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In the following video, Santorum shares his expertise on elderly care in the Netherlands, especially concerning euthanasia. As an added bonus, he also gets nostalgic about the good old days when abortion was only practiced 'in the shadows'.

The video is from the American Heartland Forum in Missouri on the 3rd of February.

In the first part of the video, Santorum imagines many elderly people in the Netherlands wearing bracelets with the text "don't euthanize me", and makes up some statistics about the large amount of seniors being euthanized against their will. This really takes the 'death panel' story to the next level, although Santorum doesn't deserve all the credit, it seems the urban myth about the bracelets can be found on a variety of conspiracy websites. If he ever visits Europe, I really hope he remembers to wear his bracelet well visible.

In the second part of the video, he explains that it was so much better 60 years ago when abortion was only done in secret where it was much more likely to endanger the woman's health. Those were the days.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Might As Well Have Glenn Beck Get The Nomination (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z, FrY10cK, farmerchuck, Lefty Ladig

    Once these views become known and the myths they are based on debunked, Obama should increase his margins in head to head matchups with ass lube. Don't think we will see a landslide though. Santorum will get 40% of the country that leans right. Then there are the lovable swing voters who think there is somehow a center, no matter how much the right wing falls off a cliff while the Democrats are conservative by worldwide standards. Santorum will get many of those assholes.

  •  I am from the Netherlands (30+ / 0-)

    And this Santorum guy is a disgusting lyar.

    First of all I have never ever heard anyone in the netherlands ever say they where afraid to go to the hospital because they are afraid to get euthanized. I have never, ever heard of "don't euthenize me" bracelets.

    It is absurd because to get euthanized in the netherlands first of all you need the concent of the family and second of all your body has to be in a state where you are unable to do anything at all except suffer in horrible pain and in a state where it is clear that there is no hope of recovery whatsoever.

    To be specific the law allows euthanazia only if there is a case of unbearable suffering with no hope of recovering ever. That to me is a reason to actually go to a dutch hospital instead of experiencing torture the rest of your short life in a french hospital or wherever.

    Of course the truth is that euthanasia is practiced everywhere including in countries where its not legal. They just stop treating the patient so his death is sped up.

    Card-carrying member of the Illuminati.

    by DarkOmnius on Sun Feb 19, 2012 at 02:09:36 AM PST

    •  I am an American living in Europe. (18+ / 0-)

      And these freaks like Santorum are a total embarrassment. He, and others like him, are showing their true intentions now which is important. They have been operating in the shadows and the American public really need to know exactly what their intentions are.

      This better be good. Because it is not going away.

      by DerAmi on Sun Feb 19, 2012 at 02:14:45 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Ricky reminds me of a nouveau riche (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        maf1029

        from the 1800's who had just finished The Tour, which was expected of every millionaire in The Day.  "It is not so bad," he fumed "that all the foreigners speak a foreign language but it seems they could all get together and agree on the same one.  Shows a complete lack of discipline among them"  

    •  majority of Americans do not have a passport (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      maf1029

      and outside of military service, most never leave the US.  Downside to seeing the world on the King's shilling is that from time to time you may have to shoot some locals and that tends to diminish the whole tourist experience

      •  All the more reason to push to extend the laws (0+ / 0-)

        in places like Oregon and Washington State to be enacted in other states.  One bizarre little loophole in medicare, btw, is that it covers 100% of hospice care, unlike the 80% of expenses it covers for most other things.  That's probably one of the points that help work republicans into frothing about death panels, because you have to have multiple doctors sign off on a '6 month or less' prognosis to enter hospice care.  The reality, though, is that we're not so good about spotting that '6 month' window, and many patients end up dying either before they can enroll, or shortly after becoming hospice patients.

        (For-profit hospices, btw, would love for all of their patients to live the full 6 months.  Medicare pays a fixed per-diem rate, and hospices have gotten good at keeping costs down for most of a patient's stay.  Costs for them only tend to go up at during short windows (icc and I forget what the middle c is - intensive something care) that require 24/7 attention.  If the patient is properly taken care of, those will likely only occur at the active death stage.)

        •  6 months is not graven in stone as many pts (0+ / 0-)

          live significantly longer.  Another dodge is for hospice to belong to one corporation and the doctor's practice to be another.  hospice operates on one monthly fee includes all medical charges.  This should include doc visits but since they are 2 different corporations with the same owner, the doc charges for his services same as always, though they should be bundled into the fee.  Since one is Medicare A and the other Medicare B, they seemed to have not twigged onto this dodge yet  

      •  what really diminishes the tourist experience (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Sunspots

        is being shot or blown up by the locals and living with brain damage, PTSD and limb amputation for the rest of your life for faithfully serving your country in a war we should never have fought.

