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This is how Hedges begins what I am confident will, in due time, be looked upon as a prescient analysis of the Occupy movement:

In every conflict, insurgency, uprising and revolution I have covered as a foreign correspondent, the power elite used periods of dormancy, lulls and setbacks to write off the opposition. This is why obituaries for the Occupy movement are in vogue. And this is why the next groundswell of popular protest—and there will be one—will be labeled as “unexpected,” a “shock” and a “surprise.” The television pundits and talking heads, the columnists and academics who declare the movement dead are as out of touch with reality now as they were on Sept. 17 when New York City’s Zuccotti Park was occupied.
The next groundswell. It is coming. For I have witnessed Occupy's continued orgainizing across the country, the marches and direct actions and collective investment in combating the corporate stranglehold slowly suffocating this nation. And Hedges is correct: those declaring Occupy dead are simply out of touch. Those in the mainstream conducting post-mortems on Occupy -- and popular resistance in America generally -- don't understand the depth of discontent with our growing income disparities and corporately-owned governments.

They didn't before September 17, 2011, and they don't now.

And they also are ignoring this unyielding truth: as the disparities grow, as corporate influence and the one percent continue to gobble up greater percentages of American wealth, so too will that discontent.

Yes, those writing Occupy obituaries are out of touch. But it should be noted: they are willfully out of touch.

For these obituaries are being written precisely by those in the corporate media who make up the power structure Occupy intends to topple. Mainstream journalists today -- those who trade access for integrity, those who choose swank coctail gatherings with political and corporate elites rather than reportage from the trenches of American society -- are the ones declaring Occupy finished as an influential movement.

But they simply don't know of that which they speak. How could they? For it would require pounding the pavement and marching with those Occupy collectives across the country, from Oakland to NYC, that continue to organize and engage in direct actions. It would require a journalistic desire on the part of mainstream outlets to measure the enduring resistance, awakened last fall, still pulsing within American society, a resistance to the corporate corruption that still remains.

Here's Hedges:

Those who have the largest megaphones in our corporate state serve the very systems of power we are seeking to topple. They encourage us, whether on Fox or MSNBC, to debate inanities, trivia, gossip or the personal narratives of candidates. They seek to channel legitimate outrage and direct it into the black hole of corporate politics. They spin these silly, useless stories from the “left” or the “right” while ignoring the egregious assault by corporate power on the citizenry, an assault enabled by the Democrats and the Republicans. Don’t waste time watching or listening. They exist to confuse and demoralize you.
Yes, Occupy has been hindered by brutal police tactics and coordinted state (and federal) suppressions. However, despite this, activists continue to engage in direct actions -- from occupations of houses threatened to be foreclosed upon to stop-and-frisk marches to the comandeering of endangered public schools.

In short, the resistance remains -- being carried out by smaller numbers than in the past. But being carried out by numbers which represent those currently dormant, waiting for another chance to release their frustrations amongst the shouting masses.

Hedges again:

Our dying corporate class, corrupt, engorged on obscene profits and indifferent to human suffering, is the guarantee that the mass movement will expand and flourish. No one knows when. No one knows how. The future movement may not resemble Occupy. It may not even bear the name Occupy. But it will come. I have seen this before. And we should use this time to prepare, to educate ourselves about the best ways to fight back, to learn from our mistakes, as many Occupiers are doing in New York, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and other cities. There are dark and turbulent days ahead. There are powerful and frightening forces of hate, backed by corporate money, that will seek to hijack public rage and frustration to create a culture of fear. It is not certain we will win. But it is certain this is not over.
It's not over by a long shot. Of this I am certain.

Follow me on Twitter @David_EHG

Originally posted to Writing by David Harris Gershon on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 02:08 PM PDT.

