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Updated for clarity.
If you don't regularly read Eureka Alert then you would not know that a characteristic layer of charcoal and melt glass has been found in strata dated to 13000 years ago in South Carolina, Pennsylvania, Venezuela  and Syria. Melt Glass of the type found does not have the high sulfur associated with volcanic glasses and requires temperatures in excess of 3100 F to form. Only a few processes produce that kind of heat, cosmic body impacts and nuclear explosions. Something mighty hot happened in the Younger Dryas, most likely a killer asteroid storm,adversely impacting the Clovis people and North American Megafauna.  Does the MSM media report and clamor for an increase in NASA's budget for developing the technology to track and deflect? No that might lead to high tech job creation. So the MSM reports .....................crickets.
Search the news and you will find reporting on the new findings practically non-existant.
More beyond the glyph

Something, almost certainly a meteor storm created temperatures high enough to MELT a brick in the 13000 year old layer.

"The melt material also matches melt-glass produced by the Trinity nuclear airburst of 1945 in Socorro, New Mexico," he continued. "The extreme temperatures required are equal to those of an atomic bomb blast, high enough to make sand melt and boil."
The material evidence supporting the YDB cosmic impact hypothesis spans three continents, and covers nearly one-third of the planet, from California to Western Europe, and into the Middle East. The discovery extends the range of evidence into Germany and Syria, the easternmost site yet identified in the northern hemisphere. The researchers have yet to identify a limit to the debris field of the impact.
The PNAS (June 11, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) paper also presents examples of recent independent research that supports the YDB cosmic impact hypothesis, and supports two independent groups that found melt-glass in the YDB layers in Arizona and Venezuela. "The results strongly refute the assertion of some critics that 'no one can replicate' the YDB evidence, or that the materials simply fell from space non-catastrophically," Kennett noted.
Why is this not being reported?

Well..the public might want to fund NASA to do something more to detect and divert asteroids, and that would be counter to the NO-JOBS austerity plan.  If money were being spent on NASA, and the economy started to recover suddenly it is apparent that THERE IS AN ALTERNATIVE to the wicked TINA game being played.
NASA created good high-tech jobs on earth while developing the technology to reach the planets. Every dollar invested in NASA has caused $2.00N to 14.00 of economic activity.  Interestingly in studies that reliably showed a high return on investment because of the stimulative NASA's spending on public technology in the 70s and 80s have been curtailed or scarce in the 90s and 00.

Measuring The NASA Stimulus

NASA spending has caused "technological advancement to occur at an earlier time than it would have occurred otherwise" if it would have indeed occurred at all, an early Denver Research Institute study concluded.
But placing a monetary value on those benefits proved more difficult, even for one of NASA's greatest achievements. The "fact remains that we got to the moon in a decade, but are, as yet, unable to fully measure the present and future economic impact of the science and technology accumulated on the way to the moon (or the aggregate effect of technological progress in general)," noted the authors of a 1971 Midwest Research Institute study. No one's ever really resolved the uncertainty.
And as a result, researchers over the years have come up with a wide array of returns on investment for NASA spending. Estimated ratios of revenue generated compared to spending have been as high as 14-to-1.
Some early academic and other studies "made very 'generous' assumptions about the spinoffs, goods and services produced as a result of NASA's investments," G. Scott Hubbard, a consulting professor at Stanford University, said in an e-mail. A study commissioned by Hubbard in the mid-2000s when he was director of NASA's Ames Research Center in California on the center's local economic impact found a "more conservative" 2- to 3-to-1 ratio.
Yeah
Don't report that the Asteroids reshaped the history not just of the dinos but in the relatively recent past.
Can't have the people actually be alarmed and fund NASA.

A mere 3 to 1 return on investment is not good enough to get the Chattering Classes to fund NASA to do something more about the rocks, it might cause unintended consequences of the currently rich not getting to further concentrate their power to the stranglehold they want. It might be stimulative when stimulus spending is to be avoided at all costs. (because it works). ( and if you think that government spending is inflationary (what inflation) then you need to understand that right now BANKS LOAN money into existence, not the government Look up fractional reserve lending.)

