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Baine Capital Romney group portrait
No, they're not camping out at the Iowa caucuses. Not yet, anyway. Better yet, the messaging is now part of the political parlance, so much so that hard core conservatives are sweating Romney's wealth.

Over the weekend, the wingnut (but influential, supposedly) Union Leader in New Hampshire endorsed Newt Gingrich. The publisher explained their decision to Fox News:

"I think — and this is crazy, but so are we — that Gingrich is going to have a better time in the general election than Mitt Romney,” said McQuaid. “I think it’s going to be Obama’s 99% versus the 1%, and Romney sort of represents the 1%.”

This is a tacit confession that the Occupy message is working. Of course, New Hampshire's king conservatives are too stupid to realize that Gingrich isn't exactly working class—he made $2.5 million last year, and nothing says "1 percenter" like million-dollar credit lines at Tiffany & Co.

But hey, it's hard to be a conservative—trying to balance their worship of extreme wealth, in an environment where it has become a massive political liability.

Originally posted to kos on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 09:44 AM PST.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

    •  99 Republicans up on the wall, (10+ / 0-)

      if one of the 99 happens to fall......

      People to Wall Street: "LET OUR MONEY GO"

      by hannah on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 09:58:46 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Yep. It's an incredibly resonant message... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      annieli

      ...that lays bare pretty immediately and pretty starkly the big problem in our culture.

      Unlike the old populisms about entrepreneurship and hard work, which were created by disenfranchised farmers and industrial workers, harnessed by Democrats like FDR, and then co-opted by Republicans in the late '60s (with little resistance from Democrats as the New Left took over the party), it's really difficult for right-wingers to co-opt the 99% meme in the name of "small business owners" or "hard-working Amurrcans."

      In a way, there's a part of me that's glad that the #OWS protesters, who are becoming increasingly difficult for most of the 99% to identify with, have all but dropped the 99% rhetoric in favor of talking about themselves; this leaves the 99% theme open to organizations and groups that can use it more effectively and in more targeted ways to enact more significant (in being more achievable) changes.

      "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

      by JamesGG on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:18:42 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Trashing the New Left AND OWS? (12+ / 0-)

        The New Left took over the Party in the late '60's?

        Pleeeaaase.  Not only did that not happen but the New Left was labor-friendly and in no way unappreciative of hard work.  Opposed to a brutal, imperialist war, check.  Opposed to racial discrimination and the race-baiting that Republicans ran with in 1966 and 1968, check.  

        But your criticism of OWS protestors, apparently a sidelines "cultural critique" explains your distortion of the late '60s.  There are many people who never get their hands dirty who like to critique those who are in the trenches--as in the originators of the OWS can now leave the 99% theme "open to organizations and groups that can use it more effectively blah, blah, blah."

        Dom Helder Camara?  Also trashed by those in the peanut gallery for being too enthusiastic about the poor and not sufficiently effective and "targeted."

         

        What would Jesus do? Whip the exploiters out of the temple!

        by jhannon on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:27:30 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Well, the late '60s and early 70s, really. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          oldcrow
          The New Left took over the Party in the late '60's?

          The time from '68 to '72 would be what I'd pinpoint.

          And while the New Left was supposedly very "labor-friendly," at least insofar as institutional union power was concerned, the fact is that they gave the Republicans a mile-wide tunnel to use populist rhetoric to actually capture laborers.

          The identification arguments the Republicans used for the New Left—"these people aren't like you"—were undeniably effective in painting the Democrats and New Left as a bunch of college-educated idealists who didn't respect Real American Values and who wanted to look down their noses at Real American and their silly religious and cultural beliefs and their narrow-minded patriotism.

          Dom Helder Camara and the other liberation theologians were effective precisely because they did identify with the values of ordinary people, and connected the people's values to their struggle, rather than denigrating them as did many in the New Left, who were openly disdainful of the things many Americans held dear.

          And this is the same fight all over again—at least from where I'm sitting, it seems that #Occupy has become not about connecting with ordinary Americans and what they care about, or creating a space where ordinary Americans can take action on what they value and they identify with, but rather on demanding a complete revolution in values in order to "truly" be a part of the movement.

          Effective movements find out where the populace is and meet them there, showing them how the things they value aren't valued by the people who are running the economy, the political system, and the culture machine. The public face of #Occupy, it seems to me, is becoming more and more a movement telling people that what they value is wrong. That doesn't breed identification, but resentment—which isn't going to get a whole lot of the 99% on board.

          "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

          by JamesGG on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:41:06 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Elitist dogma (0+ / 0-)

            Same old stuff.

            "I'll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one."

            by Betty Pinson on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:42:03 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  How is it elitist... (0+ / 0-)

              ...to meet ordinary people where they are, to find out what they care about and what they value and show them the reality that the people who run things don't care about those things?

              The regular American isn't laying in bed at night worrying that they're going to get pepper-sprayed tomorrow; they're worried that they'll get laid off or foreclosed on or have some kind of health emergency.

              They're not thinking that we need to replace our national government with a consensus-based GA or our economy with a gift economy or end the Fed; they're thinking they want to provide for their families, send their kids to college, and live in a country they're proud of.

              When a movement connects with their concerns, when it identifies itself with the values they identify with and shows them a way that those values can be reflected in government and economy, that movement will be successful.

              It seems much more elitist to me to tell them that those things, the things they value, are the wrong things to value, and that they really should value what we tell them to value.

