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Rick Perry has taken a lot of heat for signing an executive order in 2007 requiring HPV vaccination for all girls in Texas. Michele Bachmann accused him of doing so because he was lobbied by Merck, the drug company that produced the vaccine.

But at this week's debate, Perry had a pretty good answer to that accusation. In fact, it was probably his finest moment during an otherwise very unimpressive performance:

"I got lobbied on this issue. I got lobbied by a 31-year-old young lady who had Stage 4 cervical cancer. I spent a lot of time with her. She came by my office, talked to me about the program."

Perry isn't exactly known for his compassion, but that's a pretty compelling reason to mandate vaccination. And it sure sounds a lot better than some of the other suggested reasons he might have been moved to support mandatory vaccination:

Over the past five years, it turns out that Merck [the company that manufacturers the vaccine] gave over $350,000 to the Republican Governors Association, a period in which Perry was heavily involved with the group, and the RGA in turn gave $4 million to Rick Perry.

And wait some more! Merck's lobbyist on the vaccine issue was Mike Toomey, Perry's former chief of staff. Toomey recently co-founded a super PAC that plans to raise over $50 million for Perry's campaign.

And that's on top of the $30,000 Merck has donated directly to Perry in the past. But Perry insisted that all that money—well, the $5,000 he was willing to admit he'd received, anyway—wasn't the reason he signed an executive order mandating the vaccine. No, it was because he was lobbied by one young woman suffering with cancer. Just one problem—it's not true:

Perry on Feb. 2, 2007, signed the order directing the state Health and Human Services commissioner to mandate human papillomavirus vaccination for all girls before admission to the sixth grade. Perry at the time released a statement saying that the vaccine "provides us with an incredible opportunity to effectively target and prevent cervical cancer," which HPV can cause.

Perry met Burcham after Feb. 2, 2007, campaign spokesman Mark Miner told CNN Friday, but he was not sure of the precise date. Miner said Perry never claimed to have met Burcham before he signed the order.

So Perry is claiming that he signed this order in an act of compassion because he was lobbied by someone he didn't meet until after he signed the order. And he was so moved by her story of suffering, after he actually did meet her, that when the legislature  passed a bill to repeal his order, he didn't veto the bill. He let his order go down in defeat. That's how moved he was.

We don't know why Rick Perry really signed that order. But we do know one thing: it wasn't because he was lobbied by a "31-year-old young lady who had Stage 4 cervical cancer."

Originally posted to Kaili Joy Gray on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 09:12 AM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  He lied about it and cynically used a (30+ / 0-)

    cancer patient to cover up the truth about Merck lobbying him. The man's a certified moldy douchebag.

    I work with B2B PAC, and all views and opinions in this account are my own.

    by slinkerwink on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 09:16:09 AM PDT

    •  Typical Perry (13+ / 0-)

      It's only ever about the $$$$$$

      People are only props to be used and discarded... Unless they are very wealthy.

      Keep your fears to yourself, but share your courage with others. (RL Stevenson)

      by cassandracarolina on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 09:43:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Perhaps we could get a poor person (6+ / 0-)

      into his office to talk about poverty, or a working person to talk about the importance of unions and workplace safety, or a child to talk about the importance of education and facts (not myths) being taught, or a senior citizen to talk to him about how Social Security and Medicare aren't Ponzi schemes, or maybe a polar bear to talk about how Perrys fossil fuel friends are driving him into extinction.  

      Of course, it's BS.  No single person has an impact on anyone money driven or ideology driven.  They believe what they believe because it benefits them personally in dollars, or votes, or powerful allies.  They'll change their tune whenever they feel it benefits them (I'm looking at you, too, Mitt McFlipFlop).

      Perry is looking to undermine that fact that the pharmaceutical company that benefitted from his order was a supporter and donor.  In signing the executive order rather than going through the Legislature, he gets sole responsibility (and also the blame) for it.  He can't shift the responsibility elsewhere so his only recourse is distraction and outright lies.  Right now any lie will do since the "small government" and "government off our backs" memes he promotes are diametrically opposite of his action in this matter.