        As my father used to say,"We have the best government money can buy."

        by BPARTR on Sun Feb 19, 2012 at 06:49:50 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  One quibble with your last two sentences. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      leevank, averblue

      In America, there's a strong indoctrination in 'saving the patient no matter what' and 'life is sacred', so you get doctors performing emergency procedures to prolong life people that will be dying anyway, in weeks or months.

      Something like 93-95% of doctors will perform resuscitation measures on 20-22 week old neonates, the vast majority of which will die within a month or so anyway, and virtually all of the rest of whom will suffer multiple severe handicaps for as long as they live thanks to immature organ development at birth, most notably lungs, which usually results in oxygen deficits to the brain.

      This is distinct from discontinuing treatment when a patient reaches a point of irreversible organ failure.  At that point it is actually far more comfortable not to eat or drink, for instance, because the organs cannot actually process the food/drink and it actually causes greater pain.  It's not speeding up death, it's just 'first, cause no harm' in action.  The way to 'speed up death' is simply for patients to maintain proper advance directives that and medical powers of attorney refuse treatment even beyond a point at which the individual can communicate such wishes.  

      Euthanasia here in the states pretty much always implies death against the wishes of the individual, despite the fact that the literal translation would be 'good (eu) death (thanatos)' while death by the patients' wishes is referred to as active or passive assisted suicide' depending upon how involved medical personnel would be.

      Again, I'm not really disagreeing with your comment, just clarifying the situation in the US slightly.

  •  Even Jesus would key Santorum's car (9+ / 0-)

    if He heard what he said

    Profoundly humbled by DKos generosity of spirit and selflessness of nature. Forever grateful beyond measure.

    by wretchedhive on Sun Feb 19, 2012 at 02:59:21 AM PST

  •  What a f-ing moron. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    farmerchuck, Renfriend, leevank, freesia

    No European country presumes consent to euthanasia. Not a one. Oh, well, the fact that his voters gobble up this tripe speaks volumes about them.

    Iuris praecepta sunt haec: Honeste vivere, alterum non laedere, suum cuique tribuere. - Ulpian, Digestae 1, 3

    by Dauphin on Sun Feb 19, 2012 at 03:11:04 AM PST

  •  my husband is Dutch... (8+ / 0-)

    ... and both his mother and a cousin of his chose euthanasia.  They were both terminally ill and suffering greatly.  

    His mother died before I met him, but I heard about it.  She had bone cancer in her jaw and had been unable to speak for many months due to the pain.  After they got permission for euthanasia, the hospital increased her pain medication beyond what they could have used otherwise -- and she was able to talk, and say goodbye to all her family members, and leave the world peacefully with everyone nearby.  

    With his cousin, the health care system was able to set up a bed and curtains in her living room (so she could be at home with her young children.)  When none of the treatments worked (she also had a rare form of cancer, I think), and she was losing weight drastically and in a lot of pain, she also asked for euthanasia.  The family discussed it.  The children were told ("momma is going to have to leave soon, but she will become a star in the heavens and still watch over you and love you forever....")  

    Everything continued to be handled at home.  We all went to see her in the last week and say goodbye (and sit in the garden with each other and the children.)  At the scheduled time, someone came with an injection.  Then the funeral home came and set up their refrigerating-type unit in the living room, and family came again to view the body, pay their respects and attend the funeral.  She was in good spirits before the euthanasia and looked very peaceful afterwards.  

    It was my first up-close experience with death, and I was pretty much an emotional wreck, but I know for sure it could have been much, much worse.  Dying alone?  Unexpectedly?  In agony?  In the hospital?  Heavily drugged?  Without saying goodbyes?  Without knowing that your young children were OK?  No thanks.  I think the Dutch system is great.  

    (I do wonder why I've met so many people in Holland who have rare forms of cancer and other illnesses.... more than I remember in America....  coincidence?  Were fewer people seriously ill during my childhood in America, or did I just not notice it?  Is the situation worse now than 40 years ago, and if so why, and is it worse everywhere?)

