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Leading Off:

Ohio Primaries: Last night, Ohio held the first-in-the-nation non-presidential primaries, and one House race saw a major upset. In OH-02, Republican Rep. Jean Schmidt, who first won office in a 2005 special election and has always had a rocky road to re-nomination, was knocked off by surgeon and Iraq war vet Brad Wenstrup, 49-43. Wenstrup was outraised by Schmidt but ran a vigorous campaign and also ran up the margins in turf that was new to the incumbent (thanks to redistricting) in Hamilton County. Wenstrup will have an easy time winning in the general election in this dark red district in November.

Another incumbent also lost in the Democratic primary in OH-09, but that was going to happen no matter what, since the race pitted two sitting members of Congress against each other: Dennis Kucinich and Marcy Kaptur. As expected, Kucinich drew the short straw, losing 56-40. While Kaptur always had the geographic edge (she represented more of the new 9th than Kucinich did), Kucinich made what looks like a serious tactical blunder late in the game, dissing the city of Toledo in a radio ad. That helped Kaptur run up a truly comical 94-4 margin in Lucas County, home of Toledo (which is also Kaptur's home turf). Of course, Kucinich hasn't ruled out moving to another state (such as Washington) and running for Congress again this year—hey, the filing deadlines haven't passed in most places yet! So, rather improbably, this may not be the last we've heard of him.

Finally, in OH-03, a new heavily Democratic open seat created by GOP map-makers to ensure surrounding districts would remain safely Republican, former state House Minority Leader Joyce Beatty won something of an upset over former Rep. Mary Jo Kilroy, 38-35. The winner here will almost certainly go on to victory in the fall. Worth noting: Public Policy Polling conducted an internal poll for Beatty just a couple of weeks ago, which had Kilroy up 35-34 but indicated that Beatty had the momentum. Pretty accurate results for a tough-to-poll, low-turnout primary in a brand-new district.

Senate:

IN-Sen: How would you like some lead in your cat fud? The NRA is endorsing Treasurer Richard Mourdock, who for a year has been challenging incumbent Sen. Richard Lugar from the right in the Republican primary. Let's see, though, if the NRA actually puts any money behind Mourdock, or if they're all clip and no ammo.

ME-Sen: As promised, we've got our full writeup of PPP's poll of the Maine Senate race, which shows indie ex-Gov. Angus King leading a three-way race against Chellie Pingree and Charlie Summers. That's just one of many, many matchups PPP tested, so click the link for our complete take on all the results.

Not much will be clear, though, until we know whether or not Pingree is running, and now she says she's waiting on the results of a different poll—one conducted by the DSCC, which was slated to be completed on Tuesday night. Pingree adds that she still might not decide "for a few days" (in the words of the Portland Press-Herald), and in a non-encouraging sign, calls a three-way race "really tricky."

Why am I discouraged? Well, speaking of the DSCC, the organization's chair, Sen. Patty Murray, "did not rule out the possibility that the DSCC could back" King on Tuesday, despite the fact that King is an independent and not a Democrat. And King has busy emphasizing just that. Check out this nonsense:

King said he could envision himself caucusing with either party, depending on the issues at the time, or neither party at times.
That's just simply not how it works. You can only get assigned to committees if you caucus with a particular party, and if you aren't on any committees, then there's nothing for you to do in Congress except write back to constituents' emails and hang around waiting for the occasional roll call vote. A senator who refuses to join a caucus would be a joke of a senator, and what's more, the Senate isn't some kind of parliament. You don't just get to randomly switch sides as it suits you.

You know, Charlie Crist tried this ridiculousness last cycle, saying he'd "caucus with the people of Florida." He was roundly mocked for attempting to have it both ways, and in the end, it got him nowhere. King may be able to coast on his personal popularity all the way to election day, but he's going to have to answer this question eventually. And the fact that he won't do so now ought to make Democrats very wary.

Indeed, I'm starting to feel like King's nascent campaign is quickly turning into a weird joke that I'm just not getting. In a new interview with the Portland Press-Herald, he says "I have no intention of being a spoiler," and adds that he'd drop out if he didn't think he could win. When, exactly, would that decision take place? What's his timetable here? What metrics would he use? What level of certainty would he require? What...ever.

King also reiterated his refusal to declare which party he'd caucus with, saying "If I announce now, I would be giving up a lot on what I have said I would sell down there." As my colleague David Jarman says: "Cue up the scenario next January of 50 GOP Senators, 49 Dem Senators, Joe Biden holding the gavel, and then King falling off the turnip truck like he's Jimmy Stewart." Only I don't think King will have much luck working the humble Mr. Smith routine, seeing as he's already offering to sell himself to the highest bidder.

And I find this public display of King's inferiority complex to showcase exactly the kind of defensive crouch that so often makes Democrats look so weak and contemptible. So why is King engaged in this kind of shtick?

The Dartmouth College graduate and Bowdoin College lecturer also took umbrage at criticisms that he is an “elitist,” volunteering that he came from an unassuming family in which his grandparents quit schooling after the eighth grade.

I don’t drink wine, I don’t know what brie is, I bowl every Thursday night and my idea of fun is to go RVing,” he said. “If that’s an elitist, this country is in trouble.”

What an absurd, fearful posture. Ya know, if you know enough to include "brie" in a litany of things that have supposedly elitist connotations, then you know what fucking brie cheese is, no matter what anti-intellectual airs you put on. If you have to go to such lengths to convince people you're a just a reg'lar guy, then you're probably not. So yeah, I'd really like it if Chellie Pingree got in and won this thing.

UT-Sen: The right-wing American Action Network is running a "low-six figure" ad buy (good for 800 points) on behalf of Sen. Orrin Hatch, but what's interesting about the spot is that it's a negative attack on Hatch's main opponent for the GOP nomination, state Sen. Dan Liljenquist. Hatch, long regarded as a conservative apostate, began the cycle looking quite vulnerable but seemed to shore himself up over the course of the last year. So does the AAN (or Hatch, or the NRSC) have some polling we haven't seen showing Hatch is  weaker than he's let on? Anyhow, you can watch the ad here or below.

Gubernatorial:

NC-Gov: The conservative Civitas Institute is out with a new survey of the general election in North Carolina's gubernatorial race, conducted by pollster National Research. They find Republican Pat McCrory leading all three matchups they tested: 46-32 over Bob Etheridge, 49-30 over Walter Dalton, and 48-27 over Bill Faison.