      His primary goal is to make himself disappear as a person who will support anything for a buck.

      There already is class warfare in America. Unfortunately, the rich are winning.

      by Puddytat on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 10:04:22 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Karma is gunna git him Slink (6+ / 0-)

      when I was little my grandma scared me but good into not telling lies about other people, especially a lie like Perry told..using someone elses misfortune to cover up your own BAD actions.

      My grandmother told me that whatever LIE I told about someone else was going to come back ON ME....   and I always believed what my Gramma said soooo I became quite afraid to tell a lie about anyone OR ever use other peoples misfortune to protect myself... if I do that (and I am NOT infallible) there is this CLOUD over everything while I subliminally keep a cosmic eye out for that wallop upside MY head from KARMA.

      Perry used someone elses misfortune to cover up his own possible misdeeds.... according to my dear departed Grandmother KARMA is gunning for Perry now so I wouldnt stand to close to him cause the karmetic upside the head SMACK is going to be a  major one!!

      "Orwell was an optimist"

      by KnotIookin on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 10:06:03 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  my understanding is she DID lobby Perry (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bruised toes

      after Texans became outraged over Perry's executive order and the legislature was debating whether to override it.
      But of course she didn't lobby Perry in the context he asserted.

      The GOP says -- "firefighters are thugs!"

      by MartyM on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 11:13:02 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Could have talked to her on the phone ... (0+ / 0-)

      ... months before the order was signed. She could have written a letter.

      Other cancer survivors and victims might have called or wrote letters as well.

      I'm not giving Perry a pass on this issue; however, OP doesn't prove her point with the evidence cited.

      Jon Stewart: Greenspan's problem with the free market is the freedom part. The part he left out of his technical modeling is what slime-balls people are.

      by DeanObama on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 04:07:33 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  For a party that doesn't care about the sick (9+ / 0-)

    They sure jump at the chance to use one to make political points.

    Perry to cover-up the fact that he could be "insulted" by a $5,000 bribe while hiding a bigger one.

    While Bachmann makes up sick just to justify opening her big mouth and inserting her big foot.

    "My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we'll change the world,"~ Jack Layton

    by JMoore on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 09:26:56 AM PDT

    •  Because Bachaman is an idiot, she ruined her (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      sherlyle, JMoore, elwior, trivium, MartyM

      intial point. It should have never been about the pros and cons of the vaccine, it should have always been about the "mandate" provided by "executive order", because he was on the take from the drug company. Because she is so stupid, she could have really scored points with it and it would be something that haunted Perry for some time, she screwed it up, and it has become mute, the response is, well it does help to prevent the HPV virus so no real harm done. Do people realize this man is running for President and he will bring this same crony capitalism to the W.H.

      •  excellent point,Vera and I agree (0+ / 0-)

        But I was glad she screwed up...(again)...The field needs to narrow to the real contenders so that we can concentrate efforts to get the truth out there.

        If they pick Perry to run...there hopefully will be alot of "vetting" going on. If the truth can outlast the cover-ups...there is no way he can win.

        "My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we'll change the world,"~ Jack Layton

        by JMoore on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 10:28:25 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Sort of like they vetted Palin? (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          JMoore, Helena Handbag, MartyM

          All the GOP cares about is if they are likable and popular, they want idiots in charge, this way they can be controlled. I often think this is why all this hatred for Obama, because he actually has a brain and uses it. Lately that is a disqualification for President, and probably one of the reasons, Romeny is having such a difficult time.

      •  For Bachmann, sexual aspect WAS the point (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MartyM, mmacdDE

        While I agree that the coupling of Perry's HPV executive order with campaign support from the drug company SHOULD be the the key issue, to Bachmann the key issue instead is that Perry issued a mandate requiring young unmarried girls to be vaccinated against a sexually transmitted disease, thereby (according to social conservative sensibilities) encouraging and endorsing young women to have promiscuous sex.  In fact, that IS the aspect social conservatives within the Tea Party movement find offensive about Perry's order, and not Perry's financial support connections with the drug industry (and the HPV vaccine maker in particular).

  •  Is the vaccine widely given? (0+ / 0-)

    Is it basically freebie?

