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John Avlon:

This attempted purge of Teddy Roosevelt by some conservatives reflects the electoral opportunity that President Obama is trying to seize in his re-election: painting a picture of a GOP that is too ideologically rigid and extreme to respond to the remorseless squeeze of the forgotten middle class, while the ranks of the super-rich have grown exponentially in recent decades.

President Obama has gotten the message that this election will be decided by the middle class, and whether they believe the Republican nominee will look out for them more than the Democrat incumbent.

Bill Schneider:

Gingrich’s problem is that the voters don’t like him. In 35 polls taken over the past 17 years, Americans expressed a negative impression of Gingrich 32 times. Republicans know that. In that same CNN poll where Gingrich was the top choice of Republicans, he was rated fourth most likeable —after Romney, Herman Cain and Perry. And far less likely than Romney to beat Obama.

Romney has his own problem. He looks and talks as if he just walked out of Wall Street boardroom, at a time when Americans are talking about growing inequality.

It looks like the Republican race is coming down to a choice between two problematical contenders. Romney is Mr. 1 Percent. Gingrich is Mr. Gridlock.

Ronald Brownstein:

Romney has all sorts of resource and logistical advantages. But in terms of the range of voters that each man is currently attracting, these results suggest that as of today, at least, Gingrich is positioned to compete in a broader range of states than Romney. All of this will undoubtedly increase the incentive for Romney to find a more effective line of attack against Gingrich in the next round of Republican debates - starting with ABC's encounter in Iowa on Saturday.

Charlie Cook:
Lest anyone get carried away, the pros still think the November jobless number was an outlier. But even if the 8.6 percent rate isn’t revised upward and is replicated in subsequent monthly reports, some key elements of the Democratic base—the groups that turbo-charged Obama’s White House victory—are still facing tough economic headwinds that could affect their enthusiasm and turnout next year. The November unemployment rate among African-Americans was 15.5 percent. Among Hispanics, it was 11.4 percent. For 18 to 19 year-olds, the jobless rate was a whopping 23.6 percent; 20 to 24 year-olds saw a 14.2 percent rate; and 25 to 34 year-olds came in at 9.2 percent.

Tough economic times, added to disappointment from perhaps unrealistically high expectations about hope and change that Obama could deliver, could weigh down his popularity with minority and young voters. But by how much would it affect the 9.6 million popular-vote and 95 Electoral College-vote margins that he enjoyed in 2008?

NY Times:
Obama Strikes Populist Chord With Speech in Heartland

Infusing his speech with the type of language that has emerged in the Occupy protests, President Obama on Tuesday delivered his most pointed appeal yet for using taxes and regulations to level the economic playing field.

OWS infuses the lexicon. Big win for them... and us (we the people.)

Ron Fournier: The President gave a terrific speech, but who cares, really? I mean, he can't get anything done, so why bother?

Ben Adler has a good pair in The Nation, First up, a look at Newt and the tea party:

But how does the Tea Party feel about Gingrich? Decidedly mixed. On the one hand, he embodies much of what they loathe about politics: a career politician who has lobbied on behalf of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Gingrich has profited from his political influence, and he earned a rebuke from the House Ethics Committee while he was Speaker of the House in 1996. He also has taken many positions in the past that may alarm them, most notably filming a commercial with Nancy Pelosi endorsing action against climate change, and most recently calling for a “humane” policy towards illegal immigrants.

On the other hand, Gingrich’s political persona is much more appealing to movement conservatives than Romney’s. He is a determined partisan who throws rhetorical firebombs. And unlike, say, Rick Perry or Michele Bachmann, he has a high enough IQ and a deep enough knowledge base to make the conservative case against Obama in complete, often coherent, sentences.

Here's Adler again, on Huntsman's conservative base problem:
Conservatives identify inadequate nationalism as a source of unease with Huntsman. Gingrich cleverly capitalized on this when he spoke in Staten Island by offering Huntsman this backhanded compliment: “I’m not fluent in Mandarin, so Governor Huntsman will have an advantage” in their upcoming one-on-one debate.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Wonkbook: Occupy Wall Street occupies Obama's 2012 (8+ / 0-)

    "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

    by Greg Dworkin on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:08:45 AM PST

    •  methinks Plouffe and Axelrod ain't seen (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tb mare

      nothing yet. I hope they're ready.

      Once the spring gets here, I think it's going to begin to get VERY interesting. OWS will begin heating up just as the GOP chooses its victim and the actual election gets underway.

      There NEED to be some prosecutions of criminals on Wall Street. There NEEDS to be some decisive action to STOP foreclosures. There NEEDS to be a speculation tax or trade tax levied immediately. There NEEDS to be a source of funds for a jobs bill. These will become issues that will no be going away.

      And personally, I'm thinking there's a path to all of them getting done given the pressures of the election season. That, or the GOP faces the real possibility of the biggest defeat in the history of America, not only on the presidential level but also at the congressional level.

      I found it interesting on 60 minutes (IIRC) this past Sunday that the Federal investigator didn't say that people wouldn't be arrested for the stuff on Wall Street. He said (para)  we're investigating it and making sure we have all the information we need to make an effective prosecution. He said something about how it takes years to do this stuff, which is true when you're dealing with the feds. They make sure they're airtight before moving in for arrests. I remember thinking to myself: "I think they're going to begin bringing cases. he just can;t SAY it exactly that way." He certainly said everything that COULD be said, IMO.

      I've become re-radicalized. Thanks a lot you bunch of oligarchical fascist sons-of-bitches. But once again, I have no choice. Bring it the fuck on.

      by mdmslle on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:40:06 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  No republican has a chance! If it wasn't so (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tb mare, sebastianguy99

      serious; I'd be rolling on the floor laughing, at just the thought. Even Romney doesn't stand a chance against Pres, and gingrich is too laughable!