House:

AZ-04: I guess this won't help the story go away: Jose Orozco is apparently suing his former lover, Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu, claiming $1 mil in damages for as-yet-unspecified wrongs. Babeu, as you know, is a Republican running for Congress in the 4th CD and allegedly threatened Orozco with deportation for refusing to stay silent about their relationship.

CA-21: So after all that, former Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante won't run for Congress in the open 21st District. That leaves businessman John Hernandez as the only Democrat in the race, though Fresno councilman Blong Xiong seems poised to enter. (At least some press reports a little while back said Xiong had joined the race, but more recent accounts put him back at the "considering" phase.) I guess there's also a dim chance that former state Sen. Dean Florez could still get in, but that seems very unlikely. We'll know for sure on Friday, the filing deadline.

FL-07: It's another one of those rare internal polls released by a campaign that's down double digits. Freshman GOPer Sandy Adams, who has to deal with veteran Rep. John Mica trying to bogart her district, put out a survey from Public Opinion Strategies showing her trailing in the Republican primary, 46-30. (The sample size was just 300.) Obviously the memo included some "if the stars align perfectly" numbers that have Adams leading, but I wouldn't take a lot of solace from a poll like this if I were her.

IL-02: Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel, who of course used to serve in the House himself, just endorsed his former colleague, Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr. Jackson is facing a challenge in the Democratic primary from ex-Rep. Debbie Halvorson, whom Emanuel never overlapped with in Congress, since he resigned in 2009 to become Barack Obama's first chief-of-staff just before Halvorson took office.

IL-10: Businessman Brad Schneider is the second Democrat to go up on TV in the Democratic primary, following on the heels of activist Ilya Sheyman. In his spot, he goes after the "Tea Party and Republicans like Bob Dold," and says he'll "fight for a woman's right to choose" and will "protect Social Security and Medicare." The production values are, well, a bit unusual, though, featuring nothing but a series of still photos. Kind of reminds me of those ancient filmstrips we'd watch in class back in the `80s. Anyhow, you can watch the ad yourself here or below:

According to Roll Call, Schneider's spending "upwards of $20,000 each week" for the next two weeks (the primary is on March 20), which is really peanuts in a media market this expensive. Meanwhile, Sheyman just scored the endorsement of former Wisconsin Sen. Russ Feingold, and the organization he runs, Progressives United.

IL-16: GOP Rep. Don Manzullo is out with yet another ad attacking his primary opponent, fellow Rep. Adam Kinzinger, for being insufficiently conservative. One data point the spot relies on are the National Journal's new congressional rankings, which purport to empirically classify members based on how "conservative" or "liberal" they are; Kinzinger managed only a 58% "conservative" score, while the woman he replaced, Dem Rep. Debbie Halvorson, managed a 48%. (Manzullo was at 74%.) You can watch at the link or below:

But National Journal's ratings have really pissed off conservatives, as Politico's Dylan Byers explains, because they actually don't measure ideology but rather how often a given member votes with their party. For instance, NJ regards Orrin Hatch as more conservative than his fellow Utah senator, Mike Lee, which seems impossible to believe. Ultimately, though, it seems like the problem has to do with how NJ labels its rankings; Byers suggests they just switch from calling their scale "liberal/conservative" to "Democratic/Republican," which makes sense.

MI-14: Dem Rep. Gary Peters keeps on picking up union support: Three more—branches of the Machinists, Steelworkers, and Utility Workers—all just gave him their backing, bringing his total list of labor endorsements to 14.

NC-09: Retiring GOP Rep. Sue Myrick just gave her backing to Mecklenburg County Commissioner Jim Pendergraph to succeed her. Pendergraph would be out-of-place in Lake Wobegon, though, seeing as Myrick called him "an average guy" in her endorsement. (Strong statement!) Meanwhile, NC-10 Rep. Patrick McHenry endorsed a different Republican for Myrick's seat, state Sen. Robert Pittenger, with whom he once served in the legislature. (McHenry also currently represents a small chunk of the redrawn 9th so he may have a little name rec there.)

NJ-10: Veteran Democratic Rep. Donald Payne died on Tuesday, after a battle with colon cancer. Payne revealed that he'd been diagnosed with cancer just last month; over the weekend, he was reported to be gravely ill. Payne, who was first elected to Congress in 1988, was 77 years old. Our condolences go out to Payne's family.

PA-12: On Monday, as we noted, a judge turned back Dem Rep. Mark Critz's challenge to the signatures fellow Rep. Jason Altmire submitted to get on the ballot. The ruling (which you can read at the link) hinged on whether one petition-gatherer who recently graduated college was actually a resident of the 12th District (where her parents live), or the 14th (where she rents a home). The judge chose to credit her claim that she maintained her residency with her parents and intends to return there when her lease is up, thus making the signatures she collected valid. Color me skeptical of this story (it sounds like a classic case of a college grad moving out but occasionally returning home for a meal), but given that the decision turned on a witness's credibility, it'll probably be difficult to overturn on appeal. Still, no word yet on what Critz plans to do.

TX-35: Not that there was really any doubt about where he'd run, but the Texas Democratic Party confirms that Rep. Lloyd Doggett has filed to seek re-election in the new 35th District.

Grab Bag:

Voter Suppression: Good news on the voter suppression front: A local judge just granted a temporary injunction against Wisconsin's new voter ID law, saying plaintiffs were likely to prevail in their suit seeking to strike down the law. The state (i.e., Republicans) says it's likely to appeal.

WATN?: What do you do after you raise and spend $1.5 million to score just 19% in a Democratic congressional primary where you ran to the right of the incumbent? Why, you parlay that into a bid for citywide office, of course! Reshma Saujani, a former hedge fund attorney who got creamed by NY-14's Carolyn Maloney in 2010, recently quit her job at the Public Advocate Bill DeBlasio's office, apparently as a prelude to running for her boss's job. (DeBlasio is widely expected to run for mayor next year.)

Redistricting Roundup:

FL Redistricting: Just FYI, the Florida Supreme Court is expected to issue a ruling, mandated by the new Fair Districts amendments, on the validity of the state's new legislative maps by the end of the week.

NY Redistricting: That was fast! The special master charged with drawing a new congressional map for New York State just a couple of weeks ago released draft plans on Tuesday. You can find PDFs of close-up versions for each region of the state and detailed maps of each individual district. The full map is below:

NY congressional map
(click for larger)
While the final lines may yet change, we've gone ahead and put together a comprehensive district-by-district analysis of the complete map. At the link, you'll also find our patented redistribution analysis, as well as a table explaining which new district numbers correspond with which old ones. Another great resource is this interactive feature from CUNY's Center for Urban Research which sets the proposed new congressional map side-by-side with the current one. Zooming in on one side automatically zooms you in on the other, so that you can see exactly where changes have been made.

