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The never ending development of nuclear energy appears to be, well, never ending. Seems this diaryist (dariest? What?) is right...the future of electrical generation appears to be quite the stew pot. You name it and the nations of the world are developing it, or want to, or plan to. Anyway...the other items noted in the subject is Bangladesh. This one I actually expect to come to fruition as they are quite well along in setting up their safety regime.

On the other hand they also are building dangerous natural gas turbines as well. Oh well. Only proves my point. A diary on how nuclear in it's various creative forms can provide 100% of our energy needs will be on it's way. Until them:

Nigeria signed a cooperation accord with Russia towards the construction of its first nuclear power plant today at the AtomExpo event in Moscow. Bangladesh also furthered its work with Russia and South African officials were in attendance.

Nigeria signed a cooperation accord with Russia towards the construction of its first nuclear power plant today at the AtomExpo event in Moscow. Bangladesh also furthered its work with Russia and South African officials were in attendance.

Rosatom chief Sergei Kiriyenko signed a memorandum of understanding with the chairman of the Nigerian Atomic Energy Commission, Franklin Erepamo Osaisai. Its terms will see the two countries "prepare a comprehensive program of building nuclear power plants in Nigeria," including the development of infrastructure and a framework and system of regulation for nuclear and radiation safety.

It was noted that one of the most important areas for cooperation was to establish the proper educational structure for Nigerian professional skills in nuclear physics and energy. The country is seen as one of the most serious and promising to be exploring the future use of nuclear energy. In 2010 Nigeria said it aimed to have 1000 MWe of nuclear generation in place by 2019 with another 4000 MWe online by 2030. Increasing power production is a major priority in order to end the unreliability of power supply that millions of people suffer, while adding non-fossil generation also would allow Nigeria to capitalise on exports of liquified natural gas.

Another country that has been cooperating with Russia on its road to employing nuclear power is Bangladesh and Kiriyenko also used AtomExpo as the public event to announce two new memorandums with that country. One concerned the setting-up of a public information centre in Bangladesh which it is hoped will raise the profile of nuclear work in civil society and among young people; the other was a mutual agreement on nuclear training that included sending a 'pilot group' of Bangladeshi students to Russian institutions. Signing both of these for Bangladesh was the minister for science and technology, Yafesh Osman.
Opening ceremony

AtomExpo takes the form of an exhibition showcase of the Russian industry with side events and forums covering current topics. Officially opening the event today, Kiriyenko noted the attendance of 1300 people representing regular and new exhibitors. He said "the nuclear world is coming back to normal development" one year on from the shock of the Fukushima accident, adding that Rosatom's order book had doubled in the last year. This bore witness to "the high degree of trust in our industry," he said, because "strategic partnerships are the keystone" of an industry with product that remain in operation for 60 to 80 years.

Another country in discussions with Russia about its nuclear future is South Africa, which is developing plans for a build programme of about 9.6 GWe of new nuclear capacity starting from 2024. Attending AtomExpo and speaking at the opening ceremony was Dipuo Peters, the country's minsiter of energy.

Although South Africa already employs nuclear energy, Peters summarised the situation for many nations when she explained how the "ferocious appetite" for energy "requires the use of all sources of available to mankind." It is our colleactive duty, she said, "to make sure energy is provided in a safe, affordable and secure manner."

Peters urged the manufacturers present to consider their role in creating "meaningful employment" in countries to which they export. She added that the Nuclear Industry Association of South Africa (NIASA) has held joint workshops on Russian technology opportunities.

This relationship was expanded today by an agreement between Rosatom and the Nuclear Energy Corporation of South Africa (Necsa) to "elaborate joint business projects in such areas as the production and marketing of medical isotopes, nuclear fuel fabrication and the production of power equipment." This was signed in the presence of Kiriyenko and Peters by Necsa executive director Mapula Letsoalo and RuSat overseas CEO Alexei Kalinin.

Researched and written
by World Nuclear News

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (5+ / 0-)

    Dr. Isaac Asimov: "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny ...'"

    by davidwalters on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 09:17:53 AM PDT

  •  Japan: Minamisoma City Counselor Sends "SOS" (4+ / 0-)

    Sadly, it's no longer possible to have a conversation about nuclear power without mentioning Fukushima.  And the Fukushima debacle continues to escalate, with no end in sight.

