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Those of you who have been reading this series know that this will be the last installment about the history of The Who.  Although The Who continued to record new material and tour after 1978, to me the band really ended then and what was left was sort of what we now call a tribute band.

For 1978 to be such a disaster, it started off well enough, actually really well.  The Who were at the top of their game insofar as business interests went, Townshend, after being burnt by Kit Lambert, with whom he never reconciled, developed a high degree of business acumen, and The Who as a band were never strapped for cash again, although Moon and Entwistle had chronic money woes because of their lifestyles.  Daltrey was pretty conservative and also had a fairly successful acting career post 1978.

Although it pains me greatly to write this last installment, we might as well get on with it.  There are a number of ironies in 1978, and I shall point them out as we encounter them.  Please follow after the fold.

Most of the winter was occupied with continued production on the documentary The Kids are Alright, recording material for Who are You, and Daltrey filming his role in the horror camp classic, The Legacy.  While it does not really rise to the level of irony, it is interesting that Daltrey's character dies in the film.

On 19780306, John Bundrick auditioned to become the keyboard player for The Who.  He was finally hired, and spent many, many years touring with them and playing on post Moon albums.  Known as "Rabbit" because of his buck teeth, the Texan fell out of the taxi door taking him back to his hotel after partying with Moon all night.  He broke his wrist, and was out of action for a few weeks.  He was thus unable to contribute material for Who are You

During the spring final mixing was done for Who are You, and it then became very evident that Moon was deteriorating rapidly.  During the recording of "Music Must Change", Moon was unable to keep the 6/8 rhythm and is said to have uttered the famous phrase, after repeatedly apologizing for not being to keep that beat, "I'm the best Keith Moon-type drummer in the world!"  That song really only consisted of Daltrey's vocals and a few cymbal whacks, until Townshend and engineer Jon Astley added the coin hitting the floor, the squeaky boots walking, and the synthesizer bits.

Now, he had had no trouble with 6/8 meter as recently as 1975, because he drummed well on "They're all in Love" on The Who by Numbers, and it was 6/8.  This was one of several warning signs that Moon was not doing well at all.

The entire album was recorded without Daltrey being present.  He did his vocal tracks at different times and Townshend and Astley mixed them with the instrumental parts that the others did together.  The famous "recording" of the title track on The Kids are Alright was staged for the film.

Track Records finally came to an end on 19780401, or at least that was when it was reported.  It ended up bankrupt with around a 70,000 pound debt.

On 19780509 production work for The Kids are Alright was finally finished, months behind schedule and tens of thousands of pounds over budget.  The only thing that remained was the filming of a live performance by the band, and that was done on 19780525.  It was Moon's very last performance before a live, although nonpaying, audience.  Here is "Won't Get Fooled Again" from that set, Moon's very last song performed.

That was a masterful performance, by the band as a whole and by each individual.  This was actually the second attempt for a piece for the film, the director not being happy with the session recorded on 19771215.  It is comforting to see that Moon's last live performance was up to his previous standard.  I like this clip also because there is a lot of camera on Entwistle.  He makes playing such complex bass look easy!

On 19780528, perhaps the most famous, or infamous, photograph of The Who was taken, and it became the front cover for Who Are You.  Terry O'Neill took the shot with Moon sitting in the chair backwards (to hide his fat belly), the chair being stenciled "NOT TO BE TAKEN AWAY".

Photobucket

Townshend was quite concerned about Moon's physical and mental health, and created the position of director of promotion and publicity for Who Group, Ltd., the production company that the band had set up after getting away from Track Records.  Townshend thought that the sense of responsibility would be good for him.  His appointment became official on 19780704.  Moon would hold the position for barely two months.

On 19780814 Polydor released "Who are You" with the "B" side "Had Enough" (an Entwistle song that Daltrey sang, which was sort of rare) in the UK where it charted at #18.  MCA released the same single in the US on 19780805, where it charted to #14.  That was the last single ever released during the Moon era.  As a matter of fact, although there were a few singles released in the UK years later, they were all of material recorded when Moon was alive.