              And the latter is what I'm seeing right now from #Occupy. It's what I'm seeing on this site, it's what I'm seeing from people on Facebook and Twitter, it's what I'm seeing in the media. "Ordinary Americans' values are wrong, they're media-driven consumerist sheep, and they need to value the  things we value in order to be acceptable to us." Whether that's the actual message or not, that's what I'm seeing out there, and I'm particularly plugged in; what the ordinary 99%er is seeing is likely even worse.

              "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

              by JamesGG on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:58:10 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  What is elitist is to assume to tell (4+ / 0-)

                "ordinary" folks anything about their problems and assuming they don't already know--better than you do--what their problems are.

                Listening to them, rather than telling them, would be the first place to start.

                •  There's a tremendous amount of polling data... (0+ / 0-)

                  ...supporting the claim that Americans are concerned about jobs and the overall health of the economy. No shortage of evidence there.

                  What do you think they're concerned about, that isn't showing up on the polls?

                  "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

                  by JamesGG on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:24:52 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  dude, just serve your neighbors (0+ / 0-)

                    don't get polling data to figure out how to manipulate elections to get representatives to reframe the agenda.  just  give a few bucks to a guy on the street, or sign a petition, or something.

                    Agree? Disagree? Feel like throwing a pie at me? Give a buck to wikipedia and let 'er fly! I'm game! :-P

                    by Tommy Allen on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:44:23 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Those things are all well and good... (0+ / 0-)

                      ...but one of the things #Occupy has made clear is that we need systematic change as well.

                      Please refer to my signature quote; we need not only to feed the poor, but ask why the system creates poverty, and what changes need to occur in order to make that less so.

                      In order to do that, we need ordinary people to believe that systematic change is possible, and we need them to support the changes we advocate. That requires a larger-scale operation.

                      People know something is wrong. They know people are working harder now than they were a few decades ago, for less money and with less job security, and they won't have any protection if they get sick or can't make their mortgage payments or something else happens.

                      The #Occupy movement found an excellent frame for capturing that frustration in the theme of the 99%. They entered that frame, the systematic frame, into the conversation, and expressed things that rung true in a lot of people's lives.

                      So we need a next step that will continue to meet those concerns and continue to talk to what people value and care about, and to give them efficacy and agency in participating in a reordering of the system to serve those values. Small-scale stuff is important, but it's not going to solve the problem.

                      "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

                      by JamesGG on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:58:15 AM PST

                      [ Parent ]

        •  I'm guessing he meant the McGovern (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          rebel ga

          campaign, which was kind of a "Hippie" based campaign featuring a candidate who, while definitely a good guy, was not successful-presidential-candidate material. But the "takeover," if it ever really was one, didn't last long. The truth is that Republicans in the late 60s and 70s were very sharp in their framing of "the silent majority" against the noisy minority of protesters, mostly on college kids who were "privileged" by virtue of the fact that they were in college....and against the "counterculture" that criticized materialism while the working class was looking for material betterment.

          "All governments lie, but disaster lies in wait for countries whose officials smoke the same hashish they give out." --I.F. Stone

          by Alice in Florida on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:04:41 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  It was not a hippie based campaign (0+ / 0-)

            that is repeating the reframing of the Republicans.  It was an anti-war campaign and a racial and economic justice campaign.  As often happens too many people were unable to see that the war was a disaster and that "staying the course" with a "wartime president" was a huge mistake--and that the interests of white people and people of color were not in conflict.  

            The Republicans DID do a good job of framing.  I just don't think we should repeat their framing.

            What would Jesus do? Whip the exploiters out of the temple!

            by jhannon on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 05:12:39 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Nixon didn't campaign on "staying the course" (0+ / 0-)

              nor did he proclaim himself a "wartime president"...he said he had a "secret plan" to end the war...apparently he had secret plans for lots of things. And when I said "hippie" I meant it in the sense of reflecting the values of the original "DFH" crowd, though of course we didn't think of ourselves that way at the time. The campaign was broader that just being against the war...not many were "pro-war" by then, but there was a certain anti-antiwar sentiment, which was not necessarily pro-war, but resented the perceived anti-Americanism of antiwar protesters, some of whom did things like burning flags.

              "All governments lie, but disaster lies in wait for countries whose officials smoke the same hashish they give out." --I.F. Stone

              by Alice in Florida on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 09:02:30 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

      •  perhaps... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        oldcrow, 714day, Empower Ink

        Präsidentenelf-maßschach; Warning-Some Snark Above"Nous sommes un groupuscule" (-9.50; -7.03) refusing to have a battle of wits with unarmed people since 1980

        by annieli on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:28:48 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  You don't gotta dis OWS. (14+ / 0-)

        OWS has done this country an incredible solid.  If you can't identify with them, that's fine.  But show a little respect for the folks who have changed the terms of the debate to include the most important issue of our time.

        We were talking about austerity before they pitched their tents.

        •  Of course they do (3+ / 0-)

          DLC Dems are just as fearful of OWS as the GOP.

          "I'll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one."

          by Betty Pinson on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:40:27 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  I think they changed the terms of the debate... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          glorificus

          ...but then, having done that, failed to raise an effective voice in the debate itself.

          I think they had a tremendously effective message in changing the way in which the economy is framed, and for that I very sincerely salute them.

          But now that they've done that, I don't think they've got a clearly articulated next step—and it's really starting to show.