    Because if it isn't it certainly ought to be.

    Whatever Perry has gotten up to, according to this timeline,  this vaccine ought to be something freely available to all teenage women.

    I'd see it as a benefit rather than something to politik about.

    What has happened with this vaccine in Europe for instance?

    A Catholic, Jew, Muslim and Buddhist walk into Al Aqsa Mosque. Buddhist immediately exclaims: "excuse me I appear to be in the wrong joke."

    by Salo on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 09:27:52 AM PDT

    •  I believe it is part of the standard battery of (0+ / 0-)

      shots at the pre-teen visit, for both boys and girls now.  At the time Perry tried to mandate it, it was new and not widely available.  It was expensive and many pediatric offices did not carry it.

      In our clinic, it is offered to all young patients between age 11 and 26.

      We have nowhere else to go... this is all we have. (Margaret Mead)

      by bruised toes on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 11:27:26 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Damage done by both Perry (6+ / 0-)

    and Bachmann re: this vaccine.  His lying is par for the course.  His use of an executive order by-passed a viable legislative route only because he benefited financially, thus, making the vaccine a political rather than health issue.  He gave fodder to yet another anti-vax nutjob.

    I have paid very close attention to the CDC and credible medical sources re: this life-saving vaccine -- I'm still a bit leery re: a mandate like those for proven, decades old vaccinations.  Perhaps it is because I still am not completely confident with the FDA.

    I also don't have children -- so anything I might write regarding my reservations should be taken with a giant grain of salt.

    Vi er alle norske " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

    by gchaucer2 on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 09:27:53 AM PDT

    •  The vaccine seems like a good. (5+ / 0-)

      "UK Department of Health figures suggested that by 2009, approximately 70% of 12-to-13-year-olds in England had been fully vaccinated. This high uptake is due in part to full state funding of the vaccine. The HPV vaccine is offered free of charge to the target population in Germany, Italy and the UK.
      So, good news in some of the largest EU countries but elsewhere in Europe the picture is not as good. In France 65% of the cost is borne by the social security scheme and a recent report in the March issue of the Journal Vaccine by Fagot et al reports that just 33% of girls of the age of 14 years in 2007 and 24% in 2008 were reimbursed for required 3 doses of HPV vaccine."

      I tend to think Bachmann is literally evil for going here. This shot ought to be completely subsidized and universally available.

      A Catholic, Jew, Muslim and Buddhist walk into Al Aqsa Mosque. Buddhist immediately exclaims: "excuse me I appear to be in the wrong joke."

      by Salo on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 09:37:53 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I'm a chronic skeptic (4+ / 0-)

        at the same time thrilled by medical/health advances.  I remember the tragedies of thalidomide -- which mostly affected children in Europe.  Of course, I am also of the generation which greatly benefited from the Salk/Sabin vaccines.  I still remember vividly swallowing a sugar cube with a pink splotch (vaccine) to protect against polio.  Not sure whether that was Salk or Sabin.  I still see the scar on my upper arm for the small pox vaccine (hope it still works).  

        I did get, in quick succession, mumps, measles and chicken pox -- must have been prior to vaccination.  I am a true believer in vaccines -- I absolutely hope this one has a high success rate over the years with negligible side-effects.  We honestly don't know yet but every scientific advancement re: health has its risks.  

        If I had a daughter or son, yes, I most likely would get her/him vaccinated against HPV.  Every single medical "cure" or prevention carries a risk -- 1 in a million?  That's life -- risk is what we deal with daily.

        Vi er alle norske " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

        by gchaucer2 on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 09:51:34 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Vaccines are not a matter of belief. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          trivium, bruised toes

          The data are emperical.

          Bachmann ought to have been removed from the stage for being a freak.  It's one thing to believe in creation myths, quite another to start attacking proven medical science. Especially about a cancer that is  specific to women.

          Wouldn't anyone want this condition to be vaccinated against?  I find it bizarre that a reasonable, if perhaps corrupt decision by Perry, could be highlighted by a freak like Bachmann and reinforced by people who normally wish to see medical proceedures subsidized and reimbursed.

