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An entry in How To Be Poor

As has likely been noticed by regular readers (and unnoticed by approximately the entire world) the How To Be Poor series on voluntary poverty has not seen a new entry in over two months. In the last post in the series, Ending Our Exuberance, I wrote of my intention to address some of the ways in which I would have to manage a new living situation so as not to fall into the traps of an overly abundant lifestyle, instead staying focused on my attempts to scale back my life and live within modest means. I planned to write about ways to craft the context of my living so as to assist me in my goals, making that the subject of the next few posts in the series.

A few occurrences have conspired to keep me from that goal, however. First of all, I find I need more time to figure out something of a coherent philosophy and set of behaviors for how to live well on the grid. I've been spending some time thinking on this, but I'm not yet ready to write any particularly helpful posts in that regard. Furthermore, as I noted in my last post, I recently slipped into some bad habits and a resulting mental funk that has distracted me from my blog and some of the behavioral goals the blog is about. That accounted for much of my quiet over the last few weeks. However, it also has provided me the opportunity to think about the subject of distractions and habits and how they relate to my attempt to live a simpler life. And so, being an opportunist, I want to recalibrate the current thrust of this series to address the topic of distraction.

This isn't a complete reversal from the previous topic of context, as distraction is a part of the context of my current living situation. Of course, distraction has been available at every place I've lived--the difference lies in what kinds of distraction are available and prevalent. Ultimately, the reality of distraction comes down not to the specific place I'm living, but my own behavior and mentality. The simple truth is that I tend toward distraction, in ways that can border on, and even slip into, addiction. I've known this about myself for awhile now. For instance, I spent a good chunk of my childhood addicted to television, consuming it for hours on end and losing much my life to the flickering images of easy emotional comfort. I grew overweight and depressed watching TV, which tended to reinforce my addiction. It wasn't until I started to play basketball that I began to watch less (but still plenty of) TV and dropped quite a bit of weight, playing myself into a healthier state.

Coincidentally, basketball is my current distraction. Not playing it, though, but watching it on TV--which is available in the place I'm living. The NBA playoffs are in full swing and I've been watching them for a month now. Anyone who happens to be familiar with the NBA knows that, up until the championship series, there is generally one or more games on every single night. And while I certainly haven't watched every game, I've watched enough that I've given a majority of nights over to this particular distraction.

While I don't consider watching basketball a sin of the highest degree, it is most certainly a distraction from the multitude of goals I have for myself this year, particularly with the gardening season in full swing. I work two jobs (though even between the two, they don't make for a full 40 hour work week) and am trying to get a large garden going. I'm also writing this blog and aiming to get a full compliment of homesteading activities in place. Add into all that my propensity for reading, a desire for semi-regular socializing, the urge to revive my fiction writing, household chores, cooking, and the fact that I'm the sort of person who enjoys and benefits from a decent amount of rest or recreational time to think and reflect, and I'm looking at a mighty busy schedule--provided I follow through at least somewhat on all these goals. Such a schedule requires not just a general lack of significant distraction, but also an avoidance of negative, patterned behavior.

Except that significant distraction and negative, patterned behavior is exactly what I've provided myself throughout much of the last month.

Watching basketball most nights not only took away from the various aforementioned activities, but worked to slip me into a pattern of negative behavior that saw me actively avoiding much of that work. I still did my regular jobs, of course, and kept up with my obligations to others, but the work that depended on my own personal motivation began to fall by the wayside. Aside from watching basketball, I spent more time clicking around aimlessly on the internet. I started to fall into a trap that I know too well, in which I shirk certain duties for a bit too long, causing me to then double down and avoid them out of guilt for having not already taken care of them. It's a bad pattern of behavior to get into and I fell head on into it.

Now, before I roundly flog myself, I will note that I did accomplish some things. I worked up a couple beds in the hoop house and planted tomatoes. I started to go up to the farm I lived at last year for some socializing with newly arrived WWOOFers. My work hours picked up a bit. But there still were many days with multiple free hours during which I could have done more work on the garden or experimented with some homesteading, written posts for my blog, responded more readily to comments, did some reading, or revived my long-dormant fiction writing ways. There was no shortage of productive work I could have been doing; just a shortage of motivation to do it.

This is an interesting phenomenon to think about. I don't think I'm particularly alone here in America in falling into this trap. While I know plenty of people who are much better at getting to work than I am, I also have seen countless others who lose an incredible number of hours to television or the internet, video games, movies or other distracting media. At the risk of sounding like a broken record--but keeping within the theme of my blog and this series of posts--I can't help but see the tie to an overabundant lifestyle. Much as it's bizarre to speak of voluntary poverty as a challenge, it's a bit bizarre to speak of doing the work that needs to be done as a challenge. This isn't because work can't be hard--it certainly can be, though it can also be invigorating and joyous--but because we live in an overly abundant society in which distractions are available and pervasive. Furthermore, we live in a society in which we are cultured to partake in these distractions at every possible point, and at the expense of a more meaningful and satisfying life. This is bizarre not just because of its ability to disconnect us from good work and good living, but also because it's rooted in an abundant wealth that provides the possibility of our turning away from the necessary work of making our living, instead outsourcing it to the industrial economy.