NASA is a common good. In to saving the planet, not so much into world domination.

As DC Barker Commented
No other organization or industry  has had the effect of inspiring and motivating people to engage in innovative thought, enhanced educational goals, and broadened  universal mindset than the achievements of our space programs; inefficient as they are at times. This is almost unquantifiable as an economic return on investment as it drives individual goal/career paths and crosses generational boundaries. Therefore, it seems that NASA has and will always be a success because it will always provide a greater than a 1-1 economic benefit versus spending.

We need to break free of the There IS NO ALTERNATIVE and understand that the whole system of rules about money and debt is a system of made up rules that the BTB change at their convenience. We need to change the rules so we can invest in the technology to do something about the problems we ourselves create and those that  universe throws at us. That is what a civilization does.

Originally posted to Bluehawk on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 07:32 PM PDT.

Also republished by Astro Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Now I gotta go to work! (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    blueoasis, palantir, G2geek, Sandino

    Sorry to post and run, but duty calls.

    To Goldman Sachs in according to their desires, From us in accordance with the IRS.

    by Bluehawk on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 07:34:06 PM PDT

  •  It's Been On History and Science Channels for a Yr (8+ / 0-)

    or more, mentioned in a number of different programs.

    I don't think it's clear if the clovis people themselves were all wiped out, from what I've been seeing the distinctive spear tip technology itself definitely did, but then if the targets for them disappeared maybe there'd be no point retaining it.

    Although I personally would want something at least as effective as one of those spears if I were looking to take out a bison, which did survive.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 07:37:57 PM PDT

    •  Meant to Say, As of These Programs the Hypothesis (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      palantir, dopper0189, G2geek

      was a single comet strike probably to the ice sheet in eastern Canada.

      I'm sure a reference will pop up on one of them before the end of the month, with all the incessant reruns that circulate among all the sci-hist reality channels.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 07:40:34 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  a single impact couldn't do that. (4+ / 0-)

        Thin layers of something like Trinitite all over the world, necessarily mean that there were multiple impacts.

        Think of the inverse square law.  The energy of the impact is greatest at ground zero and falls as a function of the distance from ground zero.  If the energy converts to heat, to melt and boil sand & rock, then what you necessarily see is a thicker layer of that material close to the impact.  The layer becomes thinner with increase in distance from the impact.  

        If an impact was sufficient to melt & boil sand and rock on two continents separated by an ocean, then two things would necessarily be true:  One, the layer of material close to ground zero would be very very thick, possibly tens of meters thick.  Two, the amount of heat absorbed by the ocean would be enormous, perhaps sufficient to boil away a respectable fraction of the ocean water into the atmosphere (where it would later come down as torrential rains): these effects would have obvious geological consequences that could be observed later.

        However if you have a large number of smaller impacts, you end up with many smaller ground zero locations, and the thickness of the Trinitite layers reflect that condition: an more or less comparably thin layer everywhere.

        From this I would hypothesize that what the Earth encountered at that point in time, was a swarm of objects, a cloud of these objects in space, and they hit within a geologically short period of time.  

        Any human civilization that had historical continuity through those events, would have picked up a collective story about the events and the times, and those stories or something derived from them might be found in some of the persisting myths of these cultures.  

        "Minus two votes for the Democrat" equals "plus one vote for the Republican." Arithmetic doesn't care about your feelings.

        by G2geek on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 08:52:18 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  So it's in the Book of Mormon? nt (3+ / 0-)

          "Well, yeah, the Constitution is worth it if you succeed." - Nancy Pelosi // Question: "succeed" at what?

          by nailbender on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 09:17:43 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Compare the K/T impact (0+ / 0-)

          The is 110 miles across.

          We haven't heard too much about this one because, frankly, it wasn't very big.  Unlikely to have caused the post-ice-age extinctions in and of itself.

          Nearly everywhere we've seen megafauna collapses in the last 50K years, the common thread is that Home sapiens arrived shortly before.  There may have been other stresses on these animals besides humans.  But I'm putting my money on people doing the coup de grâce.