          My mind is boggling.  

          A Catholic, Jew, Muslim and Buddhist walk into Al Aqsa Mosque. Buddhist immediately exclaims: "excuse me I appear to be in the wrong joke."

          by Salo on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 09:59:32 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Again, I'm not an anti-vax (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            mmacdDE

            nor even an anti-experimental medicine individual for the most part.  Yes, data are empirical -- as with supposed data for a number of drugs which have been removed from the shelves re: arthritis, cardiovascular disease, contraceptives, miscarriage, etc.  Empirical data is not necessarily 100% accurate for all time.

            One example -- even though I am forever grateful for the procedure.  My Dad had an aortic aneurysm in the '90s.  Despite horrific emergency surgery (cut him open sternum to groin without anesthesia) they implanted stents -- the early version.  He survived another 15 years because of those thingies, but in the interim it was discovered that they were inadequate and one's body worked against them as a foreign intrusion -- massive improvements since then.

            Am I sorry he had that surgery?  Absolutely not.  Am I happy that he was basically a "guinea pig" for the technology?  Yes.  Others will benefit from improvements and my Dad had 15 years he otherwise wouldn't have.  My sister who died at 47 was a guinea pig for cancer drugs.  Do I regret that?  Uh, yes.  She should have died in peace rather than become a tumor factory because she was given false hope.

            I've practiced enviro law for almost 20 years including work re: FDA.  I understand risk/benefit.  I also understand how big Pharma can pay a premium to fast track their drugs and how many times there's been a fuck up.

            Vi er alle norske " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

            by gchaucer2 on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 10:15:52 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  Sabin. (0+ / 0-)
          Of course, I am also of the generation which greatly benefited from the Salk/Sabin vaccines.  I still remember vividly swallowing a sugar cube with a pink splotch (vaccine) to protect against polio.  Not sure whether that was Salk or Sabin.
          Salk is an injection.  The difference is that Salk uses killed viruses, so it has to be injected or it will just be digested.  Sabin uses living but weakened viruses, so it survives the digestive system.

          Renewable energy brings national global security.      -6.25, -6.05

          by Calamity Jean on Sun Sep 25, 2011 at 02:29:31 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Skeptical, too (0+ / 0-)

        My skepticism is not based on vaccination, but rather on the rush. The 50% with HPV figure that I recently heard is ... bizarre. Given that we're talking about a virus known for being unreported, there is danger in the statistical reporting of the spread will serve the people with money. The link between HPV and cervical cancer is undoubted, but it's still correlative rather than causal. So, we have a real link, a bad but unknowable disease, and a new vaccine.

        A sexually active girl or woman should get the vaccine. However, when a patented vaccine that is new and that was approved under the current FDA (only on reported information by the drug maker, and using animal analogs) is jammed out on all girls at a young age, I can't see the efficacy over the profits.

        Every reductio ad absurdum will seem like a good idea to some fool or another.

        by The Geogre on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 10:07:23 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Not reportable in the same way as syphillis (0+ / 0-)
          Given that we're talking about a virus known for being unreported, there is danger in the statistical reporting of the spread will serve the people with money

          Diseases are reportable when there is an easy to do test and an intervention, and the benefit for the public health outweighs the burden on the bean counters.  Genital warts are a chronic condition, mostly diagnosed clinically. If all the OB-Gyns and STD clinics had to report every case of genital warts that may carry the HPV virus, it would overwhelm the provders and the local health departments.

          From my own experience in public health, I can assure you that genital warts are VERY common. And they cause a great deal of interpersonal stress even if they don't lead to cancer.

          I hear your argument about the profit making, and agree that it stinks that millionaires are being made at the same time that we can't provide basic health care. But I have to come down on the side of prevention.

          We have nowhere else to go... this is all we have. (Margaret Mead)

          by bruised toes on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 11:43:37 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I'm for prevention, but not field testing (0+ / 0-)

            The Texas decision was Salk-level field testing on the youth of America. That would require a massive health crisis to be justified.