      The object we Democrats need to address; is, getting more, and yes better Democrats elected in Congress, the Senate, on state and local levels and in our court system!

      The Republican Mantra, "You Must Forget, You Must Forget"!

      Mountaintop Removal, Gas Fracking & Tar Sands XL Pipeline An American Tragedy!

      Brought To You By That Crazed Sociologist/Media Fanatic rebel ga Be The Change You Want To See In The World! Gandhi

      by rebel ga on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:44:15 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  typo; should have said, (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tb mare, sebastianguy99
        The biggest, object we Democrats need to address; is, getting more, and yes better Democrats elected in Congress, the Senate, on state and local levels and in our court system!

        Naturally I think it's important to keep campaigning for Pres Obama too. I thought that was implied, but decided it's better to be clear.

        Brought To You By That Crazed Sociologist/Media Fanatic rebel ga Be The Change You Want To See In The World! Gandhi

        by rebel ga on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:02:01 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  I Rec'd And Tipped This Great Diary And (0+ / 0-)

      book marked your, Wonkbook: Occupy Wall Street occupies Obama's 2012 campaign. Really Great Diary Dem!

      Brought To You By That Crazed Sociologist/Media Fanatic rebel ga Be The Change You Want To See In The World! Gandhi

      by rebel ga on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:57:45 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Typical Obama (0+ / 0-)

      He's got Franklin Roosevelt as an example to use as an offensive weapon. Instead, he goes on the defensive with Teddy Roosevelt.

      This strategy is  as empty as his "CHANGE" strategy. He's not going to help the Middle Class. He just wants to win the election.

  •  in IA, Romney and Paul have ceilings (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    OLinda, tb mare
    Among their challenges — three in 10 less committed voters are turned off by Romney’s Massachusetts health-care policies and even more say Paul’s opposition to military intervention overseas is a count against him, both higher than the number who see these as positive attributes.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

    "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

    by Greg Dworkin on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:10:16 AM PST

  •  GOP candidates: to know them is not to like them (6+ / 0-)
    Americans’ views of the Republican candidates for president — as a group — are getting worse, not better, as the campaign intensifies, according to a new Washington Post-Pew Research Center poll.

    But so far, there’s little evident effect on President Obama, who awaits a general election match-up with the eventual GOP nominee.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

    "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

    by Greg Dworkin on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:11:06 AM PST

  •  Good morning, everybody (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Kitty, mdmslle, rebel ga

    Jason, our tech VP, posted a diary about new site updates. It went up around 2:30AM ET, so I thought some of you may have missed it.

    America is so not like her hype.

    by OLinda on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:11:23 AM PST

  •  Gingrich is every bit as much (7+ / 0-)

    a 1% er as Mitt.  Sure, he got there as a phony and a grifter but he clearly represents the 1% and fights for their interests as much as Romney.

    •  Repubs like "Grifter 1 Percenters." (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      mdmslle, rebel ga, bluegrass50, tb mare

      It's the silver-spoon ones they distrust.

      Hucksters are respected on the right, as smart businessmen who played the angles to their advantage.

      Or, as I like to define the difference, Repubs like the "motor boat rich" versus the "sail boat rich."

      The revolution will not be privatized.

      by Bush Bites on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:24:16 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  That Republicans represent the 1% (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bluegrass50, tb mare

      and are willing to shaft the 99% doesn't seem to register with rank-and-file Republican voters.  Their hatred of Democrats seems to outweigh every other area of judgment.  Asking them why they would prefer the election of candidates whose main interest is protecting the moneyed interests elicits only answers based on Fox News talking points, most usually the canard that Democrats want to take money from those who have worked for it and give it to people who are too lazy to work.  There is no thought to their replies.  Reality escapes them; they are so wrapped up in hating, there is no way for them to see any circumstance objectively.

      For thirty-plus years this country has operated under the burden of an economic policy that further enriches the rich and devalues workers.  The policy was introduced by a glib, quick-witted, likable president, but its proponents have devolved into thoughtless, nasty and hateful bullies.  And now there is no Republican left who is likable enough that even the policy's believers want to vote for him.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:48:03 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Ahhh, Ron Fournier...remember him fondly... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Bush Bites, ratcityreprobate

    ...from his days as "AP Reporter" AKA Bush's personal buttboy.

    Welcome to Frothy Mick's

    by Rich N Mdriems on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:13:10 AM PST

  •  Isn't Fournier that former AP tool? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ratcityreprobate

    Who took donuts to McCain on Liz Sidoti's days off?

    The revolution will not be privatized.

    by Bush Bites on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:13:59 AM PST

  •  And the GOP Flavor of the Day is.......(insert (0+ / 0-)

    moran here)

  •  I'm not worried about African-American voters. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mdmslle

    They won't let Obama down.

    He might have trouble with the other groups -- especially the young -- but not with African Americans.

    The revolution will not be privatized.

    by Bush Bites on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:18:06 AM PST

    •  methinks his disapproval numbers have bottomed.... (0+ / 0-)

      time to take a few more steaks out of congress......how low can they go?

    •  You should. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      mdmslle, LSmith

      Enthusiasm is not high...and by the way it isn't our job to not let him down. We don't work for him.

      Please understand that approval does not mean turnout. Black folks could just as easily approve from the couch.

      I predict Obama will get 90-95 % of the black vote, but that turnout is going to be down sharply from 2008.

      I don't think folks are excited about four more years of 15% unemployment and negative net worth.

      •  When faced with their kids cleaning... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mdmslle, sebastianguy99

        ...schoolhouse toilets in order to qualify for their educations?

