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Last time we discussed Seventh Sojourn, considered by many to the finest album made by the band.  Tonight we shall examine the time after that record.

After Seventh Sojourn was released, The Moody Blues were the top record selling band at the time, and had reached their zenith.  Their success brought a huge world tour.  As a matter of fact, the tour, although broken up into a couple of legs commenced in October 1972, in the US (with at least 13 dates played in late 1972).  They then took a break until the European leg started in September 1973, playing at least 33 dates (some were back in the US).  They played another 12 at least sets in Japan, Hawaii, and California in January and February of 1974.

That is 58 sets (some dates had two shows) in a little over a year, but in concentrated bits.  I am not sure that this is a compleat figure because the sources that I used all had disclaimers that their lists might not be compleat, but it is a good reliable number for a minimum.  Some things were happening personally to the band members that were complicating factors.

Pinder's marriage was breaking up during the tour, Edge's marriage had already failed, Thomas was married, Lodge was married, and so was Hayward.  Touring is tough on a marriage.  In addition, Hayward's first child was born just a month after the first leg of the tour.  Lodge already had two small children during the tour, and I could not find out anything about Thomas.  Edge and Pinder had one small child each at home whilst touring.  That has to take a toll.

I have read quite a few things about the tour, and am not sure that I believe them all.  One thing that I think is true, although I have not read it anywhere, is that it kept them out of studio and thus prevented them from doing what they did best, writing and recording.  The Moody Blues were not really a band meant to tour (at least at the time with the technology available).  The Who, with a less orchestral sound, were great at touring.  It is ironic that The Moody Blues still tour, but the technology is so much better now that keeping a Mellotron working is no longer a problem.

I also believe it when I read that touring caused conflict betwixt at least some of the band members.  It also caused the very mystic Pinder to go into overload, and he vowed that he would never do a world tour again, and he did not.  The result of the ambitious tour was that the second lineup of The Moody Blues would not release a new studio album until Octave came out in 1978.

From the heights of creative ability shown in Seventh Sojourn to a really poor album, Octave just put the final seal of approval for the demise of the band.  Pinder all but quit, reneging on his initial agreement to participate in a comeback tour.  He was agreeable to continuing to write and perform in studio for future albums, but by then the feelings betwixt him and the rest of the band were too frayed to be healed.

As a matter of fact, Pinder up and quit before all of Octave had been recorded.  Another blow was that Tony Clarke, their producer since 1968, also ended his association with the band before it was completed.  An even worse omen was that Phil Travers did not do the cover art, even though this album kept the tradition of being a gatefold cover.  This time the cover art was done by John Kosh, who was no slouch.  There were two other albums before this that had other than Travers designing the cover, but they were either compilations or a live set.  We shall mention them in passing over the next couple of installments.  He also designed the cover for Who's Next!  But this cover was very much different, and if you look at it closely, you can see a photograph of Pinder almost completely obscured by the other four band members.

Even though the band were not recording much during this time, they did sort of kind of oversee the compilation album aforementioned, This is The Moody Blues.  That is sort of Americanized, because in UK English it likely would have been This are The Moody Blues, but I get too myopic at times.  It not a remarkable album, just a compilation of their greatest hits.  Because of the themes in the original albums, a compilation to me seems quite flat.  It was issued on Threshold Records, with an agreement with Decca as the canonical albums were.  It was released in the fall of 1974 and charted at #14 in the UK and at #11 in the US.

Tony Clarke produced the songs on the album since it was just a compilation of earlier canonical work.  This is also the last Moody Blues album with the cover art done by Phil Travers.

Their next release was not until the spring of 1977 when Caught Live + 5 was released, also on Threshold Records through Decca.  This was a double album of an underpar performance recorded at The Royal Albert Hall on 19691212.  However, the final five tracks were previously unreleased studio work (produced by Tony Clarke) from the canonical period.  Since we have not listened to these before, we shall cook a them tonight.  This was the last album of theirs to be released on Threshold Records, and the first since the band had the canonical lineup not to have artwork done by Phil Travers, but rather by the graphic design group Hipgnosis.

