 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Considering (5+ / 0-)

      That every time our President starts talking about lack of employment success he starts lecturing that parents need to turn off the Nintendos as if this is the problem? Obviously, more folks than we like to admit.

      If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

      by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:01:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  This is a blatant mischaracterization of President (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        BarackStarObama

        Obama's plan and, for example, his 2012 budget for creating jobs within the African American community. Stop the lying! See here:

        The Budget proposes a series of coordinated investments around four key objectives: creating jobs and enhancing economic competitiveness, building 21st century infrastructure, making our
        communities stronger, and educating and training our workforce. Specifically, the Budget proposes making the following investments:

        Support Business Growth and Lending in Low-Income and Minority Communities. Even in this constrained budget environment, the Administration continues to support robust funding for programs that improve the availability of credit in underserved and lower-income
        communities, and includes initiatives that target financial literacy and increase the availability of healthy foods in areas now lacking them.  For example, the Budget provides $227 million for the Treasury Department’s Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) Fund, which provides capital to low-income communities across the Nation and is targeting a portion of its
        funds to help bring grocery stores and other healthy food retailers to underserved urban communities.

        To help entrepreneurs start businesses and create jobs in inner cities, the Budget also includes $13 million to continue the Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Emerging Leaders (formerly Emerging 200) initiative. The Budget also funds several initiatives designed
        to promote entrepreneurship in underserved areas including the Small Loan Advantage and Community Advantage programs and the Impact Fund within the Small Business Investment Company (SBIC) Impact Fund debenture program, which will support impact investments that target residents of economically distressed regions or owned by a socially or economically disadvantaged group.

        Provide Small Business Access to Credit and Technical Assistance. The Administration is taking a series of steps to improve the access to capital for small businesses. First, the Budget supports $16.5 billion in 7(a) loan guarantees, which will help small businesses operate and expand. This includes an estimated $14.5 billion in term loans and $2 billion in revolving lines of credit; the latter are expected to support $48 billion in total economic activity through draws and repayments over the life of the guarantee. The Administration also supports $7.5 billion in guaranteed lending for commercial real estate development and heavy machinery purchases; $3 billion in SBIC debentures to support new businesses and new jobs through early-stage and mezzanine small business financing; and $25 million in direct microloans, for intermediaries to
        provide small loans to emerging entrepreneurs and other borrowers unable to receive credit elsewhere.

        Modernize Urban Mass Transit. In order to spur job creation and lay a foundation for future
        economic growth through greater and safer transportation choices for Americans and increased
        business development in communities, the Budget proposes an additional upfront boost of $50
        billion in transportation infrastructure investment, as part of its 6-year proposal for surface transportation reauthorization. More than 20 percent of this funding will go to supplement urban mass transit programs, traditionally funded by surface transportation authorization legislation.

        Consistent with the Administration’s commitment to mass transit, the Budget 3 includes increases in several Department of Transportation (DOT) grant programs dedicated to mass transit investment, including Transit Formula Grants, Bus and Rail State of Good Repair
        Grants, Transit New Starts Capital Grants, and Greenhouse Gas/Energy Reduction Grants.  These investments will increase transportation options, cut commuting time, ease congestion, reduce oil consumption, lower greenhouse gas emissions, and expand access to job opportunities and housing that’s affordable. In addition, the Administration’s reauthorization proposal will adopt a ―Fix-It-First‖ approach, to emphasize the importance of preserving and improving the condition of existing transportation infrastructure.

        Establish a National Infrastructure Bank. The Budget provides $30 billion over six years to
        fund a National Infrastructure Bank (I-Bank) which will invest in those projects nationwide that
        have the most significant impact on our national and regional economies.  For example, a
        project to improve road and rail access to a West Coast port would not only improve West
        Coast shipping capacity, but also improve market access for farmers in the Midwest. A cornerstone of the I-Bank’s approach will be a rigorous project comparison method that transparently measures which projects offer the greatest return on investment to taxpayers and
        our economy. Eligible applicants will include States, localities, transportation agencies, and private entities.

        Expand Access to Rail.  The Budget proposes to invest $53 billion over six years in passenger
        rail, from a new dedicated rail account of the expanded Transportation Trust Fund.  This program will provide competitive grants to fund the development of a robust intercity passenger rail network comprised of core express (over 125 mph), regional (90 to 125), and
        emerging (up to 90 mph) corridors. These investments will support the President’s goal of providing 80 percent of Americans with convenient access to a passenger rail system within 25 years. The Budget also proposes to merge Federal support for Amtrak into the larger rail
        program, so that the Federal government takes a coordinated approach to rail issues. Improve the Condition of Key Highways.  The Budget includes $69.9 billion in 2012 (an increase of 70 percent from 2010 levels) and $336 billion over six years (an increase of 48 percent over SAFETEA-LU) for the Federal Highway Administration. The proposal includes a new
        livability grant program ($4.1 billion in 2012 and $28 billion over six years) for projects like
        multi-modal transportation hubs (where different forms of transportation converge) and streets
        that accommodate pedestrian, bicycle and transit access.

        This is not some plan about nintendos, the President is in there pitching to provide opportunities for struggling communities. Your mischaracterization is done in order to create a deep-seated opposition within the African American community against this President.... It will not work.... I wonder what are the Republican plans???????

    •  It's a knee-jerk meme (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Nulwee, shanikka, slatsg

      kind of like Ronnie Reagan and his Cadillac-driving welfare queen who MAY have existed somewhere (and that's a big "may") but was not the norm. The blame-the-victim crowd always insists that families without money for their kids to eat over the weekend have big-screen TVs and Nintendos. I seriously doubt a family with hungry kids spends money on Nintendos.

      Jennifer Brunner for Governor of Ohio 2014

      by anastasia p on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:30:58 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  yep (20+ / 0-)
    Nobody gives a damn about what is happening to Black [and Native American] people in America .

    enough said!

    ...We have many more issues that bind us together than separate us!

    by ThisIsMyTime on Mon Jun 20, 2011 at 10:44:05 PM PDT

  •  Thank you, shanikka for putting the spotlight... (50+ / 0-)

    ...on this, what else can we call it, catastrophe for African Americans.

    And thanks for also pointing to the plight of American Indians. Many people do not recognize that most Indians don't live on reservations. But in the urban areas where the majority now live, they suffer from the highest rates of poverty and unemployment of any minority, and are victims of crime more often proportionate to their numbers in the population.

    New jobs programs are needed for all Americans in the current economic climate. But an emphasis must be placed on remedying minorities' higher long-term rates of unemployment (and all the collateral damage done by these higher rates). That will take a significant change of attitude on the part of Democratic leaders. Republicans, of course, are hopeless in this regard.

    Don't tell me what you believe. Tell me what you do and I'll tell you what you believe.

    by Meteor Blades on Mon Jun 20, 2011 at 10:44:20 PM PDT

  •  And anyone who dares speak up (16+ / 0-)

    Is quickly added to the right wing hit list.

    I'm reading your diary, and I can't stop thinking about the list of activists I've known who've tried to bring attention to this, only to be silenced the minuet they started gaining momentum.

    I object to violence because when it appears to do good, the good is only temporary; the evil it does is permanent.

    by Futuristic Dreamer on Mon Jun 20, 2011 at 10:52:33 PM PDT

  •  I tell all African American friends...quit (14+ / 0-)

    following the white man off the cliff like lemmings, chasing Corporations that don't want to employ them,  they are headed for destruction, let them go. It's time to get out on on their own and start forming businesses and infrastructure like what was happening prior to the civil rights movement...

    I tell them this is not your fathers country, if you want to survive as a race you are going to have to go it alone. The white men who run this country and own these corporations can no longer help you, hell they can't help themselves at this point. Steadily losing ground, by the day as the GOP continues to sell them out at a brisk pace.

    When I first started saying this, I was told I was no better than the Klan, a racist, a bigot. That we as a race should continue to assimilate and become one with the nation...Obama had a legit chance to become President, things are going to get even better, just a slight setback in the economy.

    Now conversation after conversation....after job loss, homeless, unemployment benefits gone..I hear over and over again...you know you're right...I'm going to start this venture...

    That's one movement I hope catches fire...

    •  Saw a bit on tv recently... (11+ / 0-)

      ... I think on Democracy Now!, talking to a filmmaker about how one of the unintended consequences of integration was the collapse of a lot of African American owned businesses.  

      Before integration, there weren't just Black restaurants and stores, but an insurance company for Black people, started so people would have the money to bury their dead.

      After integration, Black people could work "anywhere", but as the filmmaker (who appeared to be white) pointed out, who owns the companies?  Who's making the money from them?

      I'm not sure any white person "telling all their African American friends" what to do is a good idea, but I see a lot of white people, too, creating smaller, local ways to make a living, because this whole international corporate system will outsource all it can to the cheapest place on the planet.  (As Thom Hartmann described, including places where the male managers routinely rape the female employees to keep them in line.)  These "American" companies aren't American in any meaningful sense anymore, if they ever were.

      •  And of course, because Peak Oil (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shanikka, Imhotepsings, Nulwee

        is gonna make the whole thing unworkable pretty damn soon.

      •  Ahhhh...I'm African American...with (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cai, barbwires, shanikka, Nulwee

        friends of all races, nationality etc etc...but to your point.

        If you research it, you will find there was more than 1 insurance company...if I'm not mistaken about 30 or 40, quite a few banks...etc, etc...

        Actually a prominent businessman at the time, his name escapes me at the moment, tried to warn African Americans about letting MLK and trust fund babies  who were going to have income regardless...not to be swayed by them and continue on a economic path...but he was shunned for a chance at civil rights  and equality.

        •  Oops! (6+ / 0-)

          I inferred that you were white based on the virulence of the comments you got in response.  I apologize.

          It was one particular insurance company the filmmaker was talking about, but I didn't assume there was only one.  Hang on, I'll get the quotation so I'll be precise.

          An interview with John Sayles:

          Excerpt from the film Sunshine State:

          DR. LLOYD: Civil rights happened. Progress. Used to be you’re black, you buy black. Jim Crow days, you need your shoes shined or wanted to ride in a taxi to the train station, wanted some ribs, fish sandwich, chances are a black man owned the place you got it in. Now the drive-throughs serve anybody. But who owns them? Not us. All our people does is wearing paper hats and dipping out them fries. Only thing we got left are funeral parlors and barbershops.

          REGGIE PERRY: Yeah, but now we can do anything.

          DR. LLOYD: Yeah. Them that get over do fine. Them that can’t are in a world of trouble.

          From the interview:

          AMY GOODMAN: From Sunshine State. And so, what happens?