        The revolution will not be privatized.

        by Bush Bites on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:27:13 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  The campaign will be able to scare up some (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          mdmslle, Meteor Blades

          votes, for sure. But negative campaigns don't usually drive a big turnout.

          Most people don't get this, but Black folks have literally hit rock bottom. It really can't get any worse than it is right now.

          Obama's main pitch to black folks is usually some form of "shut up, vote for me, and dont ask for anything." Which I understand considering his predicament. Most black folks understand his predicament. Working for white folks aint easy. Never has been.

          •  I guess we'll see.... (0+ / 0-)

            ....because it's literally impossible to improve the African-American unemployment picture between now and then.

            More educational opportunities are needed, not more fast-food jobs. (The unemployment rate among college grads is about 4.6 percent.)

            And that takes a long time to bear fruit.

             

            The revolution will not be privatized.

            by Bush Bites on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:41:58 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Boy that's a real rallying cry! (0+ / 0-)

              "Things are going to continue to suck for you for a long, long time and there's pretty much nothing I can do about it. Vote for me."

              LOL

              I'm being facetious but in all seriousness folks will vote for Obama because...well...he's a decent guy and he's trying. More sympathy than enthusiasm. But he certainly can't come into black communities talking about his record jobs and economy unless he wants to get laughed at.

              •  He has to present a future vision, agree. (0+ / 0-)

                African-Americans have been sliding for a long time, and most of that has to do with substandard educations and lack of opportunities to go to college.

                And, OK, if the economy picks up, they will have more job opportunities, but they won't be the kind of jobs that can move them into the middle class. That comes from educational opportunities.

                A side issue:

                I wonder how the African Americans are being hit by state and local government cuts, as well as post office cuts. In my city, African-Americans are vastly overrepresented in these types of jobs. In fact, these types of jobs are probably the backbone of the African-American middle class where I live.

                When you think about that, I'd assume African-Americans are more likely to vote for the people who want to keep government jobs than those that want to cut them even more.

                The revolution will not be privatized.

                by Bush Bites on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:02:22 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Obama froze their pay. (0+ / 0-)

                  I'm sure that didn't exactly endear federal workers to their president. Especially after doling out a coupla hundred billion to Wall Street.

                  As for educational opportunities and what not...lol...well, i'll just talk more about that joke at a later date.

                  But it isn't true black folks have been always sliding backwards. Right up through Bill Clinton there was a steady increase in overall earnings, net worth, and upward mobility. It did begin to stagnate a bit under Bush. But it has absolutely crashed down to the floor under Obama. We're almost back where we were before the civil rights act in terms of relative standard of living. And none of those green labor factories Obama crows about have been located in black neighborhoods. None of em.

                  Ever seen him visit a factory in a black neighborhood? Exactly.

                  So yeah...this is pretty much a God awful state of affairs. Not Obama's fault of course. But has he done anything about any of it? No. And if we start asking, he will have to say no for political reasons that are completely understandable.

              •  The same old voter conundrum - (0+ / 0-)

                Who is the least worst?

                "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

                by SueDe on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:03:21 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

            •  I'm thinking you're wrong on this one. I think, (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              bewareofme, sebastianguy99

              even though the unemployment numbers are bad, they know why they're bad.
              GOP obstruction.
              They've been watching the race-baiting and hearing the dog-whistles the last 3 years, too.
              There's also the voter suppression effort by the GOP, which is going to boomerang on them.
              I think the poll numbers right now are very fluid, and express a mood, a collective opinion, but I think this next election will be taken very seriously. That's always good for the Dems.

          •  i feel you on this BBB and i think you're right (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            brooklynbadboy, DemFromCT

            about it. But I will also suggest that while the enthusiasm won't be there the way it was in 2008 (especially with the first time AA voters), I think there will be still tremendous social pressure in the community to just "do the right thing". At the end of the day, I don't think it's much of the issues that will motivate that base of support, but the attacks and the way the president will be besieged will anger a lot of us.

            I know you've seen it in your community and I have in mine as well. Once recurring theme i hear, no matter if I;m talking to an 80 year old woman who WLAYS VOTES or whether I;m talking to the "boys hanging out at the corner store" is this: "They hate that he's a black man". I think that has legs. And As we move into the season, especially with Gingrich who is the male equivalent of Sarah "Mean Girl" Palin (only worse - he brings a decidedly white male privileged attitude with him wherever he goes), I think we'll see more unity and more movement in the community.

            I've become re-radicalized. Thanks a lot you bunch of oligarchical fascist sons-of-bitches. But once again, I have no choice. Bring it the fuck on.

            by mdmslle on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:52:30 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  For us black folks still left in the middle class, (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              DemFromCT, mdmslle

              I'm sure there will be a lot of that. I'm sympathetic towards him all time, poor guy. White guy leaves a mess on his desk and blames him for the mess. Welcome to America.

              But for black folks that's broke, chances are they've got bigger things on their minds than politics. Like rent and food. Kids school clothes and gas money. Probably the only thing that's going to get some of those folks to the polls is fear. But some just aint trying to hear any of it.

              It certainly isn't like 2008. Very different vibe then. Hope and Change. This time? Sympathy and Fear.

              •  important points you make (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                brooklynbadboy

                keep making them.

                "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                by Greg Dworkin on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:05:40 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Greg, its like this: (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  DemFromCT

                  I live in this community. I didn't move out to the suburbs after I got my education. I moved my wife into this community. I could afford to live in Cos Cob or Sag Harbor if I wanted to. I don't.

                  All around me there are people who, literally, hanging on by the skin of their teeth. I know because they come to me for help when they have to. This isn't a joke. It's not academic. It's a goddamn full-on crisis.