Everyone except Entwistle (he was trying to finish up the mixing for The Kids are Alright) flew to New York to promote Who Are You on 19780804.  They were interviewed by David Hartman for Good Morning America, and that segment, which is now know to be Moon's LAST interview, aired on 19780807.  Thanks to the marvel known as You Tube, here it is.  Note that they got the names reversed for Moon and Townshend.

The next day after departure to the US, 19780805, Peter Meadon, the first producer for The Who, was found dead at his parents' house, only 36 years old.  He died of barbiturate overdose, and the coroner did not rule whether it was an accidental overdose or a suicide.  In large part Meadon was responsible for their early success, and Townshend and Meadon were close until Meadon died.

On 19780818 Polydor released Who are You in the UK where it charted at #6.  MCA released it on 19780821 in the US where it charted to #2.  Here is the link to my piece on that album.  I knew that it was about to be released, so I had been saving up the money to buy it.  I got it the first day that it came to Fayetteville, Arkansas and the former Mrs. Translator and I hosted several friends and neighbors to come over to listen to it on my Klipsch Heresys, played on my BIC turntable, and amplified through my Kenmore 200 watt per channel integrated amplifier.

On 19780830 Entwistle, still mixing The Kids are Alright, needed some drum crashes and asked Moon to come and hit a few.  Entwistle was alarmed at who he saw.  Moon could barely get around, was seriously overweight, and acted like a man of 79 years rather than one who had just turned 32 the week before.  Cy Langston, an engineer helping Entwistle with the mix, recalled:

We sat his kit up and Keith came in and started to play what was required.  Then after two or three hours, he just got more and more sluggish, he could barely hold a drumstick.
After such a wonderful performance in late May, I really think that Entwistle should have taken notice of the severe deterioration in only three months, but he either was too busy trying to finish up mixing, just figured that Moon had had a bad night, or that there was not anything that he could have done anyway.  Please do not get me wrong, I am not blaming Entwistle for anything.  However, if it had been me, I would have gone to Townshend straightaway and would have tried to get an involuntary commitment for Moon for what in retrospect was an actual medical emergency.  But that never happened.

Now come a couple of real ironies.  On 19780906 Moon and Annette went to Paul McCartney's house to begin a week long celebration of Buddy Holly Week, McCartney's musical spiritual leader.  Moon was actually doing pretty well that evening, was sober (for Moon), and shared a booth with Paul and Linda McCartney and, among others, Kenny Jones!  Then they went to the theatre to see the opening of The Buddy Holly Story, probably Gary Busey's finest work.  Remind me to tell you about him in a future installment in this series, because I have been familiar with him since I was around 14 years old (does Mazeppa ring a bell with anyone?).

Moon was not in the mood for the film, so he and Annette went back to the apartment that he had just bought (with 15,000 pounds borrowed from Townshend) in Mayfair.  Here is another irony:  that was the same flat in which Cass Eliot had died in 19740729.  He was hungry, and Annette cooked a late dinner.  They watched the Vincent Price thriller, The Abominable Dr. Phibes.  He also took "a couple" of his meds, prescribed to take the edge of of cutting back on alcohol.  The drug was clomethiazole, a particularly dangerous drug that should, for alcohol withdrawal, be used only under controlled clinical (inpatient) settings.  Here is the structural formula for the bugger:

Photobucket

Modern practice is discouraging the use of this drug, with safer and more effective ones available.  Unless under inpatient care, modern guidelines also specify prescription of no more than one day's worth of the medication, and new prescriptions being given after evaluation every day.  With alcoholism as serious as Moon had, he should have been put in a rigorous rehabilitation facility, quaintly called at the time, "sanitoria".  Obviously there is no 100% assurance of recovery even with the best of medical treatment, but chances are improved.  Townshend had enough money to take care of Moon, and I honestly think that he would have if he had known how ill Moon really was.  Before we get back to the timeline, here is what Moon was going through the last couple of months.