          JOHN SAYLES: Yeah, that’s based on American Beach, which is a place in northeastern Florida that was founded by the head of the African-American Insurance Company, which was an insurance company started by an African-American man so black people could bury their own people, would have enough money to bury people when they died. He wanted there to be a place where people could go to the beach, because the beaches in the South were all segregated at that point, and needed the intercession of Eleanor Roosevelt to be even allowed to buy this beachfront property that nobody else wanted and that he had the money to buy. Once he bought it, it became this kind of Mecca.

          So that's what I was referring to.

          And it supports your point.

    •  I Do Believe (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Nulwee, sberel

      That we as a people need to examine why we gave up so much in terms of our own businesses, our own do for self, just for the dream of "integrating" with mainstream society.  Even Uncle Clarence Thomas, a hated brother if ever there was one for lots of good reasons, highlighted in Parents United (the case that eviscerated Brown v. Board of Education) that we had destroyed our own schools based upon the foolish understanding that the country that had enslaved us actually intended to do anything meaningful for our children).

      And we need to ask whether we've gotten from our giving up our own resourcefulness, direct symptom of the ongoing disease of slave mentality or not, what we bargained for.

      If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

      by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:58:59 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Well, maybe not much to some here.... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        zett

        but clearly the Jim Crow days of segregation is not an experience I want to relive, that's for sure.  

        Segregation forced black folk to pool resources and to do business with one another.

        The flip side of being too successful with 'supporting your own' was Tulsa, Rosewood and hundreds of other 'so-called' race riots around the 1900s that burned black communities, their businesses, homes and people --

        down to the ground.

        I'm just sayin'.

        "The bottom line is, we've got to wake up. We can't allow our disappointment in Obama to lull us into allowing a truly dangerous strain of conservative philosophy to gain any more traction than it already has." --ObamOcala 4/5/11

        by smoothnmellow on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 08:08:30 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  disgusting (16+ / 0-)

    here is a sociology study about discrimination against black men versus other men:
    Discrimination in Low Wage Labor Markets.

    This was in NYC, so I think it casts a good light on employers and discrimination on the hiring process.  If this study was conducted in say, Kansas, the results would prolly be more stark.  

    The Money shot:

    The magnitude of the penalty of blackness is underscored in its comparison with the penalty of a criminal record. A black applicant with a clean record fares no better that a white applicant recently released from prison.

    I still can't believe this is the country my daughter is growing up in.

  •  Thnak you for this: (11+ / 0-)
    There is indeed one group who deserves more attention than we do, by name, because they have it worse than we do and have for a very long time:

    Native Americans.

    The invisible, born of this land throughout, Americans.  

    Yet the unemployment situation with Native Americans has been rendered even more invisible than ours, where the adult unemployment rates in some reservations well exceeds 50 or 75%.  Indeed, the collective unemployment situation of Native Americans makes the disgrace of a 16.2% unemployment rate for Black Americans look positively luxurious.

    ~*-:¦:-jennybravo-:¦:-*~

    by jennybravo on Mon Jun 20, 2011 at 11:10:21 PM PDT

  •  Definitely. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shanikka

    I'm not sure how it can be separated out from the general population at this point because of the overall problems with the economy.  Sure wish we had an avenue to discuss and create methods to address these issues politically.

    S.A.W. 2011 STOP ALL WARS "The Global War on Terror is a fabrication to justify imperialism."

    by BigAlinWashSt on Mon Jun 20, 2011 at 11:29:04 PM PDT

  •  Systemic racism is easier to hide than the more (20+ / 0-)

    traditional form of active racism. Some will even use this data to justify their racism and we all know the rhetoric they will use; however they will totally ignore the long term and systematic discrimination.

    "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

    by LaFeminista on Mon Jun 20, 2011 at 11:33:10 PM PDT

  •  Things like this are why a part of me squirms (6+ / 0-)

    when I see "immigrant activists" (erasing the difference between legal and illegal entry to a country) talking about how they're just "here to work."

    Yes, NAFTA was a ratfuck for Mexican farmers, maybe even more so than for American manufacturers.  No, a lot of Mexicans had little other choice than to come here.  Yes, American companies, some of whom we should start calling illegal employers (rather than placing the label on the imported workers), created the demand for (exploitable, abusable) illegal labor, going so far as to advertise in and bus from Mexico.

    And no, the last thing I want to do is to encourage Black-Latino resentment or immigrant-bashing.

    And yes, I have read that illegal immigration actually helps the economy and creates jobs.

    And yet, and yet, and yet... when I also heard from a Black contractor and lifelong resident who couldn't afford to return to NOLA after Katrina, because they rebuilders wouldn't pay him enough to live on, but they were importing construction workers from Honduras et al...

    When, as you say, the Black unemployment rate should be a national scandal, let alone the Native American rate...

    I wonder why we keep focusing on the jobs of undocumented workers, rather than those of POC who are already American citizens.  

    Or on the fact that the inner city unemployment rate for young adults up to 35 is fucking ridiculous, but especially for Blacks and Latinos.

    •  Yea, i get's a littl hard to reconcile... (5+ / 0-)

      Especially when you see headlines like this....

      Luis Gutierrez: Latinos Won't Vote For Obama In 2012 Without Deportation Relief

      HuffingtonPost Article

      At this point of the equation, you have to ask yourself...what about the citizens....

      •  Thing is, I won't say that... (6+ / 0-)

        ... because most of the people saying that think that "citizens" = "white", and are, furthermore, xenophobic horses behinds.

        It's part of that "avoiding saying things that sound like right wing/nativist memes" thing I try to do.

        But at the same time, I think the article you link demonstrates that Representative Gutierrez feels he can threaten to withhold votes from Obama if Obama doesn't do what he wants.  

        Or what Latinos want?  Is it?  A lot of people assume that the Latino vote is united in support of undocumented immigrants... but I haven't seen data on that.  I'd definitely believe that most Latinos are opposed to anti-illegal immigrant measures, but that's because a lot of them, like AZ's despicable bill, are just thinly disguised anti-Latino racism.

        Anyway, Gutierrez seems to think he has this leverage of withholding the Latino vote, so he's threatening to use it.  (Counterproductively, IMHO, but whatever.)  

        The question is, who can, and how can, someone put pressure on the Congress to act on unemployment?  They don't seem to give a crap about white unemployment, so what are the chances they'll care about Black or Native American unemployment?

        •  LOL...no when I say citizens... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cai, shanikka

          I mean everyone...there is no color distinction for me, but I recognize and agree with what you are saying in reference to that...

          I'm coming to the conclusion that folks are going to have to give up on the current batch of politicians and forge their own way...start boycotting the big corporations and foreign owned business that are exploiting the non-citizens and shunning those that are citizens...

          Is it realistic...? probably not, it just seems no one has the back of the average citizen in this country....folks are running out of options.

          •  Oh, I know YOU don't mean that. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            bruddaone, shanikka

            It's just, on the immigration topic, you start by saying something that could be reasonable, and then you realize that the reasonable thing you're saying is similar to the language adopted by the guys who sit out on the border in their lawn chairs holding shotguns claiming they're "defending the country."

            IOW, I don't want to offer even unintentional support to those guys.

        •  He literally seems to be putting "race" ahead of (0+ / 0-)

          country. Despicable.

      •  Gutierrez need to be boycotting the Republican (8+ / 0-)

        Governor of Puerto Rico. He is actually worst than John Kasich.  He admires the John Birch Society. Puerto Rico actually had protests and marches BEFORE  Wisconsin. Deoliver47 wrote a article about it.  Like Keith Olberman said when he quoted Churchill "fight the enemy in front of you".

        Think...It ain't illegal yet ! George Clinton

        by kid funkadelic on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 01:20:10 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  It's Not about citizenry (6+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        esquimaux, Nulwee, HCKAD, cai, zett, bruddaone

        It is, however, food for thought.  Here are folks that are advocating for a group that, like it or not, have no legal right to be here - and conditioning their votes on it.

        And people are defending their right to do it.  Hell, I defend their right to do it.  

        Yet if someone Black were to advocate that Black people not vote for President Obama or any other politician (since he didn't create the problems even if he's not talking much about meaningful solutions -- as opposed to initiatives that will take decades to reach fruition) if something wasn't done? Lord have mercy the rending of garments would be through the roof.

        As Malcolm once said, we must understand what politics is supposed to produce. As it relates to Black Americans, we appear to have accepted that for us, we have a duty to be the moral compass, the stalwart soldier - and to shut up about anything we might have the audacity to EXPECT as the price of our votes.

        If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

        by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:53:57 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  . (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Nulwee, zett, cai
      When, as you say, the Black unemployment rate should be a national scandal, let alone the Native American rate...

      I wonder why we keep focusing on the jobs of undocumented workers, rather than those of POC who are already American citizens.

      Or hey, maybe look at the actual system that creates ALL of this and see how it all interrelates, rather than going where you went with it.

      Nah. I mean ... What would be the useful function of that anyway? Way better to draw that line between those with papers on this land, and those without, and focus attention right there.

      •  I Think the System Does Create all of This (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        bullyness, cai, Michellebird, bruddaone

        But I also think that by the disproportionate rhetorical and temporal focus on the plight of the undocumented, who at least are here voluntarily, the left has abandoned the cause of Black people in America, most of who of course did not choose to be here, did not choose to be exploited for hundreds of years and do not choose to be yet again shoved to the back of the line in terms of political priorities.

        The country has not yet paid its due for what has been done to us.  It is great about complaining about what's wrong with us but piss poor acknowledging that what is supposedly "wrong with us" is directly tied to slavery, and Jim Crow and hundreds of years training all of us that we are dysfunctional, less than human, and undeserving.

        This is why I used the words labor arbitrage.  I believe that in part the Left focuses on the plight of the undocumented at our expense because in truth for more than 150 years the rule in America has been that anyone not Black is more important, more deserving of help, and better than, Black and Native American folks.  Particularly Black folks descended from slavery.  Just as white immigrants were ultimately allowed to take their place at the table so long as they were willing to buy into this unspoken rule, so now the undocumented are encouraged to do the same.  Put their own first, and hell and damned with everyone else who might have been waiting been waiting for justice from America before them.

        If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

        by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:43:59 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Shoulda read your comment before (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          bruddaone

          I commented... you'd already answered my question.

        •  I suspect that it's not quite the same as white (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cai

          immigrants:

          Just as white immigrants were ultimately allowed to take their place at the table so long as they were willing to buy into this unspoken rule, so now the undocumented are encouraged to do the same.  Put their own first, and hell and damned with everyone else who might have been waiting been waiting for justice from America before them.