                  These folks where I live...they could care less about politics. Most of them don't believe any politician makes a difference one way or the other. Folks are losing their apartments. Turning to drugs. Doing risky things that ends up bringing trouble with the law. Selling their food stamps for metrocard money. Caring for their elderly is almost next to impossible.

                  The only time politicians pay attention to this community is either once every four years or when they need a place to send in police.

                  So, you'll pardon me if I'm not waving the flag of Obama high and proud. More like I'm willing to put on the t-shirt to change my motor oil.

                  •  I'm from Brooklyn (0+ / 0-)

                    (Marine park and flatbush)...

                     easy to picture (alas) what you're saying.

                    "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                    by Greg Dworkin on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 07:21:54 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

              •  yes I think hope and change is not the (0+ / 0-)

                motivator this time, not for any of us, black, white or otherwise.

                And yes I think it will be harder to get those who are merely hanging on to show up. But frankly I had a very difficult tim getting that contingent to show up even in 2008. Very hard time. And really I'd say maybe I got less than 20% of that group to register and even fewer to actually show up. I was working I-4 in Florida in a little red town called lake wales.

                But I also think that's true of nearly EVERY poor constituency. I worked low income AA neighborhoods as well as low income white neighborhoods, mostly trailer parks. None of those people seemed motivated to vote at all.  I was like pulling teeth.

                But of course if you have more people in that space today than 2008, then yes, you may see a drop off.

                I've become re-radicalized. Thanks a lot you bunch of oligarchical fascist sons-of-bitches. But once again, I have no choice. Bring it the fuck on.

                by mdmslle on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:14:45 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

          •  Again, I have to disagree. (3+ / 0-)

            The President's pitch to AAs has not been to say shut up and vote. Just off the top of my head I know his record includes increasing funding to HBCUs and settling the black farmer's suit against the Agricultural Dept. That is aside from the fact that AAs, like everyone else, benefit from passage of healthcare reform, reversal of DADT and preventing the auto industry from failure.

            He recently held a conference with AA community leaders, politicos and academics to address his legislative agenda, past and present. Again, I think they aren't very good at making their accomplishments known but they have been successful in many realms.
            Legislative Agenda for African-American Community

            Sarah Palin is a fictitious character created by the media to close the charisma gap between Obama and McCain in the summer of 08.

            by smartdemmg on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:13:40 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Sigh. (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              DemFromCT, LSmith, Meteor Blades

              You guys have to learn to stop throwing these lists at people. That's just not going to work. Nor will the fact that you had meetings our useless leaders. Theyre always having meetings. Thats all they do is have meetings.

              Try this instead: Convince somebody to open up a factory in compton and put everybody who doesn't have a job there to work. Then illustrate how you helped those employees improve their skills, credit, and economic stablity. Then show how they bought homes in the area and rebuilt their local school.

              You all need something like that than these nibble around the edges lists. You guys need a fundamental story that gets to the heart of the bread and butter.

              God...you sound like academics in the projects. Just dont get it.

              •  wait... what? (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                sebastianguy99
                Try this instead: Convince somebody to open up a factory in compton and put everybody who doesn't have a job there to work. Then illustrate how you helped those employees improve their skills, credit, and economic stablity. Then show how they bought homes in the area and rebuilt their local school.

                You all need something like that

                who is "you all" in this context?  and how do you expect something like that to get done on the leadup to this election?

                you sound like the corner dude with big dreams and no sense of the scale of them.  I KNOW you're not that, so what gives?

                This comment is dedicated to my mellow Adept2U and his Uncle Marcus

                by mallyroyal on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:44:59 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  LOL (0+ / 0-)

                  Big dreams? From Obama? LOL. Ummm...no.

                  I'm just pointing out that these lists you guys throw around..well, you could print a million of em and people will still be more persuaded by the lint in their pockets.

                  I using that as an illustrative point, not that it could actually happen. Nobody in America gives a damn about black folks to anything that dramatic, especially not Obama. Drama aint his thing.

                  •  yep big dreams. "lemme run for prez, fuckit: (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    sebastianguy99

                    stranger things have happened.  stop laughing y'all, I could win!"

                    "know what?  fuck you rahm, I'm gonna pass healthcare, not just try it, watch.  bet money."

                    yeah big dreams from THAT dude.  hilarious, right?

                    y'all keep giving me the fat pitches to just rock outta the park lmao

                    anyway.  that you're using an impossibility as an illustrative point actually illustrates my general point when it comes to certain lefty critiques of the prez:  they're not grounded in reality.

                    This comment is dedicated to my mellow Adept2U and his Uncle Marcus

                    by mallyroyal on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:57:57 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Ah. (0+ / 0-)

                      So...a half white boy who comes out of a private school and goes to columbia and harvard ends up as president.

                      Umm..ok. That's good for him, sure. Not exactly translating into big dreams for US, now is it?

                      He passed the Heritage Foundations healthcare plan. Ok. I suppose that counts as an accomplishment in some circles.

                      Anyway, im not a lefty. I agree with progessives on many economic issues, but im far too conservative on military force and the environment to count as a lefty. I do keep my views quiet on those things so as not to provoke fury and cause a lot of craziness, but a lefty I am not.

                      MB will attest. My views on the environment would probably get me run out of here.

                      •  the "half white" thing slays me. (2+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        smartdemmg, bewareofme

                        you would never assume that about him if you passed him on the street.  you know it, I know it.  I'd lose that meme, were I you, but alas, I'm not. (I don't make near your bread, for one LOL)

                        meanwhile how do you know that exactly what you just said doesn't translate into big dreams for me and mine?  my son looks even whiter than him because I look about as black as the prez does and my kid's mom looks white.  he's in a private school right now.  follow where I'm going with that?