Before we start of the studio pieces from Caught Live + 5, I am going to speculate a bit about the demise of the band.  One of the problems that I see is that they did not have a business management team like The Who had with Kit Lambert and Chris Stamp.  Although Lambert finally proved to be essentially a thief to support his drug habit, he and Stamp took a lot of business pressure off of The Who and allowed them, for the most part, to concentrate on music.  The Moody Blues were more hands on in the business part, and that distracted them.  Money matters are fraught with risks to otherwise good relationships, and I think that they got caught up in the business aspect of the band to the harm of their art.

I have also stated previously that five member bands seem more difficult to keep together than four member ones.  This is a broad generalization, but it seems to be correct more often than not.  The Who lasted from 1962 to 1978, and only the death of Moon brought them to an end.  The Moody Blues only lasted from 1967 to 1972, really, and it was internal strife that finally did them in, at the peak of their success.  Those are just my opinions, but I think that they have some merit.

Now we shall look the studio part of Caught Live + 5.  Interestingly, the album did not chart in the UK, but made it to #26 in the US.

The first song on the forth side is the Lodge piece "Gimme a Little Somethin".  It sounds to me like Hayward is singing the solo parts, but sometimes they are hard to tell apart.  I like this song very much, partly because it, like all of the others, were recorded in the same era of my favorite album of theirs, In Search of the Lost Chord, and it has that kind of flavor.  The Mellotron is quite nice.


My life is not as easy as you say
My life is not anything but as the day
My life is surrounded by the things of the day that have gone
My world is built on everything that I want can be won (one?)

Gimme' a little somethin' to help me on my way
Gimme' a little somethin' to help me on my way

(Love)(Love)

My heart is not as cold as you can say
My heart is not anything but as the day
My heart is warmed by the way that you love and are gone
My life is founded on the thoughts that we two are just one

Gimme' a little somethin' to help me on my way
Gimme' a little somethin' to help me on my way

(Love)(Love)

Gimme' a little somethin' to help me on my way
Gimme' a little somethin' to help me on my way
Gimme' a little somethin' to help me on my way

"Please Think about It", by Pinder, is the second studio track.  This hearkens back to their blues roots, and is really a nice song.  I suspect that it was written before the material from Days of Future Past because of the style.  Note the lack of Mellotron, vocals providing the background.  I am not sure if the lyric near the end where "I will be your guide" is a reference to the psychedelic experience or not, but since it is by Pinder it would not surprise me at all.


There in your eyes, I see
That you want to be free
There by your side, I'll be
If you still want me

Please think about it (Think about it)
I need your love
I'm no good without it (Think about it)
Please think about it (Think about it)
Give me your love
I can't live without it

Oh no
Never leave my side
Baby please decide
I'm in love with you
I hope you want me too

Don't go
Say there's nothing wrong
Stay where you belong
I'll be good to you
That's all I wanna do

Please think about it (Think about it)
I need your love
I'm no good without it (Think about it)
Please think about it (Think about it)
Give me your love
I can't live without it

Oh no
Never leave my side
Baby please decide
I'm in love with you
I hope you want me, too

Don't go
Say there's nothing wrong
Stay where you belong
I'll be good to you
That's all I wanna do

So, if you have to go
I won't stand in your way
But, if you decide to stay
I will be your guide

Please think about it (Think about it)
I need your love
I'm no good without it (Think about it)
Please think about it (Think about it)
Give me your love
I can't live without it

Oh no
Don't go

The next three songs were all written by Hayward.  The third track is "Long Summer Days".  This is an atypically simple song for The Moody Blues in that only piano, bass, drums, and vocals are used.  However, the backing vocals are extremely rich and complex.  I like this song very much.