            I absolutely, wholeheartedly agree with saying that all sexually active women should get an HPV vaccine. I also want the FDA to get a firewall between its officials and industry. I also want FDA to require that studies be done without intellectual property controls. I also want longitudinal studies in animal models. The biggest thing is that I can't really stomach admitting it, but I agree with the libertarians that the problem is the requirement and the low age and the speed.

            I lived through 1) the Framingham study finding that my medication was killing people, 2) the gabapentin off-label abuse, and avoided 3) the Cox-2 inhibitors are great for warfarin-taking-patients moronia. I don't trust quick numbers any more. I wish I could.

            Every reductio ad absurdum will seem like a good idea to some fool or another.

            by The Geogre on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 07:23:53 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  She's just a prop to him (7+ / 0-)

    First, Perry used this 31-year old woman as a prop to justify/defend his bypassing of the legislature to sign an executive order. Now, he's attempting to use her to shut up his critics, and the MSM initially enabled him to get away with it.

    The clips were conveniently available for the MSM to show Perry meeting with her in her hospital room, giving her a ride on his motorcycle, and other assorted feel-good moments.

    Today, finally, the MSM followed up those clips with a one-liner to the effect that his claim wasn't true. It will be interesting to see whether the Sunday shows point out that he lied.

  •  Am I the only one who think Perry (8+ / 0-)

    has a "crook look" problem ?

    "Walking into someone's diary is like walking into someone's home. You are a guest. Act accordingly." Kos

    by Mariken on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 09:50:31 AM PDT

  •  Let's just stipulate to this: (3+ / 0-)

    Conjugate the verb "to lie" and then plaster Perry's face next to it.  Or any other Republican for that matter.

    QED.

    Next!

    Land of the propagandized; home of the ignorant.

    by Lavocat on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 09:50:50 AM PDT

    •  Right, Lavocat. I and practically anyone else here (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      mmacdDE

      knows that, but I wonder if the FOX news dunderheads will even hear that he lied. Moreover, even if they KNOW Perry lied, will they excuse him on the grounds that Republican lies might help throw "that Kenyan" out of the White House?

      Our best bet for combatting Perry is probably to emphasize his "luv for them illegals" even though we know his main interest is their exploitation.

      Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from a religious conviction. -- Blaise Pascal

      by RJDixon74135 on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 10:40:05 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  We don't know why Perry signed the order (7+ / 0-)

    any more than we know why a bribed official awards a contract to the person doing the bribing.

    Two great mysteries of the universe.

    "Mr. President, I'm not saying we wouldn't get our hair mussed." General Buck Turgidson

    by muledriver on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 09:53:13 AM PDT

  •  Do you deny that Rick Perry has time travel? (4+ / 0-)

    He was in his Prayer Tower in Austin, and there he had a vision of the meeting that he was going to have, and he heard an angel in the guise of Burcham before the woman her self came by.

    The angel said, "Rick, I want you to be good to Merck so that they'll donate to the Republican Governor's Association so that they'll make you the head of it, and then you'll have a base of support for a presidential run. This is good and righteous, and you are not to enjoy it."

    Every reductio ad absurdum will seem like a good idea to some fool or another.

    by The Geogre on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 09:59:24 AM PDT

  •  The real challenge here (4+ / 0-)

    is not that Perry lied, that's no shock. The real problem is that the rethugs lie on the tee vee machine and their sheep believe them. They never see the actual facts, they don't even care. They believe whatever feels true. That's how we got shrub and I'm afraid that's going to be the biggest problem for us next year.

    peace

    bk

  •  Clearly you are not a believer (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sherlyle

    Perry knew ahead of time he was going to meet this woman and hear this amazing story. God told him all about it. If you were a true believer, you'd know this, because God would have also given you lots of money from a pharmaceutical company.

  •  Well, hang on (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Salo

    Yes, he met the woman before he signed the order, but a year later when he had to defend it, she was lobbying him to keep it, and he used her story to defend it so it wasn't overturned.  So I'm actually willing to give Perry a little pass on this one -- he didn't say the woman lobbied him to sign the bill in the first place, he said he was lobbied by her on the issue, which is true.