                        I know you're not a 'lefty'.  many self-identified 'leftys' share your concern when it comes to Af-Am support of the president.  even more look to you as a barometer (far more than those same people do me, which cracks me up but thats neither here nor there) so that's why I said that.

                        This comment is dedicated to my mellow Adept2U and his Uncle Marcus

                        by mallyroyal on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 07:10:02 AM PST

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  Ha! (0+ / 0-)

                          People don't look to me as a barometer. People look to me because I've got a bigger soapbox than you do. I'm no different than you. I just get heard more.

                          In any case, no I don't follow you because I'm not like you. I come from the gutter. My father came to this country with nothing and practically died in Vietnam to earn his citizenship. I grew up in the Pink Houses. I didn't go straight to college. Couldn't afford it and had no interest in it. I became a Marine.

                          So yeah...I can't identify with someone who has private schools and what not. I've met folks like yourself but don't know any on a personal level. Far above my social class. Both my girls (16 and 13) go to public schools right here in the hood. By choice, not necessity.

                          •  here's the thing though homie (0+ / 0-)

                            your experience is damn sure no more indicative of black life in the USA than mine.

                            so that's on you that you can't relate.  I actually do know folks on a personal level that came up like you and I think it's a real shame you can't say the reverse.

                            it's a big world out there.

                            This comment is dedicated to my mellow Adept2U and his Uncle Marcus

                            by mallyroyal on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 08:06:57 AM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  ROFL I had to come back: you just revealed how (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            sebastianguy99

                            your household makes like 4 times mine and AFTER that tried to take me to task for being "above your social class"

                            fuck outta here LMAOOO you almost had me going there.  good one.

                            This comment is dedicated to my mellow Adept2U and his Uncle Marcus

                            by mallyroyal on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 08:09:01 AM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  Luck brah. (0+ / 0-)

                            Some people got it. Some people dont.

                            But that has nothing to do with ones social class. When you start making a lot of money, you'll see that.

                          •  this ain't england, "brah" (0+ / 0-)

                            social class IS money here.  you know that as well as I do.

                            I don't begrudge you your luck but you begrudge me my upbringing, same as you do the prez.  that's just ridiculously subjective when it comes to class in America.  you're just floundering for something to say at this point.

                            This comment is dedicated to my mellow Adept2U and his Uncle Marcus

                            by mallyroyal on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 08:31:34 AM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  Actually, (0+ / 0-)

                            it isn't that. I just know that social class has nothing to do with money. You might think that, but you'd be wrong. In fact, I used to think like you do. But that was mistake. It has very much to do, in America, with where you went to school. There are plenty of New England blue bloods who make far less than me but can get into clubs that wouldn't give me the time of day. You either, I suspect.

                            Money is just what it is. A thing to facilitate trade. Says nothing about your upbringing, social class, or character.

                          •  you can pay for your kid to go ANYWHERE (0+ / 0-)

                            and merit can get you there too.  I thought that was the whole thrust of your Punahoe argument, pick one.

                            if social class is about an elitist "where did you go to school" thing, and money can't buy you into those schools, then your assumption about the prez, me, AND my kid makes absolutely no sense.

                            if you CAN buy your way into those schools, then I'm right about class in this country.

                            pick one, like I said.

                            This comment is dedicated to my mellow Adept2U and his Uncle Marcus

                            by mallyroyal on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 08:50:59 AM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  Perhaps you don't see what I mean. (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            Meteor Blades

                            Okay, who is of a higher social class:

                            1. A Harvard educated man from the plata born into a family of landowners whose heritage dates back to the conquistadors, but who, as an adult, has lived on his trust fund to spend most of his time travelling between St. Tropez and Majorca.

                            2. A Bahian man born in a slum who never knew his father but managed, through public schooling, to become the worlds most successful offshore drilling engineer.

                            You'd probably think #2, but in reality, its #1.

                            Yes, where you went to school is a greater factor than how much money you make, but a lesser factor than your social background. At least in the most elite circles of this country. Where people have horses and oil paintings of their ancestors. Like in Beverly Farms or Charlottesville.

                          •  your antiquated notions of class continue to (0+ / 0-)

                            amuse me.

                            that the "well bred" spaniard is automatically of a higher status than the favela born brazilian in your eyes is especially hilarious.  

                            you gave me a hint earlier as to why you think this is the case too, when you mentioned your dad.

                            like I said, antiquated (probably british) notions of class.

                            This comment is dedicated to my mellow Adept2U and his Uncle Marcus

                            by mallyroyal on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 11:51:37 AM PST

                            [ Parent ]

              •  Wow. (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                bewareofme, sebastianguy99

                1. Yes, I believe discussions/debates should be fact driven and not simply based on my emotions. I don't expect my personal feelings to substitute for facts.

                2. Note that the conference the president held included community leaders who were able to provide their input and feedback to the president and Cabinet members--in other words, they wrren't nvited to simply listen to the president pontificate.

                3. What you dismiss as a mere list, I'm sure if you wrre a black farmer or kid currently appkying to college at an HBCU or a gay member of the military would matter. Run your dismisdive attitude past a worker at GM who still has a job, house and healthcare.

                One of pet peeves with this place is the ease with which any topic that doesn't directly improve their individual existence is dismissed as unimportant.

                Let me encourage you to read the report linked to my prior post where many of your concerns are addressed, so we may discuss facts. We claim this site is reality based and while I appreciate your feelings, they are no more or less valid than the feelings of those who love this president.