Also republished by The Rebel Alliance.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (205+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    costello7, Herodotus Prime, Glen The Plumber, jwinIL14, david mizner, leftyguitarist, Rosaura, BigAlinWashSt, blueoasis, luckylizard, Horace Boothroyd III, MKinTN, mrsgoo, theKgirls, gooderservice, sofia, Saint Jimmy, kevinpdx, Publius2008, elwior, Ian Reifowitz, rlharry, mcd12, Caddis Fly, emal, Eric Blair, Getreal1246, Preston S, Kristina40, fumie, Flyswatterbanjo, KJG52, LinSea, Carlo, dailykozzer, Peace JD, CT Hank, quince, Egalitare, rmonroe, Mentatmark, drnononono, tardis10, Gowrie Gal, Beetwasher, gulfgal98, reflectionsv37, Demeter Rising, Robert Dobbs, maggiejean, TravnTexas, LynChi, CT yanqui, trueblueliberal, snpsmom, praenomen, LucyandByron, Paul Ferguson, cwsmoke, Gay CA Democrat, Gemina13, eru, AlwaysDemocrat, Leo in NJ, Irons33, Ice Blue, pat bunny, Simplify, blueoregon, Gustogirl, stevej, Dallasdoc, Wolf10, millwood, ColoTim, varro, jarbyus, wyvern, muddy boots, Skennet Boch, Noor B, Odysseus, ms badger, sawgrass727, MJ via Chicago, 3goldens, lcrp, Sapere aude, Lefty Coaster, offgrid, karmsy, hyperstation, thomask, AnnieJo, no way lack of brain, Medium Head Boy, SeaTurtle, Regina in a Sears Kit House, slatsg, Geenius at Wrok, SD Goat, US Blues, markthshark, sunny skies, llbear, One Pissed Off Liberal, TiaRachel, AgavePup, peptabysmal, David Futurama, SoCalHobbit, Rogneid, dilutedviking, zerone, jacey, Its a New Day, Diana in NoVa, unclejohn, Robynhood too, nicolemm, asterkitty, Wek, slowbutsure, Art Tric, topazOR, Renee, bnasley, tidalwave1, owlbear1, wonkydonkey, Only Needs a Beat, terabytes, elengul, Justina, cacamp, Oaktown Girl, Lady Libertine, psnyder, MRA NY, triv33, Cinnamon, Paddy999, Loudoun County Dem, uciguy30, ask, rantsposition, RebeccaG, terryhallinan, Ginny in CO, TigerMom, begone, radical simplicity, bluesheep, aliasalias, pgm 01, deha, Sanctimonious, DRo, DaleA, Emmy, WakeUpNeo, happymisanthropy, WheninRome, Actbriniel, daveygodigaditch, salmo, Shelley99, isabelle hayes, dance you monster, MartyM, glitterscale, MuskokaGord, bronte17, eeff, Bill in Portland Maine, jnhobbs, idbecrazyif, flowerfarmer, Sean Robertson, Tool, Pescadero Bill, BlackBandFedora, Sylv, tjmorganjr, wxorknot, Militarytracy, jrooth, Empower Ink, semiot, jbob, shaharazade, PBen, greenbastard, shortgirl, ChemBob, War on Error, jjellin, FrY10cK, Arahahex, Syoho, kharma, poligirl, cybersaur, bunsk, WB Reeves

    I'm "THE" Troubadour," and not "Troubadour" without the article. We're different people here at DK :)

    by David Harris Gershon on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 02:08:57 PM PDT

  •  I absolutely agree (31+ / 0-)

    "Let them eat cake" has never been a successful political policy or strategy.  And the results of such a policy/strategy are as predictable as they are inevitable.

    "Power concedes nothing without a demand; it never has and it never will."—Frederick Douglass

    by costello7 on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 02:12:02 PM PDT

    •  I'm knitting (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      semiot

      how about you, mon frere?

      We kidnap. We torture. It's our policy. Embrace it or end it!

      by Mosquito Pilot on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 04:33:53 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Inspired Hopelessness + Self-Organized Criticality (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      semiot, shaharazade, sunny skies, ChemBob

      I remember for years reading people on the center left writing about "keeping powder dry."  In some ways, that always struck me as vernacular for what systems scientists refer to as self-organized criticality--basically a fancy formal description of how systems tend to make their way to the cusp of avalanche or earthquake.