That's odd. Every other animal goes about making itself a basic living and acting out fairly natural behaviors. Humans, on the other hands--in recent centuries--have gained access to amazing amounts of temporary wealth and resources and used that odd happenstance to specialize to an unprecedented degree and plunge a significant percentage of the population into a life that centers, as much as anything, around manufactured distraction. The circus is forever in town and we're handed a loaf of bread and a ticket to the main event each day after our allotted work schedule. Our agency plummets, our unease rises, and society crows about how all its ducks are in a row, even as the ducks teeter and topple. Every night the circus tent looks a bit more ragged and the loaf of bread is smaller, but we continue to watch the ever-more-chaotic show.

How odd, then, that as I write my blog about skipping the circus, breaking away from the allotted work schedule and at least occasionally baking your own bread, I found myself suddenly spending more and more nights at the circus, unhappy and disappointed in myself, yet still somehow enthralled by the spectacle. It's nothing new for me; I've spent much my life vacillating between activities that are a distraction from larger goals and the necessary work of achieving those goals.

It's been a long road for me, getting away from the spectacle and distraction, and I'm only partway down it. I take occasional detours. I get discouraged by the long haul and at times explore a side path, even if I know I need to stay focused on the long term goal. Not to mention--and I'm going to be talking about this more down the line--I live in this house alone and it's hard not having a partner to help keep me on track. I'm most effective in keeping my obligations to others. When I have only to keep an obligation to myself, I'm far more likely to fail. I think that reality grows out of feedback patterns as much as anything else. I don't tend toward having a dominant will. It shows up at times, granted--I can get on a tear under the right conditions--but I'm far more likely to go with the flow, to move within the current. That makes this path much harder, as the cultural and societal current is very much going in the opposite direction from where I want to go.

That's why it's important for me to craft a different sort of life, featuring different pillars of support and encouragement than our standard society offers. I need others around me who understand and at least somewhat support what I'm doing. I need the natural feedback that the land and the seasons offer. I need those glorious moments of accomplishment that confirm the beauty and necessity of what I'm doing. I need sunny and warm days, or enthralling storms, or the quiet doings of the many other creatures around me, always somewhere within my view, ready to remind me of what's real and honest and important. I need nights of good socialization, with drinks and campfires and home cooked pizzas and the ease of a night on the farm, the soft glory of a warm summer evening, laughter and shared experience and a place where this life is normal, not bizarre and contradictory.

I also may need, on occasion, the promise and opportunity of a 90 by 40 foot patch of tilled earth staring me in the face. As I wrote in the last post, it was the sudden and unexpected sight of that soil on a warm and sunny day a couple weeks ago that brought me back to a good place. The farmer within me responded with a surprising ferocity and I grew giddy at the thought of what I might be able to do with that gardening space. Since then, I've planted potatoes, lettuce, chard, kale, cabbage, broccoli, spinach, parsley--and I keep adding more tomato plants in the hoop house and will soon be getting in peppers, summer and winter squash, a couple globe artichokes, basil, direct-seeded carrots and beets and, well, so much more. I'm a bit slow going on the garden, but every time I get out there and work on it, it brings me a joy and confirmation and sense of purpose that just resonates throughout me. It's so, so good. It's so much better than an evening spent watching basketball.

However, I'm still doing that on occasion. Should I? I don't know--it's debatable. But I'm watching the Western Conference Finals, which is playing every other night. On Tuesday, I watched it after a long day of building fence and hauling wood, followed up by a few garden maintenance activities. It felt earned at that point and I watched without guilt. Yet, at the same time, my intention to write this post after the game ended gave way to the fatigue brought on by the long day of work. If I had skipped the game, I likely would have finished this post and had it up Tuesday evening. So there are trade offs.

Yet the distractions aren't going to go away anytime soon. Much of it may yet go away in my lifetime, but I'm not going to get the easy out of all these societal distractions suddenly no longer being available. I'm going to have to either make them more unavailable to me or become better at avoiding them, at choosing the good and necessary work. Or I'm going to have to fail in my goals. These really are my options and I think they're the options for many people attempting a path similar to mine.

Voluntary poverty, voluntary simplicity, a simpler way of living, a life lived with less resources--whatever you want to call it, it necessarily involves a lot of work, much of which is not sanctioned by our society. It's the sort of good work that the media-based distractions so prevalent in our society are designed to lead us away from. A life with more agency, more community, and more good work is a life that leads one to spend less, to be less dependent on the industrial economy, and to tend toward a greater degree of self-determination and, I dare say, a greater degree of skepticism toward the so-called leaders in our society. There's a reason that all this distraction exists: it serves the existing power structures well. That's not to say it's a vast conspiracy, as I don't believe it is. It's just that there's money to be made, a system to be maintained, and power to be held onto and the various distractions available to us in America and in many other industrialized nations serve those goals. They arise naturally out of the system.