                Sarah Palin is a fictitious character created by the media to close the charisma gap between Obama and McCain in the summer of 08.

                by smartdemmg on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:51:31 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

          •  What do you mean things can't possibly get worse? (0+ / 0-)

            Do you really think that if the republicans win in 2012 the distribution of wealth won't continue to get more and more lopsided?    It CAN get worse, and republicans win in 2012, it WILL get worse.

            Obama may not be exciting many of us right now, but we can't afford the alternative.

            explain how letting gays marry will directly affect your own heterosexual relationship?

            by bluestatesam on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 07:28:47 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  I strongly disagree. (4+ / 0-)

        The anger over the perceived disrespect of President Obama among the AA's I know has many determined to get him re-elected. Add this to the belief that he is generally well liked and beloved by some and I anticipate the numbers will be simikar to 2008--the economy, unless it just plummets between now and 11/2012, will not be the determinative factor for the majority of AAs.

        Sarah Palin is a fictitious character created by the media to close the charisma gap between Obama and McCain in the summer of 08.

        by smartdemmg on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:38:11 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  And he has been disrespected. (5+ / 0-)

          From the day he walked into office, the old, white and Southern Repubs have vowed to make him a one termer.

          Those optics couldn't have passed by the African-American voters unnoticed.

          The revolution will not be privatized.

          by Bush Bites on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:44:03 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  I agree (6+ / 0-)

          I have spoken with many AA colleagues that feel that although they have not been thrilled with the economy, Barack is their man. They are personally offended by the level of disrespect that the president has faced. They are very dedicated to making sure that he wins again. Do you think Newt Gingrich calling the president of the united states a "food stamp president" isn't a dog whistle? The AA community knows that the GOP has it out for the president on a personal level. It's all about respect.

        •  Well. Good luck with that. (0+ / 0-)

          I'll be keeping my eye out for the Obama campaign canvassers here in Bed-Stuy and we shall see. On election day, if I see the line I saw in 2008 (which was ridiculously long...unheard of in my 20 years of voting), then I'll know folks turned out.

          But if it looks like 2004...well...then I'll think things will turn out as I expect them to.

      •  I'm not either. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        smartdemmg, sebastianguy99

        you think black folks won't show up to vote in the prez for re-election?  brooklyn isn't the world.  what you're hearing from poor blacks is almost the complete opposite of what I'm hearing.  I'm hearing "they wanna blame the black guy for everything" I think you're underselling the (still major) emotional boon the man brings to our communities.

        and poor folks have been poor through a bunch of presidents.  I think you're underselling their understanding of their situation and their understanding of the solutions.

        now, all that said, I don't know ANY prez running for re-election that has a base as jazzed as they were for his first run.  this smacks to me of more of the usual setting the bar higher for this guy than any other.

        This comment is dedicated to my mellow Adept2U and his Uncle Marcus

        by mallyroyal on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:26:15 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  The teaparty's slip is showing. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    smartdemmg, Bush Bites

    We will know the level of their hypocrisy (if we don't know enough already) by the level of support they give Newt Gingrich.  They're willing to give the back of their hands to Romney because his personality is not fiery enough or his conservative bona fides are not pure enough?  But they're willing to throw their support to a man who has proven himself to be both a political and social hypocrite?  That says a lot more about the tea party voters than it does about either candidate.

    "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

    by SueDe on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:22:12 AM PST

  •  Of course people hate Gingrich. Even if he were my (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Bush Bites, mdmslle, bythesea

    political ideological twin, I would despise him for this arrogance, hatred, hypocrisy, and dishonesty.  Is there a more condescending man alive?  If so I have never seen him.

    Well, the good news is the "Obama is arrogant" meme of the GOP will be quickly dying its well deserved death. I think the word "arrogant" is not one that the GOP will want in the forefront should Gingrich win the nomination.

    Gentlemen, you can't fight in here! This is the War Room!

    by bigtimecynic on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:23:53 AM PST

  •  I found that commercial with Newt and Nancy. (0+ / 0-)

    It's here.  This should cost him major points with the Republican base.  They don't believe in climate change and they  hate Nancy Pelosi.

    Poor people look for work. Middle class people find a job. Rich people seek employment.

    by k4pacific on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:25:26 AM PST

  •  in Gingrich we have Romney's Palin (0+ / 0-)

    The Newt will be the VP nominee because the establishment can't accept him as the nominee and the unwashed masses of the GOP base voters can't accept Romney as the nominee ...so a compo....I would not be surprised if they don't start floating those ideas soon......Newt can be the VP.....attack Obama and debate with Biden.

    in the end this enterprise is doomed.

    /If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer/. Thoreau

    by hron on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:26:31 AM PST

  •  On the one hand, Newt has certainly positioned (0+ / 0-)

    himself in a more substantive and dominating fashion than his predecessors in the "flavor of the day" rotation, but when/if he destructs it will be a doozy.  I look for fingerprints of Karl Rove on the shiv.

    Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a Republican. But I repeat myself. Harry Truman

    by ratcityreprobate on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:28:54 AM PST

  •  heheh. "often coherent sentences". (0+ / 0-)

    That's a hoot.

    Then the Mandarin comment. Gawd, is Newt an asshole. I honestly at this point hope he gets the nom. He's so nasty and derisive that I think the vast majority of people will recoil from him they way everybody hates the obnoxious guy at work. And whatever Obama's approval ratings, his likability is still very high. Nothing earns American scorn more than being obnoxious to the "decent guy".

    Gawd, what an asshole he is. It's genetic and he can't help it. I'm not even sure e realizes it. Which is good.