    The Fukushima I megaplex has been likened to a "war zone", with massive, unimaginable destruction to the reactors and spent fuel pools.  This massive destruction includes heavy damage to the 4700 metric tons of nuclear material at the site, some of which has been burned, or else been leaked into the ocean or scattered around the countryside.

    And this contamination of the surrounding area and the oceans, all the way to Tokyo and beyond, continues to get worse each and every day.

    Here is one example, where a Minamisoma city councilman reports in on the extreme contamination occurring in the area:

    A Message from Koichi Oyama

    I am now making a map with becquerel of algae types.
    Near the end of this week with 100 samples,
    On the Sea of Japan side : Yamagata, Niigata, Toyama, Ishikawa  
    On the Pacific side : Miyagi, Fukushima, Ibaraki, Chiba, Tokyo, Gunma, Tochigi
    I plan to bring together the informations of the widespread area.

    This biological concentration is one of the environmental indication.
    This is an element which is as dangerous as the level of elevated concentration of radioactive isotope which have not been imagined or have been ignored daringly.

    The clearance level of ICRP for cesium 134 and cesium 137 are 100 becquerels / Kg.

    But in Minamisoma City and in Fukushima Prefecture, there's 100,0000 becquerels that are left uncontrolled.
    And there's a danger that children step up on it and they also may touch it.

    Although I went to see the police so many times to talk about it and also talked to public health institute and talked with the city administration every time my demand were just refused.

    Please send out SOS signals to the world!

    Thank you for your help.

    Koichi Oyama

    One hopes that the people in Africa, and davidwalters as well, will listen to these incredible lessons on "nuclear power" coming from Fukushima.
    •  yes but have you? (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      gzodik, northstarbarn, FG, NNadir

      What is the solution? Do you propose one? The people of Ohi have voted to restart their reactors. Why don't you listen to them?

      The point is to prevent these sorts of events from happening again...not crying about them so Japan can then start importing it's highest levels, EVER, of fossil fuels, which will cause far more death than the 'figures' presented by the his Honor above. I would suggest you read NNadir's diary on the fear of radiation in tuna to get a better handle on what these actual results really mean...and don't.

      So, BACK TO AFRICA....clearly others reject the fear mongering going on with Fukushima and intend to build nuclear power plants that are safer by far, sited more smartly than those built in Japan. If Japan had replaced these plants with their modern Gen III plants we wouldn't be having YOUR discussion on Fukushima...we would be discussing Nigeria, Bangladesh and Russia.

      Dr. Isaac Asimov: "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny ...'"

      by davidwalters on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 10:01:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  as politically unstable as (4+ / 0-)

    some nations are, I don't see this as a good thing.

    On the otherhand these same nations are just damming rivers for cheap hydro power too.

    I'm struck by how the meanest, cruelest, nastiest people brag about how they live in a Christian nation. It's rather telling.

    by terrypinder on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 10:01:24 AM PDT

    •  Follow the money, always. FREE ENERGY anyone? (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bincbom, ozsea1, splashy

      We the people have paid enough...

      No crying here David - your GIG is UP
      ... now go CLEAN UP your POISON MESS.

      Pay for it with your poison profit - instead of taxpayers for a change!
      No nukes.  Ever.

      People REFUSE to no longer become "collateral damage" for the 1% ripping us off, then dumping poison on us.
      NO.

      You and your pro-nuke poison are NOT immune to the terrible effects that you have sown.  Get real - protect the earth's environment for future generations, for a welcome change. eh?

      In other words, all beings and phenomena exist or occur because of their relationship with other beings and phenomena, and nothing in either the human or the nonhuman world exists in isolation.

      All things are mutually related to and interdependent with all other things. They all form a great cosmos maintaining the rhythms of life.
      http://www.sgi-usa.org/...

      •  This diary is for *SCIENCE* based discussions (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        gzodik, FG, alain2112

        without hyperbole and faith-based libels.

        Please refer to the DIARY here and stop cross posting the same s*it from your other commentaries.