    •  The incident rate, or diagnostic (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      elmo, averblue

      rate accuracy has been going up, and there is, and has been a stigma associated with cancer, at least in the US. Check out the "Monday night Cancer Club" here for some discussion of the subject, and general support. Here is a link to one of my diary's on the personal ramifications:
      Comedy of Manners

      "I took a walk around the world, To ease my troubled mind. I left my body laying somewhere In the sands of time" Kryptonite 3 doors Down

      by farmerchuck on Sun Feb 19, 2012 at 03:57:21 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  hi farmerchuck... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        farmerchuck

        ... I'm trying to ration my time on DK so that I can keep up with chores and work, but I read your linked diary and another one and had to respond:

        (hmmm, hard to find the words....)

        Getting sick (or going into a depression, which is also getting sick but on another level) really lets you see who your friends are, doesn't it?  And also whether your "in sickness and in health" vows are really as strong as you thought they were when you made them...  Or, as you very wisely pointed out in your diary, it shows you how people who are probably well-intentioned, just aren't prepared to handle life-and-death situations.  

        I wonder if the phenomenon is similar to what makes it difficult for someone (like me) to talk to people in wheelchairs.  I don't want to stare, I don't want to make the person uncomfortable, I don't want to say something hurtful or stupid... I'd like to say/do something to make the person feel seen and valued, but what? I'm a pretty shy person, yet I can imagine that the Right Response would be very welcome...  Think, Averblue, think!  and by then the opportunity is long gone....

        I'm happy for you that your relationship survived your diagnosis and that you found some friends who have stuck by you (and it seems the compassion to forgive the ones who didn't stick by you.)  And maybe with the current health care and economic crises, more people will at least learn how to "be present to the important things in life" out of personal necessity.  I hope so.

        How are things for you now?  You have an organic family farm, I gather?  Have you been able to keep it going?

        I'm going to follow the Monday Night Cancer Club.... (and I see from your profile that there is also a Lyme Disease group at DK?  I could really spend 24 hours a day here -- so much interesting and relevant information for me....)

        •  The farm still exists, albeit in a dormant state (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          averblue

          I'm waiting on a Dr visit on tuesday (a friend is loaning the money) and after that, we will know what we can devote our energies to...very long story, and I'm not having the best of days. Peregrine Kate and I are both working on diaries about legacy which will probably explain better (at least hers will).
          Yes, I don't know what I would so without this place, as maddening as it can be at times

          "I took a walk around the world, To ease my troubled mind. I left my body laying somewhere In the sands of time" Kryptonite 3 doors Down

          by farmerchuck on Sun Feb 19, 2012 at 11:57:06 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  With each passing year I can feel the effects of (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      elmo, Calamity Jean

      mortality but it is a mystery to me why so many Americans are literally scared to Death of dying.  I can see a day coming in the not too distant future when the pain will no longer be relieved by meds and each day I can see more and more evidence of my intellectual deterioration.  Being maintained as some sort of vegetative shrine by my family concerns me more than death ever will.  Ricky and his ilk's behavior over Terri Schiavo reveals how heavy the fear of death hangs over their heads

    •  speaking from experience (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dallasdunlap, elmo

      my grandmother died in 1966 from pneumonia; 20 years later advances in antibiotics would have saved her.  The medical advances within a generation are breathtaking

  •  This is why my ancestors left Holland (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    leevank

    After being diagnosed with a sprained ankle, those European "doctors" wanted to euthanize my grandmother.

    /no, not really

    Don't forget that most men with nothing would rather protect the possibility of becoming rich than face the reality of being poor. - John Dickinson ("1776")

    by banjolele on Sun Feb 19, 2012 at 04:21:27 AM PST

  •  Gawd how embarrassing (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dauphin, leevank, freesia, Sunspots

    I hope none of my Dutch friends see this.

    ....no longer in SF.... -9.00, -7.38

    by TFinSF on Sun Feb 19, 2012 at 04:46:22 AM PST

  •  yep Ricky thinks the Dutch put their elderly (5+ / 0-)

    on ice floes to float out to sea.  Ricky forgets the good old days in the nursing homes with the elderly tied to their beds or sitting in restraints or else medicated out of consciousness or sitting in their own feces and urine for hours.  He waxes nostalgic about the good old days of necrotic bed sores or pressure ulcers.

    He would have really enjoyed the lunatic asylums of the 1700s and 1800s where warders were frequently bribed by wealthy young swells about town to have sex with the younger more attractive inmates in the days when having problems with parents or unmarried pregnancy or dozens of other nonconformist behavior could land you in an institution.

    Brings a tear to the eye of the traditionalists  

    •  He misses the "good old days" (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dauphin, leevank, Sunspots, Calamity Jean

      When the maternal death rate was over 50%. Those were the days!