As such, any attempt to live one's life in a scaled back and more self-sufficient manner is going to necessarily involve divesting oneself of many of those distractions. They reinforce behavioral and thought patterns that are antithetical to voluntary poverty and consistently reinforce the values of a society that is actively hostile to such a life. I speak from way too much experience on this topic. In the coming weeks, I'm going to use that experience to explore some of the ways in which our society offers up distraction, how we can go about avoiding those distractions, and how we can turn the natural desires and needs that those distractions target away from the destructive fulfillment that society at large offers and toward a more human-centered set of behaviors. I'll be exploring different forms of media, what they've become in our industrial society, and in what ways they might serve as a healthy part of a community. Then I'll be turning this all back to an exploration of the necessity of human community in a world of restricted wealth and resources.

That's the goal, anyway. We'll see how many detours and side paths I discover on my way there.

(Cross-posted from my blog, Of The Hands.)

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lorikeet, Burned

    Of The Hands - Thoughts on voluntary poverty, homesteading, farming, reconnecting to the land, doing good work, and muddling through the new no-growth economy.

    by aimlessmind on Thu May 31, 2012 at 01:50:09 PM PDT

  •  I have really enjoyed everything I remember (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    aimlessmind

    reading of yours. You get me jazzed up. And I SO know about the distraction addiction. And the guilt. And the distraction from the guilt, etc.

    Carry on, I can't wait for more. Even if it is a distraction of sorts. :)

    Here is the truth: The Earth is round; Saddam Hussein did not attack us on 9/11; Elvis is dead; Obama was born in the United States; and the climate crisis is real. It is time to act. - Al Gore

    by Burned on Thu May 31, 2012 at 02:20:57 PM PDT

    •  Thanks, Burned! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Burned

      I really appreciate that--it does mean a lot to me to think I might inspire a few people.

      The distraction and guilt cycle can be so tiring and ridiculous. I understand how it works for me a bit more every year, though, and so I'm slowly getting some kind of handle on it. Certainly, it doesn't cycle like it once did, so that's good.

      Aside from understanding, the other key I find is to not be too hard on myself, while still recognizing shortcomings and working to become better. It's surprising how tricky a balancing act I can find that.

      Of The Hands - Thoughts on voluntary poverty, homesteading, farming, reconnecting to the land, doing good work, and muddling through the new no-growth economy.

      by aimlessmind on Thu May 31, 2012 at 02:26:35 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I can really relate to how you felt (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        aimlessmind

        sitting down to a game after a hard days work, how much better that feels, than if you had not accomplished so much beforehand. Pleasure without guilt. You'd think it would be more a powerful "drug" from the get go.

        I'm in the process of training myself on that during my summers off. For most of the year I work close to 60 hours a week, and dream about what I will do every summer. Things I end up not doing so often.

        Here is the truth: The Earth is round; Saddam Hussein did not attack us on 9/11; Elvis is dead; Obama was born in the United States; and the climate crisis is real. It is time to act. - Al Gore

        by Burned on Thu May 31, 2012 at 02:33:57 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yeah, if I've accomplished a good amount (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Burned

          I don't worry too much about taking a couple hours off, assuming it's not keeping me from doing too much more. And particularly if it's every couple days, say, rather than every single night.

          I'm quite familiar with dreaming up lots of plans and then only following through on a few of them. It's a terminal condition for me. I'm getting better at it, though.

          Anyway, I'm off to seed some starts, before tonight's game begins.

          Of The Hands - Thoughts on voluntary poverty, homesteading, farming, reconnecting to the land, doing good work, and muddling through the new no-growth economy.

          by aimlessmind on Thu May 31, 2012 at 02:42:40 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Taping NBA games, especially (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    aimlessmind, cassandracarolina

    playoff games, makes a ton of sense. The timeouts are endless, and there are also the instant replays and other interminable pauses. If you fast-forward through all that (and free throws), you can watch the whole thing in less than an hour.

    •  Though I can save you even that (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      aimlessmind

      amount of time by letting you know that the Heat are not going to be denied this year.

      •  No offense (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        doc2

        But I think the Spurs are going to deny them. Their ball movement is just astounding. :)

        Anyway, taping would certainly help if I'm going to watch the games, but I don't have a good set up for it. At this point, though, it's not far from over anyway, and I feel okay with watching the rest of the WCF and the Finals while being otherwise productive.

        Back in the day, when I watched far more TV and had a different set up, I had a DVR and used that for basketball games. It really does cut them pretty much in half if you can fast forward through the commercials and many of the play stoppages.

        Of The Hands - Thoughts on voluntary poverty, homesteading, farming, reconnecting to the land, doing good work, and muddling through the new no-growth economy.

        by aimlessmind on Thu May 31, 2012 at 02:39:56 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Spurs are awesome. (0+ / 0-)

          But they are a bit old, and I think that will be the difference. If Bosh is not back, I think they (the Spurs) have a decent chance. If he's healthy, the Heat are like from another planet they're so good.

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