        Dr. Isaac Asimov: "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny ...'"

        by davidwalters on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 10:51:35 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  if i were predicting (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ozsea1, gzodik

        i'd say nuclear power is here to stay, for the next 40 years or so, in some form or another. and i say this as a fencesitter who leans opponent. "the people" are notoriously distractable.

        i'm of course typing this on a computer powered by coal energy, which is equally as poisonous and much more far reaching, and is undergoing an expansion with other fossil fuels as Germany and Japan abandon nuclear power (which I note is notoriously left out of diaries that tout the awesomeness that are Germany and Japan for abandoning nuclear power. It's great they did. They replaced it, or are replacing it, right now, largely with fossil fuels. It's what will happen here if and when we close the nuclear plants that exist and that is a fact.)

        I'm struck by how the meanest, cruelest, nastiest people brag about how they live in a Christian nation. It's rather telling.

        by terrypinder on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 10:56:58 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  good thoughtful comment, Terry (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Russgirl, splashy, bincbom

          I suggest shifting oil and nuclear subsidies to alt energy, and rebuild America.

          The nuke industrial complex is not cost-effective when one or more reactors have another "accident".

          And they will, David. No spin will obviate that.

          "What have you done for me, lately?" ~ Lady Liberty

          by ozsea1 on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 11:46:04 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  i'm on david's side here btw (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            jam, FG

            he's long advocated a mix of energy creation. his just includes nuclear. sometimes i agree with it, sometimes i don't.

            The US will be using a lot of natural gas. It does already as we slowly phase out coal. there's a glut in the market, and I forecast it will get used for power projection. this unfortunately means more gas extraction.

            I think renewables are great but good luck getting a Congress or most state legislatures that'll support subsidizing this industry. That is what we need to focus on, other than just saying "I wish we'd do this."

            I'm struck by how the meanest, cruelest, nastiest people brag about how they live in a Christian nation. It's rather telling.

            by terrypinder on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 12:02:51 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  power generation (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              jam, ozsea1

              not projection. lol. i'm in two different diaries.

              I'm struck by how the meanest, cruelest, nastiest people brag about how they live in a Christian nation. It's rather telling.

              by terrypinder on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 12:03:31 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  Not my concern re who's "side" you're on (0+ / 0-)

              FFs should be used to buy time while we get other power generation tech online, then ween us off, like the oil and coal addicts that we are.

              Nat gas? Great stuff, except for the CO2 ( which can be sequestered ) and extractive fracking, the flammable drinking water etc etc.

              Nuclear tech has a promising future, but not in its current business model.

              "What have you done for me, lately?" ~ Lady Liberty

              by ozsea1 on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 02:02:11 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  i know about that (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            FG

            i also know about their solar industry. it's great. and it's growing.

            i also know that when they closed their nuclear plants, they replaced a great deal of that baseload with fossil fuels.

            I'm struck by how the meanest, cruelest, nastiest people brag about how they live in a Christian nation. It's rather telling.

            by terrypinder on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 12:33:00 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  what exactly is it that you know about? (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              splashy, Russgirl

              the diary shows data from 2010 to 2011 where the "great deal of that baseload with fossil fuels" is shown to be 0.07%.

              •  er (0+ / 0-)

                link

                (from 2011)

                last data i saw from after the first phase outs indicates 55% of germany's electricty comes from coal. it is true that renewables is growing. i've never said otherwise. I hope that it meets the demands needed (with obvious new energy efficiency technology standards, which i support btw) by the time the final phaseouts occur by 2021.

                I'm struck by how the meanest, cruelest, nastiest people brag about how they live in a Christian nation. It's rather telling.

                by terrypinder on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 01:05:54 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Yes, i agree with it. One of the reasons for (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  gzodik

                  this cognitive disconnect, I think, is that first, Greens, etc don't ever in Germany want to talk about the rise of natural gas and coal there. The media, which is totally pro-renewables (it's very profitable, obviously, with the feedin tariffs) doesn't much talk about it either.

                  Germany gets its power from COAL and don't ever think they don't. They get an increasing share of it from gas and from renewables.