          There is a land-based relationship between the US and Mexico (meaning, parts of the US were Mexico for some time), and economy-based relationship between the US and Mexico and some of the other countries (eg not not only NAFTA, that cai mentioned.)

          I think that the white immigrants' actual assimilation into whiteness made a difference.

          And it is also true from what I've seen that the mainstream/assimilation parts of the immigrant rights movement are pushing for exactly what you describe, the place at the table and putting your own first and do whatever to try to be accepted like other immigrant waves were eventually. So they would be in the mode of: show [the white people] how nonthreatening you are, don't fly Mexican flags, don't mention the Native/indigenous part of who and what you are, etc.

          But the reality seems more complex than that, to me. There is the intersection between immigrants from the south and Native/indigenous peoples (the mix, for example, between Spanish and Indigenous). There are the communities that were crossed by the imposed border.

          I suspect, though I may be wrong, that despite the mainstream movement rhetoric, undocumented Mexicans from Mexico (for example) won't be accepted as white any more than Chicano/as US citizens have been accepted as white. And I do believe that the gateway for the place at the table, when it comes to immigration to the US, hinges on moving into the category of white.

          But I also think that the system will do tiers of racial hierarchies and those tiers will depend on whatever is best to continue white supremacy. So focusing away fro the actual impact of slavery and stolen land is part of how this stuff works also from what I can see.

          Just what I see.

      •  I was talking about the system for (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        zett, Michellebird, bruddaone

        a whole paragraph there, with NAFTA and illegal employers.  I definitely blame what passes for capitalism and globalization these days.

        Unless you mean the entire system of nation states, which is much bigger game than I feel qualified to set my sights on.

        And my point wasn't to blame either those advocating for the undocumented workers or the workers themselves, but to ask... why are we, as progressives, as liberals, as Democrats, spending so much time and energy on that... but can't even TALK about Black and Native unemployment.

        (I can answer part of that, myself, which is that the Republicans have taken aim at an entire ethnic group with their legislation, and we have to fight back.  Still, where's the discussion of citizens of color who also just want to work?)

        •  okay, that focuses it better for me (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cai
          And my point wasn't to blame either those advocating for the undocumented workers or the workers themselves, but to ask... why are we, as progressives, as liberals, as Democrats, spending so much time and energy on that... but can't even TALK about Black and Native unemployment.

          Critical reflection on the focus and practice of liberals, progressives, Democrats makes way more sense to me than a the broader meaning I took from the initial comment. Sorry I misunderstood.

          I live in Arizona. The virulence and persistence of the racism here related to immigration is rather extreme.

          One thing I have seen, just locally, is a White Savior mentality in some parts of the immigrant rights movement.

          I wonder if it's easier to be the Great White Savior persona with undocumented immigrants versus Black and/or Native American in the US communities.  Not the only thing, just something that may be a part somehow.

          •  I see how I could have been unclear. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Michellebird

            It really is a question of focus, to me.  

            Maybe it's partly that I live in the Northeast, but the prominence of the immigration in the national discussion seems odd to me.  Not that it's not important, but it seems like it's a lot of people's most important... and I'd put the wars, global climate change, and the real economy (jobs) first.  

            I get that everyone's mileage varies, and everyone's passions vary, but...

            I'm not sure it's the most crucial use of political capital right now.  For one thing, ending the wars would save us a shit-ton of money, ending the millionaires' tax breaks would save us a shit-ton of money, and then we could put money into social programs, including a (green) jobs program.  

            Instead, we're talking about cutting Medicare and Medicaid and Social Security (augh, no!), and then immigration reform is next on the agenda?  Where the only realistic outcomes I see are a) some form of amnesty/path to citizenship + no crackdown on illegal employers = we revisit this in 20 years with a new round of undocumented workers and a hotter, drier planet; or, b) some form of guest worker program, which lets businesses keep exploiting immigrant labor, but maintains them as a permanent underclass.

            IOW, de facto status quo, or worse, and political capital expended to get it.  Which IMHO could be better spent elsewhere.

            And this diary of shanikka's is only one example of somewhere that could be.  (And I can't help but agree that there is anti-Black and anti-Native racism at work in prioritizing undocumented immigrants over these minority citizens.)

            •  I do think that in some cases (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              cai

              it really is a matter of where you live.

              I currently live 60 miles or so from the US/Mexico border. due to deliberate moves by the US govt in the 90s, the immigration corridors shifted - the govt deliberately shifted people away from relatively safer passage (eg areas of CA)  into deadlier desert areas.

              On the ground in this area, immigration reform makes a lot of sense as a focus for various reasons. One of the many reasons is that people are dying because of the policy and larger economic contexts. But that's not the only reason. (that linked site is to an organization that IMO does damn good grounded work and if you haven't looked at a local/regional approach from a non-mainstream perspective, the rest of the site might be also of interest).

              The way things are here, immigration is an in-your-face issue nearly all the time - not because of some political choice, but because it is part of lived reality in this physical area. Undocumented immigrants are not a privileged class, they are quite often the primary scapegoats for the white supremacists.

              So I tend to see it less in terms of abstract political capital and more in terms of "this is grounded reality where I live."

              I live in the southwest now but I grew up in the northeast and yes in my experience, the context is completely different.

              So I do feel like you hit on something when you mention geography.

              Maybe it's partly that I live in the Northeast, but the prominence of the immigration in the national discussion seems odd to me.  .  Not that it's not important, but it seems like it's a lot of people's most important... and I'd put the wars, global climate change, and the real economy (jobs) first.  

              I haven't been following this closely in the last three years or so, but I do know that immigration reform has been on local/regional radar here for a very long time.  

              •  Absolutely correct (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Michellebird
                Undocumented immigrants are not a privileged class

                When I said there was anti-Black and anti-Native racism at work in keeping their plight out of the spotlight, I didn't mean for a second to imply that undocumented immigrants were the ones making that decision.  

                I'll check out that site you linked.  Another thing that bugs me about the immigration discussion -- as I've alluded to in other comments -- is that the things that stand any long-term chance of changing the underlying causes of people coming to the U.S. to work, i.e., NAFTA and illegal employers, aren't on the table.  So even if the DREAM Act passes and there are other paths to citizenship made available, people will still keep trying to cross the desert to get to the U.S., and people will still die.

                (Not to make this oppression one-upsmanship, but I think it's important to note that unemployment is killing Native and Black people as well, even if it's by different causes.)

        •  Possibly (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cai

          Globalization corporations would rather have illegals or guest workers because they can pay them less and keep the cost down. And they'd rather keep blacks & first nations people out of the news (but keep feeding them into PIK as income generators for the companies)  and progressives more react than act & the black and native unemployment is kept out of the news. When so many attacks are happening what's hidden doesn't get the attention it deserves.

          The boss needs you, you don't need him. -- France general strike, May 1968

          by stargaze on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 02:29:54 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Oh, that's definitely the reason. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            stargaze

            And that's one of the reasons I'm leery of the DREAM Act and/or "paths to citizenship" for current residents.  Not that either of those are bad things, they're good things!  

            But unless we crack down on illegal employers, they will keep importing a permanent (if rotating) underclass of undocumented workers, who will always be exploitable, even if their natural-born children or grandchildren or not.  This will be true with any "guest worker" program, too.

            Meanwhile, the existence of lower paid and exploitable non-citizen labor will undercut the power of citizens of all ethnicities to collectively bargain and/or achieve economic advancement.  (Or hell, these days, achieve economic holding steady.)

            When so many attacks are happening what's hidden doesn't get the attention it deserves.

            Good point.  It's hard to draw attention to neglect, even when it's systemic, when there's so much outright abuse happening.

            •  DREAM act (0+ / 0-)

              There were a lot of people wanting it to happen, so I wasn't very conflicted about my support for it. In general, of course, I'm for changing the system so government is "for the public good" not "for the owners".

              ... and if there's a crack down on employers, I fear that largest employers will be able to bribe their way out of it or to a minimal fine, while small business get the brunt. Perhaps the big companies wold take advantage to get their competition wiped out. What a mess.

              The boss needs you, you don't need him. -- France general strike, May 1968

              by stargaze on Wed Jun 22, 2011 at 03:53:39 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  Your Points are Well Taken (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      sethtriggs, Nulwee, cai, stargaze, bruddaone

      I keep trying to remind people that speaking up about this issue is not the same thing as creating Black-Latino resentment.

      I don't know a single Black person, employed or unemployed, that blames Latinos for doing what they gotta do.  Not one.   Last time I saw a study, it is our people that were the most supportive of the undocumented.

      But despite that, reality is what it is, and undocumented Latinos have been used by those who have the capital and power to arbitrage Black workers out of many sectors of the labor market and to depress wages for lower-skilled workers.  That's undeniable even if it isn't those undocumented workers' fault at all.  And it isn't.

      I believe, however, that there is a reason that the meme has arisen that calling it just like that is being "divisive."

      If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

      by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:51:11 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Exactly. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shanikka, bruddaone
        I believe, however, that there is a reason that the meme has arisen that calling it just like that is being "divisive."

        Exactly.  

        And what the hell is up when a Latino politician can invoke Rosa Parks in the name of undocumented workers and their kids, but Black people (of whom I'm not one, just in case I seemed to present myself otherwise) have nobody at the national level speaking about Black unemployment, or Black rates of imprisonment?

      •  Here are my feelings... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        conlakappa

        why is it that when we discuss black and native unemployment undocumented workers are even in the mix?  You may not like it being defined as divisive but I see it pitting people of color against each other.  And you know what, as long as we fight that fight, the nice white ensconced jobs and careers stay nicely white ensconced.  To be blunt, why are people who are citizens being discussed in the same paradigm as those who are not?  I think black and native unemployment is more of an issue of hiring discrimination that low-wage labor.  Focusing on low-wage labor shifts the paradigm.  

        We are english speakers, we went through this educational system, so why would we even be competing for the same jobs?  We aren't and we don't.  I don't think we are being arbitraged out by undocumented workers and certainly not where I live.  We are being arbitraged by the movement of the job market outside of where we live and can readily commute and white folks not hiring us and when they do hire us, showing us their ass any chance they get.

        I for one am tired of pandering to perpetrators --- many of whom are opposed to any discussion however it comes. -- soothsayer99 DPK Caucus

        by princss6 on Wed Jun 22, 2011 at 07:27:30 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I Never Said (0+ / 0-)

          We are being arbitraged out BY undocumented workers.  It is those who have the power and the capital that are using undocumented workers to effectuate arbitrage, both in terms of access to certain industries and in depressing wages.  It is not the fault of the undocumented, as I have repeatedly said.  But to pretend it is not occurring or is not important to discuss out of fear of being divisive is IMO just not facing the reality of the changes that have occurred since Simpson-Mazzoli made it impossible for most south-of-the-border unskilled laborers to enter the country, either.

