Skip to main content

As Reuters today reports

Syrian forces bombarded districts of the city of Homs in their drive to crush a revolt against President Bashar al-Assad...

"Tens of shabbiha (militiamen loyal to Assad) along with army snipers and two tanks have deployed at the citadel and they are bombarding Old Homs with mortar rounds and anti-aircraft guns," activist Malek Mohammad said by satellite phone from the city, 140 km (88 miles) north of Damascus

I was alerted just a bit ago to a tweeter from Homs, Syria. Some of the tweets are in English, some in Arabic. I thought I would run a few of the Arabic ones through Google's Arabic to English translation tool and see what I could make of them. The results are below in most recent to least recent chronological order. The ones without attribution are the ones run through the tool, the attributed ones are originally in English.

I have no idea whether the tweets are legitimate, but no reason to believe they aren't.  They seem to tell a tale consistent with what little we can find out from main stream news stories.

It's a battle of freedom going on in Syria. I am a little soldier in it from the living heart of Syria, Homs .

mobile phones cut off until the moment for the entire city of Homs since Sunday

Today some people are also able to get out of Homs, but according to what I learned is still forbidden access to the city through portlets regular

 what is happening from theft and looting of the gangs of Al-Assad for homes construction in Homs district

 Homs "calm" relative control of the Homs now after a day full of bombing and bullets that did not stop I do not think that this calm will last much

Samsom homs @Samsomhoms  Reply  Retweet  Favorite · Open
i could finally got some bread for me & family here in #Homs not much i got it with 75 #Syrian pound while it's 40 normally #Syria

Samsom homs @Samsomhoms  Reply  Retweet  Favorite · Open
Do not dwell on the martyrs and the hungry-there are hundreds of injured here in #Homs who need immediate medical attention #Syria

Samsom homs @Samsomhoms  Reply  Retweet  Favorite · Open
WE ARE RUN OUT OF FOOD WE ARE RUN OUT OF MEDICATIONS WE ARE SUFFERING HERE IN #HOMS SHAME ON YOU #WORLD #SYRIA

You almost certainly know of the bloodbath that is going in Syria daily, and the failure of the Arab League observers to have any effect.

You may also be aware that there is no indication that the revolt against Assad or Assad's bloody attempts to squash the rebellion show any signs of letting up.


A very recent CNN report on Syrian army attacks and recent protests:



At what level of slaughter does humanity -- with or without Russia and China -- decide that they must intervene? Or is the cure in this case unfailingly worse than the disease, regardless of the level of brutality in Syria?  I certainly have no answer.

8:40 PM PT: Update from comments: US Embassy in Syria twitter account

9:04 PM PT: Update from comments: Al Jazeera live blog

9:06 PM PT: Photobucket

Originally posted to jpmassar on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 07:47 PM PST.

Also republished by Occupy Wall Street and Eyes on Egypt and the Region.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  The intervention question was much easier (15+ / 0-)

    in Libya, where there were far fewer ethnic and religious differences amongst the population than there are in Syria.

    But man, this is getting really, really bad.  

    Russia and China haven't exactly made themselves popular in the Arab world, that much is sure.

    Tipped and recced

    "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

    by Lawrence on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 08:01:44 PM PST

    •  judging from the few comments i read (5+ / 0-)

      on the twitter account (syria embassy one) we should not be looking at anything else right now (except i suppose iran) but it's a blasting hot mess.

      assad doesn't deserve another day.

      Addington's perpwalk is the trailhead of accountability for this wound to our national psyche. (But go ahead and arrest Rumsfeld, too.)

      by greenbird on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 08:31:59 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  extremely difficult, though. (5+ / 0-)

        Lawrence laid out some reasons above.  But also the Libyan situation was, at least loosely, geographically defined.  SItuation got much  more complex with Tripoli, etc, as the fight progressed, but there a concept of 'hold the line in Benghazi' that one could relate to.

        Military intervention in Syria will be incredibly brutal and a no-fly zone, I would guess, far more complicated.   Also the military is still firmly with Assad--with the exception of some defectors...in Libya there was at least a loose fighting force, based in the east of the country.

        I, too, find it difficult to just sit back--but it is possible that intervention turns into a no-win affair with tends of thousands more civilians killed....  there's no way to know for sure.

        And this all without even considering the inter-regional conflicts.

        Would be interesting to see some Arab  League special ops...perhaps...  but that won't happen.  Peacekeepers?  Not now, at any rate....