Meanwhile, even though the maps are not final, several folks have already announced their plans in response to the new lines:

NY-06: Rep. Gary Ackerman, as expected, says he'll seek re-election in the proposed 6th CD, which contains more of his current constituents than any other new seat. (He currently serves the old 5th.) But not a whole lot—just 38%—which means he'd be vulnerable to a challenge in the Democratic primary. And that's exactly what he might get from Assemblyman Rory Lancman, who had been eager to challenge GOPer Bob Turner in the old 9th but is now closely eyeing the redrawn 6th. (Turner's district was utterly shattered, so it's not like Lancman could go against him even if he wanted to, unless Turner decides to make a suicide run.)

NY-18: Wappingers Falls mayor Matt Alexander says he'll continue with his plans to challenge freshman GOPer Nan Hayworth in the district that's the clear successor to the old 19th. He'll likely face physician Richard Becker in the Democratic primary, since Becker previously said he'd keep running against Hayworth pretty much no matter what happened in redistricting.

NY-19: Freshman Republican Chris Gibson finally has a Democratic opponent: attorney and former prosecutor Julian Schreibman, who had previously expressed interest in running in Maurice Hinchey's old 22nd CD before it was dismantled. However, Schreibman's hometown of Kingston wound up in the new 19th, the successor to the 20th. It's good to see that Gibson's presence didn't scare him off.

NY-21: After moping around for a year and raising no money, could two-time loser Doug Hoffman finally motivate and run for Congress? Hoffman said on Monday that he wouldn't make another bid if he wound up in Gibson's district, but that he'd consider a third run if he wound up in Democrat Bill Owens' seat. (That's the guy who beat him twice last cycle.) And indeed, it looks like that's what happened: Hoffman's current hometown of Lake Placid has been placed into the redrawn 21st, which is the successor to Owens' current 23rd CD. Hoffman claims he'd run on both the Republican and Conservative Party lines, but given that he twice split the vote running on a third-party ticket and, more importantly, given that local Conservatives are now much more enamored of Matt Doheny, I doubt he's going to get that chance. It would be great, though, if Hoffman wound up with the GOP nomination but Doheny scored the Conservative nod.

Originally posted to Daily Kos Elections on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 05:00 AM PST.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  ME-Sen: This is the talk of someone who (8+ / 0-)

    should be anointed?

    Former Gov. Angus King Jr., on his first full day as a declared candidate for the U.S. Senate, said Tuesday that he would consider dropping out of the race this fall if it appeared that he could not win.

    "I am certainly not interested in being a spoiler and changing the dynamics of the race," the independent candidate said in an interview with The Portland Press Herald.

    I find no reason why Pingree shouldn't run. She's down 5 points and King
    Pingree said she has talked about the race with King but they have made no deals.

    "People end up deciding whether or not they want to run for office for the reasons that are important to them, and it's always good to stay in the conversation with people," she said, "but it doesn't mean that everyone gets in a back room, smokes some cigars and a deal is cut."

    Pingree was gathering information and awaiting results from a poll that was supposed to be completed Tuesday night by the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee.

    http://www.pressherald.com/...

    20, Dude, Chairman DKE Gay Caucus! (College IN-09) (Raised IL-03, IL-09) Tammy Baldwin and Elizabeth Warren for Senate!

    by ndrwmls10 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 05:07:24 AM PST

  •  NJ 10: possible successors (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Woody, PAbluestater
    In conversations with a number of Essex County political operatives, two names were frequently mentioned: Donald Payne Jr., a son of the late congressman who is a Newark councilman and Essex County freeholder, and Assembly Speaker Sheila Oliver, who counted the elder Payne among her mentors.

    Less frequently referred to was Newark Councilman Ron Rice Jr., who had been exploring a candidacy even before Payne announced that he had cancer.

    http://www.nj.com/...

    As for the process:

    Candidates must file to run in two June primary elections by April 2 — a special one to fill the remainder of Payne’s term from November to January, and a regular one to serve a full term beginning in January.

    . . . .

    Come November, Josephson explained, the two general elections are held, one for the special term and the other for the regular one.

    But it’s not that simple this year because of redistricting.

    The special elections will include the old 10th District, whose boundaries are valid until January, and the regular elections will be for the new 10th District, which was redrawn three months ago.

    "We calmly accept our uncertain position." Joey Rathburn

    by Paleo on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 05:07:59 AM PST

    •  Interesting (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Woody

      I thought Sheila Oliver would be perfectly comfortable where she was. Didn't think she was interested in Congress.

      Also, Rice is almost certainly in at least for now, as he removed the word "exploratory" from his website.

      21, male, RI-01 (voting) IL-01 (college), hopeless Swingnut

      by sapelcovits on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:14:10 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Rice probably pissed off quiet a few people (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Woody

        with his terrible timing. Can Oliver remain Speaker for as long as she wants? Is there any chance of her being dumped? That seems like a common thing. Of course she's seems to be playing within the rules.

        20, Dude, Chairman DKE Gay Caucus! (College IN-09) (Raised IL-03, IL-09) Tammy Baldwin and Elizabeth Warren for Senate!

        by ndrwmls10 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:19:43 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  If you're referring to Buono's ouster (0+ / 0-)

          I don't think Oliver is in danger of that happening. I think Buono only got kicked out for being a liberal reformer in a conservadem machine state. Oliver's not a machine pol per se, but she definitely doesn't rock the boat as much as Buono did.

          21, male, RI-01 (voting) IL-01 (college), hopeless Swingnut

          by sapelcovits on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:26:53 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  She works for Joe DiVincenzo (0+ / 0-)

            I mean, literally works for him.  And he may be a bigger Christiecrat than George Norcross.

            "We calmly accept our uncertain position." Joey Rathburn

            by Paleo on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:32:26 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Of course (0+ / 0-)

              I don't doubt that she's tight with the Christiecrat crowd. But I'm sure she herself would be perfectly progressive once she got to Congress. But maybe I'm just biased because I was impressed with her leadership on marriage equality.

              21, male, RI-01 (voting) IL-01 (college), hopeless Swingnut

              by sapelcovits on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:36:00 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

  •  NJ 9: John Lewis endorses Pascrell (0+ / 0-)

    "We calmly accept our uncertain position." Joey Rathburn

    by Paleo on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 05:09:21 AM PST

  •  Anybody else read this (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ChadmanFL

    http://www.politico.com/...