He began to realize that drink was killing him, physically, emotionally, and mentally.  He kept quitting, but kept going back to drink.  When he quit, he was so physically addicted to alcohol that he would have seizures and delirium tremens.  Most alcoholics never have DT, but Moon was so far gone that his system could not function without alcohol.  He would quit to be human, and start again to stop the pain.  He began falling and hurting himself, and often had no memory of how he hurt himself.  Annette began to fear for his safety (it was falsely reported at the time that she said that she feared for HER safety), and called a doctor.

The doctor who finally prescribed the drugs to Moon was one Geoffrey Dymond.  Later he said that he did not remember much about his interaction with Moon (only the most famous rock and roll figure of the time in the UK) and that giving large amounts of the drug for home use was "standard practice".  Moon started the drug, but did not stop alcohol, a deadly combination as we have just been reminded of recently with Whitney Houston, although the toxicology has not come back for her.  Whilst it looks like an alcohol and drugs combination, the sedative involved almost certainly was not clomethiazole.

There is more.  It is almost certain that Moon had serious liver function impairment, not only from the alcohol consumption over the many years, but also from other drugs and lack of good nutrition.  Serious alcoholics often develop vitamin deficiencies because alcohol calories sate hunger, so nutritious food is often passed.  In addition, alcohol also reduces the absorption of at least one key vitamin, so that was also likely another factor.  In addition, alcohol in the system slows the first pass clearing of clomethiazole because some of the liver enzymes needed to detoxify it are tied up with alcohol.  This increases the concentration of the drug over time.  All in all, he was quite toxic.

The next morning, 19780807, he awakened around 7:30 AM and was hungry again.  Annette cooked him a steak breakfast, and he took more pills and went back to bed.  Annette slept on the couch because of his snoring.  He evidently took more clomethizole capsules and went back to sleep.  Annette went to check on him at around half past three in the afternoon, and he was already cold.

At 32 years of age, Moon was pronounced dead on arrival at Middlesex Hospital in Westminster.  The soul of The Who was no more.  There was an inquiry, and more on that later.

On 19780808, a Friday, the three surviving band members went into emergency conference to address the press.  They did not talk directly with the press, but released a written statement.

We have lost our great comedian, our supreme melodramatist, the man, who apart from being the most unpredictable and spontaneous drummer in rock, would set himself alight if he thought it would make the audience laugh or jump out of its seats...  We loved him and he's gone.  The Who?  We are more determined than ever to carry on, and we want the spirit of the group to which Keith contributed so much to go on, although no human being can ever take his place.
That night we held a wake in Fayetteville.  The former Mrs. Translator, several friends, and a few people that I did not know met at a friend's house (larger than our mobile home) and played Who are You over and over and over.  We drank, keeping a chair at the table empty whilst we ate a little.  I choose not to name names of the attendees because most of those folks are still living and have actual jobs and things.  We partied on until the wee hours, and all of us pretty much passed out over there.  Since it was early September, college had just started for the semester, so everyone was in town.  That was the start of my senior year in undergraduate school.

None of us were worth much the rest of the weekend, but we did sort of get his passing out of our systems, but using the very tools that caused his demise.  Some later went on to develop similar situations, and when I used the term "most" in the past paragraph I mean that the few no longer with us have succumbed to drink and drugs for the most part.

The final determination from the coroner in Moon's death was that he died of an acute overdose of clomethiazole with alcohol as a contributory cause.  The capsule count indicates that he took 32 capsules over the course of the evening and morning in question.  IF the current dosage was the dosage then, each capsule contained 192 mg of clomethiazole, coming to 6.1 grams.  There are known cases of alcoholics taking up to 25 grams of clomethiazole per day and living, but if his liver function was severely compromised AND he had been drinking enough alcohol, it is not unreasonable to conclude that the combination was the cause of death.  In the UK that is referred to as an "open verdict".  Pete Meadon's death was also an open verdict.