    "The majority of a single vote is as sacred as if unanimous." - Thomas Jefferson

    by cartwrightdale on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 10:01:10 AM PDT

    •  It's bizarro world (0+ / 0-)

      This shot was administered privately in the UK for 450 pounds stirling. That's close to 900 bucks.

      Why not have the state pay for this and attempt to get population imunity by innoculating every woman in Texas?
      Next thing DKos will say that Merck and Glaxo Smith Klein bribed Labour to administer the same shots at the tax payers expense.

      What is this the daily "fucking" mail?  

      A Catholic, Jew, Muslim and Buddhist walk into Al Aqsa Mosque. Buddhist immediately exclaims: "excuse me I appear to be in the wrong joke."

      by Salo on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 10:08:16 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Krauthammer brought that up on O'Reilly (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sherlyle, drmah, Libby Shaw

    About 2:20 in.

    You know things are bad when the GOP establishment types are even calling you out as a liar.

    Here we are now Entertain us I feel stupid and contagious

    by Scarce on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 10:03:06 AM PDT

  •  So Perry lied. I'm shocked, I say, shocked (0+ / 0-)

    And by that I mean "so what else is new".

    WWMBD? -7.50, -8.51

    by Rogneid on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 10:04:14 AM PDT

  •  As nutty as Rick Perry has been... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sherlyle, Libby Shaw

    ...he may not be winning the praises of establishment Republicans, but he is sure saying the things that are going to win him support of the teaheadists who have become the party's main force. In the general election, he is sure providing a lot of material that I pray that the Obama campaign will use big time against him.

    Friends don't let friends vote Republican.

    by alaprst on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 10:08:24 AM PDT

  •  Perry & CERN (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    psykos

    It only appears to us that Perry met Burchman after he signed the order.  What really happened is that Perry and Burchman were going faster than the speed of light at the time of their meeting.

    As we all know, time slows down as you approach the speed of light and actually reverses if you exceed the speed of light.  

    Perry and Burchman, by exceeding the speed of light, went back in time and met before the order was signed.  This was prior to yesterday's big announcement by CERN, unless...

    This is settled science for Perry, but sadly for us, Climate Instability and Evolution are just theories.

    We kidnap. We torture. It's our policy. Embrace it or end it!

    by Mosquito Pilot on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 10:09:56 AM PDT

  •  That is devastating. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sherlyle
  •  Who cares? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bruised toes, hdwh

    Perry's EO would have provided the vaccine to women who could otherwise have not afforded it.  It's nice to think a politician could be bribed into doing the RIGHT thing for a change.

    •  If they can be bribed into doing the (0+ / 0-)

      right thing, they can just as easily be bribed into doing the wrong thing. That's why processes exist, testimony, deliberative bodies, etc.
      We really don't want to bypass those processes.

      -- We are just regular people informed on issues

      by mike101 on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 10:29:49 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Of course they can... (0+ / 0-)

        and they usually do.  But in this case, Governor Perry did the right thing.  People would have benefited from it.  But instead of focusing on the fact that it was the right thing, he's been attacked for his motives.  The next time a governor wants to do something like this, he or she may think twice because of the criticism Governor Perry has received.  That benefits no one.

        •  No it wasn't the right thing, unless you approve (0+ / 0-)

          of dictatorial power. Is the product good? If so, make it a priority and push for it's quick passage. Where is that effort to do the right thing?

          •  That's just silly. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Salo

            It was an executive order, just like President Obama's executive order to mandate insurance coverage for birth control.  Perry's executive order would have required the HHS to issue the vaccine free to uninsured girls and would have required Medicaid to cover it for poor women.  If he were a Democrat, people here would be applauding him.

            •  Faux argument (0+ / 0-)

               Let's think about this:

              1.  Mandate that co-pay for BCP is zero.  No one is forcing anyone to take BCP's.

              2.  Mandate to require a vaccination - here in TX - no vaccination (or documented rejection) means no schooling.

                 If you want to have a debate, then it should be about apples v. apples, not apples v. oranges.

    •  This critique of him ... (0+ / 0-)

      ... Is bizarre, I completely agree with you. The NHS for example, were they bribed to do the same thing?