    Where is the outrage here?  Obama is clearly going to have more than enough money and will likely have well over 270 electoral votes locked up by the time September comes around.  Why not share some of that money to help Democrats possibly gain seats in the Senate and win back the House?

    The only explaination for this is that Obama wants a Republican Congress for his second term like Clinton.  

  •  Bye bye, Mean Jean (11+ / 0-)

    You won't be missed.

    Here we are now Entertain us I feel stupid and contagious

    by Scarce on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 05:28:19 AM PST

    •  War on Women? (5+ / 0-)

      I see that the guy who beat her is an even loonier wingnut, so it won't change much.

      However, it means one fewer GOP woman in Congress. The party that's already lily-white old males, is getting more "maler" all of the time. I wonder if women will notice?

      So, does anyone know how many Republican women will be left after November?

      We ought to use this as another opportunity to point out the Republican hatred for females. How any woman can vote or consider herself Republican is beyond me.

      •  Yep. Mean Jean was teabagged. (6+ / 0-)

        OMG.

        My new favorite RIGHT WING website: NewtCantWin.com It's what the RIGHT thinks of Newt! Enjoy!

        by pucklady on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:03:15 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Here's a list (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tietack, Amber6541, Woody, LNK

        Sandra (Sandy) Adams (Republican, FL)
        Michele Bachmann (Republican, MN)
        Judy Borg Biggert (Republican, IL)
        Diane Black (Republican, TN)
        Marsha Blackburn (Republican, TN)
        Mary Bono Mack (Republican, CA)
        Ann Marie Buerkle (Republican, NY)
        Shelley Moore Capito (Republican, WV)
        Renee Ellmers (Republican, NC)
        Jo Ann Emerson (Republican, MO)
        Virginia Foxx (Republican, NC)
        Kay Granger (Republican, TX)
        Vicky Hartzler (Republican, MO)
        Nan Hayworth (Republican, NY)
        Jaime Herrera Beutler (Republican, WA)
        Lynn Jenkins (Republican, KS)
        Cynthia M. Lummis (Republican, WY)
        Cathy McMorris Rodgers (Republican, WA)
        Candice Miller (Republican, MI)
        Sue Myrick (Republican, NC)
        Kristi Noem (Republican, SD)
        Martha Roby (Republican, AL)
        Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (Republican, FL)
        Jean Schmidt (Republican, OH)

        Here we are now Entertain us I feel stupid and contagious

        by Scarce on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:04:09 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Comedy gold, that Jean Schmidt bought the farm (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LordMike, Matt Z, Woody, PAbluestater

    in the darkest of dark red parts of Ohio, probably because she wasn't looney enough.  Is the new guy a Tea Partier?

  •  OH-03: Congrats to Joyce Beatty and PPP! (8+ / 0-)

    And the political world will continue to treat PPP like crap.

    20, Dude, Chairman DKE Gay Caucus! (College IN-09) (Raised IL-03, IL-09) Tammy Baldwin and Elizabeth Warren for Senate!

    by ndrwmls10 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 05:36:58 AM PST

  •  ADP: 216,000 job increase in February (4+ / 0-)

    More than expected.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/...

    But that employment expert, Gallup, said hiring nosedived.  And they must be right.

    "We calmly accept our uncertain position." Joey Rathburn

    by Paleo on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 05:53:24 AM PST

  •  NY legislative redistricting talks continue (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Taget

    With the master's map hanging over their heads.

    http://palltimes.com/...

    "We calmly accept our uncertain position." Joey Rathburn

    by Paleo on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 05:56:51 AM PST

    •  I think there will be a deal (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ChadmanFL

      I only say this because the dems have no response. Senate Republicans and some intervenors have tweaks.

      Who knows, by Monday we might have a less sensible Albany drawn map.  

      •  I'd be stunned (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Woody

        If they reached a deal.  Why the GOP Senate would make a deal based on this "awesome for the GOP" map is beyond me.  The only deal would be getting tweaked congressional maps in exchange for the GOP drawing the Senate map.  

        I doubt that will fly with Cuomo.  More importantly I think everyone involved is too ignorant and selfish to make an actual deal.  Will be an interesting week or so of negotiations upcoming.

        "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

        by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:47:59 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Frankly (5+ / 0-)

    I'm much less interested in reading analysis of King's personality based on a few generic public statements than I am in reading analysis of his actions over eight years of prominent political office.

    26, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-14 (formerly PA-02/NY-12).

    by Xenocrypt on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 05:58:01 AM PST

    •  I'm more interested in what he's (8+ / 0-)

      willing to commit to. I read here yesterday that he endorsed George W. Bush in 2000. That's a major blunder (and was obviously one at the time to anyone who cared about the issues). I will find it very hard to overlook.

      Ok, so I read the polls.

      by andgarden on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:17:38 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  What do you think that says about his (0+ / 0-)

        positions and priorities?

        What he's willing to commit to now is also important, and it's a good question, but I'd like to be able to place that in the context of information about his entire career, and not just set my opinion based on the very little information we all know as of now.  For example, has he been a political weathervane, or has he had consistent positions and emphases?  

        26, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-14 (formerly PA-02/NY-12).

        by Xenocrypt on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:25:45 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  To be fair (0+ / 0-)

          A lot of independents and even some Democrats got it wrong in 2000.  And they weren't all Zell Miller's.

          "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

          by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:28:34 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I continue to hold that against them (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Matt Z

            Ok, so I read the polls.

            by andgarden on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:30:49 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Which is certainly fine (0+ / 0-)

              it just depends on the extent.  Jim Webb voted for Bush didn't he.  Robert Byrd was in the KKK.

              Eventually each person has their own criteria for what they vote on, but I'd suggest that more recent actions usually out weigh past ones.

              "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

              by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:34:05 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

        •  I think it says (0+ / 0-)

          that he doesn't care a whole lot about the issues I do. And that's really concerning.

          Ok, so I read the polls.

          by andgarden on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:31:24 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  Good riddance to Kucinich (7+ / 0-)

    Also, wouldn't it have made sense for him to run in OH-03?  He could've even presented the plan to run there to Kaptur to secure her support.  The Columbus-based candidates would've split the anti-Kucinich vote.

    NY-12 resident, lives across the street from NY-14

    by Bobby Big Wheel on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 05:59:20 AM PST

    •  Might have lost anyway (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      sapelcovits, tietack, jncca

      "Why doesn't George W. Bush run against Janice Hahn and Laura Richardson?  They'd split the anti-Bush vote."