The inquiry did not conclude that it was suicide, but not that it was accidental either.  The coroner, Dr. Gavin Thruston, found that although Moon took the drug without coercion, there was no evidence to support the premise that he intended to kill himself.  In the UK that is referred to as an "open verdict".  Pete Meadon's death was also an open verdict.

Thus ended The Who.  Sure, they recorded more albums, toured, and tried to stay the band that they were, but everyone from fans to the band members themselves knew that The Who were no more, at least as they had been.  I have a few thoughts about that now.

I saw The Who twice after Moon's death.  Remember, I saw them in 1976 in Fort Worth, Texas.  The second time that I saw them the former Mrs. Translator and I, along with a couple of friends from graduate school and one of guys from the 1976 trip, drove down to the Cotton Bowl to see them, with Kenny Jones drumming.  We had a horrible seat selection, and if it had not been for the widescreen, we would not have seen anything because of the great concrete pillar in front of us.  That was on 19821204.  The playlist supplied on Wikipedia is pretty much in keeping with my memory of the concert.  Remember, this was before Mrs. Translator and I had had children.  I found the show sort of flat, but Townshend did smash a guitar.  Jones just did not fit in well, even though he is quite a talent.

The last time that I saw them was at Reunion Arena in Dallas, Texas on 20000827.  The entire family drove there to see them, and the venue was smaller and more intimate.  My boys were old enough to appreciate what they were seeing, and honestly if it had not been for giving them a piece of history live, I would have not have gone just for myself.  I was happily surprised, however in some ways and horrified in one specific one.  What I was happy about was how well they played.  Zac Starkey was drumming, and he became the best Keith Moon style drummer other than Keith.  Of course, he and Moon used to play together (I mean play like a kind uncle plays with a child, putting together puzzles and such, when Zac was little.  Moon NEVER became an adult mentally.) and just hang out when Zac was little.  Moon gave him some drumming lessons, and Zac's dad, Richard (aka Ringo Starr) also did.

Zac seemed to reenergize them, taking cues and giving them to the rest of the band, just like Moon used to do.  Jones just never had that connexion with them.  The boys loved it!  I noticed something that none of the other family did, however.  I saw a very ill Entwistle leaning against a support to play.  He even allowed Daltrey to sing his signature song, "My Wife", and then I KNEW that something was very, very wrong.  In under two years, he was dead, his heart giving out from years of drugs and drink abuse, being brought on finally by the cardiac destabilizing drug cocaine.  That was the morning before the new North American tour, slated to start on 20020627.

In retrospect, I still think of The Who as the finest band from the UK.  Townshend's writing was superb for a long time, and every now and then he still surprises me when I find an old gem.  Although this history series is ended, when (NOT IF) I find old material that is not generally known, I shall post about them.

The future of this series is not in jeopardy, but I am not sure about where to go next.  I love to write, but sometimes have difficulty in finding good topics.  The Who were easy to write about, and they gave me topics for many months.  If I have a good topic, I can write for miles and miles.  If I struggle to find a topic, my hands are numb.  But find one I shall.  I am considering writing about the wonderful comedy series SCTV, but it does not have the universal appeal that The Who have.  I would appreciate any suggestion in the comments.

I feel sort of sad that these journeys are now ended.  However, I am encouraged by the wonderful comments that all of you, my dear readers, have contributed over the course of this Odyssey into the band.  I appreciate each and every one of them, and treasure not only them but all of you for taking the time to read and give me your thoughts.

In the next few weeks, expect me to post things that are irregular and a bit more political, but I shall always keep faith with my three series, even though the one Wednesday garnered but five comments, three of them mine!  Now and then eggs are laid.