          If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

          by shanikka on Wed Jun 22, 2011 at 12:16:24 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  I was about to say NO F'IN SHIT (7+ / 0-)

    When I saw this diary was written by you.

    In the last week, the utility company in my town has chosen to turn off the electicity of two families I know.  Both of them, and quite a few other people I know, just have a real hard time getting a job right now. Here at DailyKos, I can talk about the big-picture of why, but to those women I have to project complete and solid hope that they will make it thru. So I gave somebody a big 5-day cooler. Any suggestions how to make do when you don't have juice?

    In this case, one of them is white and one is black. Their neighbors are helping them out one way or another. But it's hard to find a job, and worse if you have to care for your baby or your disabled mom.

    If you live on a reservation at least there is land, but much of it might not be farmable. That's a different dynamic, because there are different strategies available. That may mean you have to live as a third-world person, but there's no shame in that except for what the tv culture might do to make you think differently.

    In a democracy, everyone is a politician. ~ Ehren Watada

    by Lefty Mama on Mon Jun 20, 2011 at 11:56:19 PM PDT

  •  Your anger is righteous. (13+ / 0-)

    You may not have done your usual exhaustive research, but your words are still just as powerful. I'm sorry for the pain in your heart, shanikka. That's all I really wanted to say.

  •  One problem (17+ / 0-)

    "I'm on the verge of just refusing to encourage any of them to vote next year".  

    That's how Ohio got so eff up. No sister no, don't tell them NOT to vote. In more than 40 states they're trying to STOP US from voting.  People were burned to death, hanged, castrated, raped and shot so that we can vote. You KNOW who is not hiring and WHY. All this shit to make one man LOOK bad.

    Before WE get our country back, I gotta get MY state back and John Kasich got a hell of a fight. Some things we can blame politicians for, this one is the fault of big business.  People work more hours and for less money. While that's going on we are the first fired and the last hired.  What they're doing now with the vote they did to me in 2004. They took it away. That's the only tool we got. After that if the Tea Party "get their country back" America is over with as a unified country. It would be a giant slave colony then and I'm not going to let that happen.

    Think...It ain't illegal yet ! George Clinton

    by kid funkadelic on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 12:23:52 AM PDT

    •  I Understand What Shanikka Is Saying (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      shanikka, esquimaux, SpecialKinFlag

      Our ideas about what we are doing with our votes are being heavily challenged by the current situation.

      Are we doing the right thing?

      I happen to be a homo-type person and we are always told by our opinion makers to vote for Democrats "no matter what."  It seems like African-Americans are too.

      But look at what Latino leaders tell their people:

      "Don't vote for them unless they give us what we want."

      I think for this reason they end up wielding more political power.

      Well -- that and the number of Latinos as a percentage of the population is increasing, gays are static and African-Americans are likely to decrease over time.

      Find me fast on Daily Kos by following me.

      by bink on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 04:29:43 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Actually (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        esquimaux, zett

        If I go by something I heard at NN this weekend, the Black population increased by 16% over the last census period.  I was actually quite surprised because I knew that our birth rates were just slightly above whites, who are not replacing themselves in America (or frankly, anywhere else really.)  Latinos are, however, growing exponentially, in terms of their share of the population.

        I do think the question of what Black people demand for their votes is one that has to be discussed.  It appears that our cultural understanding has become that we get to demand nothing.  And definitely not from a Black president.  But, of course, if we didn't vote, there would never again be Democratic President since there hasn't been one without a lopsided Black vote for nearly 50 years now.  

        Which is why I was wrong to say that there are times I want to stop telling people to get out and vote (I regularly have the "we must vote" discussion with our youth.)  Frankly, our votes are the only power we have left.

        We just don't seem to use it.  Instead, we get fussed at if we actually put up our hands and say "Well, what about US?"

        If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

        by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:36:46 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Blacks should VOTE for Democrats, (0+ / 0-)

          but should NEVER demand anything in return for said vote.

          That's the deal. Hooray!

          •  We don't have the time to be nuiance (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ribletsonthepan, princss6

            There's no time to talk about Maslow's Law. I'm not voting Green Party. I'm not voting Independent. I voting for whatever stops Neal Boortz from hunting Black people in Atlanta.

            The Republican Party had DECLARED OPEN WAR on black America.

            Think...It ain't illegal yet ! George Clinton

            by kid funkadelic on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:57:54 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  That's Dan Phieffer's argument as well. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              SpecialKinFlag

              We either get nothing from Democrats, or we get worse than nothing from Republicans.

              Well, I guess nothing it is!

              •  I remember in 2010 when we had the Governors race (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                shanikka

                The POTUS came to town and SEVERAL so called "progressives" boycotted him.  Well Kasich won the state and I may NOT  be able to vote next time. In 2004 J.Kenneth Blackwell made sure that Bush won Ohio. Every body in Cleveland went to work THREE HOURS LATE. The voting laws in all those states are not to stop RICH WHITE PEOPLE FROM VOTING. They're to stop US. The Republican didn't win in 2010 because they had a good message, they won because nobody PAID ATTENTION to them in a off year election. I can't convince you but if the ballot don't work someone is going to try the bullet. We don't need that now do we? Remember the Tea Baggers said that next time they're bringing their guns.

                Think...It ain't illegal yet ! George Clinton

                by kid funkadelic on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:23:59 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  How about hounding Democrats? (7+ / 0-)

                I do. My problem of course is that my Democrats are all fantastic people who get the scope of the problem and don't need hounding. My congressperson and both my state senator and state rep. are all black women; they are strong in standing up for regular people. My Democratic senator, a white man, is very progressive and very accessible; you can go to one of the many meetings he's at and talk to him. You don't have to be a lobbyist with a big checkbook. He's famous for driving his schedulers to distraction by stopping to have long conversations with hotel maids and airport porters. The idea that we get "nothing" from "Democrats" — ALL Democrats — is exactly why we are getting much less than we want or need. THEY know — President Obama knows — we are too weak, too cynical, and too faithless to have his back. Every time someone says Democrats and Republicans are the same it's one more nail in our coffin. They are NOT EVEN REMOTELY the same, and continuing to say so will continue to paralyze Democrats.

                Jennifer Brunner for Governor of Ohio 2014

                by anastasia p on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:36:56 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  You can either get nothing from Democrats (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                shanikka

                Or something from Republicans. One thing I respect about Fox, they  DO say that they're coming TO GET US!

                Think...It ain't illegal yet ! George Clinton

                by kid funkadelic on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:44:14 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

        •  But here is the thing... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          conlakappa

          we can't ONLY VOTE!  That is what is missed so much here and elsewhere.  We have to get involved and vote, yes but then we have to organize and effect change where we can.

          I for one am tired of pandering to perpetrators --- many of whom are opposed to any discussion however it comes. -- soothsayer99 DPK Caucus

          by princss6 on Wed Jun 22, 2011 at 07:34:37 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  You know something (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shanikka

        It cost $650,000,000.00 to put the POTUS in. How much does the Koch Family have. They got to do their best to dissuade people from voting.  Look at all the voting right acts being passed against the poor and blacks.

        BTW, Deolvier is a Latina leader as well and you know who she supports and it ain't Sarah Palin.

        Believe me you don't want your state like Ohio. Peep my blog out three days back and you will see what Republicans are going to do to us.

        Think...It ain't illegal yet ! George Clinton

        by kid funkadelic on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:14:19 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  You Are Right (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Matt Z

      But to be clear, I didn't say I would tell someone not to vote.  After all these years of begging our people to vote, I would never say that.

      But I was also wrong to say I would stop encouraging folks to vote.  That's what happens when despair twists your heart.  So thank you for the comment.  You are right.

      If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

      by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:37:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  politics is not the answer (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shanikka, zett, princss6

        Everyone should vote and participate in politics but what is needed for real change is a resurgence of focused, disciplined social justice movements conducted mostly outside the political sphere.

        Everyone should continue to vote because the Dems have done a few good things and the Repubs are criminally insane.  Do we really need some "progressives" pontificating that "things need to get worse before they get better" to try to justify "teaching the Dems a lesson"?  Looking at some states, I don't think they need to get worse.  If by opting out of voting we endure a greater scope of human suffering will the pendulum really swing back sufficiently to make up for the destruction and death?

        In any case we can't count on politicians.  What is needed is for coalitions of labor with social justice groups among low income and unemployed Americans to put a few million people in the streets.  The issue of income inequity needs to be put front and center in all its dimensions.

        All the great social movements that spearheaded change in this country were effective because many participants had been pushed to their limit leaving little more for them to lose.  They also had a focus and some discipline.

        It's not going to happen at DKos.  This is a web site that on a particular day over half of the 50 most recent diaries were all about Weiner.  That's not the kind of focus needed.  DKos is also not a format that is oriented for organizing major social justice action.

        "O, yes, I say it plain, America never was America to me, And yet I swear this oath-- America will be!"

        by Satya1 on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 09:00:18 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  If only we had a president who cared about this. (5+ / 0-)

    Instead of one who cares about keeping Wall Street happy.

    Each time a person stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope... --RFK

    by expatjourno on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 01:32:13 AM PDT

  •  Thank you. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shanikka

    One q - are you using the U3 or U6 unemployment rate?  Please use the U6 rate, which is much higher than the U3 rate, but much more realistic.

    The U3 - popularized - rate is essentially bullshit as it does not count those who have given up looking for work.

    The only exercise I take is walking behind the coffins of friends who took exercise. -- Peter O'Toole

    by dov12348 on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 02:22:47 AM PDT

    •  I am Using U3 (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dov12348

      In part because, as I noted in my diary, the U-3 for Black Americans now exceeds the U-6 rate for the country as a whole.  For the first time EVER.

      If they measured the U-6 based upon race we'd be approaching 35-40%, I suspect.

      But they'd never put that number out there.  Folks would be out in the streets, if they did.

      If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

      by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:26:03 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Right on! Been like this a long time - and (17+ / 0-)

    will stay that way as long as Americans don't address the racism of the economic/political system.  

    Race has become caste-like, with few exceptions.  As long as all of the "concern" is for "the middle class" which has become a euphemism for white folks, nothing will be done.