Long summer days, I keep thinking
What to do with my time
So many ways, I keep sinking
What's to do with my time

Take me back, I don't mind
(Take me back) I've got time
(Take me back) and let me start again

Time hurries by, I keep thinking
What's to do in our time
Don't let it by, just keep thinking
What's to do in our time

Take me back, I don't mind
(Take me back) I've got time
(Take me back) and let me start again

Utopia's within our sight (Utopia)
Don't kick it or we lose it
Though you think the world's too fast
It's that way 'cause we choose it
Automation is the cry (Automation)
Our minds have been forgotten
To understand me, you must try
My thoughts are turning rotten

Oh, please, please
Don't mess it up now for me
Please, please
Don't sit there and condemn me
Please, please, please

Long summer days, I keep thinking
What's to do with my time
So many ways, I keep sinking
What's to do with my time

Take me back, I don't mind
(Take me back) I've got time
(Take me back) and let me start again

Ah, ah, ah, ah long summer days

"King and Queen" is next, and this is equal to any of their best work.  It is strongly psychedelic, has LOTS of Mellotron, excellent choral work, and Edge is really rocking on the drums.  The style of it reminds my very much of material from In Search of the Lost Chord, and I wonder if it found the cutting floor when they were putting the record together.  Remember, at the time 45 minutes was about all that could be put on a single vinyl.  I looked back, and sure enough, it was included in the 2006 SACD edition of that very album!  By the way, be sure and watch the slideshow in this embed as it has some pictures of the band wearing really cool clothes.


It's like awaking from a dream
All I remember is a lullaby
I couldn't tell you where I've been
A thousand images just flutter by

Takin' my time
In a white limousine
If I was the King
She'd be my Queen

And my thoughts are growing louder
And my mind has lost its way
And the flames are getting higher ev'ryday

My mind is back behind my eyes
And there before me sits a butterfly
And as I watch, she gently cries (And as I watch, she gently cries)
Can there be anyone who'll pity her? (Who'll pity her?)

How many faces
Have all of you been?
If I was the King
She'd be my Queen

And my thoughts are getting louder
And my mind has lost its way
And the flames are getting higher ev'ryday

My mind is back behind my eyes
And there before me sits a butterfly
And as I watch, she gently cries (And as I watch, she gently cries)
Can there be anyone who'll pity her? (Who'll pity her?)

How many faces
Have all of you been?
If I was the King
She'd be my Queen

And my thoughts are getting louder
And my mind has lost its way
And the flames are getting higher ev'ry day
And the flames are getting higher ev'ry day
And the flames are getting higher ev'ry day

The last song is "What am I Doing Here?, a plaintive, hauntingly beautiful song is what I believe to be a protest over the conflict in Viet Nam.  This song is set in the Middle Ages, but the concept is transcendental.  It is nice, with understated Mellotron and good bass.  I like the song very much, but not as much as "King and Queen".  It still is in their upper echelon of work.


Pale the young squire who goes to fight
To die at his master's side
Living is just a dream inside
You ask me why he cried
"What am I doin' here?"
"What am I doin' here?"

Beautiful princess, fair and pale
Stares out across the sea
Alone in her castle dark and grey
Her love she'll never see
"What am I doin' here?"
"What am I doin' here?"

Tenderly bury the fair young dead
Place a wooden cross at his head
All the words you can say
Have been said
It's for you my tears are shed

What can be done, you won't believe
Listen and you may see
Everyone's dream is deep within
Find it and you'll be free
"What am I doin' here?"
"What am I doin' here?"

Tenderly bury the fair young dead
Place a wooden cross at his head
All the words you can say
Have been said
It's for you my tears are shed

Tenderly bury the fair young dead
Place a wooden cross at his head
All the words you can say
Have been said
It's for you my tears are shed

I am debating whether or not to do a piece about Octave next time.  It was a mediocre album for The Moody Blues, so it might be better to go back through the material from the extended CD versions of the canonical albums.  What say ye?  Please comment freely and I promise to be nice tonight.  I was very wrong to be curt with a commenter last week, and I shall not do it again.

Finally, for those of you who did not know, the former Mrs. Translator had a total knee replacement yesterday.  She went through the surgery well, and I spoke with Youngest Son tonight and she continues to do well.  She has 79 degrees of flexation now, and has been walking with help.  Please wish her well!

Warmest regards,

Doc

Crossposted at

The Stars Hollow Gazette,

Docudharma, and

firefly-dreaming

Originally posted to Translator on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 05:59 PM PDT.

Also republished by An Ear for Music, DKOMA, and Protest Music.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tips and recs for (21+ / 0-)

    history and some great music?

    Warmest regards,

    Doc

    I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

    by Translator on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 05:21:31 PM PDT

  •  Nights in White Satin?!?.. mebe I'm showin my age? (7+ / 0-)

    er... no disrespect... but DON'T mention them in the same breath with the Who... ;)

    Dudehisattva...