      (Yes, extreme example, but let me have the fun of coming up with an extreme example.)

      26, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-14 (formerly PA-02/NY-12).

      by Xenocrypt on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:03:42 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Does Kucinich have support outside Cleveland (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      sapelcovits

      I'm pretty sure the anti-Kucinich vote in Columbus is big enough to be split and still beat the pro-Kucinich Columbus vote.

      "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

      by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:04:21 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Of course he does (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ban nock

        Just check the comments on DKE from people that weren't at SSP.  The most liberal portions of the party have an affinity for his anti-war, pro-legalization (which would play well in a college town) stances and don't mind that he's not a team player, which the pragmatists in the party loathe.  I could see a scenario where he could get to 35% in an OH-03 primary with Kilroy, Beatty, Celeste et al splitting the non-very liberal vote.

        NY-12 resident, lives across the street from NY-14

        by Bobby Big Wheel on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:08:26 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I mean in Ohio (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ban nock, bumiputera

          If he's so damn popular why run for president but not something statewide.  I think his support is capped at a lower level than DKE commentary might suggest.

          The whole idea that legalization of drugs drives college turnout has been disproven quite a bit over the years.  College kids don't get insanely enthused on the issue and college kids aren't all drug-supporting voters, either.

          "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

          by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:20:13 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  He wanted the bully pulpit the House provides (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ban nock, tietack

            If he's willing to move to Washington state to run for the House, why not try an open seat in Columbus instead of running against Marcy Kaptur in a Toledo heavy district instead?  He could have even tried to get some institutional backing by avoiding an incumbent-on-incumbent battle.  Keep in mind nearly every House member who weighed in on Kaptur-Kucinich was on Kaptur's side.  If he ran in Columbus he could've gotten their backing, which would help in a clown car primary that someone did win with 38%.  Kucinich might've been able to win that seat with 30% in a primary.  You think he couldn't cobble together 30% a Democratic primary in a Columbus district?

            NY-12 resident, lives across the street from NY-14

            by Bobby Big Wheel on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:29:11 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  Sorry, but Kilroy, Beatty & Celeste (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          sapelcovits, ChadmanFL, bumiputera

          are all VERY liberal. They weren't appealing to "non-liberal vote." All that would have happened is that the African American vote would have rallied around Beatty, and the rest would have atomized more. Kucinich could not have won here. He kept his old district as long as he did not by appealing to pot-smoking hippies but because of his blue-collar ethnic roots and his birth ties to the area. That would all be gone in Columbus. He'd be viewed there as an intrusion after Columbus politicians waited for years for the opportunity they now have. The idea that Dennis should swoop in and steal other people's prizes is weird to me.

          Take the "Can't(or)" out of Congress. Support E. Wayne Powell in Va-07. http://www.ewaynepowell.com/

          by anastasia p on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:44:46 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  Why good riddance? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Amber6541

      Do me a favor and send me a link to the case against Kuc.  I've always liked the fellow.

      When we talk about war, we're really talking about peace.

      by genethefiend on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:40:53 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I still feel kinda bad for him. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      gabjoh, Funkygal

      Jerk or not, he still did a number of great things.

      Sh*t politicians say: “Well It’s not a stereotype at all. This is a — you know, through the creative — this is a young woman in China who is speaking English. That’s quite an achievement. " -Pete Hoekstra

      by KingofSpades on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:14:10 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  No, no sense at all (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tietack

      This district was created for the raft of excellent LOCAL Columbus candidates. There wouldn't have been so much an anti-Kucinich vote as a "Let's ignore this guy because he has nothing to do with us" vote. Also, the Columbus candidates DID split the vote. I don't really see what Kucinich would have added, except to possibly make Beatty's margin even larger, since she would have solidified the African American vote, a demo to whom Kucinich has little appeal.

      Take the "Can't(or)" out of Congress. Support E. Wayne Powell in Va-07. http://www.ewaynepowell.com/

      by anastasia p on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:41:27 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  So what was (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ban nock, itskevin, James Allen, Matt Z

    your favorite moment of last night?

    Mine? Watching Newt Gingrich's speech where he took shots at everyone who's ever offended him and acting like he'll trounce Obama in the debates if he somehow becomes the nominee.

    "Viewing time at the zoo!" - America on the GOP Presidential primaries

    by ehstronghold on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:20:42 AM PST

    •  I didn't watch much last night (0+ / 0-)

      But my favorite of this morning is reading a half dozen or so articles on CNN that made last night seem like it was bad for Romney.  

      Methinks we give North Dakota and Oklahoma a little too much sway in the conversation if we think last night was bad for Romney.

      "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

      by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:24:17 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Willard Barely Beat the Guy Who...... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        The Caped Composer, ChadmanFL

        ...."forgot to file the papers" in the most important state on the map.  And in the second and third most important states last night, he got crushed.  The only way in which it wasn't a bad night for Willard is that both Gingrich and Santorum are likely to stay in the race and continue to split the 60+% anti-Willard vote that exists in every state that isn't majority Mormon.

        •  Come on (0+ / 0-)

          1.  There are no majority Mormon states to have voted yet.  
          2.  The only reason Ohio was the most important was because the bigger states were all foregone conclusions to the non-Santorums.  Georgia had more delegates, and proving he could win in a transitioning Southern state like VA would have helped Santorum more than winning Ohio by 5%.  

          The argument that Mitt only wins states that are "X", be it his home state, or Mormon states, or what not is not only dis-proven at this point but also irrelevant.

          Mitt's base is the Northeast, the non-Pacific West, but he's also now won Alaska, Michigan, Ohio, Washington, Florida.  At some point the idea that Mitt's appeal is thin becomes irrelevant because clearly everyone else's appeal might be deeper but isn't very wide, and each vote counts the same.

          but even if you believe that mitt can only win Mormon and northeastern states, that still puts him in fantastic position going forward.  He can sweep (or come close) CT and RI for big chunks of delegates, he has Mormon places like Samoa/Hawaii/Montana/Utah still to come.

          Then he has opportunities to get significant delegates in the major states that are left (maybe not PA, but Santorum also isn't going to sweep there either).

          "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

          by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:34:28 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Take a Look at the Idaho County Map...... (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            James Allen, ehstronghold

            Mitt only won the state because every Mormon in the state showed up, as evidenced by the fact that he got destroyed in the counties in the Mormon-less Panhandle.  I'm not seeing any exit polls available in Idaho but I'd bet money that Mormons represented well over 50% of the caucusgoers.  Beyond that, Willard won his home state....and the remaining states he all won with 40% of the vote or less.  And he seems capable of only winning voters over age 65 in those states.  If Gingrich were to drop out, Willard would be uncompetitive against Santorum in just about every state.

