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Mystery Lover's Puzzle Book by Linda K. Murdock, 2007. Bellwether Books, 128 pages, paperback

This past week I finished re-reading the Lily Bard series by Charlaine Harris and The Siege by Stephen White. I had planned to write a review of the latter, but find I need to think about it some more. So there's something a little different for this week.

While at Left Coast Crime in Denver in 2008, I picked up a small paperback, the Mystery Lover's Puzzle Book. It is made of crossword puzzles, one per author. There are 29 different authors featured, including Carol O'Connell, John D. MacDonald, Walter Mosley, Robert Crais, Rhys Bowen, Michael Connelly, etc. All seem contemporary, as I've heard of them.

I thought I'd pick out a few clues, and put up the answers tomorrow.

Have fun!

John D. MacDonald

1. Main character McGee. (Travis)
2. Profession of McGee's friend Meyer. (economist)
3. Setting for the McGee books. (Florida)
4. McGee goes Rambo in The ___ Ripper. (Green)
5. McGee's Rolls Royce, Miss __. (Agnes)
6. McGee converted his Rolls to this. (truck)
7. Mcgee served in this war. (Korea)
8. Animal that best describes Meyer. (bear)
J. D. Robb
1. Dallas' best friend. (Mavis)
2. Roarke keeps this in his pocket from Dallas' old jacket. (button)
3. Beautician feared by Dallas. (Trina)
4. Setting for Dallas books. (New York)
5. Dallas' father figure, computer chief. (Feeney)
6. Dallas' snappily dressed 'coroner.' (Morse)
7. Dallas' first name. (Eve)
8. __ in Death, someone is after Roarke. (Betrayal)
Patricia Cornwell
1. Main character Kay ___. (Scarpetta)
2. Kay's favorite ethnic food. (Italian)
3. Kay's ex-husband. (Tony)
4. Kay doesn't confide in __. (anyone)
5. Kay's title. (MD)
6. What Kay pours herself into. (work)
7. Kay's niece. (Lucy)
8. Prosecuting officer who uses Kay's evidence. (DA)
Robert Crais
1. __ Cole, World's Greatest Detective. (Elvis)
2. Joe has these tattoos on his arms. (red arrows)
3. Cole served at the end of this war. (Vietnam)
4. Face on Cole's office clock. (Pinocchio)
5. Yellow sports car that Cole drives. (Corvette)
6. Lullaby ___ involves New York criminals. (Town)
7. __ Chenier, Cole's girlfriend. (Lucy)
8. Joe drives a red one.  (Jeep)
John Dunning
1. Main character __ Janeway. (Cliff)
2. Word in all titles. (book)
3. Janeway motive for murder. (love)
4. Where Janeway lives. (Denver)
5. Scifi author Wells, Janeway collectible. (H.G.)
6. A first edition Stephen __ outsells Twain. (King)
7. Janeway turned this in for a bookstore. (badge)
8. 1st edition error corrected in new editions. (point)
Sharyn McCrumb
1. Recurring character Bonesteel. (Nora)
2. Series nickname. (Ballad)
3. State setting for the books. (Tenn)
4. Martha trains to become a __. (ACE)
5. Martha and Spencer organize this event. (reunion)
6. She Walks These __ (Hills) features a small ghost.
7. Series forest setting and Native tribe. (Cherokee)
8. Spencer's job. (Sheriff)
S. J. Rozan
1. Chin's partner Bill __. (Smith)
2. City setting for the series. (NY)
3. Bill's bar drink. (bourbon)
4. Color of Chin's martial arts belt. (black)
5. Chin's term of respect to an elder. (grandfather)
6. China __ Chin seeks stolen porcelain. (Trade)
7. Name of business Bill lives over. (Shortys)
8. Instrument Bill plays. (piano)
John Sandford
1. Main character __ Davenport. (Lucas)
2. Davenport's female boss. (Rose)
3. How Davenport makes money. (Games)
4. Davenport creates __ playing fantasies. (Role)
5. What Davenport suffers from. (depression)
6. Davenport's preferred martial art. (karate)
7. Job of Davenport's wife. (DR)
8. Davenport's sidekick __ Capslock. (Del)
Please let me know if you like these clues in the comments while you tell about your own reading. As Susan will be returning, hopefully soon, I'll be doing fewer of these posts and if you enjoy these clues, I can add more.
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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (20+ / 0-)