    I've become re-radicalized. Thanks a lot you bunch of oligarchical fascist sons-of-bitches. But once again, I have no choice. Bring it the fuck on.

    by mdmslle on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:32:02 AM PST

  •  Obama's speeches matter to Pundits - and (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    thinkdouble

    those of us who HOPE-d he wouldn't turn around and shit on us ... ??

    yawn.

    the DLC-ers are almost as good as convincing the schmuckery that they aren't a bunch of lying rich pig ass kissers as the republicans are at convincing the boobs that they aren't a bunch of lying thieves.

    rmm.

    Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look; He thinks too much: such men are dangerous

    by seabos84 on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:36:44 AM PST

  •  On Avlon: TR is a powerful reference, and (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mdmslle

    it's a shame Obama didn't get the message before now.

    A TR-type message is a way to speak to Tea Party(ish) types on fundamental values and to separate actual conservative ideas and the ideals of America's founders from those, like Rush Limbaugh, who sound more like their Tory enemies.

    TR actually championed the free market and its power by understanding how a free market works -- and what destroys it.

    He's not going to get the extremes, but he doesn't need to.

    The problem is that he hasn't acted the part in his first three years as President, more or less flipping the bird to most of the middle class while he's pursued his agenda.

    If the GOP candidate is sufficiently distasteful, however, he may be able to hop on the train now and get where he wants to go.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:40:31 AM PST

    •  Maybe Obama thought if he beat that horse (0+ / 0-)

      for four years that horse would be dead by now.

      Republicans, the slum lords of America. They never fix anything and then blame the tenants when it all falls apart.

      by PowWowPollock on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:58:16 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Obama's agenda? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Bush Bites, smartdemmg

      You mean...

      Medicare Drug Discount Saves Elderly $1.5 Billion, U.S. Says

      http://www.businessweek.com/...

      The nice thing about Obama's reelection is that some of the things he put in place  that you continue to deride will bear more public fruit.

      The other nice thing is keeping the gonifs out of the WH silverware drawer.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 05:58:50 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I've never claimed that he hasn't done a single (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DemFromCT

        good thing while in office, which puts me ahead of Bush bashers by a country mile.

        Doesn't change the fact that he's mostly looked the other way while we got hammered.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:06:11 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  "down" was so far down (0+ / 0-)

          that magic wands and holy water wouldn't help.

          He's done things wrong (too much Wall Street, not enough Main Street), but saving the country from depression counts as a plus. That and the (should've kicked in earlier) health reforms are a major plus that he doesn't get credit from you for.

          Biggest failing? Housing crisis not addressed. Sure, we could use more jobs, but so-called job creators see jobs as an expense.

          "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

          by Greg Dworkin on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:17:32 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I haven't seen country saved from depression. (0+ / 0-)

            The well-to-do may have been saved, but out here it's still pretty nasty.

            "Sure, we could use more jobs"?

            Sounds like Democratic policy:

            "Sure, we could use more jobs, but is more important"

            As to housing, yeah.
            Whether it's more important than jobs depends on your social status, I guess. The well-to-do are working, so they need only worry about the ability to sell their home so they can move on up to the East Side.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:21:52 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  indeed. I reel for classical republicans. (0+ / 0-)

      I really do. There's just no representation for them. And not only that but the current GOP is destroying the brand altogether. Creating a distaste and animosity that will last generations. Anyone between the ages of say, 10 and 50 will have today's GOP as their only point of reference for what the Republican Party is. That's just AWFUL.

      for Pete's sake, I have friends who are classical republicans. Hell, I was one much more conservative than I am today. But gawd almighty, what rational person can embrace today GOP?  

      Sad.

      I've become re-radicalized. Thanks a lot you bunch of oligarchical fascist sons-of-bitches. But once again, I have no choice. Bring it the fuck on.

      by mdmslle on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:00:05 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  heh - reminds me of Adlai Stevenson (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        dinotrac, mdmslle, LSmith
        During his 1956 presidential campaign, a woman called out to Mr. Stevenson "Senator, you have the vote of every thinking person!" Stevenson called back "That's not enough, madam, we need a majority!"

        "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

        by Greg Dworkin on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:04:28 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Probably why there are so many independents. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DemFromCT, mdmslle

        The parties today don't much look like they did when I was growing up.  Hell, Barry Goldwater looks almost moderate by today's GOP standard, and he was a fire-breathing (but honest and principled) conservative, the man who made Reagan possible.

        But yes, I do feel for them.

        I've never been a Republican -- the only party affiliation I ever claimed, in my young and foolish days, was Democrat -- but this lot of aggressively shiftless front-men for the monied elite (wait -- which party am I talking about? Oh yeah, the GOP) would make me throw up if I were.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:10:15 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I should amend that just a bit... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          mdmslle, DemFromCT

          In this crowd, Newt actually looks principled and accomplished.

          Come to think of it, in this crowd, he is.

          LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

          by dinotrac on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:11:13 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  and why an indie run would be devastating (0+ / 0-)

          to the GOP.

          I was a registered indie for 25 years from the moment I was old enough to vote until, literally, 2009. I disliked the idea of being beholden to one party or the other.

          Why and I now a democrat? because the GOP has nothing to offer. zero. zip. nada. And to pretend that they do, that they might have a "point" worthy of rational consideration is wishful thinking. So I saw no reason to remain non-partisan. The only ideas worth considering anymore are coming out of the democratic party, which itself is comprised of both leftist thought and what used to be considered conservative thought. The actual conservatives are irrational and not worth listening to at all.

          I've become re-radicalized. Thanks a lot you bunch of oligarchical fascist sons-of-bitches. But once again, I have no choice. Bring it the fuck on.

          by mdmslle on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:21:01 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  In my dream of dreams, Ron Paul and Howard (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            mdmslle

            Dean both mount runs so that people can remember what candidates with positions they believed in looked and sounded like.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:25:10 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  why is believing in a whackdoodle position (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              mdmslle

              a good thing?

              see Rand Paul.