          "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

          by JamesGG on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:43:02 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  Corporate-owned Vichy Dems (5+ / 0-)

        The small minority in the DC bubble who still haven't realized their days are numbered.  To paraphrase the Beatles, money can't buy you love, or votes for that matter.

        Like the GOP, OWS scares the h*ll out of you DNC types, and that's a good thing.

        "I'll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one."

        by Betty Pinson on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:39:30 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  The Third Way (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Betty Pinson, happymisanthropy

          aka tools for Robert Rubin and Larry Summers.

        •  It's impressive to me... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          glorificus, NYFM

          ...just how many incorrect assumptions you can draw from a single comment.

          Please substantiate your claims about me, or label them properly as pure speculation.

          "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

          by JamesGG on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:44:10 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I claimed (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            714day, happymisanthropy

            that it appears you don't like OWS. That appears to be the case, judging from your post.

            You're free to change my opinion if you wish by offering some proof or substantiation.

            "I'll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one."

            by Betty Pinson on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:47:51 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  You claimed by implication that I'm a DNC type... (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              glorificus

              ...and a "Vichy Dem," one of the "small minority in the DC bubble."

              Such claims require substantiation.

              As for #OWS, I like the theme of the 99%. I want that theme to become the dominant framing device for our politics, economy, and culture.

              I'm agnostic about the means and methods; whatever is pragmatically more effective in spreading that message and getting it accepted as the baseline frame for political, economic, and social decision-making is what I'll support.

              Right now, I don't see #Occupy as productive anymore in strengthening that theme, and think other organizations or movements could be more productive in so doing.

              "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

              by JamesGG on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:01:48 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Clarification (0+ / 0-)

                my comments were aimed at your talking points about OWS. Those originated from the DLC beltway establishment.

                You have a right to privacy and I don't expect you to identify which organizations, if any, you belong to.

                "I'll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one."

                by Betty Pinson on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 12:13:47 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

            •  Try to focus, Betty. Your first paragraph below is (0+ / 0-)

              a fantasy. As yet, OWS has no better candidates identified. There is just all this continual "we have no leadership, we have no demands, we won't be co-opted," etc. Your second paragraph is equally unsubstantiated.

              Someone has to be on the ballot to get the vote. Write-in campaigns are not that successful, historically speaking.

              James never said he doesn't like OWS. In fact, he gives them substantial credit.

              But there is more to do.

              The small minority in the DC bubble who still haven't realized their days are numbered.  To paraphrase the Beatles, money can't buy you love, or votes for that matter.

              Like the GOP, OWS scares the h*ll out of you DNC types, and that's a good thing.

              He's a walking contradiction, partly truth and partly fiction. Kris Kristofferson

              by glorificus on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:06:37 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  As I said before (0+ / 0-)

                The election is the second Tuesday of November of 2012.  Dem incumbents have a lot of time left to earn the votes of the 99%.  That's pretty obvious, no?

                "I'll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one."

                by Betty Pinson on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 12:16:03 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

      •  What is your opinion (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        happymisanthropy, Diebold Hacker

        On the OWS movement demonstrating against Obama as they recently did in Des Moines?

        Living in Iowa, I can tell you that OWS here is not a democratic party auxiliary and has resisted any effort to be taken over by any group that feels it "can use it more effectively and in more targeted ways."

        Becoming a tool of some party's self-described betters would be the kiss of death of OWS.

  •  certainly Gingrich won't be airing that money pic (10+ / 0-)

    of Romney.
    Oh wait -he probably will since hypocrisy means absolutely nothing to Republicans.

    Republicans have the 1% vote locked up.

    by MartyM on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 09:49:39 AM PST

    •  Well Marty, (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      glorificus, MartyM

      I'd be surprised if Grinch aired the "money pic" in the near future.  He probably doesn't believe the polls himself...maybe looking for the VP slot.

      However, if after the first 4 or 5 primaries, he thinks he can go for the gold then he just might air it:  he is nothing if not nasty.

      BTW, Markos, grifterism is harder work than Romney's Bain Capital job killers.  My guess is that Romney earned more in a couple years of Bain than Grinch can earn in a lifetime of revising history and selling it like a "Fuller Brush" man.

    •  And if you look up "shameless" in the (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MartyM, rebel ga

      dictionary, there's a picture of Gingrich...

      "All governments lie, but disaster lies in wait for countries whose officials smoke the same hashish they give out." --I.F. Stone

      by Alice in Florida on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:16:49 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  The GOP in general, and this gaggle of (15+ / 0-)

    GOP geese who are trying to pass themselves off as candidates for President are so far behind the 8 ball that it's nearly like watching an episode of the Three Stooges.

    If OWS has done anything, it has highlighted how insulated these guys are from reality. Do any of these candidates, their financial backers, the lobbyists, the strategists, have any idea how incredibly craven and foolish these guys look?

    Gosh, I hope not.

    Capitalism may be our enemy, but it is also our teacher. --V.I. Lenin equalitymaine.org

    by commonmass on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 09:52:36 AM PST

  •  nightmare scenario, or am I a worrywart? (6+ / 0-)

    Seems to me, evidence is building that the Republicans realize none of their current candidates has a whisper of a chance of becoming President, or of performing the job at a minimum level of competency.
    So--for people who know more about politics than I--what are the chances that they will go into the convention still undecided, and draft someone who has a better chance, say Jeb Bush, Chris Christie, Mitch Daniels, Marco Rubio, or Paul Ryan?
    Is that possible at this late stage? Cuz all the current Republican candidates just make me feel more confident about Pres. Obama's second term actually coming to pass.