    If you do not believe that there is an ongoing war on women, then you aren't paying attention. h/t The Pootie Potentate

    by glorificus on Mon Apr 09, 2012 at 05:00:04 PM PDT

  •  ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ (6+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    glorificus, cfk, Limelite, hazey, Aunt Pat, jarbyus

    That was my cat warming up on the keyboard - sorry+.
    He loves Monday Night Mystery Lovers.  He thinks it's toasty and cuddly.

    I recognized  the authors you mention in your diary, but I'd have to google most of the answers.  I'm in the process of updating my 2012 +journal and finding it very helpful+++++++++++++++++++++++++++ in remembering the details about the books I've read, but I only started doing that this year.

    I recently finished reading It's Classified by Nicolle Wallace.  It was all right - interesting, in some ways, but I won't seek out any more by this author.  The interesting thing is that Wallace has worked for a number of Republicans - George W. Bush, John McCain and Sarah Palin.  She has a Sarah Palin-type character who is a Democrat, although, to give her credit, she makes the character mostly sympathetic.  The Republican president, a woman - is a strong, confident intelligent woman - much more like Jennifer Granholm or Nancy Pelosi than any Republican female politicians I can think of.

    I'm reading two books now.  One is a medical thriller called The Second Opinion by Michael Palmer.  I am enjoying it a lot.  Several of the main characters are diagnosed as being somewhere on the autistic spectrum and it's interesting to read the story from their point of view.  

    I'm also reading Jane Austen and the Canterbury Tale by Stephanie Barron.  I've heard mention of her books but never picked one up before.  I'm enjoying this one, too.

    This is a joint comment by Calder and myrealname.

    •  Regarding the Jane Austen - is she just (6+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      myrealname, cfk, Limelite, hazey, Aunt Pat, jarbyus

      another character? I see books with real-life characters and I just can't get enthused about reading fiction about them.

      What is it like?

      If you do not believe that there is an ongoing war on women, then you aren't paying attention. h/t The Pootie Potentate

      by glorificus on Mon Apr 09, 2012 at 05:47:04 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  She's the main character (5+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Limelite, hazey, Aunt Pat, glorificus, jarbyus

        in the book.  Austen is living her life as a spinster and author (she's quite nonchalant about her writing - she seems to regard it as a hobby that brings in some extra cash.)  In this book, she's encountered a murder victim and, so far, is involved in and writing about the solution.  I'm not very far into the book, so I can't say much more.  I think the series is pretty much based on that premise.  I like it pretty well.  It describes her life in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

  •  I Can Only Make Headway in the JDM Clues (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, MadRuth, glorificus, Brecht

    That's about when I stopped reading serialized character mysteries.  I know notzink about any of the others.

    But the Mystery Lover's Puzzle Book is a great idea and sounds like loads of fun for you.  Which set of clues did you do best with?

    Readers & Book Lovers Pull up a chair! You're never too old to be a Meta Groupie

    by Limelite on Mon Apr 09, 2012 at 06:24:35 PM PDT

  •  Thanks for keeping the series going (6+ / 0-)

    It's a tribute to Susan, and I know we have all been thinking about her.  

    I am not a fan of any of the above authors, so I am clueless.