    "Generosity, Ethics, Patience, Effort, Concentration, and Wisdom"

    by Dood Abides on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 06:16:34 PM PDT

  •  I am glad you chose to write about Live+5 (4+ / 0-)

    My brother got married in 1979, moved out and took a LOT of vinyl with him, including Live+5 which I never got around to picking up for myself.

    I agree that the studio tracks would all have fit in nicely on the canonical LP's but I found the live recording more enjoyable than you did.

    I admit it sounds a bit tentative, but it is not sloppy and I especially enjoyed the live versions of tunes from On the Threshold of a Dream, my favorite of the "Big 7."

    Great piece as always Doc.

    I'll be back later to see what everyone else has to say.

    I'm not paranoid, I'm just well informed--SherwoodB

    by SherwoodB on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 06:37:27 PM PDT

  •  Also, nice to see the Dood here! n/t (3+ / 0-)

    I'm not paranoid, I'm just well informed--SherwoodB

    by SherwoodB on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 06:38:46 PM PDT

  •  Good stuff, Doc. I'd still like to hear your take (4+ / 0-)

    on the Blue Jays album.  They will be here in NJ again, soon, twice.  Will provide a report.  Hope I am not disappointed.

    You don't need to firebomb Dresden to prove that you can fly the plane.

    by SpamNunn on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 06:43:24 PM PDT

    •  I liked it. Perhaps that (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SpamNunn, SherwoodB, Brown Thrasher

      should be the topic next week.  I have the vinyl.

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

      by Translator on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 06:45:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Thx (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SherwoodB, Translator

        You don't need to firebomb Dresden to prove that you can fly the plane.

        by SpamNunn on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 06:46:08 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I'd like to see you write a Blue Jays diary! (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Noor B, Translator

        Mind you, my knowledge of the content doesn't stretch too far beyond "Blue Guitar", but its reputation certainly precedes it as 1 of the best of the post-Sojourn "hiatus" — & it seems to have spawned a (metaphorical) thousand Hayward-Lodge collaboration pieces in the band's 1980s era!

        Speaking of the hiatus/solo era, what's your take on Hayward's Songwriter (1977), if any?

        Mine: Some good stuff, some dead ends; all in all a mixed bag, but better than a lot of other 1st solo albums out there. (I'll post specifics if anyone is interested...)

        Tell Congress: DON'T BREAK THE INTERNET! Fight CISPA! Stop Cyber Spying!

        by Brown Thrasher on Sat Jun 16, 2012 at 10:11:18 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I liked Blue Jays very much, (0+ / 0-)

          but honestly have never heard any of the material from
          Songwriter, so I must defer.

          Warmest regards,

          Doc

          I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

          by Translator on Sat Jun 16, 2012 at 06:52:30 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Your talk of their families being left behind.... (4+ / 0-)

    ....reminds me of part of prog drummer Bill Bruford's book.

    When he drummed for Genesis on one of their early post-Gabriel tours, he said it was pretty much like one big family -- wives and children invited.

    Others have said the summer US genesis tours were like big family outings.

    Just something I remembered.

    At the time, of course, the Moodies could afford that sort of thing far more than Genesis could.

    "The disturbing footage depicts piglets being drop kicked and swung by their hind legs. Sows are seen being kicked and shoved as they resist leaving their piglets."

    by Bush Bites on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 06:44:24 PM PDT

  •  Poor Patrick Moraz. (5+ / 0-)

    He always hooked up with groups (Moodies, Yes) when they were going through their doldrums.

    "The disturbing footage depicts piglets being drop kicked and swung by their hind legs. Sows are seen being kicked and shoved as they resist leaving their piglets."

    by Bush Bites on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 06:48:34 PM PDT

  •  I missed last week's discussion (4+ / 0-)

    about Seventh Sojourn, so I will say a bit about it tonight.  When the album came out, I bought it immediately, took it to my dorm room, and listened to it from start to finish with headphones on.  Okay, it was my roommate's headphones and stereo; I was too broke to have my own system then!