Finally, please feel free to make comments, add videos or pictures, or give me hell for what I have said.  Feedback is the Mothers' Milk of blogging, and tonight I feel like I need lots of it.  Finishing this series is sort of like putting an old friend out to pasture.

On a purely personal note, I made a decision this morning that promises to be life changing, and for the better.  Expect to see my mood improve over the next few weeks and for my writing to be more crisp.  Whilst I choose not to reveal exactly what that this decision was here in the open, suffice it to say that I am similar to the Republican puppies who became Democratic puppies one day.  My eyes were opened.

Warmest regards,

Doc, aka Dr. David W. Smith

Crossposted at

The Stars Hollow Gazette,

Docudharma, and

firefly-dreaming

Originally posted to Translator on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 07:12 PM PST.

Also republished by DKOMA and Protest Music.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tips and recs for (19+ / 0-)

    Moon's last masterful, live performance?

    Warmest regards,

    Doc

    I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

    by Translator on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 07:12:25 PM PST

  •  Thanks for the series, Doc (6+ / 0-)

    I appreciated many of the videos you posted, particularly of some of their lesser known cuts.

    There never can be another band that replicates the sound of the Who as there is only one Townsend, one Moon, one Ox, and one Daltrey. Long live Rock!

    Cause we find ourselves in the same old mess singin' drunken lullabies--Flogging Molly

    by dalfireplug on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 08:11:05 PM PST

    •  Thank you for the kind words! (5+ / 0-)

      Did you see the series on My Little Town where I used the pictures that you sent me?

      I agree, The Who were quite unique, and it is still a mystery to my why they were called a men's band.

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

      by Translator on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 08:15:25 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I did see the pics and am glad they were of use (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Translator, palantir, SherwoodB

        Coincidentally, I'm in Magazine AR this weekend and will be driving through Hackett on Sunday. If there's anything else you would like to have photographed, let me know.

        Cause we find ourselves in the same old mess singin' drunken lullabies--Flogging Molly

        by dalfireplug on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 08:18:58 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Hi! (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          dalfireplug, palantir

          Actually, there is.  If you take the old #10 out of Hackett, going west, you will go over a bridge and then come up on higher ground.  On your right will be the old schoolhouse, sandstone, if it is still standing.  About 3/4, give of take, you will see a now roofless rock building with a huge tree to its right.  That rock building was where my granddad stored his blasting powder from when he mined coal.  I would very much appreciate pictures of both the school but more importantly the rock building on the left.

          I very much appreciate your efforts to make my memories more intact!

          Warmest regards,

          Doc

          I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

          by Translator on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 08:24:09 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Blasting powder...no wonder you love the Who! (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            SherwoodB, Translator, Simplify

            I do my best to find the buildings and send pics. As they'll be taken with a cell phone this time, I cannot guarantee quality but I'll give it my best shot.

            Speaking of deafening explosives, I'll be seeing the Dropkick Murphys again later this month. I've already lost one ear and eardrum to cancer....if I have to lose the other, let it be to rock and roll instead.

            Cause we find ourselves in the same old mess singin' drunken lullabies--Flogging Molly

            by dalfireplug on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 08:33:52 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Spoken as Pete (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              dalfireplug, SherwoodB

              himself would say!

              Thank you very, very much for being such a good friend!

              Warmest regards,

              Doc

              I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

              by Translator on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 08:56:15 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  I was on the telephone (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              dalfireplug

              with my dear friend Steve when I wrote this.

              The old school is just after getting up on the hill after the bridge, on the right.  The powder house is about 3/4 of mile later, going west, and on the left.  That is on the level ground.  You can not miss it, with the huge tree to the left as you view it from the road.

              I apologize for not being more specific earlier.  Thank you for the help!

              Warmest regards,

              Doc

              I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

              by Translator on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 09:18:06 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

      •  I need it every night (4+ / 0-)

         It was a great series.
        I did not know The Who was called a man's band.
        Maybe because there were no cuties. Not that they weren't sexy. They were sexy but they weren't cute.
        The Beatles were cute. Even early Stones were, kid of cute. But The Who were not cute.
          A word of advice. What ever you decide to write about SCTV or whatever. Make sure your heart is in it. If the subject doesn't hit you where you live, don't bother. It will just come off as academic.