          Mitt Romney is a T-1000 sent back from the Future as a harbinger of the upcoming Robot Apocolypse.

          by mbayrob on Wed Jun 13, 2012 at 01:20:55 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Formatting didn't quite work. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            nuclear winter solstice

            The "Chicxulub crater" is 110 miles across.  That's what a real dinosaur killer will do.

            The impact described in the diary is very small potatoes (and not a potato, say, the size of Manhattan.)

            Mitt Romney is a T-1000 sent back from the Future as a harbinger of the upcoming Robot Apocolypse.

            by mbayrob on Wed Jun 13, 2012 at 01:23:14 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  A lot of smaller asteroids. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Sunspots

              There are always going to be far more small ones in the 300 meter range than world killers like the KT rock. But the impact of one of the 300 meter size would not be an event that anyone within several miles would walk away from unless they were under ground, much less the impact of a swarm of them.  Extinction level event no. Pleasant? No.
              Preventable now?
              Almost, if we are willing to.
              My real point is that there is always money to fight anything the elite consider a threat to its existence.  Evidently they either don't consider the space rocks a threat, or they consider NASA role as a force for innovation a greater threat.

              To Goldman Sachs in according to their desires, From us in accordance with the IRS.

              by Bluehawk on Wed Jun 13, 2012 at 02:30:08 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  Sadly (12+ / 0-)

      I am on an iPad, so I can't get the links for this.  Perhaps someone else can.

      My day job is an archaeologist.  This theory came out a few years ago, and has, at this point...been pretty well rejected.  It wasn't junk science...just most
      Iikely wrong science.

      Meanwhile, in the fringe science sites, it's getting amplified and morphed into "killed the Clovis people" crap.

      Wish I was on a real computer so i could do the links...but the asteroid/comet killed north American megafauna theory is likely wrong...and an asteroid killed the Clovis people is certainly wrong.

      "Empty vessels make the loudest sound, they have the least wit and are the greatest blabbers" Plato

      by Empty Vessel on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 08:06:39 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  gotta' question: (3+ / 0-)

        Leaving aside the issue of effects on societies, it seems to me the central claim here is that Trinitite deposits were found around the world at about the same depth, and that this points to a cluster of large object impacts occurring at that time.

        Is that hypothesis still in play, or has some other explanation been found for the widely-scattered Trinitite deposits?  And what other explanations are considered reasonable for the data?  Seems to me that a large meteorite swarm is more parsimonious than, for example, roughly synchronous volcanic activity worldwide at a time long after such activity had (relatively speaking) quieted down.

        "Minus two votes for the Democrat" equals "plus one vote for the Republican." Arithmetic doesn't care about your feelings.

        by G2geek on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 08:57:49 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Ok (8+ / 0-)

          I can't link easily, but here is a website with links ito some current work by Vance Holiday.  Vance is likely the best Palestinian archaeologist in the nation these days...and also specializes in geological studies in archaeology.

          http://uanews.org/...

          The short version is that the megafauna did not die out fast enough for the impact hypothesis to make sense.  So....even if the meteor swarm did happen, it didn't cause mass extinctions nor did it lead to the collapse of the Clovis people.  So...even if we do have evidence for some sort of meteor event, it simply wasn't that big a deal.

          The likely explanations are far simpler...a combination of gradually changing environment at the end of the last ice age and the over hunting of north American megafauna by a new predator (humans).  There are huge debates as to whether environmental change or human predation was more important....but both clearly played a part.

          "Empty vessels make the loudest sound, they have the least wit and are the greatest blabbers" Plato

          by Empty Vessel on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 09:10:19 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Let me add (5+ / 0-)

            The key thing is that the megafauna did not die out quickly...it was gradual.  With that fact established, neither meteors nor volcanos are necessary to explain anything.

            "Empty vessels make the loudest sound, they have the least wit and are the greatest blabbers" Plato

            by Empty Vessel on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 09:12:53 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  NOT The key thing (0+ / 0-)

              The key thing is that there is evidence of pretty much world wide meteor impacts.  Impacts that we almost have the technology to prevent.