    To keep our faces turned toward change, and behave as free spirits in the presence of fate, that is strength undefeatable--Helen Keller

    by kareylou on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 09:58:33 AM PST

    •  Please, oh please (10+ / 0-)

      everyone stop with the JEB nonsense!

      There's more momentum for him here, than among Republicans!

    •  Both Gingrich & Romney Not Tea Party Favs (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      kareylou, commonmass, ColoTim, tomjones

      Although with the "top down" history ( astroturf) of the Tea Party would not be surprised for them to cozy up to Newt, or even Romney.

      Existence is no more than the precarious attainment of relevance in an intensely mobile flux of past, present, and future.~~~ Susan Sontag

      by frandor55 on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:08:03 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  but 'baggers ABHOR Romney much more ! (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        kareylou
      •  About the teaparty (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        kareylou, frandor55

        The teaparty is just a wisp of what it was during the 2010 elections.  Do they still have input into GOP politics?  Of course.  But, that political element has become far smaller and less significant in the mainstream republican party.  

        Even many of those that won election in 2010 because the teaparty was involved in their campaigns are moving away from their radical and unobtainable goals.  

        - If you don't like gay marriage, blame straight people. They're the ones who keep having gay babies.

        by r2did2 on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:26:19 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  A brokered convention (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      kareylou, glorificus

      seems possible if not likely.

      A brokered convention going to someone with no delegates entering the convention seems less so.

      In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice; but in practice, there always is a difference. - Yogi Berra

      by blue aardvark on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:28:03 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  no, (0+ / 0-)

        Falling into line is all they know how to do.  Once there's a line to fall into, they will line up behind a candidate.  They're just looking for a Gop Daddy, and they're gonna find one.

        Ask your barista what her degree is in.

        by happymisanthropy on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:20:34 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  No, because voters (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        kareylou

        will find a way to pick a winner. Even with the front-loaded schedule, one or two will come out ahead in the early states, which will make them more attractive in the next state, pretty soon the field is whittled down and it's a matter of who looks more like a winner. In six months things will look totally different.

        "All governments lie, but disaster lies in wait for countries whose officials smoke the same hashish they give out." --I.F. Stone

        by Alice in Florida on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:29:25 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  I asked that same question a while back (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      kareylou

      and someone noted that delegates are only bound on the first vote. After that, the nomination's up for grabs, apparently. Like you, I don't see any candidate going into this with a clear majority, which certainly does give the party a chance to nominate someone saner, with an actual chance of winning, who hasn't been playing Twister with the religious right for two years. I do see Jeb Bush as a very viable candidate, but I think he's too smart to run against a sitting president.

      "I had seen the universe as it begins for all things. It was, in reality, a child's universe, a tiny and laughing universe." Loren Eiseley

      by cadejo4 on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:28:09 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  If Jeb is too smart, (0+ / 0-)

        how about one of the other four, or even Tim Pawlenty, who must be kicking himself up and down the sidewalk about now?

        To keep our faces turned toward change, and behave as free spirits in the presence of fate, that is strength undefeatable--Helen Keller

        by kareylou on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:32:38 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I depends on what strategy the adults in (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          kareylou

          the party come up with. I assume they'll just want to move the discussion as far right as possible, yet still present a somewhat appealing candidate who doesn't have a lot of baggage and can bring in some congressional seats. I don't know who they may have in mind.

          "I had seen the universe as it begins for all things. It was, in reality, a child's universe, a tiny and laughing universe." Loren Eiseley

          by cadejo4 on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:45:29 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  I don't think he'll worry about a sitting (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        kareylou

        president as much as be intimidated by the mess the economy will still be.

        He's a walking contradiction, partly truth and partly fiction. Kris Kristofferson

        by glorificus on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:16:13 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  The chances are ZERO (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      fou, MRobDC, kareylou

      You can't "draft" someone to be the nominee (people have to choose to run). Besides, modern conventions do not really decide...the nominee will be chosen long before the convention, whether it is Romney or Gingrich or one of the TP'ers or even a serious dark horse like Huntsman (though I feel safe betting against him). The convention is a large-scale party/infomercial, not a decision-making body. (It's the same for Democrats)

      "All governments lie, but disaster lies in wait for countries whose officials smoke the same hashish they give out." --I.F. Stone

      by Alice in Florida on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:20:59 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Exactly (0+ / 0-)

        This fantasy about a brokered convention with some messiah of the right being nominated is just that: a fantasy. It CANNOT happen because of how the primary structure is set up. This isnt 1820, the decision of who will be the nominee is not made in smoke filled rooms. The nominee will be either Mitt Romney or Newt Gingrich. The VP nominee has probably already been selected by both pending who wins. Conventions are not for the process of nominating, they are for well coreographed beauty pageants.

  •  An additional aspect of Romney's work with Baine (15+ / 0-)

    Capital, where he amassed much of his wealth, is that part of their strategy was to identify ailing business with some essential product, buy into it, and then strip out everything holding back cash-flow.

    This usually, meant thousands of lay-offs of all non-essential personal, and everything not immediately essential to delivering the core product, (or service), such as longer-term R and D, training, OE, etc.