        Hanoi a liberal. Courtesy of Sarah Palin

        by nellgwen on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 08:24:45 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Your words are well taken! (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          SherwoodB, nellgwen, dalfireplug

          There are several bits on SCTV that I think are hilarious, and I promise only to provide the ones that I personally are really funny in the series.  One comes to mind instantly, when a young Brooke Shields was the guest, and the guys from the Farm Film Report "blowed her up, good, REAL good!"

          There were several other moments that were a funny.  Pique the Geek is the academic one, Popular Culture is supposed to be more visceral.

          Warmest regards,

          Doc

          I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

          by Translator on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 09:00:17 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  thanks (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dalfireplug, SherwoodB, Translator

    I haven't followed the series, but I'm glad I caught this.  Now I know to look back to previous installments and forward to new things.  This is the first time I've bothered to log in in quite a while, and it was just to leave a comment and a recommend.

    Government can't restrict free speech, but corporations can? WTF

    by kyoders on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 08:26:50 PM PST

    •  I very much appreciate your (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SherwoodB

      time and thought to recommend my pieces!

      Please look back at this series, and also please check out my Wednesday night, and Sunday night, ones!

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

      by Translator on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 09:02:02 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I played The Who to death in high school (5+ / 0-)

    So while I still love the music, I don't really listen to them that often. The only exception is Quadrophenia, which is one of my all time favorite albums. I never tire of listening to it. Thanks for the diary!

  •  Thanks Doc (4+ / 0-)

    Very good work, your connection is obvious, even some of your pain shows thru.

    “that our civil rights have no dependence on our religious opinions, any more than our opinions in physics or geometry.” Thomas Jefferson

    by markdd on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 08:41:43 PM PST

    •  But my love is not as carnal (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      markdd

      as some think it to be.  I have dreams, only empty, about holding, her with me.

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

      by Translator on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 09:04:17 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Oh, I see the problem. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        markdd, SherwoodB

        That piece should be hummed to the music from "Behind Blue Eyes".  Your reference was obvious to me, but likely not to others.

        Warmest regards,

        Doc

        I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

        by Translator on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 09:46:26 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  ahh, erm, ahh, yeah I meant your pain (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Translator, SherwoodB

          About losing Keith and Roger.  Certainly a sense of personal loss or even betrayal over them passing way too early.

          “that our civil rights have no dependence on our religious opinions, any more than our opinions in physics or geometry.” Thomas Jefferson

          by markdd on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 10:06:44 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  No, you know me too well. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            markdd

            The pain was mine, alone yesterday morning when I told a certain person that even though I love her, I can not put up with lies, and told her to go away until she can be honest with me.  That was at the same time the hardest, and the most liberating thing that I have done in years.  How about a song to celebrate?

            Turn it up!

            Warmest regards,

            Doc

            I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

            by Translator on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 10:23:23 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Keep on trucking, Doc! (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Translator, SherwoodB

              “that our civil rights have no dependence on our religious opinions, any more than our opinions in physics or geometry.” Thomas Jefferson

              by markdd on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 10:30:09 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Actually, I am much better. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                SherwoodB

                I really love that girl, but unless she can be honest with me I do not want to have anything to do with her.  Until and unless she gets honest with me, I want nothing to do with her.

                Is that tough love for her, or me just protecting myself?  Either way, I am better, because I am not fooled again.

                Warmest regards,

                Doc

                I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

                by Translator on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 10:36:48 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

  •  It's painful to read your descriptions of Moon's (4+ / 0-)

    deterioration, but it would be dishonest not to address it.