        •  I'm sure some air units would defect (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          jpmassar, Lawrence, greenbird

          if a no-fly was put in place.

          I can't decide personally what the best course is at the moment, but I'm sure a no-fly zone would be in place now if the spin-out weren't extremely disruptive geopolitically.

          "And now we know that government by organized money is just as dangerous as government by organized mob." -- FDR

          by Mogolori on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 10:34:34 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  agree with both your points---although to be (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            jpmassar, Mogolori, greenbird

            honest--if the second point were the case, it really wouldn't be Syria at all....  a country like that is defined as much by geopolitics as the country itself.

            But even so....the battle lines are different...it's more nebulous than Syria was.  Even so, it's the ground forces/artillery that's wreaking all this havoc...I wonder how effective a no-fly-zone would even be?  It was effective in Libya--in part because NATO upped the ante a bit--like a no fly zone Plus.  (hitting offensive units, etc.)  Seems to me this situation would be far more precarious in Syria...with the potential for far more 'collateral damage'

    •  It was easier in Libya because rebels... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      greenbird

      ..controlled territory from the near-outset.

      But nobody's buying flowers from the flower lady.

      by Rich in PA on Sun Feb 12, 2012 at 05:50:01 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  earlier today i read (6+ / 0-)

    that amd ford was using his facebook and twitter accounts to try to keep communications alive with the citizens of syria. i haven't explored further, but there is the state dept blog, here, which may refer to those accounts.

    i will try to provide further information for you, after i wash the george rockwell and larry sinclair ick from my brain (via another diary on dk4).

    Addington's perpwalk is the trailhead of accountability for this wound to our national psyche. (But go ahead and arrest Rumsfeld, too.)

    by greenbird on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 08:03:16 PM PST

  •  Two emails today sought help for Syrians. (9+ / 0-)

    Amnesty International wants signatures for a petition to Russia:

    The death toll continues to rise in Syria. Hundreds of largely unarmed people have reportedly been killed in the city of Homs alone. The crisis in Syria is escalating.

    The world must do everything in its power to end the Assad regime's violent crackdown. Instead, Russia, a country with influence over Syria, appears to be standing by while crimes against humanity are being committed.

    Demand that Russia put real pressure on Syrian authorities to end the military assault on Homs.

    Link to petition

    "Smuggle Hope into Syria" is an effort of Avaaz.org and seeks donations:
    as embassies close, medical agencies withdraw and journalists pull out, Avaaz has the only network that is both smuggling medical equipment and journalists in and images and information out. The UN has failed, but we can help peaceful democracy heroes like Danny loosen the dictator's grip on their country. Click here to see Danny's appeal and chip in now so we can continue our Arab spring campaigning and support for citizen journalists -- if 20,000 of us donate now, we can get aid to the most besieged cities and towns before the next attack.
    Avaaz is quite new compared to Amnesty International, having been established originally online to take action globally. Here are some of their goals and accomplishments.

    "Let each unique song be sung and the spell of differentiation be broken" - Winter Rabbit

    by cotterperson on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 08:32:01 PM PST

  •  Keep in mind the Arab League Observers (3+ / 0-)

    Report when reading or listening to the news/propaganda being reported by the MSM.  

    http://www.columbia.edu/...

  •  still have live bookmarks (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jpmassar, cotterperson

    Addington's perpwalk is the trailhead of accountability for this wound to our national psyche. (But go ahead and arrest Rumsfeld, too.)

    by greenbird on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 08:54:44 PM PST

  •  Responsibility To Protect (8+ / 0-)
    The responsibility to protect (RtoP or R2P) is a United Nations initiative established in 2005. It consists of an emerging norm, or set of principles, based on the idea that sovereignty is not a privilege, but a responsibility.[1] RtoP focuses on preventing and halting four crimes: genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and ethnic cleansing, which it places under the generic umbrella term of, Mass Atrocity Crimes.[2] The Responsibility to Protect has three "pillars".

    A state has a responsibility to protect its population from mass atrocities.

    The international community has a responsibility to assist the state if it is unable to protect its population on its own.