                  People get all excited about 3hours of solar energy for a day or two and it's like the world changed.

                  But, hey...what about those Nigerian. Also South Africans (which as two reactors). Ghana too is considering nuclear and just set up their own NRC to develop guidelines.

                  Dr. Isaac Asimov: "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny ...'"

                  by davidwalters on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 01:16:27 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  my feeling on Africa (3+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    jam, splashy, Russgirl

                    is similar to what they did in lieu of setting up expensive landline telephone networks: go cellular.

                    Why go nuclear at all? For rural regions, wouldn't solar be more cost effective? Especially for nations that might actually be stable, like Ghana, but are hamstrung by the world bank and whatnot.

                    I'm struck by how the meanest, cruelest, nastiest people brag about how they live in a Christian nation. It's rather telling.

                    by terrypinder on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 01:34:43 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  I think it is fine for them to pursue it (0+ / 0-)

                      but it is realistically a decade out for the cities and who know how long for the countryside. They can deploy solar and wind in a matter of days.

                      •  I agree. At least. but it's a start. (0+ / 0-)

                        The UAE, with more resources, actually is quite on track for their first of what maybe 8 or 10 reactors. They've moved the quickest of new countries that are planning nuclear. And, like people immune to lobbying, are building all sorts of interesting things like "Solar City" and other projects (of course they want to market their discoveries but it's still interesting).

                        The UAE, which did intensive studies of their energy future, in fact decided that renewables in no way could meet their needs but found a place for it as a supplemental source of energy (solar PV, mostly). That's fine. I don't object.

                        David

                        Dr. Isaac Asimov: "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny ...'"

                        by davidwalters on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 01:48:23 PM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                  •  yes, david (0+ / 0-)

                    don't let the facts get in the way of your narrative. Renewables increased by 20 TWh last year in Germany and gas decreased by 3 TWh, but they are JOINED at the hip, yes sir, JOINED at the hip. Apparently negative is the new positive? an increasing share from gas?

                    I think that they made a poor decision to close their nuclear power plants, but that doesn't change the facts that they are managing to pull it off with a surprisingly small increase in coal, less gas, and less oil.

                    •  Yes, they are. The decline of gas use (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      gzodik

                      is episodic at best. It's up HUGELY from 5 or 6 years ago. There is no storage and wind itself can't back up solar as it's intermittent as well. If Germany's economy actually expands (which is doubtful but it might happen as they are in the best shape in Europe) then any gains will get wiped out.

                      Dr. Isaac Asimov: "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny ...'"

                      by davidwalters on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 01:51:46 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

      •  Pitiful. (0+ / 0-)

        An unwitting tool of the real poisoners of this planet.

        GOP: Bankers, billionaires, suckers, and dupes.

        by gzodik on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 11:20:04 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Shorter Russgirl: (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        alain2112

        OMG ATOMZZ!!!!!!!

        •  Nope, just "basic American common sense". (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          splashy

          Don't spoil your nest, eh?  

          Einstein "got it" and came out against nukes in his book.  

          •    "A human being is part of the whole, called by us 'universe,' limited in time and space.

          He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest – a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness.

          This delusion is a prison, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons close to us.  

          Our task must be to free ourselves from our prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all humanity and the whole of nature in its beauty."
           – Albert Einstein

  •  More Myths About Nuclear Power: Debunked (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ozsea1, Russgirl, splashy

    In this presentation Hiroaki Koide from the Reactor Research Institute at Kyoto University reveals the horrific consequences of nuclear power.  He notes that already an area of about 20,000 square kilometers in Japan is unfit for human habitation, and that this area should be a "radiation control area" according to Japanese law.

    It's all about the consequences.

    •  Really, at levels that by ALL experts show (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      gzodik, FG

      is totally safe? Such nonsense is criminal. I'm glad the "let us go home" movement is slowly beginning to take off there.

      At any rate, interesting that Nigeria and Bangladesh, as the diary shows, rejects these unfounded assumptions.

      Again, if you come to this diary, respect it and answer questions when they are poised to you. What are YOUR solutions to make nuclear safer?