    1978 COULD have been a banner year for the Who: great new material, a renewed sense of purpose (a strong reply to the Punk revolution, which they may have been a precursor of anyway!), plus the fact that they DID record a great LP-Who Are You-transcending Keith's poor health.

    Thanks, Doc. Excellent work as always.

    I'm not paranoid, I'm just well informed--SherwoodB

    by SherwoodB on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 08:59:54 PM PST

  •  When news of Keith's death hit us, (4+ / 0-)

    my old friend and drummer in many bar bands (perhaps the "best Keith Moon-type-imitator" of all time and a great drummer regardless) and I suitably got trashed.

    I wrote a (drunken) fan letter to Pete urging the band to continue and got a reply-which I did not expect. He apologized for the fact that it was duplicated (due to the sheer volume and intensity of letters after Moon's death) and was unsure if they would continue as Moon was, and I quote: "obviously irreplaceable."

    I still have it stashed away and what is interesting is that that, though duplicated, the signature is in pen and clearly resembles Pete's signature on the "joke wall" of the original issue of "Odds and Sods."

    I was really knocked out at this personal touch given the huge publicity that accompanied Keith's death.

    I'm not paranoid, I'm just well informed--SherwoodB

    by SherwoodB on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 09:12:20 PM PST

    •  IF you can find that, (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dalfireplug, SherwoodB

      would you PLEASE send me an image of it?  Obviously I am trying to write the defintive bio about The Who, and little things like that are extremely important.  You know that I will attribute it to you!

      I am more honest and forthcoming now than in any part of my life, except for innocent childhood.

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

      by Translator on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 09:27:03 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I've read Graham Chapman's autobiography. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Translator, SherwoodB

    Chapman (of Monty Python) was a great friend of Moon, and recounts many of Moon's escapades. I've never been a huge fan of The Who, but I do like me some Graham (who I met one time).

    On the one hand, it's sad that such talents left us so young. OTOH, they left a mark that few of us can aspire to. Talent and self-destructive behavior. It's a conundrum.

    -8.38, -7.74 My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world. - Jack Layton

    by Wreck Smurfy on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 09:47:52 PM PST

    •  I am a HUGE Python fan! (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Wreck Smurfy, SherwoodB

      No, I'm NOT!  YES I am!  No, I'm NOT!  YES I AM!  I love "The Argumentative Man" that Cleese did so well.  I have a question for you, because this has been bothering me for years.

      If I understand correctly, Chapman and Moon were friends, and George Harrison was also friends with both of them.  I think that Harrison bankrolled at least part of The Life of Brian, but I might be mistaken.  Here is my question.

      I very vaguely remember a Harrison video, perhaps Crackerbox Palace, but to no avail have I been able to find Moon in it, that Moon was being a loon.

      Do you have any memory about Moon being in a Harrison video?  I am just about positive that he was in one, but for the life of she that I love can not find it.  Any help would be appreciate and acknowledged.  Since this series about the band proper is ended, some Moon pieces would be nice to add.

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

      by Translator on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 10:00:44 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes, George made "Life of Brian" happen. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Translator, SherwoodB

        HandMade Films was formed specifically to bring the movie to the screen, after several other backers pulled out.

        But no, I don't know of Moon in any Harrison song or video. I know most of Harrison's post-Beatle song list, and nothing on it sounds like Moon on percussion.

        -8.38, -7.74 My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world. - Jack Layton

        by Wreck Smurfy on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 10:42:48 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  OK, in one of (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          SherwoodB

          the Harrison videos, is there a person sort of coming and going at his arm?

          Warmest regards,

          Doc

          I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

          by Translator on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 10:44:47 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  One other thing. Chapman made a movie (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Translator, SherwoodB

        titled The Odd Job, in which Moon was intended to play the part of the antagonist. Moon was too far gone by that point to get the role, sadly. I've seen the film as it was eventually shot, and while it's good, it would have been better with Moon.