    If the state fails to protect its citizens from mass atrocities and peaceful measures have failed, the international community has the responsibility to intervene through coercive measures such as economic sanctions. Military intervention is considered the last resort.[3][4]

    The responsibility to protect (RtoP or R2P) is a United Nations initiative established in 2005. It consists of an emerging norm, or set of principles, based on the idea that sovereignty is not a privilege, but a responsibility.[1] RtoP focuses on preventing and halting four crimes: genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and ethnic cleansing, which it places under the generic umbrella term of, Mass Atrocity Crimes.[2] The Responsibility to Protect has three "pillars".
    A state has a responsibility to protect its population from mass atrocities.
    The international community has a responsibility to assist the state if it is unable to protect its population on its own.
    If the state fails to protect its citizens from mass atrocities and peaceful measures have failed, the international community has the responsibility to intervene through coercive measures such as economic sanctions. Military intervention is considered the last resort.[3][4]
    •  Oops. Bad cut and paste. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Just Bob

      Link for the above: http://en.wikipedia.org/...

    •  lifelines are always targets. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jpmassar, Just Bob

      retweet from andy carvin-npr:

      @RevoluSec RevoluSec
      #Homs DSL connections down. You can still use landline phone connection provided by #FDN: +33172890150 login: toto password: toto

      Addington's perpwalk is the trailhead of accountability for this wound to our national psyche. (But go ahead and arrest Rumsfeld, too.)

      by greenbird on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 09:13:49 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Do you understand why Russia and China (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      greenbird, jpmassar, PatriciaVa, Funkygal

      vetoed the U.N. resolution?  

      •  not really. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        jpmassar, allergywoman

        fill me in.

        Addington's perpwalk is the trailhead of accountability for this wound to our national psyche. (But go ahead and arrest Rumsfeld, too.)

        by greenbird on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 09:15:43 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  No. (4+ / 0-)

        Do you.  I've read something about Russian arms sales to Syria and China protecting its investments or something, but I haven't followed the UN resolution diplomacy closely.

        Do you have the straight dope?

        •  Because they don't want to give a green lite (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          jpmassar, PatriciaVa, Funkygal, Sean X

          for regime change, again, and because they wanted the identification and removal of outside interference from Syria.  This has been an engineered quasi civil war with a large number of players and for the U.S. NATO is all about regime change, a step closer to Iran, and fucking with Russia and China.  This is not what the MSM is telling everyone, much more complicated than another evil regime quelling protestors with violence.

        •  What about Bahrain? (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          jpmassar, BigAlinWashSt

          How did the US react when Saudi Arabia sent its military to Bahrain, to assist in the slaughter of hundreds of innocents.

          Should the US immediately assist the resistance movement in Saudi Arabia?

          Or are some tyrants more equal than others.

          And if some of you are so concerned about the slaughter in Syria, did you also support the liberation of Iraq?

          Learn about Centrist Economics, learn about Robert Rubin's Hamilton Project. http://www1.hamiltonproject.org/es/hamilton/hamilton_hp.htm

          by PatriciaVa on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 10:22:02 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  Hmmmm.... (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        highacidity, Sean X, Lawrence, greenbird

        Could it be the oil concessions both get from the Assad regime, as well as a significant portion of the Russian Federation's total arms sales come by way of Syria?

        From Amnesty International:

        Russia and China, two of five permanent members with veto powers, have blunted the teeth of the Security Council all but quashing its ability to end the violence. These permanent members of the Security Council have hidden behind the traditional stance of not interfering with the affairs of another state.

        Interestingly, what hasn’t been mentioned by the Russian or Chinese authorities is their major oil concessions in Syria. And that Russia relies on Syria for ten percent of its total arms sales.

        Also....
        Amnesty International considered the Russian and Chinese governments’ double veto as “completely irresponsible” and a “shockingly callous betrayal of the people of Syria.”
      •  Yes. Don't agree but I understand (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        jpmassar

        International law has norms that often conflict with each other.  As someone posted, there is an emerging "norm" of the duty to protect.  Any emerging norm is sort of like an international law in the making.  As more governments and international bodies adopt it as practice or by treaty, it goes from being an emerging norm to international "law."

        A conflicting norm that is more firmly established is the obligation of governments not to interfere in the internal affairs of other states and respect the sovereignty of other governments.

        You might think that this is a crappy norm designed to prevent interference with dictatorship, but it's actually a well respected norm, particularly in the third world.

        That's because the third world has suffered neo colonial intervention, and super power sponsored coups.

        In other words, where we see the unambiguous need for intervention, others see a slippery slope between humanitarian intervention and interventions like  the overthrow of Salvador Allende.

        Russia and China have historically put more emphasis on the duty to respect sovereignty and not interfere in the internal affairs of other states.