      Dr. Isaac Asimov: "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny ...'"

      by davidwalters on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 11:23:11 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  ACCOUNTABILITY Is Where It Starts, David Walters (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ozsea1, Russgirl, splashy

        It's time for YOU, David Walters, to be accountable for what has happened with nuclear power.  You are one of the ones responsible for the ongoing Fukushima disaster, by sowing your lies and downplaying the dangers.

        Even Dr. Hiroaki Koide, a nuclear scientist himself, says:

        Awareness of our own responsibilities

        Who is responsible for the Fukushima No. 1 Accident?

        o The state (the Diet and the government
        o TEPCO
        o The nuclear industry
        o The mass media
        o The judiciary
        o The scientists promoting NPP's

        Please see page 15 of the presentation.

        It is time for you to accept real responsibility for what has happened, and to take responsibility for your part in it.  Quite simply, many of the claims you've made about nuclear power have been false.  Now it's time for you to start being REAL about nuclear power and to stop misleading people - here and elsewhere, but especially here.

        •  DITTO! David has eyes but "does not see"? (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          splashy, bincbom
        •  Not really. It's time for YOU to account (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          gzodik, alain2112

          for the fact that you spend all of your time sorting through oodles and oddles of "scientists" to find one outlier and present it has scientifically valid.

          And then YOU could ACCOUNT for the fact that as always, you're supremely disinterested, as always, no matter how time we confront your fear, superstition and ignorance, in the 3.3 million people who die each year from air pollution.

          Half of them are under 5?

          By the way, since you're so intent on showing us lurid photographs of people injured 67 years ago at Hiroshima, how come you never give us any photographs of people burned by napalm, or in gasoline housefires?

          I'll tell you why.   BECAUSE.  YOU.  DON'T.  FUCKING.  CARE.

          Anti-nukes cannot and should not be taken seriously, not scientifically, not technically and above all not morally..

          They are all obsessive compulsives.   Thank goodness that Africans don't give a rat's ass about what these poor examples of Western humanity think.

      •  Respect "my" question David. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        splashy

        I have asked repeatedly...

        What are you going to do - and how will you clean up the poison mess your industry makes and continues to spew in this on-going DISASTER.  

        Answer the question.

        Adm. Hyman Rickover, “father of the nuclear navy,” came out against nuclear power near the end of his life:
        “I do not believe that nuclear power is worth it if it creates radiation. . . . Every time you produce radiation, you produce something that has a certain half-life, in some cases for billions of years.
        I think the human race is going to wreck itself, and it is important that we get control of this horrible force and try to eliminate it.”
        •  Stop beating your boyfriend? What (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          gzodik

          kind of nonsense quesiton is this. The responsibility of Fukushima is TEPCOs. Are you flying off to China to clean up the huge hazeroudess waste mess YOU are responsible for from all those solar cell factories unregulated dumping thousands of tons of POISON?

          See, Russgirl, I don't expect answers to stupid questions. it is simply a dumb game of bait and switch. I expect a serious discussion, which even Bibcom has at least tried to use. you repeat yourself adnausium and you've become an embarrassment.

          I'm willing to discuss nuclear energy and renewables and the future of the human species, I'm not willing to ask asshole comments from you over my personal 'responsibility' that you assign to someone over their position on some question.

          Dr. Isaac Asimov: "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny ...'"

          by davidwalters on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 12:52:25 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Well...on Rickover...not...! (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          gzodik, alain2112

          Friends:

          Here is what Ted Rockwell, who actually worked with Rickover, had to say about this with the FULL context:

          I promised to respond to the questions on Rickover’s statement to Congress that we should abandon nuclear technology. It’s a mixed bag, but not inscrutable. Here’s my view of it.

          On Jan 28,1982, immediately after being fired at the age of 82, by a vengeful SecNav, with the concurrence of several other officers and officials with a variety of motivations, Rickover was called to present his views on “Economics of Defense Policy” before the Joint Economic Committee. Actually, only President Reagan could fire him, because he was an official in the AEC, “with additional duties in the Navy.”