              To Goldman Sachs in according to their desires, From us in accordance with the IRS.

              by Bluehawk on Wed Jun 13, 2012 at 02:36:09 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  if there were, we'd have craters (0+ / 0-)

                Even with erosion. Between Montreal and Quebec City there's a crater that's over 200 million years old and it's clearly distingushable from imagery. I'm not seeing the evidence. I'm seeing cherry-picked conclusions. Sorry, I agree with Empty Vessel, and quite frankly, that does not negate the hypothetical threat from an asteroid impact.

                I'm struck by how the meanest, cruelest, nastiest people brag about how they live in a Christian nation. It's rather telling.

                by terrypinder on Wed Jun 13, 2012 at 01:04:27 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

          •  And also (6+ / 0-)

            I tried to say vance is the best paleo Indian archaeologist, but my iPad turned it into palestinian.

            "Empty vessels make the loudest sound, they have the least wit and are the greatest blabbers" Plato

            by Empty Vessel on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 09:13:59 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  One more useful link (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            terrypinder

            To a discussion by vance holiday

            http://www.argonaut.arizona.edu/...

            "Empty vessels make the loudest sound, they have the least wit and are the greatest blabbers" Plato

            by Empty Vessel on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 09:57:02 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Did you read the diary? Or just start typing? (0+ / 0-)

              Or do you think that evidence of the  impact of a swarm of asteroids 13000 years ago, which JUST HAPPENS to be contemporaneous with a global cooling is not important because it is not an extinction level event or because your favorite palo-biologist/archeologist (who is not in possession of the newly published facts)  once published an opinion that an asteroid did not wipe out the megafauna.  Did he also publish an opinion saying that scientific findings should not receive enough coverage to be widely considered and debated?
              Did you even get to the point about investment in NASA as both a guardian against space rocks and a force for spurring the innovation necessary for our long term happiness if not survival.

              To Goldman Sachs in according to their desires, From us in accordance with the IRS.

              by Bluehawk on Wed Jun 13, 2012 at 03:01:09 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Last ice age started to BREAK UP circa 13,000 BP (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                terrypinder

                That was NOT a period of global cooling ...though there is reason to think that the geologically-sudden-and-rapid breakup of the ice cap was precipitated by an impact of the sort mentioned in the OP - which would have introduced enough new heat into the system to destabilize all that ice, and begun a new warming cycle.

                "Kenyan-Muslim-Communistic-Expialidocious!"

                by chmood on Wed Jun 13, 2012 at 10:01:15 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

          •  that's a reasonable conclusion. (3+ / 0-)

            Nomadic hunter/gatherers simply shifting locations & strategies to keep up with changes in the populations of animals in the region.  

            That is, there's no need to invoke anything like a mysterious disappearance when simple migration will do.  

            "Minus two votes for the Democrat" equals "plus one vote for the Republican." Arithmetic doesn't care about your feelings.

            by G2geek on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 10:29:29 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  It's might not be a coincidence that the only (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          nuclear winter solstice

          Place that large, diverse  quantities of megafauna still exist is in Africa, where they grew up with people. We snuck up on all the other megafauna populations and they were blindsided by us.

          Patriot: the person who can holler the loudest without knowing what he is hollering about. Mark Twain

          by Deathtongue on Wed Jun 13, 2012 at 12:09:38 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Ignoring the point MUCH! (2+ / 0-)

        Search for this item in the news and you just will not find it.
        Why?
        It would seem reasonable to report when melted earth and charcoal is found in a layer that spans half the globe. One can not imagine that this would not have been a pleasant day at the beach to live through.

        I am a materials scientist and i can tell you that modren blast furnaces do not usually attain the temperatures necessary to create the  samples described , and rock of volcanic has a much higher sulpher content AND lava is formed at LOWER temperatures about 2200F. The melted material discribed melts at over 3000F.

        Twern't no campfire.

        Obviusly it was not an extinction level event, other wise I would be. Ghost typeing.
        On an i-pad btw.

        To Goldman Sachs in according to their desires, From us in accordance with the IRS.

        by Bluehawk on Wed Jun 13, 2012 at 01:58:17 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  I guess they think it's difficult to make the case (6+ / 0-)

    for 13,000 year-old breaking news.