        Fortunately, their adherence to this norm is not iron clad, and they approved the intervention in Libya -- although they wouldn't vote for intervention, they wouldn't veto it either.

        If the situation in Syria deteriorates, they may change their vote.

  •  tweet from andy carvin-npr: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jpmassar

    @acarvin Andy Carvin
    Calling it a night. Stay safe, Homs, Douma, zabadani, Deraa, Aleppo. RIP Whitney. And RIP Hamza.

    Addington's perpwalk is the trailhead of accountability for this wound to our national psyche. (But go ahead and arrest Rumsfeld, too.)

    by greenbird on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 09:09:41 PM PST

    •  Hamza: (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jpmassar, mickT

      @RuwaydaMustafah is Ruwayda Mustafah.

      Saudi Arabia wants to execute 23-year old Hamza for his tweets while giving a safe haven to Ben Ali. What a joke. #freeHamza

      Addington's perpwalk is the trailhead of accountability for this wound to our national psyche. (But go ahead and arrest Rumsfeld, too.)

      by greenbird on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 09:28:12 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  tweet journo (don't know where he is now) (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jpmassar, Lawrence

    (was in tahrir, then libya...)

    @robcrilly Rob Crilly
    US satellite photographs show Syrian artillery - Telegraph - goo.gl/VHzpo
    live link.
    1 hour ago via shareaholic app

    Addington's perpwalk is the trailhead of accountability for this wound to our national psyche. (But go ahead and arrest Rumsfeld, too.)

    by greenbird on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 09:17:13 PM PST

  •  playing catch-up with twitter: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jpmassar

    @ArabSpringFF Arab Spring
    After we topple Assad, all those who want children should consider adopting an orphan. So many children left without parents.

    6 hours ago via web
    Retweeted by acarvin and 43 others

    Addington's perpwalk is the trailhead of accountability for this wound to our national psyche. (But go ahead and arrest Rumsfeld, too.)

    by greenbird on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 09:20:09 PM PST

  •  slightly OT tweet: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jpmassar

    @ASE Ahmed Shihab-Eldin
    Tunisia: Politicians and Deputies Opt for Open Governance Through Social Media globalvoicesonline.org/2012/02/06/tun… via @globalvoices
    live link.

    1 hour ago via Tweet Button. Retweeted by acarvin.

    globalvoices
    Global Voices · Follow
    Calling attention to the most interesting conversations and perspectives emerging from citizen media around the world. Tweets: @emmab33 (^EB) @kthread (^KT)

    Addington's perpwalk is the trailhead of accountability for this wound to our national psyche. (But go ahead and arrest Rumsfeld, too.)

    by greenbird on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 09:25:13 PM PST

  •  Intervene in Syria? (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BigAlinWashSt, jpmassar, Funkygal, mickT

    War #4 after Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya?  Another war using "humanitarian" reasons as an excuse?  

  •  One Syrian dissident leader the Western media (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jpmassar, BigAlinWashSt, stargaze, mickT

    won't quote, because he is against NATO intervention - Haytham al-Manna, of the NCC (SNC is pro-intervention):

    (Via Angry Arab blog)
    http://english.al-akhbar.com/...

    On the other hand, what needs to be made very clear is that the lowest recorded number of people killed on the back of Western military intervention was in the Libyan case. As an observer in the International Criminal Court case on Libya, I can confirm to you that 52,000 people were killed in the war there. There is not a single positive example in history of Western military intervention. In Rwanda, the humanitarian corridor established did nothing to stop the genocide.

    We will not be forced to choose between cholera and the plague. After all the sacrifice and advances made in the struggle against the regime, we won’t step back now. We don’t want either occupation or the regime. Some play on the idea that the regime is protecting the minorities. This is an absurd idea, because the revolution is based on a citizen-building project by a people that has risen.

    "The word bipartisan means some larger-than-usual deception is being carried out”. - George Carlin

    by Funkygal on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 11:05:33 PM PST

    •  But in Syria we're moving towards... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jpmassar, bevenro

      ...many thousands of dead and no new regime, so I don't see how 52k deaths in Libya is a bad deal.  It's a bad deal or not depending on what kind of regime the Libyans get.

      But nobody's buying flowers from the flower lady.

      by Rich in PA on Sun Feb 12, 2012 at 06:06:31 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Wow, 52000 dead is not bad? Ghaddafi never came (0+ / 0-)

        close to killing that many. Are you serious? I see tribalism at work.  And have you checked the atrocities going on in Libya under the NATO sock puppets - torture and all that?