     

    "If you're in a coalition and you're comfortable, you know it's not a broad enough coalition" Bernice Johnson Reagon

    by Denise Oliver Velez on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 03:03:57 AM PDT

    •  I Got Really (9+ / 0-)

      Irritated a few times this weekend hearing folks go on over and over again about "the middle class."  Because you're right, it's just repeating the caste narrative that contributed to all of us getting here.  As long as folks can aspire to middle class, they are by definition aspiring to be better than the "working class" and especially "the POOR."

      (The latter being a dirty word obviously because nobody in the political arena ever says it, from President Obama on down.)

      But at this point, sister, I am believing that we'd better as a people channel our inner nationalism and trying to do for self-again no matter what other people think about us "excluding them" (That complaint always comes up, as you know, when we focus on ourselves.)  We have seen what the so-called dream of chasing to be integrated has cost us:  the schools that educated our children, the small businesses and entrepreneurs that once allowed more of our own to have jobs, our historic neighborhoods that sheltered us when nobody else would have us, and most importantly, systematic understanding about the fact that in America, the majority just don't give a damn about making it right by us, and never will.

      If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

      by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:30:40 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Me too (7+ / 0-)

        writing 'bout that for later on today (which I'm sure you knew I would)

        I am sick and tired of the glossing over of "working class" and "poor" with "middle class" as some fuzzy category with no meaning other than the coded message of "white" and "not-other".

        Time to revive the BPP program and platform.

        Point 2 was

        WE WANT FULL EMPLOYMENT FOR OUR PEOPLE.
        We believe that the federal government is responsible and obligated to give every person employment or a guaranteed income. We believe that if the American businessmen will not give full employment, then the technology and means of production should be taken from the businessmen and placed in the community so that the people of the community can organize and employ all of its people and give a high standard of living.

        We were always about jobs.

        Some folks called us crazy.  

        We weren't.

        "If you're in a coalition and you're comfortable, you know it's not a broad enough coalition" Bernice Johnson Reagon

        by Denise Oliver Velez on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:54:35 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  That, and food for children. (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Deoliver47, TomP, shanikka, scribe

          Honestly, I wish you'd do a diary on what happened with the Black Panthers, during your involvement.

          I notice that many recommends are given to the person who has a good answer, with hardly any given to the person who asks the right question. That is backwards to me; without that question, the good answer might never have come.

          by Nulwee on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 08:00:00 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  And they think we are to blind to see this... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      conlakappa
      As long as all of the "concern" is for "the middle class" which has become a euphemism for white folks, nothing will be done.

      I for one am tired of pandering to perpetrators --- many of whom are opposed to any discussion however it comes. -- soothsayer99 DPK Caucus

      by princss6 on Wed Jun 22, 2011 at 07:47:03 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  And I might add... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        conlakappa

        it hasn't BECOME a euphemism for white folks...it has always been about white folks.  Since it was built by subsidizing by the federal government and leaving out people of color, the middle class was the ticket and negotitiation with the elite.  You act as a buffer between us and them and we will elevate you over them.  And sorry, when race is not included in the class analysis, you will see this pattern and caste system replicated no matter if you kill the corporations off or not.

        I for one am tired of pandering to perpetrators --- many of whom are opposed to any discussion however it comes. -- soothsayer99 DPK Caucus

        by princss6 on Wed Jun 22, 2011 at 07:52:45 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  I thought things were getting better?? (4+ / 0-)

    I heard somewhere that we had prevented a depression and that things were getting better, albeit slowly?

    Eh. No matter Shanikka. 11th Dimensional Chess will get us out of this mess. Just be patient.

    •  My Patience (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      brooklynbadboy, scribe, zett, doroma

      Is not the issue.  I am quickly becoming an old woman.  Frankly, I'll die without much, but I will die at least with a roof over my head I think.

      It's the patience of those who don't even have that to count on that we should all be worried about.

      As far as preventing a depression, I'm not one of those that bought that bullshit.  But that's because I live in the 'Hood, where the national politicians don't even show up until election time (and in my tiny hood not even then), and I saw what was happening on the ground.  But hey, the economic theory wonks and politicians who need to have abstract definitions about what a depression is detached from human lives, but don't have to worry about eating themselves, can have at it crowing about how we "prevented a depression."

      I always knew better.  White people's cold, Black people's pneumonia.  So as it was before, it remains today.

      If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

      by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:24:54 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  When I wrote this on the FP back in april, (7+ / 0-)

        you made an excellent comment in my story that I think deserves to be reprinted:

        I Admit (17+ / 0-)

        A certain depression reading the stereotypical comments to this diary.  Why on earth is it that, every time discussions about solving the challenges in Black America comes around, the first things folks start talking about are (a) lack of education; (b) crime (c) unwed parenthood; and (d) drugs?  While certainly the Black community in America is disproportionately impacted by each of these things, the majority of Black Americans have NONE of them (except for (c), which is comparatively recently) impacting them on a day-to-day basis.  The majority of Black children graduate from high school.  The majority of Black children do not do illegal drugs - white people put them to shame in this category.  And the majority commit no crimes at all.  For those that do, a large percentage also commit no more crimes than their white age peers - they just commit different types of crimes and are far more likely both to get caught because they are under more scrutiny and more likely when caught to be criminalized rather than handled in a way that doesn't destroy their futures.

        I can handle reduction to racist stereotyping when it comes from my political enemies.  But seeing it as the argument of first resort from allies? That just leaves me in despair.

        Fortunately, however, that's something easily overcome.

        As it relates to the merits of the diary, I would like to add two obvious strategies that were left off the list because they have been proven effective, yet we were persuaded to abandon them before they truly matured as strategies.

        The first is a logical follow-on to the diarist's suggestion to "Bank Black."  That is a great idea, but I'd take it one step further.  Many Black people in America, unfortunately, remain so entrapped by slave mentality, that we do not trust each other enough to give our business to each other.  There are hundreds of thousands of well-qualified Black professionals in America - there is barely a profession we are not at least some critical mass in.

        Yet how many of us give our business to them as our first choice? I know that when I had my solo practice, most of my clients were white.  Not because I looked for white clients, but because despite networking and being plugged in, for some reason when Black folks in positions to spend money on lawyers picked them, they went with white folks whose education and background were no better than mine, even if their public profiles might have been higher.  I know Black doctors, accountants, engineers, you name it, who face a similar struggle.  When we don't support our own businesses we lose the leverage that other dispossessed communities historically used -- most notably immigrant communities and Jewish communities -- to survive and thrive.  I don't suggest we will lose hundreds of years of training overnight but it's a place to start.

        The second suggestion is for us to return to a fundamental belief that we are a village, not 40,000,000 individuals.  The level of I-got-mine-get-yours individualism that I see in too many up and coming brothers and sisters pains my heart.  They've got all the trappings of success but they do not give back.  When I say give back, I mean in terms of philanthopy (some of the wealthiest Black folks in America have terrible track records in this regard) but more importantly in terms of time and commitment to the community, especially the youth.  Previously, even the Black elite were immeshed within our communities because discrimination in housing was such that they really had no way not to be.  Today, however, you see quite a few folks who go out of their way to prove they are All That by being as far away from their own people as they can (usually justified by the same stereotypes as relied upon each and every time a discussion about "What to Do With Black Folks" comes up.)

        If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

        by shanikka on Sun Apr 03, 2011 at 10:09:03 PM EDT


  •  Thanks for this brilliant diary Shanikka (6+ / 0-)

    given underemployment (forced part-timeism) which was championed from Clinton onwards as reducing unemployment (hah) and now no longer is even considered in unemployment stats, the types of jobs that black people have access to (certainly not as many as whites and at lower pay even for the same job), the systematic destruction of industry (due to high wages and lower profitability), wage stagnation and decline combined with systematic and institutional racism has ensured that blacks in the US not only feel the economic crisis harder, they also feel it longer.

    The only way out of this catastrophe requires a clear re-focusing of priorities by our government which I do not see happening, more specifically directed (rather than the same) opportunities for black americans as compared to white americans to redress long term deliberate creation of a black underclass (which I do not see happening in this country). What is the responsibility of government? I would say that its responsibility is to address this question, directed policies to not only protect but to enhance opportunities for black americans that have been feeling the impact of all economic crises far harder and longer. The stats are appalling, but unfortunately are no longer shocking as people that look closely have been seeing this situation for quite a while. I am just wondering where our so-called representatives are and why policies are not being instituted to address this situation?

    Diary shared, tipped and rec'd

    "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

    by NY brit expat on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 03:42:26 AM PDT

    •  It is Not Just Low Income Black Folks (5+ / 0-)

      Or uneducated Black folks.  For example, in my business (big law) the percentage of Black people employed as lawyers -- especially partners -- has PLUMMETED in the past 4 years.  Although we only made up about 5-10% of all lawyers employed by commercial law firms to begin with, we suffered a full 1/4 of all the job losses resulting from the contraction of the commercial law firm market.

      Now, these are supposedly "the best and the brightest."  These are the Black folks with elite educations and resumes.  They did everything right.  They had the opportunities.

      It didn't matter.

      It was taken away from them, anyway.

      Now you know why I despair.  If even those who played the game as asked are still going to disproportionately bear the brunt of the suffering, what do you say to those who are "flawed" or didn't "do everything right?" but still have families to feed?

      If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

      by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:22:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I Noticed This When I Worked (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shanikka, NY brit expat

        At Horrible Giant Company.

        There were few African-Americans working there in the first place.  But when layoffs happened, there was sort of a sliding scale of who got laid off when.  First, the black folks were let go.  Then the women.  Then the gay guys.  Then, finally the white guys.

        I really kicked myself when it was all over for not filling out the optional HR form where I could identify myself in terms of race.

        At my round of layoffs, they sent a huge stack of papers -- like 400 pages -- giving the age, gender, job title, salary and division of everyone who had been laid off.  They were forced to do this under a court order for previous lay-offs to prove that they were not practicing age or gender discrimination.

        I was thinking that if I had provided information about race, it might help someone else down the line demonstrate that the company discriminated against African-Americans when choosing which workers to terminate.

        Anyway.

        I don't doubt that the black middle class gets hit worse by the recession than the white middle class.

        Find me fast on Daily Kos by following me.

        by bink on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 09:03:00 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  This is across the board across income levels and (0+ / 0-)

        education levels due to the contracting of the economy and with black people especially being hard hit; so it is not simply unionised households (which have felt this since the destruction of the manufacturing goods sector) or even lower income households ... I think that there is a deliberate policy (although I have no proof on this) that the first fired are black people.  This is service sector, decline in professional opportunities (which is also why I advocate gov't investment in r&d with targeted hirings of black americans); those jobs are for professionals. So what we have here is systemic and institutionalised racism on top of a contracting economy with high unemployment. I am also wondering about the precise male/female unemployment and underemployment ratio.