    Most business valuation models price assets, on some varation of the captial-asset pricing model, which determines the Net Present Value of Cash, flow, muliplied by the "discount rate," which is usually the risk-free rate (Treasury Yield) plus varioius risk-premiums, to represent the extra yield investors need to compensate for the riskiness of the business.

    So, other than expanding the core business, the two obvious ways to improve the asset value is to radically cut costs, and reduce perceived risk.

    I was leading a systems thinking - organizational learning chance effort at one company when it was bought out by Baine Capital.

    One of the interesting ways they had of reducing risk was to require that any and all of the senior management team that wanted to remain (join in the buy-out with Baine) put their house, and the vast majority of all their compensation on the line for the "new" company, so that if it failed the management team would be bankrupt.

    Then, they could count on the management teams support for a massive reduction of all labor, not directly necessary to deliver the core product to it's customers, who they also tried to lock into long-term contracts.

    Then Baine's goal was to sell all of their participation before the five year mark, - perhaps, due to the reasonable expectations that companies that slashed their long-term R and D, training, human resources, recruitment, etc. were, at least, partially, trading off long-term health for short term cash flow. But, in fairness, there must be more to the story, as what subsequant investor, would buy such companies at a premium just because short-term profitability was surging?

    I think five years was the maximum target window, and and from business school cases, I've read, that Baine became famous for being one of the most profitable turn around investment-consulting firms around.

    Although, I believe questions have arisen about the much longer-term viability of some of these companies has emerged.  I'll try to look up more research in this.

    The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

    by HoundDog on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:07:19 AM PST

  •  OWS's branding needs to result in more palpable (3+ / 0-)

    political capital like all political communication in the public sphere where its direct action will have either an institutional presence which could simply come from much more robust social media networking of all OWS activity as well as concurrent community organizing or that OWS should be occupying warmer public confines... Otherwise there will be a Russian Winter effect on this "movement" as the weather gets colder. They should continue to attempt the "occupation of everything".

    This is a tacit confession that the Occupy message is working.
    but OWS should also consult Tacitus (AD 56 – AD 117):
    As in the Germania, Tacitus in Agricola favorably contrasts the liberty of the native Britons with the tyranny and corruption of the Empire; the book also contains eloquent polemics against the greed of Rome, one of which, that Tacitus claims is from a speech by Calgacus, ends by asserting that Auferre trucidare rapere falsis nominibus imperium, atque ubi solitudinem faciunt, pacem appellant. (To ravage, to slaughter, to usurp under false titles, they call empire; and where they make a desert, they call it peace)

    Präsidentenelf-maßschach; Warning-Some Snark Above"Nous sommes un groupuscule" (-9.50; -7.03) refusing to have a battle of wits with unarmed people since 1980

    by annieli on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:07:44 AM PST

  •  sidebar Mo-Tu Senate Vote - Indefinate Detention (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Betty Pinson, glorificus

    http://www.aclu.org/...


    Senators Demand the Military Lock Up American Citizens in a “Battlefield” They Define as Being Right Outside Your Window

    While nearly all Americans head to family and friends to celebrate Thanksgiving, the Senate is gearing up for a vote on Monday or Tuesday that goes to the very heart of who we are as Americans.

    The Senate will be voting on a bill that will direct American military resources not at an enemy shooting at our military in a war zone, but at American citizens and other civilians far from any battlefield — even people in the United States itself.

    Senators need to hear from you, on whether you think your front yard is part of a “battlefield” and if any president can send the military anywhere in the world to imprison civilians without charge or trial.

    The Senate is going to vote on whether Congress will give this president—and every future president — the power to order the military to pick up and imprison without charge or trial civilians anywhere in the world.

    Even Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) raised his concerns about the NDAA detention provisions during last night’s Republican debate. The power is so broad that even U.S. citizens could be swept up by the military and the military could be used far from any battlefield, even within the United States itself.

    If GOP lawmakers vote "no" your taxes go up. "Yes", you get a tax cut. Which way do you think Congress should vote?

    by anyname on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:19:04 AM PST

  •  Going after republicans that are wealthy? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Betty Pinson

    It's a huge risk making the republicans that are millionaires evil because they're...well...millionaires.  Too many democratic politicians that are worth well over a million buck-a-roos.  

    That campaign strategy would be a HUGE loser.

    - If you don't like gay marriage, blame straight people. They're the ones who keep having gay babies.

    by r2did2 on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:20:33 AM PST

    •  Yeah, but everyone knows that all Dems (2+ / 0-)

      are socialists with no respect for capitalism, the free market, or  hard work,  (nor Mom, apple pie or the great American industry of bootstrap manufacturing either).

        So we're safe.

      © grover


      So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not.

      by grover on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:52:07 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Bain made Romney's money (0+ / 0-)

      by destroying companies and feeding on the corpses.

      Newt made his money as an unregistered lobbyist buying and selling political favors.

      It's a huge risk making the republicans that are millionaires evil because they're...well...millionaires.

      If you can't see the difference, you shouldn't be giving advice.

      Ask your barista what her degree is in.

      by happymisanthropy on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:27:45 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Oh for crying out loud (0+ / 0-)
        If you can't see the difference, you shouldn't be giving advice.

        I'm certain that you know that republicans can point to any number of democrats in high-level positions that have gotten their money in ways that can be questioned.