        "The word bipartisan means some larger-than-usual deception is being carried out”. - George Carlin

        by Funkygal on Sun Feb 12, 2012 at 07:14:11 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  A good one which lays out the complexity in (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sean X, jpmassar, mickT

    Syria :

    http://www.democracynow.org/...

    We welcome you to Democracy Now!, Patrick. Can you talk about what’s happening right now in Syria and the United Nations?

    PATRICK SEALE: Well, Amy, I think, to understand what’s happening, one has to see that it’s not a simple matter. It’s at least a two- or possibly a three-stage crisis. Internally in Syria, the situation is getting worse by the day. It’s a very ugly struggle. It’s been reduced to something like "kill or be killed." And we can explain that in a second. At a higher level, there is a struggle between the United States, on the one hand, and its allies, and its opponents like Russia and China. And so, that is a struggle for regional dominance, who is to be top dog. Then there’s a third level, possibly, of Arab Gulf states like Qatar, for example, even Saudi Arabia behind it, who are obsessed and worried by Iran, and they think that Iran might stir up Shia communities in the region—the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, in Bahrain, in Yemen—and challenge the existing political order. So it’s a multi-stage crisis.

    AMY GOODMAN: And for what’s happening at the United Nations, the motivations for Russia and China to veto the U.N. Security Council resolution, talk about the significance of this.

    PATRICK SEALE: Well, it’s of great significance, and there’s a whiff of a new cold war about it. You see, Russia has decades-long interests in the Middle East, and particularly in Syria during the time of Bashar al-Assad’s father, during the Cold War, in fact. China is a leading customer for Iranian oil and very much objects to American sanctions and European sanctions on Iran’s oil exports. China is, of course, not overjoyed by American attempts to contain its influence in the Asia-Pacific region, which President Obama has spoken about a great deal. And so, these two powers, what are they saying by their vetoes? They’re saying they don’t accept American and Israeli hegemony over the Middle East. They say they have interests there, too, and they want their interests to be addressed and to be respected.

    AMY GOODMAN: And Russia’s interest here, Russia selling Syria millions of dollars’ worth of weapons?

    PATRICK SEALE: Well, I mean, small amounts compared to what America supplies Israel with. You see, I think, to understand what’s happening, one has to see this as a concerted attack, assault, on not only Syria, but Iran, as well. You see, Iran, Syria and their ally Hezbollah in Lebanon, that trio, a sort of Tehran-Damascus-Hezbollah axis, has in recent years been the main obstacle to American and Israeli hegemony in the Middle East. And the attempt now is to bring that axis down. Of course, they’re fighting back with their allies, their friends, like—precisely, like Russia and China. So that’s what we’re seeing on that level.

    Internally in Syria is a completely different struggle. Now, you see, the main element in the opposition, the main—the most powerful element in the Syrian National Council is the Muslim Brotherhood.

    Long story short, Syrian people are caught between a rock and a hard place, the devil and the deep sea. The uprising was initially  genuine, grassroots against the Assad regime. but now have been hijacked - among others by reactionary forces including those who are pro-NATO. Neither the US/West nor Russia,China or the US/NATO sock puppets that are the gulf monarchies dominating the Arab League really care about Syrian people. It is all about their own geo-political interests.

    "The word bipartisan means some larger-than-usual deception is being carried out”. - George Carlin

    by Funkygal on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 11:25:39 PM PST

    •  you discredit the Syrians by claiming that (4+ / 0-)

      'it has been hijacked'.

      These things are organic--and while it stands to reason that large powers (as always) will look through the lens of their own interests and do what they can do pursuade, coddle, sometimes fund and even intervene so that their interest trumps others....you're placing FAR too much weight on external powers' control of the current situation is.

      This is Syria's, at the moment.  What we want, or Russia/China want, really doesn't do all that much.  Sure, sometiems you get a security council resolution...but look.  The U.S. tacitly supported rebellions in Egypt, for example.  Did we want the Salafis to take 25% of the parliamentary vote?  Of course not.  We don't own the Egyptians, or the Syrians, and neither do the Russians or the Chinese.

      All countries want to profit in some way or another--but don't use that to deprive the Syrians of what is fully their own movement.  