          His testimony is published in a 205-page congressional report (and that’s just “Part 1″ of six.). In all those small-print, single-spaced pages, there are only a few sentences, on pages 60 and 61, mentioning abandoning nuclear technology. The subject of the testimony is economics, and this is the Joint Economic Committee. In the first paragraph headed “Nuclear Reactor Safety,” Senator Proxmire opens with the question:

          “In view of the experience with Three Mile Island and the other accidents and mishaps, do you believe that civilian nuclear reactors can be operated safely?”

          To which Rickover answers “Absolutely, sir.”

          On page 60, under “Need for Nuclear Energy,” Rickover says, “Ultimately, we will need nuclear power because we are exhausting our non-renewable energy resources; that is, coal and oil.” Then he diverts to the subject of radiation and the need to control it. And then, “There are, of course, many other things mankind is doing which, in the broadest sense, are having an adverse impact, such as using up scarce resources. I think the human race is ultimately going to wreck itself. It is important that we control these forces and try to eliminate them.”

          Note that this talk of restricting use of resources is generic; no mention of nuclear yet. And then, in the next sentence, Rickover says: “In this broad, philosophical sense, I do not believe that nuclear power is worth the present benefits, since it creates radiation. You might ask, why do I design nuclear-powered ships? Because it is a necessary evil. I would sink them all.”

          Then, further down the page, he says, “From a long-range standpoint–I am talking about humanity–the most important thing we could do at present is to have an international meeting where first we outlaw nuclear weapons. Eventually, we could outlaw reactors too” He said ‘could,’ not ‘should’ or ‘must.’

          And that’s it. Only those brief sentences, in a very philosophical vein.

          Why did he say it? No one can know the emotions and motivations of another. But I believe there are a few common reasons for such sentiments, that we can understand, whether we sympathize with them or not. In this case, I suggest the following:

          1. Rickover had plenty of evidence that without extraordinary efforts to operate far differently from almost all other large-scale projects, you get the kind of performance record typified by the coal and oil industries, and he knew there were few persons that would be able to create the record that nuclear has achieved. So part of the reason was his feeling that “l’etat cest moi” and therefore “Apres moi, le deluge.” This is hubris, but he had a pretty good historical basis for it.

          2. Said slightly differently, it’s the sentiment of the parent turning the business over to the children: “They’ll never be able to run it the way we did.”

          3. A totally different reason may be concern (unwarranted, in my opinion) that radioactivity is more dangerous than “ordinary” kinds of hazardous material. And that others will not have enough understanding and insight to deal with it properly.

          4. Often, an old man, ruminating on the imminence of his demise, and growing awareness that this is the one thing he can definitely not control, would rather see “his world” disappear, rather than let others screw it up.

          So, my view is that we should not consider those brief sentences, in that context, as profound and thoughtful advice.

          Note, also that despite Rickover’s concern about earth’s radiation levels building up, the radioactivity we create each year is not enough to keep up with earth’s natural radiation decay. Each day, our natural radiation levels decrease.

          Dr. Isaac Asimov: "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny ...'"

          by davidwalters on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 01:27:08 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  If you want respect, deserve it. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          gzodik

          You could start to earn respect by opening a science book.

          I realize that's next to impossible, and so it will remain impossible (speaking for myself) for you to be worthy of respect.

          •  Thanks boys... but alt. energy is here NOW. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            splashy

            Did you not read my scientific links?

            Many, many new forms of energy (including FREE energy) is starting to unfold as we sit here and "type words".  You and your pro-profit/poison nuke cabal will not stop it.

            Again, clean up your poison, eh?

            “First they ignore you,
            then they ridicule you,
            then they fight you,
            and then you win.”
            ― Mahatma Gandhi
            We've already won.
            People have rejected nukes.
            Catch up with us on the alternative energy bandwagon.
            Use your "science" to try something better! ;)
            Best to you both.
            Namaste.
            •  More exciting solar news links - Imagine that! (0+ / 0-)

              Pilot embarks on first solar-powered intercontinental flight

              A Swiss adventurer soared above sun-splashed Spanish valleys toward Morocco on Tuesday on the world’s first intercontinental flight in a solar-powered plane.

              ...“The question is not to use solar power for normal airplanes,” he added.