        That was my point.  My goodness.  We shouldn't be here to see if we can find posts that we can turn around on meaning and trash them just for the sake of trashing posts.

        It was a legitimate post/concern.  Chill, will ya?

        - If you don't like gay marriage, blame straight people. They're the ones who keep having gay babies.

        by r2did2 on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:40:42 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Obama does not have the 99% (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Betty Pinson

    And this is just wingnut fantasy and part of the media push to "brand" OWS as a partisan outfit.

    NOW SHOWING
    Progressive Candidate Obama (now - Nov 6, 2012)
    Bipartisan Obama returns (Nov 7, 2012)

    by The Dead Man on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:22:16 AM PST

  •  postcards (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    filby, happymisanthropy

    of Mitt in front of his various mansions.. Newt covered in Tiffany jewels..

    But ...shhhh..don't want them figuring this out...

    •  It IS amusing that anyone with half a brain (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW, glorificus, happymisanthropy

      (presumably there is at least half a brain combined on that editorial board) thinks that Mr Freddie Mac Tiffany would be perceived as being something other than the 1%...

      (Unless they're judging solely by the fact that quite a few of his suits are illl-fitting.)

      But Newt might be believing it himself. His campaign called to hit ME up for money this weekend. If he's reaching down into the middle class registered Democrat/ Sierra Club member/NARAL member rolls, he clearly thinks he has some cross-over appeal...

      Or he's delusional.

      © grover


      So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not.

      by grover on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:47:29 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  He's delusional... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        grover, glorificus

        ...I got one of those calls. Held on until a live human came on, then told her to put us on their no-call list. Others may do the same, or engage them long enough to slow down the process. If Gingrich is trying to tap middle-class funds, he's toast. He's as 1% as Romney, but without a big bank balance.

        Float like a manhole cover, sting like a sash weight! Clean Coal Is A Clinker!

        by JeffW on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:50:45 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I chatted with the volunteer a while. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          JeffW, Dvalkure

          Asked for all of his positions on key issues. Then I explained my positions and explained I'm especially opposed to child labor. So they could put me down as a "No. Never Ever.."

          She was very nice. Said she'd note my concerns about child labor. She seemed to not be aware of that one.

          I thought it would be rude to just hang up, you know?

          :)

          © grover


          So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not.

          by grover on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:10:37 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I only got rude after stating... (0+ / 0-)

            ...that I wanted our number on the no-call list. I felt justified since they invaded my evening with a robo-call featuring Gingrich and his verbal manure. I figure its a waste of time to try and either turn them or delay them, where I just want them to never call again.

            Float like a manhole cover, sting like a sash weight! Clean Coal Is A Clinker!

            by JeffW on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:27:08 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  I'm glad you (0+ / 0-)

            were pleasant...she was probably hired by some marketing company for some pittance..trying to keep food on her table..

      •  But he's fat and unattractive (0+ / 0-)

        that gives him "the common touch"....Romney is too smooth. Also, Gingrich is (in John Stewart's phrase) "kind of a dick"...which apparently is something that appeals to a certain kind of Republican....who do tend, you know, to be dicks.

        "All governments lie, but disaster lies in wait for countries whose officials smoke the same hashish they give out." --I.F. Stone

        by Alice in Florida on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 12:01:09 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  kos, The Union Leader is drifting into Onion (5+ / 0-)

    territory.  Are you sure they are not on Mitt's payroll?  

    Newt, I knew you when should be a theme song.

  •  "Obama's 99%"???? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shaharazade, happymisanthropy

    I don't think so.  Thus far, Obama's administration has very little in common with the 99%.  Just sayin'.

    If Gingrich and Obama are at the top of the ticket, it seems we're still at high risk for a third party candidate.

    Obama's biggest threat lies in his own policies and actions as POTUS.  Whether he wins or loses is strictly up to him.

    "I'll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one."

    by Betty Pinson on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:23:57 AM PST

    •  I find this statement absurd. (7+ / 0-)
      Obama's administration has very little in common with the 99%.  Just sayin'.

      I'm fine with criticism about not going far enough, but to brand him as the 1% is just willfully ignorant.

      How fought for unemployment benefits?  The Stimulus, while too weak, helped many.  Same with healthcare reform.  It's not good enough, but it will help.

      Sucjh criticism as in your comment undercuts any progressive critique of Obama's policies, and many have been weak, because of its facial silliness.

      "I believe that, as long as there is plenty, poverty is evil. Government belongs wherever evil needs an adversary and there are people in distress who cannot help themselves." (Robert F. Kennedy, Speech, Athens, Georgia, May 6, 1961).

      by TomP on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:43:42 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Most likely 3rd party candidate - Bloomberg (0+ / 0-)

      Because he has the money and the ego.   Claiming to represent the 99% MAY be difficult for him, however, as he is the 14th richest American, and because he personally pepper sprayed protesters outside Walmart when he was shopping on Black Friday.

      Your message here for small monthly fee

      by filby on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:56:07 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Obama is better than Gingrich or Romney (0+ / 0-)

      ...and unfortunately in the real world of modern politics that's all that matters.

      a "99%er" third party would just end up electing a Republican, so no thanks.

      i'll stick with Obama.

      "An inglorious peace is better than a dishonorable war." -Mark Twain

      by humanistique on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:59:09 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  That's why a primary challenge (0+ / 0-)

        may be the best option.  No, the world won't come to an end, and it may help redeem our party's tarnished reputation.