      And the only way to release the tension in the system is an avalanche or temblor of appropriate magnitude.  Forest managers have since learned that a zero tolerance policy for forest fires of any size leads to megafires.

      Similarly, putting the breaks on social unrest to the point of rendering all protest and civil action irrelevant only delays the problem and the potential energy backed up.  In fact, it can ultimately make the final release all the more intense by letting the system build up well beyond it's natural slope--it's natural critical limits.

      The inspired hopelessness of our era, the feeling that we're in a slow motion multigenerational civic train wreck with no say in the matter, is part of what helped Occupy become the overnight phenomenon that it became.  For a while--about half a year there--I found myself inspired and optimistic in a "big picture" way that I hadn't felt in years.  Now, with the tamping down of resistance and voice, I'm back to that same level of anxiety and inspired hopelessness I felt before Occupy emerged.  And I know I'm not alone.  Many of us learned a lot from Occupy.  Many of us had the scales hosed from our eyes.

      The next time that welling of hope and action erupts, I think many of us will be ready to jump in as veterans to that sort of mass action.  It doesn't matter if it is called Occupy or Ham Sandwich.  Branding takes a back seat to the reality of the problems many of us came together to tackle and the entrenched interests we came together to challenge.

      Each of us a cake eaters is a grain of sand.  Pile us higher and higher and we will tumble into action.  And the very safeguards built to control us, just like with Occupy and the brutality expressed by TPTB, will ultimately lead to an avalanche larger than expected.  Gravity is on our side.

      •  The Nuns get coverage, Occupy Caravan? NOT (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        fayea, Syoho

        The 99% has to stop cooperating, stop feeding the beasts hell bent on getting away with the income inequality they have been allowed to attain.

        This is what the Roman workers did to shake the shackles of the Nobility that oppressed and impoverished them.

        Leave the cities, stop being the uber consumers, and non-violently jam the cogs of our corrupted governments (local, state, and federal).

        For us to succeed, we have to shed our dystopic opinion that freedom means being on our own, and embrace interdependence.  OWS taught this well.  Remember, cooking food is the excuse first used to interrupt the solidarity in Liberty Square.  Remember, felons were told by police to go to LSq to get food, etc.  Remember, NYPD destroyed the LSq public library.  OWS was an interdependent society that was succeeding.  It really ticked off the 1%.

        We can do this.  Will we?

        Example:  Those who still have a home, make good coffee and invite ppl to get their coffee from you, not the low wage paying chains charging usery prices.

        If we don't, we will let the 1% determine what the next version of America, and then the world, will look like.  Same goes for the EU.  US and EU are the bastions of what was what we call Democracy.  They have become the corrupted bastions of the 1% Plutocrats.

        Whose version will win?  It's up to you and I and the 99%.

        Just in case you haven't heard of this and would enjoy a MEET UP when they get to your City.

        For the details go to the OCCUPY CARAVAN website:

        Occupy Caravan

        Listen to this song.  If this doesn't move your body, mind, and spirit to want to join in, nothing will.

        The Bidding of the Many, Not the Few

        It's difficult to be happy knowing so many suffer. We must unite.

        by War on Error on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 09:33:07 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  You know, (7+ / 0-)

    wanting something, even really, really, really wanting something still doesn't mean it will happen.   Occupie killed itself and will stay dead.

    •  Hard to tell. (22+ / 0-)

      I think neither obituaries nor resuurection stories are in order.  Too soon to know where it will lead, if anywhere.

      I'm from the Elizabeth Warren and Darcy Burner Wing of the Democratic Party!

      by TomP on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 02:17:38 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  How, exactly, did it kill itself? (31+ / 0-)

      And how, exactly, is it dead?

      I'm "THE" Troubadour," and not "Troubadour" without the article. We're different people here at DK :)

      by David Harris Gershon on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 02:37:05 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I guess because (15+ / 0-)

        he proclaimed it? :D It is morphing, it is not dead.