      •  infant death rate was roughly the same (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Sunspots, Calamity Jean

        if the rate is measured as not reaching one year of age.  Visit any cemetery and the number of small headstones is heartbreaking.  A visit to my father's mother's father gravesite revealed 6 such headstones.  Census records are just as heartbreaking as to the number of children's deaths.

        I recently purchased a turn of the century baptism box which included all the elements of the sacrament so ministers could visit the homes of newborns and baptize them, insuring them of salvation should they not live long enough to be presented in church.

        Another custom was photographing children in their coffins in the 1880s-1920s or so as photography became more common and more affordable for the masses.  You can find these from time to time on auction  

  •  I am glad I did a search first, (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KGardner, Sunspots, Calamity Jean, maf1029

    because I was about to write a diary about this. I am from The Netherlands and skim the headlines of some of the Dutch papers almost daily. The comments on Twitter about this particular story quickly tell you what the Dutch think about Santorum. His remarks were complete fabrications, devoid of facts, and insulting to the Dutch people. Commenters are calling for the US Ambassador to issue a formal apology, and for the Dutch Prime Minister to publicly denounce Santorum's statements.
    When you hear the gasp of the public when he says these things during the interview, you know that Santorum was doing exactly what he meant to do: whip his base into a froth (pardon the pun) by stirring up the whole death panel canard again.
    And with the crowd properly warmed up, he launches into his nostalgic bit about the good old days when abortions happened in back allies, and only to bad people.
    He is a vicious liar with a creepy agenda, hiding behind an "aw, shucks" facade.

  •  Ricky is a loon. "Don't euthanize me" bracelets? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Calamity Jean, maf1029

    I was around when AIDS was still an unknown called GRID. When we didn't know how it was spread, I cleaned up vomit on top of diarrhea. Spoon fed people, only to hold the bucket up for them a few minutes later. I have seen total strangers die. (Not friends or lovers, I just couldn't.) And other deaths, two in hospice care due to "organ failure", unconscious shells kept alive with machines and IVs. One was my roommate, one was my teacher.

    Let me tell you how much I'm in favor of Dutch-style euthanasia laws being enacted in the US. Consultation with family, medical, and (maybe) a chance to say a coherent goodbye?  A release from constant pain, blindness, terror? Without using a handgun, or worse begging someone to use it for you. (Yeah, happened to me. I could do nothing. I mean, I could have and voluntary manslaughter charges...but I'm a coward.)  

    And don't get me started on the whole back alley abortion argument again. Back in the day, there were books published on how to do a safe, sterile D&C at someone's home. I can't believe we've regressed so far as a culture to have to re-fight this. What's next, the Rethugs dispute Lister's germ theory and say that sickness is caused by Satan?

    Don't pray in my school and I won't think in your church. (-9.00,-8.86)

    by Jonathan Hoag on Sun Feb 19, 2012 at 11:30:46 AM PST

    •  This, however, was not an argument (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Jonathan Hoag, Calamity Jean, maf1029

      Santorum was making on peaceful, dignified death. I have worked as a hospice RN and Level 1 Trama RN for years, so I understand and agree with the argument you are making.

      Ricky's agenda, in stating the Netherlands is, in essence, KILLING PEOPLE WHO DON'T WANT TO DIE, is to make people think that's what Obama wants to do.

      His 'facts' about the Netherlands.. are also lies. Big difference.

  •  Euthansia (0+ / 0-)

    I don't know about "...makes up some statistics about the large amount of seniors being euthanized against their will”, but the fact that elders in the Netherlands have been euthanized without their permission has been firmly established by the Council of Europe as far back as 2003.

    http://assembly.coe.int/...

    “a number of quantitative studies of the rate and major characteristics of these practices have been conducted in 1990, 1995 and 2001. These have demonstrated a disturbingly high incidence of euthanasia being carried out without the patient’s explicit request and an equally disturbing failure by medical professionals to report euthanasia cases to the proper regulatory authority.”

    So, I’m willing to give Mr. Santorum the benefit of the doubt on whether elders in the Netherlands are wearing such bracelets.

    And maybe it might not be a bad idea to consider wearing them here in the U.S.

    In an article published in the January 19, 2012 edition of the Journal of Medical Ethics.

    “What Makes Killing Wrong?”

    http://jme.bmj.com/...

    The authors argue that death and total disability are morally indistinguishable, and therefore harvesting organs from living disabled patients is not morally wrong.

    So, why is Mr. Santorum wrong to raise the specter that our elders are also in danger of being put down?

    What next, Soylent Green??

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