              “The question is more to demonstrate that WE CAN achieve incredible goals, almost impossible goals with
              - new technologies,
              - without fuel,
              - just with solar energy, and
              - raise awareness that if we can do it in the air
              - of course everybody can do it on the ground.”
              http://www.rawstory.com/...
  •  "dangerous natural gas turbines" (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ozsea1

    Wuh?

    I don't think they're any more dangerous than any other fossil fuel source.

    •  Yes. (0+ / 0-)

      I think that was exactly his point.

      GOP: Bankers, billionaires, suckers, and dupes.

      by gzodik on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 11:59:54 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  that is MORE dangerous? No, that it IS (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        gzodik

        dangerous, yes. The prefix of "Danger" should be attached before the word so people don't start associating the 'green' nature of solar with it's evil Siamese twin, dangerous natural gas. The point is that it's dangerous and greenwashing it (no one has done that here yet) is an international pastime.

        David

        Dr. Isaac Asimov: "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny ...'"

        by davidwalters on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 01:44:56 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Doesn't Africa have lots of sun? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Russgirl

    Why don't they go for that instead? They are mostly on the equator, for cripes sake!

    What about wind? You would think they would have lots of that too.

    Women create the entire labor force.

    by splashy on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 02:48:24 PM PDT

    •  Because the "Shock Doctrine" is all over Africa... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bincbom, chipmo

      same thugs continue their game of taking over resources at the expense of all else.

      I know that times are changing.

      Newer and better technology has already surpassed nuke poison power.
      Stay tuned... happening daily if you just "look outside the square poison nuke box."

      •  You'd actually have to read Naomi Klein's (1+ / 1-)
        Recommended by:
        alain2112
        Hidden by:
        Russgirl

        book to understand how stupid that makes you. The shock doctrine is anti-developmental, anti-infastrastructure and anti-social investment. Anything that pushes society forward with gov't support is opposed, anything that allows for foreign investment, is supported.

        D.

        Dr. Isaac Asimov: "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny ...'"

        by davidwalters on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 05:20:02 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  STOP just STOP with the name calling David. (0+ / 0-)

          Donut for you.  Seriously, grow up.
          Tired of your putting people down with differing points of view.
          I will no longer tolerate it when directed toward me or my opinion.

          Shock Doctrine does not work.  

          As long as your corporate sponsors get their dough, you appear to be o.k. with their destruction of environment and rights.

          Get a life dude.  Find your heart with compassion, while you still can.  The truth will set you free.

          "Hatred paralyzes life; love releases it. Hatred confuses life; love harmonizes it. Hatred darkens life; love illuminates it."
           - -- Martin Luther King Jr.
          •  Russgirl, when you go about (0+ / 0-)

            making ad homin attacks on me or anyone, as you do when you assign personal responsibility and [SCREAM] about nonsense like 'clean up', this is what you get. I don't resort to this stuff, like you do in a rather consistent manner, in your fake, ugly "PC" moralizing. I'm here to discuss energy.

            On the specifics, the "big nuclear" "doners" (unspecified) is also ad hominen. I don't accuse you of being a flunky bigot for Big Wind (larger donars btw in terms of lobbying) or Big Solar.

            I might add I don't post links to junk science like you do and the fake, totally dis-proven "free energy" nonsense. Generally you don't find other anti-nukes defending you and this crap.

            I take responsibility for my position of trying to insure an energy source that can power this planet that is CLEAN, like nuclear. IMO, you support the continued use, in effect by not supporting nuclear, the continued use of fossil. I recognize you don't consciously do this, but effects are what I'm looking at. We disagree, leave it at that discuss what I've posted on MY diary, now what you think the diary ought to be. It's mine, not yours. I'm getting ready to HR you if you keeps this sh*t up.

            Dr. Isaac Asimov: "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny ...'"

            by davidwalters on Wed Jun 06, 2012 at 07:20:53 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  They do, it's pushed by western NGOs (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ebohlman

      so they can boil a cup of tea at noon. Sun won't develop the African economies, nuclear will, however.

      Dr. Isaac Asimov: "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny ...'"

      by davidwalters on Tue Jun 05, 2012 at 05:18:25 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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