        Agree with everything you said, how could you not despair? If black professionals are hit, what happens to the black unionised working class, what happens to hardworking people that need to feed their families and put a roof over their heads? They do not have the education or the savings of professional classes, how are they to keep going and cover their families?

        "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

        by NY brit expat on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 12:59:46 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  What a powerfully sad statement. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lightbulb, shanikka, Imhotepsings, Nulwee

    Thank you for giving a voice to this!  And thank you for being honest about the fact that even those who are supposed to be our allies - from the federal level on down - are FAILING our communities.  Many won't even acknowledge or mention the fact that there is a growing problem.  

    Ignoring the situation is not going to make it go away.  This energy will move into other areas - mostly, non-productive.  Right here in Chicago, we are seeing the rapid uptick in adult men engaging in flash mob crimes.  Folks jumped into action when these groups started coming downtown cracking heads and stealing stuff a few weeks ago.   Like many others in all communities who are struggling to survive, these men have no jobs, no opportunities and absolutely nothing to do.  What in the world do people think is going to happen?!?!?  Now, the only options appear to be the criminal justice system/for-profit prison enslavement, the military assembly line, or death through hard living.

    On the whole, we are losing too many people to non-productive activities in this country.  And we have written off whole generations of folks in my community.  It is truly a tragedy of epic proportions.   Like you, I'm seeing the anger boil over.  All too often I'm given the stink eye when I try to encourage young people to stay in school, get an education, and believe the opportunities are out there.  They absolutely do not believe that my story is one they will be able to tell if they continue to apply themselves.  They absolutely do not believe there will be a payoff for "good" behavior.  It's heartbreaking for me to hear this over and over and over again.  

    Like you, I keep praying and trying to provide encouragement and opportunities.  We cannot give up.  

    End the wars! Single payer now!

    by HCKAD on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 03:49:55 AM PDT

    •  It is the Writing Off (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      HCKAD, anastasia p, mallyroyal, scribe, zett

      The insistence that solutions whose payoffs are more than a decade in the making (such as "improving early childhood education") are what should be the immediate priority, with no regard for what happens to people in the meantime, that makes me the angriest.  Perhaps because the politicians won't just admit that they aren't going to worry about the folks hurting now.

      It is not as sexy in campaign literature, I guess.

      I am breathless reading about what you report.  I have said for a long time now that at some point, young people would conclude that they have nothing to gain from the current system and therefore nothing to lose.  That at some point, the failure to ensure they have meaningful futures would mean that they would cease to care about the future.  And about the fact that sooner or later they'd conclude that all the "rules" of society didn't mean shit if they couldn't even count on their peers living day to day, let alone one day having a decent living.

      And that when that happened, the rest of us needed to be very afraid.  Because they would make their own rules.

      Now? You can hear it in their music:  get rich, or die trying.

      If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

      by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:18:16 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Absolutely. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shanikka, scribe

        That we don't have a massive federal jobs program initiative right now borders on criminal neglect in so far as I'm concerned.  We have a TRILLION dollars to spend blowing up Libya but we can't find productive activities for able-bodied Americans to do right here at home?  Puh-lease.  I'm not having any of that nonsense at all.  And now we are stripping the remnants of the social safety nets away from those who need it now?  Again, not trying to hear that nonsense.  

        The American Dream is dead for entirely too many people now.  Thinking that "oh, it's just those black and brown people not taking advantage of opportunities" or not recognizing that this problem is taking deep roots in the broader population will only end with more bad news.  

        As people continue to see that the rules of law do not apply to the wealthy who are stripping this country of wealth, to politicians and SCOTUS members who lie, cheat and take bribes to further their own careers, etc., they will disconnect from civil society.  No one should be surprised when that happens.  

        We must hold those we elect accountable for looking out for our interests, not theirs.  When they do not, we should move our support to those who do.  It's just that simple.  Until we demand change, we will not get it.  

        End the wars! Single payer now!

        by HCKAD on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:22:45 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Massive government hiring??? (0+ / 0-)

          So we set up a dual job market to deal with unemployed people of color doing what?  

          Building infrastructure that will privatized at some point and sold to corporations?  

          I'm not ready to let the corporations off the hook as far as job discrimination at this point.

          I for one am tired of pandering to perpetrators --- many of whom are opposed to any discussion however it comes. -- soothsayer99 DPK Caucus

          by princss6 on Wed Jun 22, 2011 at 08:11:05 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  I think many concluded this long ago (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shanikka

        It's been said this is behind the high rate of pregnancy among girls from poverty backgrounds. They see no examples of realistic ways to do anything but be a mother. It makes sense.

        Jennifer Brunner for Governor of Ohio 2014

        by anastasia p on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:40:56 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  I commented yesterday night to your (5+ / 0-)

    original comment on MB's diary and am glad that you put your thoughts  into a diary. Thank you for it. It must be so mentally and emotionally draining.

    Just on a personal note, what do you tell your son?

    Because I don't know anymore what to tell mine. It is so hard to keep up hope that getting the education will still help to find a job you can survive on. I am so tired of offering nothing but hoping and dreaming. I want hands-on solutions and I don't know where to find them.

    •  I Tell My Son (10+ / 0-)

      More and more these days that perhaps we need to find a place to send him too.  Some new town, something, where he can start over.  But then we both know that means he will lose his son, my grandson, who he only sees 2 days a week now as it is and whose mother, being still in love with him even now despite now having had a new baby with another man, periodically takes out the fact that they won't ever be together again on his visitation with his son.

      I tell him that I will still send him to college, if he wants to go, no matter what it costs me, even as he knows that the few of his male peers who are going to school, who went to school, are out there hurting almost as bad as he is.  I tell him that yes, he can do it, even as his confidence is shot because he made mistakes as a teen and feels that it's now "too late."

      I tell him taking jobs under the table as he has been since that's all there is may be a temporary solution, but it can't get him back on the grid and the grid is where he has to live, as a father of a young Black man who needs him.

      I tell him that despair and giving up is no answer.  That he hales from a dual tradition of struggle and sacrifice, being born of a Black mother and Jewish father, and that he has to keep fighting and that I will help him keep fighting.

      And when he sinks into depression or anger about how hard it is and how he feels more and more like nothing and nobody will give him a chance, I remind him that he is loved, and he doesn't have to ever worry about sleeping on the street as long as I am alive.

      I tell him whatever I can.  Especially that despite his anger issues and taking out his angst on his mom sometimes, that I love him unconditionally.  Warts and all.

      If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

      by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:12:21 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  {{{shanikka}}} - strong, strong woman - thank you (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        bullyness, scribe, shanikka, worldlotus
        I tell him that I will still send him to college, if he wants to go, no matter what it costs me, even as he knows that the few of his male peers who are going to school, who went to school, are out there hurting almost as bad as he is.  I tell him that yes, he can do it, even as his confidence is shot because he made mistakes as a teen and feels that it's now "too late."
        ....
        That he hales from a dual tradition of struggle and sacrifice, being born of a Black mother and Jewish father, and that he has to keep fighting and that I will help him keep fighting.
        ....
        I tell him whatever I can.  Especially that despite his anger issues and taking out his angst on his mom sometimes, that I love him unconditionally.  Warts and all.

        You talk sooo much to my heart, so much so that I am at loss of words to answer. We are fighting the same struggle against despair and we need each other to stand the ground and not give in. Thank you so much for your words.

        PS. About needing to live on the "grid", I kind of enjoy thinking of those "self-sustaining grids" and working on their development as a matter of putting some hope into some hands-on, encouraging work that could lead to an independet life in dignity (at least that's how I envison it to be possible).

        PSPS I envy you for the grandson and the ... "warts". :-)
        I send a hug to your son and grandson, even if I am an old woman and your son a grown man and father. Can't hurt, can it?

        •  A Hug (0+ / 0-)

          Never does anything but good  My son is the "man's man" type but deep down he's still the same little boy that wouldn't go into the backyard for 3 days after he got his PG-13 wish despite my warnings to go see the Blair Witch Project with his friends ;) Like many men who hurt inside, too often the only time he lets himself "feel" is when I insist upon hugging him even when he is squirming like a toddler ;)

          Which I do, whenever I can see the anger and sulkiness getting to be too much.

          If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

          by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 01:25:58 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  It took me a year (8+ / 0-)

    but just last week I got my friend's job back for her after it was offshored.

    1 down, how many millions to go?

    I need to work faster.

    •  Thank You (8+ / 0-)

      For trying.  For me, starting a couple of years ago I've been trying to help some of the more enterprising teens and young adults who come knocking looking for work do more than just catch-as-catch can, by talking to them about self-marketing, getting flyers to put in mailboxes, even for the work they are doing.  It may not be much, and the money may be only pocket money to adults, but it is something, trying to start one's own business.

      Because that's all that's left, and better to have a little piece of business doing small repairs and babysitting than one selling drugs or robbing people, which is the temptation too many are faced with these days.

      If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

      by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:05:52 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I appreciate that work too (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shanikka, zett, worldlotus

        I also appreciate any kid or young adult that wants to make a few bucks doing some things to help out in the neighborhood.

        One of the kids in my old neighborhood did something very cool, and I don't think he did it as a gimmick, but it was the best advertising ever.  He "adopted" an elderly lady living alone and took care of some things around her house for free, and generally "looked out" for her.  The kids are the eyes and ears of the neighborhood, after all.

        Once everyone saw what he was doing, he had more work than he could handle, and he became the most trusted and liked person around. Not sure if any of that applies to your area, but a little sunshine works wonders sometimes.

  •  this is important. I'm glad I haven't seen a pie (15+ / 0-)

    fight break out.  that would demean this.

    tipped and recced, shanikka.

    "Wake the town and tell the people!" ~Ewart Beckford, O.D.

    by mallyroyal on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 04:14:39 AM PDT

  •  Shanikka - you are one diarist that I always look (7+ / 0-)

    forward to reading! Great diary on what I feel will be THE issue of the election. This summer should be about townhall meetings on JOBS - I know Bernie Sanders is doing this - but everyone of them should.

  •  Yes, a human catastrophe (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    HCKAD, shanikka
    This is nothing short of a human catastrophe

    Losing ground.

    Meanwhile, trillions are spent on wars. And we have more war, not less.  This is not an investment in the people.  This is not protection of the people.  The vast majority of people are losing ground in terms of real income, and black people are losing ground more than anyone else.