              "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

              by Greg Dworkin on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:34:24 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Whackadoodle is in the eye of the beholder. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                mdmslle

                And -- Rand Paul is not Ron Paul.

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:38:28 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

              •  i'm not sure dinotrac's calling it a good thing (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                dinotrac

                as much as the fact that Ron Paul is at least consistent in his positions. Crazy? Yes, most of them. But if you're going to say you're a small government fiscal conservative then you should definitely be eyeing the annual MIC expenditures unfavorably as well as the ridiculous amount of money being spent on the "drug war". If you're going to say you're all in for small government, then you can't be advocating instituting rules and regulations about who marries whom and whether certain religions are allowed to build buildings. If you're going to say you're pro-life, then how do you advocate for the death penalty but against abortion?

                I'm no fan of Ron Paul (understatement of the millennium) but he's a hell of a lot more consistent in his position that the "classical GOP". Not perfectly consistent, but certainly not as dissonant at the classical GOP, IMO.

                Now as for Dean? Hell, I'd love to see the day Democrats run as Democrats. I think the lunacy of the right is almost proportionate to the degree to which the democratic party has moved rightward and the brand is potentially destroyed by it. If we had a conservative party that was like the current blue dog caucus, I think we'd have a left wing democratic party. Ironically, the right is SO off the rails that even conservative democrats (who embrace classically conservative positions) are being called "left", while we one the actual left are "radicals" and "marxists" and "communists".

                the disintegration of the GOP and classical conservatism WITHIN the GOP is hurting us all.

                I've become re-radicalized. Thanks a lot you bunch of oligarchical fascist sons-of-bitches. But once again, I have no choice. Bring it the fuck on.

                by mdmslle on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 06:47:15 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  he is consistent (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  newinfluence

                  totally

                  aka unyielding and uncompromising.

                  we have a bunch of TP Republicans who are the same way in the House.

                  I don't see it as a plus.

                  "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                  by Greg Dworkin on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 07:24:40 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Paul is principled. (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    DemFromCT

                    He's a lot more interesting than other GOP types with his opposition to foreign adventurism and belief that the government has no place in marriage, etc.

                    Seems to me to be about the same thing as Howard Dean with the polarities reversed.

                    Howard Dean, btw, remains my favorite Democrat.
                    By a lot.

                    Ron Paul is my favorite Republican.
                    By default.

                    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                    by dinotrac on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 08:12:10 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                  •  "he is consistent" (0+ / 0-)

                    I second your thought, demfromct.

                    I can admire having principles, but his principles stand in stark opposition to the job he's seeking. He's seeking to be the chief executive of an entity that he doesn't believe in.

                    How is that principled?

                  •  consistent is not equal to unyielding (0+ / 0-)

                    Consistent is using one standard to judge something.

                    If you say you're a fiscal conservative who hates deficits, you ought to be willing to consider cuts to the biggest annual expenditure we have: the military.

                    That Paul is willing to look at that expenditure means that when he says he wants to "save money" that's a consistent position, regardless of what or where the cuts might come from.

                    A person who calls themselves pro-life (anti-abortion) ought ALSO to be anti-death penalty. That's not unyielding. It's a consistent position on the issue of life. That taking a life in any form (whether a fetus or a convicted felon) is wrong. That's not unyielding, it's a position based on what it means to be pro-life. The current GOP advocates for protecting the unborn but loves the idea of 234 executions.

                    Being unyielding is not the same thing.

                    But as I said, I am no a fan of Paul or libertarianism. I think it's a flawed system that is impossible to institute.

                    I've become re-radicalized. Thanks a lot you bunch of oligarchical fascist sons-of-bitches. But once again, I have no choice. Bring it the fuck on.

                    by mdmslle on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 11:15:15 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

  •  The fact that Gingrich... (0+ / 0-)

    ...is cheered, let alone stomached by the tea party crowd is telling.

    On the other hand, Gingrich’s political persona is much more appealing to movement conservatives than Romney’s. He is a determined partisan who throws rhetorical firebombs.

    What seems to matter to them isn't government or spending or liberty, as the marketers would have you believe. It's about anger - even hatred - of this President, and of the larger Progressive movement. It's seen in the multiple "war on insert noun here" warnings seen on everything from Fox to Perry ads, Glenn Beck to NRA bumper stickers. It's about power - for those who bankroll them and stoke their fears.

    Little-by-little, the layers of the onion are peeled away, and the acidic truth offends the eyes (and ears) of those who are paying attention.

  •  Once the spotlight turns on Gingrich (0+ / 0-)

    and it looks like yesterday's polling marks the first day that Gingrich is viewed as the front-runner, I don't think he will wear well.  Santorum and Paul will gain traction in Iowa closer to election day, and I would not be surprised to see Paul victory.  What Mitt Romney needs to do is not necessarily win every primary but make Iowa close enough to ask voters to take a second look at both candidates.  From that standpoint, Romney can achieve that objective,

    Alternative rock with something to say: http://www.myspace.com/globalshakedown

    by khyber900 on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 08:16:42 AM PST

  •  News Blackout (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sebastianguy99

    ABC News did not even mention the President's speech on their newscast last night. And NPR dismissed it with the usual "the President TRIED to ..." language, followed by a parade of conservatives explaining how Obama ruined the economy.
    At the end of the ABC Nightly News last night, I turned to The Engineer and said, "Maybe even he had been wearing a flightsuit on board an aircraft carrier...?"

    Democracy - Not Plutocracy!

    by vulcangrrl on Wed Dec 07, 2011 at 09:58:55 AM PST

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