        ~War is Peace~Freedom is Slavery~Ignorance is Strength~ George Orwell "1984"

        by Kristina40 on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 03:09:39 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  It became a movement about police tactics... (33+ / 0-)

        and the use of public parks.  OWS became about the rights of protest groups, and the core message - the brilliant, powerful core message about wealth inequality and the power of the financial sector - which was the driving force for the movement's success was drowned out.

        But that doesn't take away from the success that the protests enjoyed throughout the fall, when the movement succeeded in driving that core message to the very center of American political discourse, and there's no reason a future iteration couldn't recreate that success.

        Art is the handmaid of human good.

        by joe from Lowell on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 03:41:51 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Oligarchy made it a movement of police tactics (14+ / 0-)

          They were in public spaces.

          We have the right of free speech.

          there were almost a thousand comments to the diary below. I didn't even see the diary. How many others would have commented?

          THU JUN 07, 2012 AT 09:04 AM EDT
          FOIA Revelations Show Administration Role In Occupy Crackdown+*
          by joe shikspack

          http://www.dailykos.com/...

          •  WHY it happened is irrelevant. (5+ / 0-)

            The point is that it has been pushed to the side as an effective political tactic. Whatever principles advocates for more "Occupying" may think they are advancing, all they're really doing is making lefties look bad, and playing into the hands of Republicans.

            Occupy made complete sense--and succeeded in changing the national conversation--when it was focused on Wall Street and Wall Street alone. When it became the hippie kids' shantytown and started being known mostly for conflict with police, it ceased to have any beneficial political function.

            •  I think Marty Kaplan made a good point today: (12+ / 0-)
              The consequence of being a citizen who cares about issues like carbon footprints, peak oil and rising temperatures is a feeling of powerlessness. The oligarchs have us by the short hairs. If you aren't feeling impotent, you haven't been paying attention.

              Powerlessness hurts -- literally. It's a clinical diagnosis. The Occupy movement was, briefly, a kind of therapy for it. Tracking every online detail about the latest outrage is a recent form of self-medication for it. But as long as informed majorities are rendered helpless by a rigged system, the only thing more demoralizing than knowing how nigh the end may really be is being trapped, powerless, alongside that nutcase in the cartoon (a man carrying a sign that says "The end of the world is nigh").

              OWS was the most exciting movement to move into the political arena this generation so Wall Street had it shut down. It was too effective. But they're not dead. Members of OWS marched in solidarity with the silent protest that was held in NYC yesterday.
              •  Here's an example proving that the fight against (9+ / 0-)

                corporate corruption is still alive:

                Climate and anti-poverty activists have launched a 24-hour “Twitter storm” against the hundreds of billions of dollars of government subsidies paid each year to the petroleum and coal industry, despite the global economic downturn and the rise in emissions.

                The blitz, which has been supported by Stephen Fry, Robert Redford, actor Mark Ruffalo, politicians and environmentalists, took the hash tag #endfossilfuelsubsidies up to number two in the ranking of globally trending topics and number one in the US.

                “We’re averaging a tweet a second, but it picks up when celebs hit the hashtag,” said Jamie Henn of www.350.org, a climate group that is among the leaders of the campaign.

                Raw Story

                Like I said in an earlier entry, the movement contains many groups, and they are starting to find new ways to fight back. OWS is far from becoming obsolete.
              •  holy shit (0+ / 0-)

                marty kaplan making a good point?  my mind just snapped.  Must be a different marty kaplan.

                all morals are relative, but some are more relative than others.

                by happymisanthropy on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 01:23:24 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

            •  If you need mainstream media covrage to be (8+ / 0-)

              an effective tactic then you are forever doomed to fail.  And that is the basis on which so many choose to judge Occupy.  How much good or bad media it gets.