    At that first listening, I fell in love with the album, and my liking for it has never wavered.  It is one of the band's finest works.  I cannot say that I have a favorite Moody Blues album; it depends on which one I feel like listening to at any given time.

    I didn't know it at the time, but the Moodies were bookends to my college years.  To Our Children's Children's Children was released my freshman year, and Seventh Sojourn my senior year.  After graduation, I eagerly awaited the next great album, which never came.

    Caught Live + 5 was a disappointment for me.  The live songs did not excite me; and the 5 new ones, though good in their own way, lacked the cohesive magic of their full albums.  They seemed to be scraps thrown together to keep the record sales going.

    My vote is to cover Octave next week, mediocre though it was.

    •  You make some interesting points, (4+ / 0-)

      and I have ALWAYS said that The Moody Blues were never a singles band.  All of their canonical albums were concept ones, and only folks deeply imbued in their tradition can determine where the disjointed singles belong.

      I like to think that I am one of those.  I nailed "King and Queen", and also "Gimme a Little Somethin'" because I have studied them for decades.  There are two votes now, and we shall see what the third vote says.

      I never tire of writing about them, so there may be many more very boring posts to come.

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

      by Translator on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 07:10:04 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  "never a singles band" (0+ / 0-)

        That is such a hard concept for kids coming up today to comprehend.

        For those of us from back in the day, it's difficult to hear any part of the Moody Blues canon played as a single on the radio without yearning for the DJ to keep playing, to not stop at the "end" of the song.  

        It's not unlike hearing a phrase from the Gettysburg Address -- one wants to hear the whole thing in context.

        "The fears of one class of men are not the measure of the rights of another." ~ George Bancroft (1800-1891)

        by JBL55 on Fri Jun 22, 2012 at 06:51:28 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  I actually liked "Stepping in a Slide Zone" (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Translator, SherwoodB, Brown Thrasher

    Or, at least, I thought they were still trying to be relevant.

    It was that "Wildest Dream" song that made me lose any hope for them.

    "The disturbing footage depicts piglets being drop kicked and swung by their hind legs. Sows are seen being kicked and shoved as they resist leaving their piglets."

    by Bush Bites on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 07:04:27 PM PDT

    •  It is funny how different (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SherwoodB, Brown Thrasher

      people react to art.  "Wildest Dream" is one of my favorite noncanonical songs of theirs!  I thought that it captured their old sound.  That is why everyone has different takes on things:  if even two people agreed about everything, the other one would not be necessary.

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

      by Translator on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 07:14:08 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Just seemed like they gave up at that point..... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Translator, SherwoodB, Brown Thrasher

        ......and turned to nostalgia -- that's how it felt to me, anyway.

        It IS a pleasant song, though.

        "The disturbing footage depicts piglets being drop kicked and swung by their hind legs. Sows are seen being kicked and shoved as they resist leaving their piglets."

        by Bush Bites on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 07:20:10 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Metalhead here who happens to LOVE (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Translator, Brown Thrasher

        The Moody Blues. Wildest Dreams was the song that got me into the band.

        My friends and I would go see them at the Garden State Arts Center (now PNC Arts Center) here in NJ every summer. They would play with a full orchestra & we always had a great time. Sadly, they haven't played here in quite some time but truth be told, I wouldn't want to see them without Ray Thomas.

        I have their boxed set, Time Traveler (I think that's what it's called). I may have to play that one this weekend.

        A village can not reorganize village life to suit the village idiot.

        by METAL TREK on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 08:13:27 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Moraz shot himself in the foot with the Moodies, (4+ / 0-)

    dissing his employers in a Keyboard Magazine interview.

    One of his real callings is as an improvising keyboardist, and as such, he found the band's lengthy creative process kind of frustrating and in the interview he seemed to be looking down his nose at the band's musicianship, so to speak.

    I read it at the time and got the feeling he was going to get called before the committee soon...:)

    I thought he fit much better in Yes, though I'm not a big fan. He was at least the equal of any other keyboardist in their history. His improvisational ability was put to great use there as they tended to jam a lot more than the Moodies, though within a very tight structure.