    This is wrong. The priorities are wrong.  You might say the priorities have always been wrong and that might be true but the pendulum has swung so far in the wrong direction that it is an absurdity. No one can deny it. And yet it continues.  And instead of talking about ways to help people, our elected leaders are talking about how to cut spending and how they may cut Medicaid.  Of all things, Medicaid.  Who will that hurt?  Will that hurt the top 1% or 10% or 20%? No, they won't even feel it.  It will hurt the same people who have the highest unemployment and all the rest of the people who are struggling.

    We are all going in the wrong direction, except the politicians (they'll be just fine) and the wealthiest few,

  •  I saw an (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BlueDragon, shanikka

    interview with Glenn Ford at the BAR a while back and he had some interesting things to say on this very subject. He said every time an African American would ask Obama about jobs, Obama's response would be I can just get jobs for African Americans. Ford's response was African Americans don't just want jobs for them. He said that African Americans want jobs in the cities and Obama should do enterprise zones there and that would help many African Americans.

    It's the policy stupid

    by Ga6thDem on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 05:10:25 AM PDT

    •  I Can, or I Can't (5+ / 0-)

      Your comment is unclear.  I do not know of any time that President Obama has said that he can, or will do anything, "just for" Black people.  Indeed, the very idea that a President or a candidate would say such a thing is ludicrous.  So I think you might have meant to write "can't?"

      To your larger point, however, I have always maintained that the solutions needed to help Black people as a targeted group would help everyone, since of course we don't live in a vacuum, residential segregation notwithstanding.  And I have always defied people to show me how it would be any other way (i.e. how the fear that doing something "just for" Black people would harm someone else rather than benefit them too.)

      So far, nobody has been able to articulate any facts to prove their fear.  Yet that unspoken racist fear (i.e. if you do for Black people you are being "unfair" to everyone else") IMO drives a huge part of the inaction and refusal to speak plain about us at all by our politicians except in the words that our racist culture wants and needs to hear:

      We are dysfunctional.  It's our own fault.

      And that is true of every politician nationally, no matter what race, I'm sad to say.

      If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

      by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:03:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Sorry (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shanikka

        it should be can't and not "can". Hope that clears it up.

        It's the policy stupid

        by Ga6thDem on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:55:13 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Glenn (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shanikka

        pretty much agreed with what you are saying. His point being mainly that if Obama did something to help the cities, that it would go a long ways towards helping the African American community but not strictly the African American community. He also said that Obama's reply when African Americans ask about jobs was ludicrous because African Americans aren't looking for jobs strictly for African Americans when they ask that question. They are looking for jobs period.

        It's the policy stupid

        by Ga6thDem on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:58:37 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  And I heard today that in n. minneapolis (7+ / 0-)

    FEMA has denied aid to tornado victims...Minnesota already has one of the worst "gaps" between black and white student achievement, black and white employment, etc, and now a tornado hits a large black neighborhood and unlike a small town up north that was hit last year individual people won't get help (they did approve help for infrastructure).

    Gov. Dayton is appealing that decision, hopefully he will prevail.

    There needs to be sustained positive employment trends for at least a generation to build long-term employment "momentum" if you will, so that people have enough experience that they don't get hit first when a downturn occurs, and as numbers increase, my hope is discrimination will be blunted. But I don't think that critical mass has ever happened yet, thus the situation described in the diary perpetuates.

    •  You are Kidding Me (7+ / 0-)

      One of the things I was deeply disappointed about at NN was that there were few local activists there - and no mention that I was aware of from the hosts about the need that has been created by the devastation that befell North Minneapolis at the same time that Joplin, MO was all over the news (it too, having been devastated, so I don't begrudge the city that news.)

      As far as what the future holds, I despair that what is really happening is that for Black people, we are returning to our past.  After all, in 1964 Malcolm stated plainly that Black people collectively suffered three ills here in America:  political oppression, economic exploitation and social degradation.  Setting aside the number of Black national politicians who we see all the time (especially since they don't even talk about Black people as a separate demographic if they can help it out of fear of their electoral chances), we certainly appear to be well in the grip of all three, yet again.

      Perhaps we never left.

      If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

      by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 05:58:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Now would be a perfect time... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BlueDragon, brooklynbadboy

    to cut government spending, cut taxes for millionaires and, while we're at it, trash that pesky social safety net.
    No worries, the dems have this problem on lockdown!

    “Sometimes, the most reasonable thing in the legislative process is to be unreasonable.” Mike Pence, R-Ind., on negotiating with the democrats.

    by dclawyer06 on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 05:15:57 AM PDT

  •  there is a lot to do (6+ / 0-)

    amen to this diary

    but tell them to vote.  write in if you must, but vote.

    we are all being abandoned and it must not stand.

    thank you for the native american section.

    i am terrified about what comes next.

    and also remember: there will never be enough jobs in our present system.  that is a fact.

    we need a new system.

    period.

    technology has permanently taken a lot of jobs.

    there is plenty to do, but most of it is not defined as a paying job, i.e. taking care of my 92 year old mother, helping me to keep working with disabilities. making the world a better place, cleaning up our cities, and on and on.

    but there will never be enough paying jobs under our current system.

    "Until we know how to safely dispose of the radioactive materials generated by nuclear plants, we should postpone these activities so as not to cause further harm to future generations" Dr Shoji Sawada

    by BlueDragon on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 05:16:15 AM PDT

    •  You're telling the truth (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Nulwee, esquimaux, TomP, BlueDragon, worldlotus

      and it IS terrifying.  I'm not sure voting is working anymore.  It's time to hit the streets, the truth be told.  The sociopaths that run shit will always compromise enough elected officials to get their own way.  We elect new ones, they  bribe them until they do their bidding.  We can't outbid them.  We can get in the street and scare the bejeebus out of them.  Iceland did it.  Egypt did it.  Greece is doing it.  We can do it too. ;)

      ~War is Peace~Freedom is Slavery~Ignorance is Strength~ George Orwell "1984"

      by Kristina40 on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 05:43:24 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  i agree, voting is not working (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Kristina40, worldlotus

        because the Dems are bought and paid for.

        but vote write in if there are no decent choices.

        we have to invent new ways to protest on and off the streets.

        they don't scare too easy.  they now have crowd control that scares me.  those sound cannon they used in Toronto were terrifying, meant only to address peaceful protest and terrorize the people who weren't even protesting and were in their homes.

        "Until we know how to safely dispose of the radioactive materials generated by nuclear plants, we should postpone these activities so as not to cause further harm to future generations" Dr Shoji Sawada

        by BlueDragon on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 04:07:07 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  You Are Right, of Course (7+ / 0-)

      I wrote what I wrote about voting in anger, but this is not something I would ever actually advocate, not voting.  I have always worked to ensure that Black people in particular vote - too many of our ancestors (and not from that far ago) died so that we had the right to do it.  

      You are also right that structurally, there are not enough jobs being produced to employ everyone.  But yet, I did some math the other day just for fun after reading a diary here on DailyKOS or in the Times, or somewhere.  I cannot recall now where.  One of the things it highlighted was $38 billlion in profits sitting offshore as corporate folks are negotiating for yet another tax holiday so they can repatriate those profits from offshore.  Their claim is that it will help with job creation.  To its credit the article pointed out that the last time such a tax holiday was granted, everybody but workers got paid:  almost all went to acquisition and expansion, renumeration (of executives) and feathering the shareholders' nest.

      So I said, how many folks at the national average household income of $45K/year would that money employ for just one year?

      Assuming the standard benefits and taxes load of 35% (taking the actual cost of the $45K job to $60,750), the answer is 625,514 people.

      More than 1/2 million people.

      If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

      by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 05:54:29 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  i knew it was metaphorical (0+ / 0-)

        in a way, i was covering your back from the kossacks who would rant that you are defeatist, etc.

        i may have to write in for most of the rest of my life.

        i always vote.  i always vote D or sometimes green for local races.

        not voting D will really screw with my mind.

        but we have been abandoned.

        "Until we know how to safely dispose of the radioactive materials generated by nuclear plants, we should postpone these activities so as not to cause further harm to future generations" Dr Shoji Sawada

        by BlueDragon on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 04:09:02 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  It's sad that you pre-emptively assume racist (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nulwee

    responses of such obvious proportions in your diary (prior to actually seeing the commentary), but I understand as much as I can. Tip'd/Rec'd.

  •  Democrats: END THE EMPIRE (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tardis10, Nulwee, TomP

    Looks like quite a few U.S. mayors are fed up with the obscene cost of terminal war mongering/war profiteering; which we know benefits a very small, already wealthy group of corporations- but doesn't do jack for the rest of us, including better security.

    again, keep in mind the only thing that stopped the war profiteers running the Vietnam scam was congress finally defunded the war. they STOPPED writing the cheques. until congress does the same now, this BULLcrap is going to go on forever.

    http://my.firedoglake.com/...

    "I don't feel the change yet". Velma Hart

    by Superpole on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 05:45:56 AM PDT

  •  Systemic dismantling of Black communities. (6+ / 0-)

    You said First they took our historic neighborhoods, with the predatory lending and subprime lending and all that.

    That's the latest tool, as you know. But some of your commentators here might not know that the systemic dismantling of POC communities is a very long tradition. Robert Moses is probably the most prominent example of that.

  •  It's positively criminal. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shanikka, Nulwee, 3goldens

    Everybody who wants a job should be able to find one. Unemployment should consist only of those who are between jobs in the truest sense of the phrase -- quit, laid-off, fired, and just haven't found the next one yet.

    Now long-term unemployment is worse than it was during the Great Depression.  Many employers won't even talk to you if you're unemployed.

    I hear, however, that there will be a laser-like focus on jobs once all the important stuff is gotten out of the way.

    Maybe they can put a few people to work building prisons to handle the result of kids who can't be properly cared for by parents who are out of work, frustrated and angry people who just plain blow their corks, drug addictions, etc.

    That sounds constructive, doesn't it?

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 06:28:37 AM PDT

    •  Harry Truman went to the NAACP (6+ / 0-)

      once and said, paraphrasing "Every man who wants a job should be able to get one and it is the government's job to see to it."

      Can you imagine a Democrat saying that today?

      •  Here's the actual quote: (10+ / 0-)
        We must not tolerate such limitations on the freedom of any of our people and on their enjoyment of basic rights which every citizen in a truly democratic society must possess. Every man should have the right to a decent home, the right to an education, the right to adequate medical care, the right to a worthwhile job, the right to an equal share in making the public decisions through the ballot, and the right to a fair trial in a fair court. We must insure that these rights -- on equal terms -- are enjoyed by every citizen. To these principles I pledge my full and continued support.

        Harry Truman at the NAACP

        I suspect that if a Democrat said things like this today he'd be called a communist. I don't think anybody hated Communists more than Harry Truman, whom Ronald Reagan campaigned for by the way.