              There revolution will not be televised. But it will be blogged, a lot. Probably more so than is necessary.

              by AoT on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 08:03:17 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Tell that to Martin Luther King. (0+ / 0-)

                As a point of historical fact, every protest movement that has had any success whatsoever in this country since the dawn of mass media has made effective use of media coverage.

                And that includes OWS during its period of greatest success.

                Do try to keep in mind: the purpose of a protest movement is not to make the participants feel good about themselves, but to connect with and convince outsiders, like the civil rights movement did.  If you give up on mass media, like you want to do, how is that supposed to happen?

                Art is the handmaid of human good.

                by joe from Lowell on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 12:56:23 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Mass media is the enemy now (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Dallasdoc

                  Mass media is central to corporate control over this country.  If you think we are somehow magically going to get them to start criticizing the status quo then you are mistaken.  It's not as if Occupy ever stopped targeting the rich and powerful, the media chose to ignore that to focus on the police brutality.  The mass media is profoundly different now  than it was during the era of the civil rights movement.

                  There revolution will not be televised. But it will be blogged, a lot. Probably more so than is necessary.

                  by AoT on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 01:10:15 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  You don't have a choice. (0+ / 0-)

                    If you cede the mass media, you cede any possibility of connecting with the masses.  Period, end of story.

                    Failure is not an option.  If you aren't going to even try to get your message out through the mass media - as Occupy successfully did throughout the fall, I'd like to remind you - then you might as well pack it up and go home, because you've given up.

                    And no, you are flat-out wrong in your claim that Occupy didn't change its message.  Go back and look at the diary list from, say, December.  DHS conspiracy theories and other commentary about policing tactics very much crowded out diaries with the core message - and were enthusiastically up-rated by supporters, pushing other topics off the rec list.  That wasn't the media that did that - it was the occupiers themselves.

                    Art is the handmaid of human good.

                    by joe from Lowell on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 01:27:25 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  That was not mostly Occupiers (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      WB Reeves

                      that was people here writing about Occupiers.  I know that Occupy needs to do a better job of getting our message, and a big part of the problem here was that there were plenty of good diaries being written about these things but they got crowded out by the police violence diaries and DHS CT.  It's pretty obvious, to me at least, that Occupy needs to do a better job in this regard, but the flash in the pan in the media is not a sustainable method.  It worked for the Tea Party because the TP was run by the rich.  Occupy doesn't have that option.

                      There revolution will not be televised. But it will be blogged, a lot. Probably more so than is necessary.

                      by AoT on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 01:41:42 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  Interesting point. (1+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        WB Reeves

                        One thing I'd like you to keep in mind: Occupy did do a fantastic job getting its message out, for a few months.  The MSM itself began talking about wealth inequality, and the phrase "the one percent" entered the lexicon.  Sure, they also talked about stinky hippies, but so what?  Occupy wasn't there to make Occupy popular; they were there to make the issues of economic inequality and the influence of big money on our political system popular, and they did it.  They changed this nation's discourse, every bit as much as the Tea Party, if not more.

                        So there's no need to despair.  We know Occupy can do this, because we've seen it happen.

                        Art is the handmaid of human good.

                        by joe from Lowell on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 01:56:12 PM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

            •  I think it (0+ / 0-)

              is the other way around.

          •  And OWS let them, and lost its message. (8+ / 0-)

            "The Oligarchy" used brutal police suppression against the civil rights marchers, too, but they didn't lose their focus.  They responded to police suppression by using the imagery of brutality to garner sympathy for their movement and message, but they always turned it back to the issue of civil rights and racial equality.

            Art is the handmaid of human good.

            by joe from Lowell on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 06:04:55 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  The police were part of the oppression of blacks (8+ / 0-)

              under Jim Crow and pretending like the protests for civil rights had nothing to do with police brutality is absurd and completely ahistorical.  How is it that you suggest Occupy turn that brutality against wall street, in a way that the media will pay attention to?  Because I've seen the connection made here, and elsewhere, many times and yet I still see folks say the same sort of thing you are saying.