    It seems curiosity has killed the cat that had my tongue.

    by Murphoney on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 07:41:00 PM PDT

  •  Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis Wiki (8+ / 0-)

    If anyone wants to read both the pros and cons of this particular explanation.

    I'd lobby for reading the "con' section, readers but that's your call.

    •  Also, this blog at Scientific American . .. (5+ / 0-)

      here:

      The Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis was adopted mainly by non earth-sciences related researchers and especially the mass media, who dedicated to the scenario various TV-shows – even if it was stated that some of the results were preliminary. The hypothesis is still under scrutiny by the geological community – as for example during the actual edition of the INQUA meeting in Bern. It seems however that most of the proposed evidence for the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis so far could not be reproduced by other teams and were evidence is available there are terrestrial, non impact related, interpretations possible.
      •  The beauty of simple elegant theses (5+ / 0-)

        They're either obviously right or wrong and... while this one IS elegant, it's require blowing off an immense amount of evidence that the Younger Dryas happened on a very WEIRD timescale - it's neither geological NOR instantaneous, it's neither localized nor global.

        My money is on something related to a reset/reboot of climate patterns, an extreme version of the wet/dry hot/cold shifts we see as a possible contributor to the rise of the mound building cultures in the Southeast and the pueblo builders in the Southwest.

        And those shifts occur on the decades/centuries time scales and advance region by region, too.

        •  edit: rise AND fall of said cultures n/t (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          palantir
        •  OK, but where'd the Trinitite come from? (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Bluehawk, cskendrick, chmood

          First, is it even correct that such a layer has been found at widely dispersed locations around the globe?

          Second, if those findings are correct, then it seems to me that a meteorite swarm is a more parsimonious explanation than e.g. a sudden period of increased volcanic activity with no clear cause.  

          Yes, the media loves drama, and distracting the masses with meteorite strikes is dramatic and avoids any mention of "climate."  But if there's a thin layer of melted stuff at approximately uniform depth, that's an interesting puzzle looking for an explanation.

          "Minus two votes for the Democrat" equals "plus one vote for the Republican." Arithmetic doesn't care about your feelings.

          by G2geek on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 09:06:27 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  There is some debate as to (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            G2geek, mbayrob, cskendrick, terrypinder

            The the evidence for the impact at all.  Follow the scientific american link provided elsewhere in the diary.

            As I see it, meteor event unlikely, impact on people and environment almost certainly wrong.

            "Empty vessels make the loudest sound, they have the least wit and are the greatest blabbers" Plato

            by Empty Vessel on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 09:18:00 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  that's my inclination too, though... (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Empty Vessel, cskendrick

              ... if those anomalous materials are present at that layer in widely different spots on Earth, that's a puzzle to solve.

              Hypothesis B:  One object impact anywhere on Earth, tossing enough "crap" into the atmosphere that it came down in subsequent rainfall.  

              Hypothesis C:  One major volcanic event anywhere on Earth, with the same results.

              Whether any of these hypotheses are sufficient to deal with the megafauna issues and the anthropology issue, is beyond me.  12,900 years is very recent in geological time, which in and of itself is interesting.  

              And as a policy issue, independently of any of the above, yes we should be funding NASA for "detect & deflect" capabilities, because sooner or later something big & nasty will intersect with our orbit, and it would be nice to nudge it out of the way.  

              "Minus two votes for the Democrat" equals "plus one vote for the Republican." Arithmetic doesn't care about your feelings.

              by G2geek on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 10:21:58 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  yeah (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                G2geek, cskendrick

                That's pretty much exactly what I think.  My guess, is that at the end of the day we will find out that there was a "medium" sized meteor that had little or no effect on anything....other than creating a thin layer of odd sediment in some parts of north America.  No doubt it would have been really fucking cool to see, but no extinction event or such.

                Think something like meteor crater in Arizona, maybe a touch bigger.

                "Empty vessels make the loudest sound, they have the least wit and are the greatest blabbers" Plato

                by Empty Vessel on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 10:29:38 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Or several events across centuries (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  G2geek, Bluehawk

                  related to a common cause, like the introduction of a new massive meteor stream post the breakup of a comet - something that still exists (and poses a concrete threat).