    I'm not paranoid, I'm just well informed--SherwoodB

    by SherwoodB on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 07:04:50 PM PDT

  •  Can you explain why (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    SherwoodB, Translator, madmsf

    [and I know this sounds cliche] England has such rockin' talent?

    It just seems like the stuff from England, from the Moody Blues, Hendrix, to U2 and Muse, is crazy great stuff.

    The banks have a stranglehold on the political process. Mike Whitney

    by dfarrah on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 07:10:30 PM PDT

    •  It's a reaction to the food over there... :) (3+ / 0-)

      Jimi was born in Seattle, btw though it was the Brits who realized how great he was first, so they deserve some credit.  :)

      I'm not paranoid, I'm just well informed--SherwoodB

      by SherwoodB on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 07:16:21 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Hey! Hendrix was ours! (5+ / 0-)

      Though he had to go to the UK to get famous.

      "The disturbing footage depicts piglets being drop kicked and swung by their hind legs. Sows are seen being kicked and shoved as they resist leaving their piglets."

      by Bush Bites on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 07:20:58 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I am not sure, but you are (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SherwoodB, madmsf, Brown Thrasher

      pretty much correct.  Please remember that we are talking about the United Kingdom, England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.  U2 are from Eire, not part of the UK, but culturally related.

      I have no explanation other than their educational system is better than ours.  Music and classics are very important there.

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

      by Translator on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 07:21:51 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  My theory. (5+ / 0-)

        Most British musicians -- Lennon, McCartney, Townshend, Richard, Davies, Syd Barrett (I could really go on forever with this list, all the way through the punks and beyond....) -- came from art school. Most American musicians didn't.

        That's, at least, why most British bands interested me more than American bands. Even if they couldn't play like Eddie Van Halen or whoever, they were trying to express interesting thoughts and didn't let their lack of musicianship stop them from making interesting sounds.

        Whereas many American musicians were musicians for musicianship's sake.  At least that's my take.

        (Interestingly, though, few of the British Prog musicians seemed to come from art schools, so there must be something in the culture there as well.)

        "The disturbing footage depicts piglets being drop kicked and swung by their hind legs. Sows are seen being kicked and shoved as they resist leaving their piglets."

        by Bush Bites on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 07:30:13 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Their ART and music education seems (4+ / 0-)

        quite superior to ours.

        They do not regard the arts as a mere afterthought.

        Also, I would've mentioned U2 being Irish (1st generation Irish myself!), but I had to reclaim Jimi first!  :)

        I'm not paranoid, I'm just well informed--SherwoodB

        by SherwoodB on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 07:53:07 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  My university (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          SherwoodB, Brown Thrasher, Noor B

          insisted on art instruction even for a science degree.  It is essential for a well rounded person to have some knowledge of maths, science, history, arts, and literature (I am sure that I left some out) regardless of their major.

          Warmest regards,

          Dpc

          I would rather die from the acute effects of a broken heart than from the chronic effects of an empty heart. Copyright, Dr. David W. Smith, 2011

          by Translator on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 08:13:15 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Nice to see someone else recognize this... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SherwoodB, Translator, Brown Thrasher

      phenomena.  I fine myself so much more interested in British artists than any others.  This goes way back to when I was a kid.  My music library is overwhelmingly British - sometimes I'm kind of embarrassed by the bias I display in this regard.  Even with respect to contemporary music, I have, relatively speaking, less interest in American music compared to Brit stuff.  That said, there is quite a bit of crap Brit pop out there.  Euro-techno pop stuff is definitely popular over there, but there are still some good new British artists.

  •  Good stuff Doc. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Translator, Brown Thrasher

    I'm sort of agreeing with your thesis.  They were really past their peak at this point.  None of the the +5 spoke to me like the stuff from the earlier albums.  

    “that our civil rights have no dependence on our religious opinions, any more than our opinions in physics or geometry.” Thomas Jefferson

    by markdd on Fri Jun 15, 2012 at 09:57:07 PM PDT

  •  Best wishes to the former Mrs. T (0+ / 0-)

    Knee and hip replacement surgeries can restore a person's life in amazing ways.

    "The fears of one class of men are not the measure of the rights of another." ~ George Bancroft (1800-1891)

    by JBL55 on Fri Jun 22, 2012 at 07:01:01 AM PDT

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