    I am delighted, however, with a mystery I grabbed in a hurry off the shelves of my little village library.  I do not know if 3,000 residents doth a village make, but my small town has all the elements for the perfect setting for a cozy.  And the book I grabbed is a satire on cozies.  To my surprise, it is quite engaging, the writing is excellent, and the characters, although stereotypes of those in traditional cozies, have enough depth to keep my interest.  I almost forgot to mention the title and author:  Wicked Autumn by G.M. Malliet. The back page, "Praise for Wicked Autumn," includes Louise Penny, Charles Todd, and Deborah Crombie.  The sleuth is an Anglican priest who happens to be ex-M-15, and besides being a hunk, he is humble as the apple pie served at the Autumn Fayre.  Too bad someone fed peanut laden food to Wanda Batton-Smythe. "the formidable and much-feared head of the Nether Monkslip Women's Institute."

    Again, thanks for stepping in for Susan.  

    Just waitin' around for the new Amy Winehouse album

    by jarbyus on Mon Apr 09, 2012 at 06:40:18 PM PDT

    •  My pleasure, she said today she is reading (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Brecht

      a book she wants to write about.

      The Malliet book sounds interesting.

      "Nether Monkslip?"

      If you do not believe that there is an ongoing war on women, then you aren't paying attention. h/t The Pootie Potentate

      by glorificus on Mon Apr 09, 2012 at 06:43:30 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Read all the ****** mcGees (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    glorificus

    but it's been awhile, so I can't answer all of them.  Love the John  Dunnings. I think he lives in Denver. Bookman is in all the titles. Stephen Crane outsells Twain.?

    If the Republicans ever find out that Barack Obama favors respiration, we'll be a one-party system inside two minutes. - Alan Lewis

    by MadRuth on Mon Apr 09, 2012 at 06:45:50 PM PDT

  •  Also,too (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    glorificus

    Travis McGee had a houseboat named "The Busted Flush", because he won it in a poker game with that hand. I don't recall a Rolls.

    If the Republicans ever find out that Barack Obama favors respiration, we'll be a one-party system inside two minutes. - Alan Lewis

    by MadRuth on Mon Apr 09, 2012 at 06:59:35 PM PDT

  •  Dorothy L. Sayers (5+ / 0-)

    ...wrote a Lord Peter Wimsey short story in which a crossword puzzle is an important clue to a mystery.  And being Sayers, she actually created the whole crossword puzzle and it is a beastly tricky one to boot.

    "All the World's a Stage and Everyone's a Critic." -- Mervyn Alquist

    by quarkstomper on Mon Apr 09, 2012 at 07:50:54 PM PDT

  •  glorificus, I second the thanks.. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    glorificus, jolux

    to you for helping out Susan. I never fail to find an interesting new book to read when I am here.

    Currently I am reading the Meg Langslow series by Donna Andrews. I read two from later in the series, The Real Macaw and The Penguin Who Knew Too Much. They are so funny I decided to start at the beginning and do the whole series.

    Diaries are funny things Sam. Type one letter and you never know where you might end up. My apologies to J.R.R. Tolkien.

    by Caddis Fly on Mon Apr 09, 2012 at 08:41:20 PM PDT

    •  I LOVE Meg Langslow!!!! Expecially her Dad! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Caddis Fly

      I read them in order. We'll Always have Parrots is set at a sci-fi convention and is a real hoot. Owl's Well That Ends Well details their new house and is also fun. The martial arts one - Crouching Buzzard (?) is set mostly at her brother Rob's firm and is quite bizarre.

      Her extended family on her mom's side has lots of interesting characters. I think it's an excellent series.

      If you do not believe that there is an ongoing war on women, then you aren't paying attention. h/t The Pootie Potentate

      by glorificus on Mon Apr 09, 2012 at 09:27:26 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  After the above post... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        glorificus

        I finished Murder with Peacocks an started Murder with Puffins. I'm glad it is a long series since these are excellent fun.

        Someone posted a list last week that had the winners of some mystery writers humor category and at top of the list was The Real Macaw. That got me started.

        Diaries are funny things Sam. Type one letter and you never know where you might end up. My apologies to J.R.R. Tolkien.

        by Caddis Fly on Mon Apr 09, 2012 at 10:13:23 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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