      •  I don't discredit Syrians. It will be a long, hard (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        jpmassar, mickT

        struggle. The Egyptians can vouch for that - they are trying to get rid of the military regime.  I only wish you were correct and Syrians can overthrow the regime, defeat the imperialist forces and get a popular democratic government tomorrow. But sigh, that is not reality. You are over-simplifying.

        "The word bipartisan means some larger-than-usual deception is being carried out”. - George Carlin

        by Funkygal on Sat Feb 11, 2012 at 11:52:43 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I don't think I said that Syrians can overthrow (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Lawrence, jpmassar, angry marmot

          the regime and achieve democracy?  Maybe they will, maybe they won't.  All I said is that it's their uprising--and to claim that it has been 'hijacked' goes too far. I made no predictions.  As of now, military defections (even diplomatic resignations) are few and far between--although I'm hoping this will increase as urban warfare increases in intensity, as it did in Libya.

          Not quite sure how I'm 'oversimplifying' anything.

          Give me some credit--I've been following the Arab Spring extremely closely for a year.  I know what's going on.

  •  Angry Arab (Prof. As'ad AbuKhalil) : (6+ / 0-)

    http://english.al-akhbar.com/...

    The uprising in Syria continues while the conspiracy (led by Saudi Arabia and Qatar with the latter recently receiving enormous praise from Hillary Clinton) against the Syrian regime expands. Saudi Arabia and Qatar are trying to reshape the region in the service of US/Israeli interests. They are unflinching in their willingness to pose as guardians of Arab uprisings while guarding their own repressive unrepresentative regimes. The Syrian people are caught between the various conspiracies.

    While the main camps in Lebanon are willing to use the Syrian people as fuel for their sectarian schemes, the GCC countries see the Syrian people as nothing more than tools for their own agenda. Who will stand up for the Syrian people? Certainly, not the Syrian regime and not the Syrian National Council which has become an official tool of Qatar and the GCC.

    He rips Asad too in the article. His blog is an excellent unbiased source of news from the Arab world.  He is a secular, anti-imperial, anti-Zionist leftie (and a socialist too I guess :-)). He says all undemocratic Arab regimes must be overthrown by grassroots uprising and replaced by secular populist, anti-imperial democracies.

    Al Jazeera (news, editorial) is not to be trusted on Syria. They were good on Egypt but because the monarchy didn't have any love lost for Mubarak.  Though there are good columnists writing for AJ. Angry Arab again :
    http://angryarab.blogspot.com/...

    "The word bipartisan means some larger-than-usual deception is being carried out”. - George Carlin

    by Funkygal on Sun Feb 12, 2012 at 12:07:32 AM PST

    •  Dude lives up to his name! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jpmassar

      Not clear what would qualify as good help to him, though.  There's no Arab country (yet) that models what he wants for Syria, so all Arab help will flunk his test.  The practical effect of that attitude is to support Asad, no way around it.  

      But nobody's buying flowers from the flower lady.

      by Rich in PA on Sun Feb 12, 2012 at 06:02:17 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  You know why this doesn't make any sense? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      angry marmot

      at least not to me?  

      It's not in the interests of the US or Israel for the Assad regime to fall.

      There has been a lot of contrary speculation that Israel would much prefer the regime to stay in place.  While Syria is a rival of Israel, it has been a stable one, channeling legitimate demands (like the return of the Golan) into manageable conflicts.  

      I don't want to be misunderstood but anyway  -- Syria under the Assads have brought stability to the table.  That's why the regime was tolerated.  

      Syria ended the Lebanese civil war, fought on the side of the US in gulf war I, restrains Hezbollah, and generally channels the Arab-Israel conflict into predictable patterns.

      The last thing that the US and Israel would want to see is populist governments that respond to popular sentiment in favor of greater conflict with Israel.  I'm not saying that's what popular sentiment is, but it is what popular sentiment might turn out to be and I don't think that western powers want to take that risk.

      From what I've read, Israeli political leaders would prefer the Assads remain in power.

      I think this is assuming way too much power in the hands of forces outside Syria.

      •  Have you ever read the document "A Clean Break"? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mickT
        A Clean Break: A New Strategy for Securing the Realm

        A Clean Break: A New Strategy for Securing the Realm (commonly known as the "Clean Break" report) is a policy document that was prepared in 1996 by a study group led by Richard Perle for Benjamin Netanyahu, the then Prime Minister of Israel.[1] The report explained a new approach to solving Israel's security problems in the Middle East with an emphasis on "Western values".
        ...
        The introduction specifically proposes three new policies:

        1. Rather than pursuing a "comprehensive peace" with the entire Arab world, Israel should work jointly with Jordan and Turkey to "contain, destabilize, and roll-back" those entities that are threats to all three.