            So perhaps you're right that Willard is capable of winning more than just states with majority or plurality Mormon populations and the state where he was Governor, but only insofar as he can max out at his 38% ceiling while counting on Gingrich and Santorum to split the other 62% of the vote.  And even with a split conservative vote he can't win anything in the central time zone.  Hard to imagine any scenario where someone like Willard could parlay this thin reed of a coalition into a nomination in any other scenario than the crowded-field-far-beyond-what's typical scenario in which he's in.  Put it does look as though if he runs fast enough, he'll be able to slide underneath the chamber door before it closes shut and get the nomination.

            •  He won because his voters showed up (0+ / 0-)

              Oooh he is in trouble (snark).

              Seriously, if we limit the voter pool to evangelical non-mormons Santorum will run stronger, its just that its not reality.

              And just to reiterate, he's won Florida, Michigan, Arizona, Virginia, Vermont, Alaska, Idaho, Maine, Washington, massachusetts, nevada, Wyoming.  

              You act like this is a who's who of majority Mormon states and even worse, like Mormons shouldn't matter but mid-western evangelical conservatives are the only ones who do..

              "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

              by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:58:42 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  yankees and mormons (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                James Allen

                AZ, ID, NV, WY are the states with the highest % of mormons after utah, and WA had a pretty high mormon turnout %, even for a GOP primary.

                MA, NH, VT, ME are all new england states.

                his opponents weren't on the ballot in VA, and even then ron paul (!!!) scored 41%.

                the key states that speak to romney's broader strengths as a candidate are MI, OH, FL, all of which we won on the back of massive spending in expensive media markets, hugely outspending his rivals.

                all three major candidates have regional bases, and none of them has shown much broad appeal beyond them. gingrich can't win outside of the south, santorum is strong in the midwest and among non-deep south conservative christians, romney is strong among mormons and on the east coast. each of these is a major faction of the GOP, but a strong candidate needs to show an ability to persuade voters outside their base. romney's done the best job of this, in MI, OH, and FL, but even then it's been pretty anemic.

    •  moment (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      James Allen, Matt Z, killjoy

      Watching Kaptur's numbers pile up everywhere except Cleveland.

      SSP poster. 42, CA-5, -0.25/-3.90

      by sacman701 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 08:26:18 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Here's your Wednesday morning lulz (0+ / 0-)

    21, male, RI-01 (voting) IL-01 (college), hopeless Swingnut

    by sapelcovits on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:27:40 AM PST

  •  PA-03 (0+ / 0-)

    Democratic professor Missa Eaton wins the nomination by default as her opponents get kicked off the ballot. And Some Dudette Stacey Gray announces an Independent bid. http://www.politicspa.com/...

    21, male, RI-01 (voting) IL-01 (college), hopeless Swingnut

    by sapelcovits on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:31:39 AM PST

  •  Schmidt "cuts and runs" (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LordMike, Matt Z

    That should be our meme.

  •  What message does Schmidt's loss send to (0+ / 0-)

    GOP House Caucus members?  Was she attacked from the right or center?  Was the guy just not crazy but equal to her on politics?

  •  Scozzafava'd 2012? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sapelcovits

    So I posted earlier this week that Dede's brother Tom is considering running in an open seat race for NY Assembly (NY-AD-113 or 114 depending on the map).

    Well sounds like he's gotten cranky about the primary process and is threatening to run as an Independent (of course he's planning to run in the GOP primary too)>

    So it looks like this could be a bunch of fun if it all plays out properly.

    http://poststar.com/...

    Doug Hoffman in the meantime, is considering runs for Congress or Assembly.  Either one he runs for gives the Dems a big advantage, as he pretty much only draws from the tea party-ish right.

    http://poststar.com/...

    "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

    by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:44:20 AM PST

  •  Even Jean Schmidt (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mark27, Matt Z

    had the courtesy to congratulate Wenstrup: http://news.cincinnati.com/...

    Special K is, well, special.

    21, male, RI-01 (voting) IL-01 (college), hopeless Swingnut

    by sapelcovits on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:47:34 AM PST

  •  Gingrich is Romney's best friend... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    itskevin

    Imagine that - Newt going out of his way to help Romney win - the guy who carpet bombed him in Iowa and Florida with non-stop attack ads is sticking around solely to help Romney win now.   Politics is a crazy business.  

    Without Newt in the race Santorum wins three extra primaries last night - Alaska, Ohio and Georgia, along with blow out wins in ND, Tennessee and Oklahoma - and the story is "Mitt is trouble?".  Not to mention no Newt means Santorum wins Michigan last week as well.

    Newt had a terrible night outside of his homestate, getting single digits in a four states, 12 and 15 points respectively in a couple others - he really has no business staying in the race other than because Adelson is telling him he has to.  

    •  I'm not so sure (0+ / 0-)

      I doubt Gingrich Alaska voters automatically would have gone to Santorum enough to eke out a win.  Ohio is/was always going to be a tie since MI became a tie.

      The fact Santorum can't win over voters from a candidate who "has no business staying in this race" says a lot about Santorum.

      "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

      by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:57:11 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I was very happy to see Kucinich (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sapelcovits, Matt Z, jncca, bumiputera

    go down last night. Next thing I would like to see is Val Demmings take on Grayson.

  •  I suspect that Dennis' loss will be celebrated (0+ / 0-)

    by the GOP as much as we rejoice in Mean Jean's.

    What we call god is merely a living creature with superior technology & understanding. If their fragile egos demand prayer, they lose that superiority.

    by agnostic on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 06:57:21 AM PST

  •  While I'm glad Mean Jean is gone (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mark27, Matt Z

    She is out because she was out-teabagged. Hard to believe, but true.

    From today's headline at RedState

    Tea Party Claims First Scalp
    Can you imagine what we can expect from someone who beats Mean Jean by attacking from the right? OMG.

    My new favorite RIGHT WING website: NewtCantWin.com It's what the RIGHT thinks of Newt! Enjoy!

    by pucklady on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:01:55 AM PST

  •  King identifies some positions (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ChadmanFL, itskevin, bumiputera

    Mixed bag for us. He thinks the balanced-budget amendment is a "gimmick", and on the deficit, he supports the Bowles-Simpson approach of cutting entitlement spending and raising additional revenue. He also supports marriage equality, but he says he's a fiscal conservative (though not, it seems, according to the modern Republican definition if he wants new taxes) and isn't a "secret Democrat". Most importantly for us DKE folks, he said he's not going to self-fund. Story here.