        "I'll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one."

        by Betty Pinson on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 02:59:18 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  i disagree (0+ / 0-)

          ...a primary challenge would be a waste of time at best and an absolute disaster at worst. no thanks.

          Obama is a moderate, which pisses us off sometimes but he's infinitely better than the Republican options and let's be honest...a candidate we agreed 100% with would get maybe 25% of the vote.

          "An inglorious peace is better than a dishonorable war." -Mark Twain

          by humanistique on Tue Nov 29, 2011 at 02:22:14 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  Occupy wingnutia! (n/t) (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    commonmass, filby
  •  I like the phrase (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    annieli, glorificus, Dvalkure

    "Obama's 99 percent". That's a phrase worth a million votes, accurate or no.

    In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice; but in practice, there always is a difference. - Yogi Berra

    by blue aardvark on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:26:05 AM PST

  •  This just sealed Gingrich's fate (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, happymisanthropy

    I've said I believe Gingrich will blow it before Iowa as his ego gradually takes complete control of his mouth.  This endorsement will push him over the edge; look for a truly off the wall comment to sink his campaign soon.

    Politics is the entertainment branch of industry. -Frank Zappa

    by TheGrandWazoo on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:31:19 AM PST

  •  I can't imagine a scenario (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, filby, glorificus, happymisanthropy

    in which Newt Gingrich is a viable candidate for anything. I doubt he could even win a congressional seat any more. People have forgotten an awful lot about ol' Newt.

    "I had seen the universe as it begins for all things. It was, in reality, a child's universe, a tiny and laughing universe." Loren Eiseley

    by cadejo4 on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:36:34 AM PST

  •  Personally, I hope Ron Paul wins NH (5+ / 0-)

    It's a remote possibility, I know, but it would help change the focus of the debates towards OWS goals re:foreign policy.

    And, yes, I know Paul is wingnut crazy on domestic policy.  Except the drug war.  I'm with him on that one.

    Can you imagine an Obama-Paul debate? It would be fascinating.

    •  but, but, but! (0+ / 0-)

      the last thing we want is different choices in the general election!  If the status quo is disrupted, we might have to actually deliver results to win votes!

      Ask your barista what her degree is in.

      by happymisanthropy on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:37:54 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  At least Paul says one true thing (0+ / 0-)

      that military spending is real money, unlike the rest of Republicans who hate federal spending....unless it's for war.

      I would hate seeing Obama defending our bloated Pentagon budget, though, which I'm afraid is what he'd do (by claiming we'd already cut enough)...

      "All governments lie, but disaster lies in wait for countries whose officials smoke the same hashish they give out." --I.F. Stone

      by Alice in Florida on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 12:06:00 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  million-dollar credit lines at Tiffany & Co (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    grover, happymisanthropy

    Don't they prove Newt is not part of the 1%?  Otherwise he'd be paying cash like the rest of us do when we go to Tiffany's.

    •  You're crazy. I use my Discover card to get cash (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      happymisanthropy, Scioto

      back.

      When I remember to, I like to buy Tiffany scrip from my local school to help them buy new playground equipment. But for impulsive purchases, when i just drop by and have to have that new tennis bracelet, Discover Card..

      Cash? Puh-leeze!

      © grover


      So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not.

      by grover on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:58:39 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Occupy Tiffany's! (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dvalkure, Scioto

      Just to make the point. Ask for his wish list.

      I'm from the Elizabeth Warren wing of the Democratic Party.

      by BobBlueMass on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:28:32 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Blows me mind... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    glorificus, Dvalkure

    ..Republicans are now adopting OWS language & framing.

    I wonder how Fixed News will deal with this parasitic infiltration, since BillO has declared OWS dead & Ann Coulter claims the best way to deal with OWS protesters is by shooting them dead like what happened @ Kent State.

    http://mediamatters.org/...

    When Fascism comes to America it will be wrapped in excess body fat and carrying a misspelled sign.

    by wyvern on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:44:54 AM PST

    •  People in the streets always make pols (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      glorificus, wyvern

      nervous, particularly when they weren't bussed in by the Koch brothers or Fox news. They rely on an otherwise snoozing populace to let them slide into office. They have to broaden the game to collect the votes of the 'agitator's' sympathizers. It's telling that, although OWS has not gained tremendous purchase in the breadbasket or the south, these ideas are mentioned by Joe Blow at townhalls and so on; even if they are poorly articulated. People already have a visceral understanding that everybody except the fat cats are getting screwed.

      •  Right... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Dvalkure

        ..the OWS protesters need baths, shit on the sidewalks, fuck in front of children,  spread disease, are proclaimed defunct pests by right wing TV, proclaimed fair game targets for murder by right wing pundits, are constantly beaten & pepper-sprayed by thug cops & constantly have their encampments destroyed by anti-1st Amendment mayors...

        ...yet, despite all that, Republicans are adapting their framing.

        Talk about cognitive dissonance.

        When Fascism comes to America it will be wrapped in excess body fat and carrying a misspelled sign.

        by wyvern on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:32:52 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  it is SOOooo sweet ! n/t (0+ / 0-)

      “Good things don’t come to those who wait. They come to those who agitate!” Julian Bond

      by Dvalkure on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 01:31:10 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Gingrich: The Tiffany Candidate (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, glorificus, happymisanthropy

    If Gingrich becomes their candidate I can hardly wait to see the opposition ads.  The image should be of  slightly out of focus diamonds with extreme lens flares.
     Tag line: "Do you think a man who spends one million dollars on jewelry knows what it's like to feed a family in today's economy? If you spend more money at Safe-Way than at Tiffany's, Vote Democratic."