                  I elaborate on one well-known candidate threat in a nearby post - the Taurid/Beta Taurid fragment streams which are really one - the orbit of Comet Encke.

                  The presumed source of the Tunguska impact event.

              •  It'll wait (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                G2geek, Sunspots

                There was a while after the Alvarezes proposed the KT impact theory that folks were looking for frequent impacts (in geological terms -- say, once every 30 million years or so) as a cause for the mass extinctions.

                At this point, I'm not sure if we know of any besides the one 65 MYA.  I've heard cases for one in the mid Triassic, but I'm not sure that theory has gotten any traction.

                On the other hand, all kinds of different events caused the other mass extinctions -- volcanic activity (likely cause for the Permian extinctions), run-off caused by the first trees breaking up the soil for the first time (terminal Devonian, I think), all kinds of things.  And we were likely almost wiped out as a species some 75 KYA when a huge volcanic explosion occurred at Toba.

                We are more likely to wipe out most life with adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than we are threatened by a meteor impact.  I believe in funding NASA as much as the next guy, but if it saves us, it'll save us because it gets enough people off Earth to have independent breeding populations.  We could very well be extinct hundreds of thousands (or even millions) of years before we see a large enough impact to affect the biosphere more than just a few years.

                Mitt Romney is a T-1000 sent back from the Future as a harbinger of the upcoming Robot Apocolypse.

                by mbayrob on Wed Jun 13, 2012 at 01:35:35 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

          •  My advice to cosmic effect fans: double down. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Bluehawk

            1. The Tunguska event in Siberia is tied to robust meteor streams (not one but two, the Taurids and the Beta Taurids) associated with Comet Encke
            2. Comet Encke is a near-period comet... but it wasn't always this way
            3. Encke and the meteor streams are related to the breakup of a much larger comet 20-30K years ago.
            4. The comet locked into its current configuration about 10K years ago
            5. This stream of matter is the largest known in the inner solar system, thus it being a 'usual suspect' for Tunguska
            6. It's not impossible that Younger Dryas was related to a sustained periodic bombardments, twice a year, of events within a couple of magnitudes of Tunguska, spread out across centuries
            7. also, last I checked Tunguska left no nanodiamonds or radiological traces.

            Test it out. Either it's right or it's not.

      •  terrestrial, NON-NUCLEAR interpretations possible? (0+ / 0-)

        I'd LOVE to hear them.

        "Kenyan-Muslim-Communistic-Expialidocious!"

        by chmood on Wed Jun 13, 2012 at 10:04:31 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Well if it can melt (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    palantir

    a brick I guess we're shit out of luck...This reminds me of The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy.

    Obama 2012 http://whatthefuckhasobamadonesofar.com/

    by jiffypop on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 07:53:54 PM PDT

  •  People who believe the earth is 6,000 yrs old (3+ / 0-)

    don't want science shoved down their throats!

    explain how letting gays marry will directly affect your own heterosexual relationship?

    by bluestatesam on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 08:02:30 PM PDT

  •  I've mostly found EurekAlert useless as a source (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Bluehawk, blueoasis

    But that article was better than usual for them.

    Other sources...

    •  OK, so this evidence is new, and newly published. (5+ / 0-)

      So now we have:

      a)  Some earlier publications along these lines,

      b)  Skepticism to the effect that some of the earlier findings were not reproducible, and could have been accounted for by other processes not involving large object impacts, and finally,

      c)  New evidence that appears to be stronger, in favor of large object impacts.

      From a strictly scientific standpoint, it seems to me that the jury is still out on the subject of exactly what happened 12,900 years ago, and there are still puzzles to be solved.

      From a policy standpoint, we know that large object impacts are a threat to Earth, and we are beginning to have the technology to detect threatening objects at a sufficient distance to deflect them.  Therefore it makes sense to develop the "detect and deflect" technologies further, since sooner or later they will save human civilization and possibly the Earth itself, from an impact.  