        •  Can't argue with Harry on that. (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          brooklynbadboy, shanikka, esquimaux

          Sadly, there are many things that can be done by the government that don't even stretch what many people consider to be legitimate roles for government to play.

          Hell -- government purchasing power, all by itself, could be directed to make a huge difference if somebody cared enough to do it.

          But -- no.
          Better to ladle out money to those who don't need it.

          LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

          by dinotrac on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:06:19 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Harry T - a real radical by today's standards (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          shanikka, esquimaux, TomP

          Plain, simple truth.  We can do it if we want to.

          "My father always told me that all businessmen were sons of bitches, but I never believed it until now." - JFK during the 1962 Steel Crisis

          by Betty Pinson on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:35:10 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  The President tried to get people jobs (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shanikka, princss6

        Krazy King Kasich GAVE back some of the stimilus money. We were suppost to fix out train system, but King Kasich didn't want it. Could you BLAME some Republicans for once?

        Think...It ain't illegal yet ! George Clinton

        by kid funkadelic on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 12:20:43 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Thank you for this shanikka. (10+ / 0-)

    This story is as old as it is shameful and infuriating, but you have told it well.  Would that we had the humanity and decency to write a whole new story for us all.  We, as a society, have so much to atone for, so much wrong to set right.  At this point I can only wonder if we ever will.  The prospects for that are not looking good and that a crying shame.

  •  I can't rec this diary (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shanikka

    I started writing a comment and it turned into a diary.

    Please read it

  •  shannika i don't know what to say (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shanikka, Ana Thema, worldlotus

    you once called me kind of a closet racist. well i don't know about that, but I will tell you I know plenty of REAL racists and I think that its even worse than that.

    my boss, that I work for now, hires telemarketers all the time. I am in charge of taking their phone calls and screening them. One of the first things he asks me is "does he sound black"

    so yeah I think it's even worse than what you said. I think that these people (including my parents and I am 59 years old fer chrissake) would rather starve than give anything up to black/brown people.

    and that's why america will go down. because people would rather starve than be friends with the black man that lives in your neighborhood. I'm sorry. I'm so so sorry and I don't know what to do about it.

    •  Lord Have Mercy Woman (8+ / 0-)

      I pointed out to you some unconscious racism in a diary you wrote more than 3 years ago and you're STILL tripping about that? Good Lord.  I thought our subsequent dialogue clarified that I was not calling you something I had not called myself, and everyone born and raised in this country.  All I asked you and others to do was think about what you were saying without meaning to.  I thought we'd understood each other and understood that it was not about tearing you down, but about trying to lift us ALL up.

      And I'm still not going to play the "some types of racism isn't as bad as others" game.

      One's overt, as you note in your anecdote and I appreciate you telling the story because believe it or not huge numbers of people don't believe this stuff still happens.  One's covert, the subconscious and subliminal product of the impact of hundreds of years of white supremacy on all of our minds.

      But both still are the destroyer.

      Peace.

      Don't be sorry, because you didn't "do anything wrong."  But do stand and fight.  I'll be fighting with you, sister.  Even if you are maybe still not convinced of that.

      If you don't stand for something, you will go for anything. Visit Maat's Feather

      by shanikka on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:21:02 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  well ok (0+ / 0-)

        of course I remember it. it still hurts. And so do you remember it or you wouldn't have come back that quick.
        Amirite?

        Now. You know that I agree with you exactly. You know that. Question is, what are we going to do about it, in the face of this huge bankerster/big media/guys  that want to crush all the little guys.

        You know I am completely open to suggestions. And yes, you did hurt me. You have the power to do that.

  •  But you know it's because... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sethtriggs, Ana Thema

    we have a Black man for President.  That makes up for it.

    Wait for it....

    Wait for it...

    "The bottom line is, we've got to wake up. We can't allow our disappointment in Obama to lull us into allowing a truly dangerous strain of conservative philosophy to gain any more traction than it already has." --ObamOcala 4/5/11

    by smoothnmellow on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:16:49 AM PDT

  •  It's for your son (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shanikka

    I understand.  You are right to be angry, and not afraid. Never fear.

    All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree. ..................................... Albert Einstein

    by rosabw on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 07:21:45 AM PDT

  •  1 in 6 sounds like glory days (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shanikka

    Of course it's a lot worse than that official number. In general for all americans it's 20% unemployed at least but they cook the books.

  •  a tangential comment ... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TomP, shanikka

    In marrying my/our concerns, this is the overall context in which I believe organizations and efforts like Susttainable South Bronx merit attention and (massive) support. They tackle the reality of the interlinkage of our challenges and opportunities.  Create jobs, where they are needed; improve the community's quality of life and the population's health; and help address our climate/energy/other environmental challenges.  

    A truly significant (meaningful) effort to 'green' cities, public schools (and other public buildings) would have created jobs (not least in communities of color) while helping foster change for the better in so many ways.

     

    Blogging regularly at Get Energy Smart NOW! for a sustainable energy future.

    by A Siegel on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 08:05:00 AM PDT

  •  makes me sick to read this sad (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TomP, shanikka

    state of affairs

  •  This issue has been boiling under for 30+ years (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shanikka, bruddaone, princss6

    And I have yet to see a concerted, focused, well-informed effort FROM WITHIN the African-American community to address it.  It didn't just explode overnight.  

    The same materialism, go-for-self, corporate mind virus infected our communities, led by pimping prosperity preachers running pyramid schemes while driving Bentleys and living in mcmansions, and corporate-owned "prophets" like Tavis Smiley and Cornel West, who did nothing but talk about black America for 10 years (brought to you by Walmart and McDonald's, of course).  Add to that a heaping helping of blinged out, semi-illiterate rappers ruling the music charts for the last 20 years -- a whole generation influenced by balling and shot-calling.

    What in response from the "black leadership"  -- NAACP, mayors, Congressional Black Caucus, churches????  Silence and inaction.  Except now they want to blame Obama, of course.  It was so much easier eating Clinton's crumbs (and even Bush's crumbs), but now all pretense has been dropped, and they're being exposed for what they haven't done and who they haven't served.

    My heart aches for my brothers and sisters.  It's time for a real period of self-examination and reckoning.  Only we can save ourselves.

    Many of today's "progressives" wouldn't have lasted in the 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s or 70s. Two years in and their thrill is all gone. Poor things.

    by PoliticalJunkessa on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 08:31:30 AM PDT

    •  By the way, the LAST thing I would do (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bruddaone

      is not encourage minorities to vote -- definite death spiral, and that's exactly what extremists aim for and count on -- demoralizing and depressing the vote.  Ugh.

      Many of today's "progressives" wouldn't have lasted in the 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s or 70s. Two years in and their thrill is all gone. Poor things.

      by PoliticalJunkessa on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 08:40:25 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Good post. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shanikka, 3goldens

    Another reason why focusing on the deficit now is harming people.

    CitizenX: "If the republicans were in charge GM & Chrysler would be dead and Osama bin Laden would be alive."

    by TomP on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 08:36:56 AM PDT

  •  Good diary, Ms. S (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shanikka, worldlotus, princss6

    You point out that it is not just one cause -- there are several causes. You forgot a couple of other factors --

    --the media, who tends to portray us in the worse light ever. Just take a look at what stories get national vs. stay local -- a black flash mob who robs a 7-11 vs. a missing black teenager visiting her relatives in Baltimore?

    --You mention the criminal justice system but I'll highlight this part of it -- a jury of your peers is not your peers when a white police officer gets 2 years for killing an unarmed black teenager in handcuffs. Plex got three years for shooting his own leg! The institutional racism in our police, jails, and in the law is rampant. i used to think that if we had more access to the law as lawyers and judges, things would change -- they have not.

    --Reality TV. Unfortunately, this is what we do to ourselves - I don't need to watch 'Housewives of ATL' or 'Basketball Wives' to know what happens on the shows. Some folks see that as progress -- but I'm sure when an employer who watches one of those shows and has a choice between a black woman vs. the other, most of the time you know who is going to get the job.

    ---Health.  Yeah, black doesn't crack so no one will know that i'm in my 50's unless I volunteer that information. However, we have many chronic health issues - diabetes, heart disease, et al. -- that we can not compete sometimes with someone who lives in a neighborhood with a national grocery store with fresh fruits and veggies and has had quality medical care for most of their lives.

    None of this makes it right -- none of this will be corrected over night or in four years -- or probably in my lifetime. But I do see the difference and change between my mother's time and my time. So, I stand hopefully and help when I can.

    Stay strong and continue to speak for those who can't or won't for themselves

    Superman's black in the building - Public Enemy

    by blackinthebuilding on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 08:39:18 AM PDT

  •  So heartbreaking. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shanikka, 3goldens, princss6

    These problems will never be solved if they aren't identified in the first place. So thank you for shining light on these statistics and for calling on us all to never ignore the most marginalized of our society.

    If the people one day wish to live / destiny cannot but respond / And the night cannot but disappear / and the bonds cannot but break. -- Abu'l-Qasim al-Shabbi

    by unspeakable on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 09:05:11 AM PDT

  •  The unemployment has a negative feedback effect (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shanikka, Utahrd, 3goldens, princss6

    that is all too evident when it comes to the availability of retail and services for AA neighborhoods. Having done a lot of work in the south, one of the real problems is that there is a lack of good retail and services in poor neighborhoods.

    This means that in the Broad Avenue area in memphis, for example,young mothers without cars can pay almost twice as much at the store for everyday things, to retailers who stock the store buy buying from WalMart and marking up the merchandise. And fresh produce at a reasonable price to feed healthy families? Not happening.

    So relative to wages, people are even more poor and more deprived of the basics for life  and health than the numbers would indicate because their cost of living for necessities is much higher than it would be in a well-served upper income neighborhood.

    I have seen this in too many places, in the south but also in the north and especially on Indian reservations. It breaks my heart.

    Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. Groucho Marx

    by marketgeek on Tue Jun 21, 2011 at 09:08:37 AM PDT

    •  That's the problem out west (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      marketgeek, worldlotus

      Some of the worst poverty out west is on reservations.

      So that's why I see all these "Close down all mining, oil and gas exploration now!" diaries and comments; I ask "So where are people on the reservations supposed to work?  That's the only job for 200 miles in any direction in some cases."

  •  Any statistics on this? (0+ / 0-)

    It would be interesting to compare the unemployment rates of US-born blacks, African immigrants and Afro-Caribbean and Latin American immigrants of African ancestry.

  •  Republican response... (0+ / 0-)

    "Hey - 5 out of 6 black people have jobs! We're doing great!"

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