    Democrat, OR-01 native, Swingnut for life, and keeper of the DKE glossary.

    by SaoMagnifico on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:06:16 AM PST

    •  He seems like he would be (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jj32

      Decent enough fit in the Democratic Caucus. With those positions I could not see him with the GOP.  He could always poll the Charlie Crist and say he will caucus with the people of Maine.  

    •  About what one would expect (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SaoMagnifico

      I'm sure in the coming days he'll be asked more and the picture will become clearer.

      I also like inter-generational inequity, that phrase just rolls off the tongue :-)

      "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

      by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:13:08 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Pretty much as I expected (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SaoMagnifico, itskevin, bumiputera

      I would think he would be fairly liberal on civil liberties and church and state.  Where he stands on labor issues is an unknown.  However, I can't see the Republican caucus putting up with this apostasy:

      "Anybody who thinks we are going to get out this deficit situation without revenues is dreaming," King said.

      "We calmly accept our uncertain position." Joey Rathburn

      by Paleo on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:14:59 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  He also said this: (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LordMike, itskevin
      He also said he would wait until he gets to Washington before deciding whether he would caucus with Democrats or Republicans. His decision, he said, would be based on "what's most effective for Maine," rather than any ideological preference for either party.

      Because his campaign is built on the message that political parties are causing gridlock in Washington, it wouldn't make sense to announce now which party he would caucus with, he said.

      "If I answer that question now, I would be giving up a lot on what I have said would have to sell," he said.

      King said he would expect both Democrats and Republicans to ask him to join their caucuses. If control of the Senate could be influenced by his decision, he said, he would be in a postion of power, or as he put it, "the most popular girl at the prom."

      If we take this at face value, he is no more likely to caucus with Democrats than Republicans, especially if the writer's inference that he explicitly won't consider ideology is correct. If the test really is 'effectiveness' in some nebulous sense of being able to secure funding etc. for Maine, it presumably would make more sense for him to caucus with whichever party is in the majority, not the one he agrees with more. Sorry, but that's not good enough.
      •  He's not an ideologue (0+ / 0-)

        So none of that is surprising.  The whole "do what's best for Maine" will play much better than "I'll be a reliable vote for harry Reid" with the people of Maine.  With DKE maybe not so much.

        "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

        by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:21:32 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  He's not going to caucus with the Republicans (0+ / 0-)

        That's not to say he'll necessarily caucus with the Democrats.  He could pull a Wayne Morse:

        Once, during the 1950s, when Senator Wayne Morse of Oregon had left the Republican Party but not yet joined the Democrats, he placed his chair temporarily in the middle of the center aisle to demonstrate his independence.
        http://www.senate.gov/...

        "We calmly accept our uncertain position." Joey Rathburn

        by Paleo on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:36:01 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  And Pingree should run against him on this... (0+ / 0-)

          And would peel off more than a fair share of his Dem support because he's playing coy and wanting it all ways.  He hurts Maine by not caucusing with anybody because he doesn't get any committee seats - or will, but just the lame ones that nobody else wants.  Basically he just wants to be in the press more and be the big indie vote than actually legislate.  

          King isn't running a campaign, he's running an ego trip.

          •  Ego trip (0+ / 0-)

            Well, that ego trip twice got him elected governor.

            "We calmly accept our uncertain position." Joey Rathburn

            by Paleo on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 08:01:45 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  And he's the only governor (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              SaoMagnifico

              To hit 50% in the last 20 years or so I think.

              "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

              by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 08:06:20 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  Governor and Senator are different offices. (0+ / 0-)

              As an independent you aren't impaired from properly doing your job, an indie in the senate has to pick a side or forfeit all power. If he tries that, it's fair to say he's an egotistical jackass more concerned with himself than the state, he's sacrificing what he believes in to make a pointless gesture that someone as smart as he is obviously realizes is meaningless.

              (-7.62, -6.31), Blood type "O", Democratic-socialist, social anarchist, KY-01, "When smashing monuments, save the pedestals. They always come in handy." — Stanisław Lem

              by Setsuna Mudo on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 08:14:49 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Has he indicated (0+ / 0-)

                In any way that he's considering not caucusing?  or is this just a "robust" leap based on his not saying who he's caucusing with.

                If someone asked me who I was voting for and I said I don't know yet, would you automatically assume I'm a non-voter?  Because to me the only statement that would indicate that in reality would be if someone asked me who I was voting for and I said "I'm not voting".

                "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

                by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 08:19:30 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  I didn't say that. (0+ / 0-)

                  I said if that's what he ended up doing then you can assume he's a jackass, right now we don't know yet.

                  (-7.62, -6.31), Blood type "O", Democratic-socialist, social anarchist, KY-01, "When smashing monuments, save the pedestals. They always come in handy." — Stanisław Lem

                  by Setsuna Mudo on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 08:23:32 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                •  He has. (0+ / 0-)

                  He mentioned something about caucusing depending on the issue of the moment.  So when he favors the GOP side he'd caucus with them and Dem side he'd caucus with them - That's not how caucusing works of course, but that's what he said.  

            •  And (0+ / 0-)

              rather small ideological discrepancies are much more important in the senate than the Governorship, since as Governor it's more about what you don't do than what you do do... quite the opposite in the senate.

              (-7.62, -6.31), Blood type "O", Democratic-socialist, social anarchist, KY-01, "When smashing monuments, save the pedestals. They always come in handy." — Stanisław Lem

              by Setsuna Mudo on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 08:16:06 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

          •  He didn't say he wouldn't caucus (0+ / 0-)

            I didn't read that anywhere.  Did he really say he wouldn't caucus with either side, or is he just being coy about which side.  Those are 2 entirely different things.

            "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

            by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 08:02:53 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  I hope Pingree runs... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mark27

        This guy is a headache waiting to happen.  He already seems to be getting drunk off his perceived power.  The fact that he'd even consider caucusing with Republicans tells me everything I need to know about him.  He's Joe Lieberman - self righteous, self-entitled and wanting to be the center of attention.  