  •  Please (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    714day, happymisanthropy

    None of these guys are hurting for money, Obama included. After he is eventually deprived of his $400k/year presidential salary, I'm sure he will have a really tough time making ends meet on the speaking circuit while his wife goes back to her $300k/year job and their children finish up at their elite schools.

    If Obama represents the 99% I'd say that is a sign that the message isn't working at all, but maybe I am just a cynic.

    •  Compared to Mitt, Obama is poor (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      grover, glorificus, Dvalkure

      And he certainly has more in common in terms of background with the 99%. He grew up in a single parent home on food stamps. He wasn't moving in influential circles of the jet set with his politician father. He worked a real job, helping real people. He wasn't spending his days downsizing and offshoring companies while clinking glasses with hedge fund managers at cocktail hour in the evening.

      •  Rose tinted. (0+ / 0-)

        I don't know how long he was on foodstamps, but Obama wasn't slumming it with public school children for very long.

        You might as well lament over the poor Ben Bernake who had to work his way through school. I guess he is just a poor schlub from an immigrant family, though, right?

        I stick by what I said. None of these guys meet even the most broad definition of "99%."

        •  I'm glad you think every kid in private school (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Dvalkure

          has a silver spoon in their mouth. I went to private school on scholarship and the sacrifice of my parents. So I wasn't "slumming it with public school children" for very long either. I guess that makes me an elitist 1%er too.

          •  That depends. (0+ / 0-)

            Are you currently set to be a multi-millionaire for the rest of your life? Do you hobnob with the global banking elite? Have you reached the absolute peak position of global power and influence?

            You too may be a 1%er!

  •  I hope and think you're right, kos (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    714day, glorificus, Mr MadAsHell

    The changing of the political discussion is, so far, OWS's primary impact, and in doing so it accomplished something of tremendous importance.

    My forthcoming book Obama's America: A Transformative Vision of Our National Identity will be published in Summer 2012 by Potomac Books.

    by Ian Reifowitz on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 10:57:11 AM PST

  •  They are going fast! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    happymisanthropy

    Hurry up you 99%ers!  Amazon is offering $1,000,000.00 tiaras for only $500,000.00!  HALF PRICE!  This cyber Monday sale ends today!  They are going fast! Free shipping!

  •  Newt's Youtube Account lists interests as (0+ / 0-)

    "Dinosaurs, Zoos, National Security, Reading, Writing." WTF Lol

    "Poor man wanna be rich, Rich man wanna be King, and the King ain't satisfied till he rules everything." Bruce Springsteen.

    by Johnnythebandit on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:06:52 AM PST

  •  OWS isn't finished shaping the conversation (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    glorificus, Dvalkure

    nor bringing about an alteration to the way the system functions (or more correctly - does not function). It has moved minds in the direction of leveling the playing field which in and of itself is long overdue and the kind of thing we all want to believe is possible.
    It's history in the making, not a done deal.

  •  That kind of wealth... (0+ / 0-)

    ...the kind associated with the top one percent, is not far from becoming a social liability, as well as a political one.

    People are rejecting gross, ostentatious displays of wealth in greater numbers, and it's to the point that it's starting to become something that people like Romney feel they have to downplay or hide.

    Extreme wealth is a false idol, and the realities of life have brought that home to all but the most insulated families. Sure, there's a lot of money-worship still going on in pop culture; but pop culture changes every 15 minutes.

    -5.38 -4.72 T. Atlas shrugged. Jesus wept.

    by trevzb on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:27:26 AM PST

    •  So I'm looking at Crooks and Liars (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dvalkure

      this morning and they've posted a music video about OWS...by Miley Cyrus of all people.

      It's actually not a bad video (not talking about the music; the visuals are what got me)...

      "Pleasing everyone is impossible; p*$$*#@ everyone off is easy"

      by marigold on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:50:28 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  breakfast at tiffany's ginrich (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dvalkure

    is the 1%.  same old shit just a different package.

    "The real wealth of a nation consists of the contributions of its people and nature." -- Rianne Eisler

    by noofsh on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 11:51:03 AM PST

  •  Meh. (0+ / 0-)

    Most people still don't know what OWS is.  But to the extent that OWS has changed the conversation to our advantage, I'm encouraged.  

    "I think — and this is crazy, but so are we — that Gingrich is going to have a better time in the general election than Mitt Romney,” said McQuaid. “I think it’s going to be Obama’s 99% versus the 1%, and Romney sort of represents the 1%.”

    This may be evidence that the conversation has changed to our advantage.  Then again, it may not me.  It's not like there's no upside for Republicans to tie Obama to OWS ...

  •  forgot where I saw it (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dvalkure

    but I read somewhere that

    Obama is for the millions, GOP for the millionaires.

    Sarah Palin - reality TV is the closest she's ever going to get to reality.

    by jackandjill on Mon Nov 28, 2011 at 12:04:46 PM PST

  •  Actually, we are occupying the caucus. :) (0+ / 0-)

    We've got the website rolling and have a rideshare site up that will help get people here.

    http://occupythecaucus.org/
    http://spaceshare.com/...

    We need your support!!!

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