      "Minus two votes for the Democrat" equals "plus one vote for the Republican." Arithmetic doesn't care about your feelings.

      by G2geek on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 09:20:12 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  This isn't news in the Bible Belt, They all know (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    nuclear winter solstice

    that the earth is only 6000 years old.  Bishop Usher proved it to them

    And it feels like I'm livin'in the wasteland of the free ~ Iris DeMent, 1996

    by MrJersey on Tue Jun 12, 2012 at 09:52:57 PM PDT

  •  Could this re-invigorate Bruce Willis' (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Bluehawk

    movie career?

  •  Slight problem here, I think... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Empty Vessel, terrypinder

    The  architecture of Abu Hureyra, Phase I, doesn't include mudbrick. Those were pit-houses with wooden posts and (presumably) thatch-like walls and roofs. It's only in Phase II (beginning ~9500 RCYBP) that the architecture shifts to mudbrick construction. Seems like a stratigraphic impossibility, then, to suggest that vitrification of mudbrick could be due to an event ~13,000-11,000 RCYBP.

    Real stupidity beats artificial intelligence every time. (Terry Pratchett)

    by angry marmot on Wed Jun 13, 2012 at 06:49:49 AM PDT

  •  It's fascinating this story (0+ / 0-)

    keeps coming back.

    I could have sworn this was debunked shortly after it made the Discovery/Science/NatGeo rounds. So, whatever media conspiracy you're alleging doesn't exist. They got burned already, years ago, and are smartly keeping out of it.

    Personally, I agree with the debunkers. There's simply not enough evidence, and a lot of "after this therefore because of this."

    I'm struck by how the meanest, cruelest, nastiest people brag about how they live in a Christian nation. It's rather telling.

    by terrypinder on Wed Jun 13, 2012 at 12:59:08 PM PDT

    •  unfortunately, REAL science requires INduction (0+ / 0-)

      as well as DEduction.

      It's fashionable in scientific circles to denigrate the need to look for newer, larger views to encompass and account for ever more data;  we're too quick to believe that we've GOT science (or some partial view thereof) and so we don't need/can't use/benefit from a better, more expansive understanding.  What we really need is just better engineering to apply what we've got.

      Inductive reasoning, speculation, and the search for a more complete, more inclusive context - this is ALL science.

      Fashion be damned!

      "Kenyan-Muslim-Communistic-Expialidocious!"

      by chmood on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 10:41:51 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  sure. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        chmood

        I just don't see it here yet. We'll see when if and when it gets challenged, again.

        The diarist alleges a conspiracy and media silence. This study crossed my twitter feed 4 days before this was published here---but I follow at least 20 science journalists. It was reported. And it was a popular hypothesis for several years and has several pop-sci television shows about it that are about five to six years old now. Whatever conspiracy the diarist alleges does not exist, based on available evidence.

        Also, neither the diarist nor the press release they cite lists an actual title for the study in question so that we can actually evaluate it for ourselves. My objections would be fewer if that had happened (and the media conspiracy angle was left out).

        Also, I think there's a bigger story here too. There are several people named in the study who are "old names" when it comes to this particular hypothesis. Maybe they're right. Personally, I think they have a lot invested in this and cannot let it go, even though there's more evidence suggesting that they are not correct than there isn't at this point. But I'd have to actually read the actual study to confirm my hypothesis.

        I'm struck by how the meanest, cruelest, nastiest people brag about how they live in a Christian nation. It's rather telling.

        by terrypinder on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 10:55:49 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Not a proponent of 'Younger Dryas' (0+ / 0-)

          (was not familiar w/ it, per se, before this) but interested in science, particularly geology (paleo and modern) and archaeology (among others).  Haven't watched 'TV science' in very long, but always looking to see what I don't know yet - and looking for better questions.

          Discounted the 'conspiracy' angle immediately, as I don't expect to find interesting science news in the MSM.

          I may gave been reacting to the term 'debunker' - a 'profession' for which I have no use.  My apologies if my comments were off the mark.

          "Kenyan-Muslim-Communistic-Expialidocious!"

          by chmood on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 05:48:56 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  link to actual study? (0+ / 0-)

    I'm struck by how the meanest, cruelest, nastiest people brag about how they live in a Christian nation. It's rather telling.

    by terrypinder on Thu Jun 14, 2012 at 08:57:18 AM PDT

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