        2. Changing the nature of relations with the Palestinians, specifically reserving the right of "hot pursuit" anywhere within Palestinian territory as well as attempting to promote alternatives to Arafat's leadership.

        3. Changing relations with the United States stressing self reliance and strategic cooperation.
        ...
        "Securing the Northern Border"

            "Syria challenges Israel on Lebanese soil. An effective approach, and one with which American can sympathize, would be if Israel seized the strategic initiative along its northern borders by engaging Hizballah, Syria, and Iran, as the principal agents of aggression in Lebanon, including by: ---striking Syria’s drug-money and counterfeiting infrastructure in Lebanon, all of which focuses on Razi Qanan. ---paralleling Syria’s behavior by establishing the precedent that Syrian territory is not immune to attacks emanating from Lebanon by Israeli proxy forces.... "[1]

            "Israel also can take this opportunity to remind the world of the nature of the Syrian regime. Syria repeatedly breaks its word. It violated numerous agreements with the Turks, and has betrayed the United States by continuing to occupy Lebanon in violation of the Taef agreement in 1989. Instead, Syria staged a sham election, installed a quisling regime, and forced Lebanon to sign a "Brotherhood Agreement" in 1991, that terminated Lebanese sovereignty. And Syria has begun colonizing Lebanon with hundreds of thousands of Syrians, while killing tens of thousands of its own citizens at a time, as it did in only three days in 1983 in Hama....Given the nature of the regime in Damascus, it is both natural and moral that Israel abandon the slogan comprehensive peace and move to contain Syria, drawing attention to its weapons of mass destruction programs, and rejecting land for peace deals on the Golan Heights."[1]

  •  Why not intervene on the narrow thing... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jpmassar

    ...most of us seem to agree on, which is that Asad by virtue of his crimes doesn't deserve to live?  We're good at targeted killings.

    Snark alert- This is not snark.

    But nobody's buying flowers from the flower lady.

    by Rich in PA on Sun Feb 12, 2012 at 06:15:28 AM PST

  •  Uh-oh. (4+ / 0-)

    I thought I should warn you, you're undermining an earlier troll's poutrage that "no one" at Daily Kos cared about this.

    How does it feel to be no one?

  •  jpmassar, i've republished your diary (0+ / 0-)

    to
    the queue
    at 'eyes on egypt and the region' group
    and asked an admin to publish it
    today.

    hope that gets you
    some more eyes.

    Addington's perpwalk is the trailhead of accountability for this wound to our national psyche. (But go ahead and arrest Rumsfeld, too.)

    by greenbird on Sun Feb 12, 2012 at 02:52:47 PM PST

  •  retweet acarvin-npr: (0+ / 0-)

    @freesyria74 freesyria74

    This is a nice Sky News report. Idlib, #Syria : City Prepares For Attack From Assad's Army: youtu.be/19hqywcbvKw
    livelink.   tweeted 4 minutes ago via Tweet Button
    .................
    also, AL seeks UN Peacekeepers.
    link.

    Addington's perpwalk is the trailhead of accountability for this wound to our national psyche. (But go ahead and arrest Rumsfeld, too.)

    by greenbird on Sun Feb 12, 2012 at 03:15:37 PM PST

  •  USDOS tweet: (0+ / 0-)

    @StateDept StateDept

    Ambassador Ford's interview with Brian Williams, @bwilliams, of @nbcnightlynews: goo.gl/QyaXa @USEmbassySyria
    live link.   12 minutes ago via web

    Addington's perpwalk is the trailhead of accountability for this wound to our national psyche. (But go ahead and arrest Rumsfeld, too.)

    by greenbird on Sun Feb 12, 2012 at 03:20:23 PM PST

  •  tweep is lissenup, i used since tahrir: (0+ / 0-)

    @lissnup Anita Hunt
    #Syria Tweets today bit.ly/yuRhfc Videos: bit.ly/y32TRS lb
    tweets link.  vids link.   30 minutes ago via Buffer

    Addington's perpwalk is the trailhead of accountability for this wound to our national psyche. (But go ahead and arrest Rumsfeld, too.)

    by greenbird on Sun Feb 12, 2012 at 03:24:10 PM PST

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site