        -8.38, -7.74 My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world. - Jack Layton

        by Wreck Smurfy on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 10:56:21 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Chapman was also (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          SherwoodB

          pretty much gone as well.  He was as alcoholic as Moon, and likely was one of the earliest victims of HIV infection as well.  Please do not take my wrong, I am a real fan of Chapman.  However, he WAS quite addicted to alcohol, to the point of it interfering with his work.

          Warmest regards,

          Do

          I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

          by Translator on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 11:15:44 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  Didn't know about the Chapman-Moon (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Translator

      connection!

      Thank you!

      I'm not paranoid, I'm just well informed--SherwoodB

      by SherwoodB on Sat Feb 18, 2012 at 05:57:56 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thanks for the interesting evening! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Translator, SherwoodB

    I managed to miss all of your diaries on the Who - glad I saw this one, so I could backtrack through the others.

    •  I am glad that you found this one! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SherwoodB

      Since the site crashed minutes before my regular time to post,  I think that I shall repost this one next Friday.

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

      by Translator on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 10:53:16 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I was at the Dec. 1982 Show ! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Translator, SherwoodB

    Hey Doc...

    I was at that December 1982 show at the Cotton Bowl in Dallas.  I remember it being billed as their "last" tour at the time.  The most memorable but embarrasing moment for me was at toward the end of the show.  You may recall what happened...  As you alluded to, the stage itself was projected on the widescreen that was above the stage at the south end of the field.  My college roomies and I were there with our then girlfriends, in my case with the soon to be first Mrs. Aurelius, now deceased.  We were up in the stands just off the field on the east side of the stadium.  One of gals on the field who was in a drunk / wasted state was sitting up on her boyfriends shoulders down below us saw the stage camera focus on her, and she ripped off her shirt turning loose a pair of nice ample breasts, which were marching on their own in time with the music, while the whole stadium cheered her on.  The ladies were quite unhappy with us guys that night...

    Wheathead by birth, Texan by fate, smelled "dead man's butt" as a working stiff...

    by Publius Vergilius Aurelius on Fri Feb 17, 2012 at 11:11:40 PM PST

  •  Thank you for this series. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    SherwoodB, Translator

    I was a Who fan in high school and saw them perform promoting their Happy Jack album at the Fillmore Auditorium in 1967 in a bill that included The Loading Zone and opening act, Santana Blues Band.  My brother caught one of Keith Moon's many flying drumsticks during the performance of My Generation.  They weren't too well known at the time and managed to get front row seating.  Pete smashed a Tele, awesome!

    Saw them again at the Fillmore in 1968 for the Who Sell Out tour with the Cannonball Adderly Quintet with Nat Adderly and Joe Zawinul.  Also later in 1968 I saw them in Fresno and Long Beach for the Magic Bus tour.

    They played the Fillmore in early 1969 to a really packed crowd.  I witnessed a confrontation in the lobby between their roady and a speed freak who "lifted" the pickups  from Townshend's smashed Gibson ES 335.

    The last time I saw The Who was 1969's Tommy Tour from the back of Fillmore West, it was a great show.  

    In the early 90's I played in the orchestra behind Roger Daltrey and  Friends concert, with John Entwistle, Zac Starkey, and Simon Townshend.  John came over to say "hi" to the horn section.  Awesome.

    •  Cool! (0+ / 0-)

      Lots of early contact and then getting to play with them later is a GAS!

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

      by Translator on Sat Feb 18, 2012 at 05:06:17 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I would encourage you to (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    SherwoodB, GAS, Translator

    write about SCTV.  I am a huge fan of the series and starting watching as a teenager in Canada from the very first episode and followed its history over 4 different networks (actually 3 networks and an independent station).

    "We are normal and we want our freedom" - Bonzos

    by matching mole on Sat Feb 18, 2012 at 04:55:58 AM PST

    •  It was very well thought out, (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      matching mole

      and the character cast, both the comics and the characters that they played, was great.

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

      by Translator on Sat Feb 18, 2012 at 05:07:03 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

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