        •  He's not Joe Leiberman (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          James Allen, HoosierD42

          Though feel free to make leaps to crazy conclusions.  i think he's George W. Bush :-)

          "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

          by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:59:57 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Every Indication Is He'll Be a Pain in the Ass.... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            James Allen

            Living in a state with a centrist third party that has permanent major-party status, I recognize the holier-than-thou smugness and relishing the role of kingmaker that King seems to already be wearing on his sleeve.  I expressed aloud my concern the other day that this guy sees himself as a modern-day Martin Luther pushing the independent candidate cause to the national stage, and the comments I read on this thread seem to validate my fears.

    •  If Pingree passes (0+ / 0-)

      maybe Michaud takes another look. I would think he and King would box out the GOP and have a two way race in the fall.

      •  Michaud is a non-starter (5+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SaoMagnifico, James Allen, gabjoh, Woody, jncca

        A more centrist Dem against King won't highlight many positional differences, and king's popularity would crush Michaud.

        "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

        by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:35:47 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Personally I am devastated by the Kucinich loss. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Paleo, LordMike

    He is one of my heroes in Congress and I hope to hell he moves and runs and wins again.

    I am surprised that his loss isn't more of a feature this morning. He's been a tireless campaigner for everything so many of us believe in.

    WTF?

    Lover, fighter, dreamer

    by kate mckinnon on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:06:46 AM PST

  •  I thinkRomney lost the expectations game (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    itskevin

    more than anything else. The results seemed to basically fall as we would have expected looking at the polling, particularly the close result in OH.

    But I think, for some reason, a lot of people, including myself thought Romney would close this out yesterday, which meant a bigger win in OH and possibly a win in TN.

    •  Might be winning ugly (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SaoMagnifico

      But he's winning.  Enough to be the nominee.

      "We calmly accept our uncertain position." Joey Rathburn

      by Paleo on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:19:04 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  He did close it out (0+ / 0-)

      Just no one's noticed yet.

      When Santorum surpasses Huckabee's very distant 2nd-place delegate total from 2008 I'll worry.  He's not even close.

      "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

      by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:39:12 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  But he may not get a majority of (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        itskevin

        delegates in the primary season with the 40% he is getting right now in his wins.

        He will be the nominee, but that's not closing it out, imo.

        •  Well it is (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          jj32

          The process is waaayyyyyyyyyyy more proportional in the past, so it is.  

          When you consider that 700 of the 2200+ delegates are awarded after May 1, it would be pretty hard to close it out in any arithmetic sense by March 7 when only 700 delegates have been fought for and almost all were done in proportional states.

          "What if you're on a game show one day and the name of some random New Jersey state senator is the only thing between you and several thousand dollars? And you'll think to yourself, "if only I had clapped faster." - sapelcovits

          by rdw72777 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:53:58 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  PPP: Obama up big with moderates in Maine (9+ / 0-)

    25, Male, CA-24, DK Elections Black Caucus Chair.

    by DrPhillips on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 07:50:23 AM PST

  •  Oregon (7+ / 0-)

    Republicans failed to get any candidates on the primary ballot for State Treasurer and State AG, meaning that unless someone mounts an effective write-in campaign, they'll fail to have nominees for the positions on the general election ballot.

    Another big surprise is that Republican state senator Jason Atkinson, who was once considered a rising star, and recently began moderating a bit, especially on environmental issues, will retire from politics at least for a time.

    Dem state rep Mike Shaufler will be primaried by retiring teacher Jeff Reardon.

    Republican sate senator Chris Telfer will be primaried by former state rep Tim Knopp.

    link

    I changed by not changing at all, small town predicts my fate, perhaps that's what no one wants to see. -6.38, -4.15

    by James Allen on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 08:10:55 AM PST

  •  Obama only got 57% in Oklahoma (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Woody

    Randall Terry got 43% and will be a delegate to the convention.

    http://www.google.com/...

    Of course, Oklahoma is one of the last states Obama would win in a general election.  And George Wallace got similar marks against LBJ in the Wisconsin and Maryland primaries in '64.  LBJ went on to win 61% in the general election.

    "We calmly accept our uncertain position." Joey Rathburn

    by Paleo on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 08:11:27 AM PST

  •  DNC Chair Villaraigosa supports inclusion (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sapelcovits, tietack

    of Marriage Equality in the party platform.

    At least 22 senators and seven co-chairs of President Obama’s re-election bid have indicated their support for including marriage equality in the platform, as part of Freedom To Marry’s Democrats: Say I Do campaign. Interestingly, Villaraigosa was far more circumspect about the effort last month, telling reporters on a conference call that while he backs marriage equality, that “it’s not for me to dictate” whether that position is part of the party’s official platform.
    http://thinkprogress.org/...

    20, Dude, Chairman DKE Gay Caucus! (College IN-09) (Raised IL-03, IL-09) Tammy Baldwin and Elizabeth Warren for Senate!

    by ndrwmls10 on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 08:26:17 AM PST

  •  WI Voter ID law Judge David Flanagan (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Woody

    I know Judge David Flanagan.  Twentyish years ago I was a supervisor in a cleaning company hired to clean the Justice Department building where David Flanagan was serving as an Assistant Attorney General.  One night he brought his dog into the building when working late. While I was closing the building I turned around only to face a large Golden Retriever growling at me and baring his teeth in a very menacing manner, and he had me cornered in a row of work stations so I had to call out for help with the dog.  Later I came across a rather large "present" the dog left on the hallway carpet and I went and told Mr. Flanagan to clean up after his dog.

    Ass't AG Flanagan was really very nice about it all, he apologized profusely for the threatening behavior of his dog, and he did indeed use bathroom towels to pick up the present his dog left on the carpet.

    The back story however is that Republicans in the Assembly are now threatening to "investigate" Judge Flanagan because he signed the Walker recall petition.  I can't see how supporting a recall in any way impacts a role on the voter ID law, but the GOP is rarely accused of logical consistency when it comes to attacking the judiciary when they are not doctrinaire Conservatives actively pushing the GOP agenda.

    "My name's Dr. Multimillionaire and I kicked your ass." --Rep. Steve Kagen D-WI to Karl Rove

    by walja on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 08:41:41 AM PST

  •  Sean Trende's hackery strikes again (0+ / 0-)

    http://www.realclearpolitics.com/...

    although my deepest fear is that he is right. Should the democrats be on the offensive and do what is called a "reverse-Sailer" strategy.

    also known as "AquarianLeft" on RedRacingHorses

    by demographicarmageddon on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 09:30:56 AM PST

  •  Mean Jean lost! Alleluia! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KingofSpades

    "Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D."
    Real journalists know that lies do not bring "balance" to truth! (h/t elwior)

    by TrueBlueMajority on Wed Mar 07, 2012 at 10:13:57 AM PST

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