      Why isn't this shot freely available already for fucks sake?  

      A Catholic, Jew, Muslim and Buddhist walk into Al Aqsa Mosque. Buddhist immediately exclaims: "excuse me I appear to be in the wrong joke."

      by Salo on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 10:34:51 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The bribe had nothing to do with doing the right (0+ / 0-)

      thing. The Texas legislature could have actually agreed to make this vaccine part of the others. But that process wouldn't bring in profits quickly enough. This was a bribe to get their product out there quickly. The legislature voted against Perry's authority to force it on us. Why didn't he quickly resubmit it and push for it passage in the legislator? Has he done that? If he hasn't, i don't think he's concerned about whether it's the right thing to do or not.

      •  Probably because of the political fallout... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Salo

        he received from anti-vaxxers, Tea-baggers, and Democrats looking to score political points.

        Again, whether or not Governor Perry saw it as the right thing to do is immaterial.  It WAS the right thing to do.  Women will suffer and die while people squabble over motives.

  •  I'm no political strategist, but... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Libby Shaw

    isn't it a bad sign when you give 14 different answers to the same question that just won't go away?

    How about I believe in the unlucky ones?

    by BenderRodriguez on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 10:33:38 AM PDT

  •  While I read all of your diaries and will (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Libby Shaw

    continue to do so, because I think you are brilliant, they are at times exceedingly difficult and disturbing, as this one was.  Just when I thought I could not dislike Perry anymore. This part: "Over the past five years, it turns out that Merck [the company that manufacturers the vaccine] gave over $350,000 to the Republican Governors Association, a period in which Perry was heavily involved with the group, and the RGA in turn gave $4 million to Rick Perry.
    And wait some more! Merck's lobbyist on the vaccine issue was Mike Toomey, Perry's former chief of staff. Toomey recently co-founded a super PAC that plans to raise over $50 million for Perry's campaign," made me absolutely sick!

    "A lot of people are waiting for Martin Luther King or Mahatma Gandhi to come back - but they are gone. We are it. It is up to us. It is up to you."--Marian Wright Edelman

    by TheSolipsisticMe on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 10:36:55 AM PDT

  •  Perry's memory is as selective as his compassion (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Libby Shaw

    typical conservative

  •  There's no low level these liars want go (0+ / 0-)

    Perry along with the rest, are disgusting. It would be much easier to find any truth in anything they say, but even time spent trying to find 1 truth, would be futile.

  •  Yes he did meet her before he signed the order (0+ / 0-)

    because Republican Lies are MSM Reality.

  •  Who is Mike Toomey? (0+ / 0-)

    See here.

    The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. Bertrand Russell

    by accumbens on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 11:10:12 AM PDT

  •  Making the vaccine mandatory (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    hdwh

    was a good thing in that a mandatory vaccine is covered by the Vaccines for Children program. This means that it is free or heavily subsidized by the State. If someone objects, there is a generous and easy to use opt-out for vaccines in Texas.

    Why doesn't Perry just say that it was a good public health measure and he wanted it to be available to poor children. I admired him when he signed the order, and I am disappointed by his back-pedaling.

    We have nowhere else to go... this is all we have. (Margaret Mead)

    by bruised toes on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 11:20:27 AM PDT

    •  It's because he must balance out... (0+ / 0-)

      ... Teahadists, Romneyite Opportunists and pointscoring.

      A Catholic, Jew, Muslim and Buddhist walk into Al Aqsa Mosque. Buddhist immediately exclaims: "excuse me I appear to be in the wrong joke."

      by Salo on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 11:48:43 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Save space on the blog. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Osiris

    Diary what Perry doesn't lie about.

  •  I wish the diary made the point that (0+ / 0-)

    the vaccine is a good thing and making it mandatory makes it available cheaply.  

  •  "I will always err on the side of life" (0+ / 0-)

    (the life of my bank account, that is!)

    "You can't run a country by a book of religion. Dumb all over, a little ugly on the side." Frank Zappa

    by Uosdwis on Sat Sep 24, 2011 at 03:27:19 PM PDT

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