              There revolution will not be televised. But it will be blogged, a lot. Probably more so than is necessary.

              by AoT on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 08:06:30 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  It's like you never even read my comment. (0+ / 0-)

                Me:

                "The Oligarchy" used brutal police suppression against the civil rights marchers, too, but they didn't lose their focus.  They responded to police suppression by using the imagery of brutality to garner sympathy for their movement and message
                You:  
                pretending like the protests for civil rights had nothing to do with police brutality is absurd and completely ahistorical
                Dude, WTF?
                How is it that you suggest Occupy turn that brutality against wall street, in a way that the media will pay attention to?
                If you actually want an answer to this question, a good place to start would be to look at how the civil rights movement did it.  Or, perhaps, reading the next half of that sentence: but they always turned it back to the issue of civil rights and racial equality.

                Or, to be even briefer: stay on message.

                Because I've seen...
                You'll have to forgive me if, having read your reply, I am not terribly moved by your assertions of what you've seen.

                Art is the handmaid of human good.

                by joe from Lowell on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 12:51:31 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  The civil rights movement wasn't dealing (0+ / 0-)

                  with a media environment even remotely like what we have now.  And the connection between civil rights and police brutality was far more clear than the connection between Occupy protests and police brutality.

                  You'll have to forgive me if, having read your reply, I am not terribly moved by your assertions of what you've seen.
                  So you don't care that I and others have been trying to make the connection for months now.  You just want to keep to the "Why can't you be more like MLK" refrain.

                  There revolution will not be televised. But it will be blogged, a lot. Probably more so than is necessary.

                  by AoT on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 01:05:49 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  There are a lot more media outlets now. (0+ / 0-)

                    I fail to see how the modern media environment is supposed to be less fertile for a protest movement than that of the 1950s.

                    And the connection between civil rights and police brutality was far more clear than the connection between Occupy protests and police brutality.
                    Then why, pray tell, would anyone consider it a good idea for Occupiers to go off-message and talk about policing tactics and DHS conspiracy theories, instead of continuing to push the core message of economic inequality and its effect on our political system?
                    So you don't care that I and others have been trying to make the connection for months now.
                    No, it's specific to you.

                    Art is the handmaid of human good.

                    by joe from Lowell on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 01:22:44 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  There is a huge difference between media outlets (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      joe from Lowell

                      and the major media outlets.  There are a lot of different ways we can spread our message without needing news networks and major papers.  Those are the groups I have a problem with, not mass communication as a general thing.

                      No, it's specific to you.
                      Okay.  This actually made me laugh for some reason.  Not in a condescending way, just because it's nice to see someone be so damn specific.

                      There revolution will not be televised. But it will be blogged, a lot. Probably more so than is necessary.

                      by AoT on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 01:45:09 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  You're a good sort. I like you. (1+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        WB Reeves

                        The thing is, the networks and the big papers are still where most people get their information.  And don't forget, it was these very channels through which OWS's message first penetrated the consciousness of the general population.

                        You keep saying it can't be done, but I just saw it happen, just last fall.

                        Art is the handmaid of human good.

                        by joe from Lowell on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 01:59:17 PM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  It was, but that was always going to be a fleeting (0+ / 0-)

                          thing.  We might get attention every now and then, but it's really the actions as to where we have power.  I like the refocusing on stopping foreclosures.  I think that and the continuing move your money campaign are going to have the biggest impact in terms of real effect on the country.  If we make these sorts of resistances to the powerful visible and explain why we do it then I could care less if the medias is friendly.  The reason the media was "friendly" in that beginning period was because they didn't quite understand what was going on and weren't sure how to spin it.  They have a pretty good hold on that now.

                          There revolution will not be televised. But it will be blogged, a lot. Probably more so than is necessary.

                          by AoT on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 04:28:42 PM PDT

                          [ Parent ]

                          •  There is a limited window of time. (0+ / 0-)

                            I'm impressed that OWS's campaign managed to succeed for as long as it did.  People who advertise cars know that a particular ad series is going to have a shelf life; people waging media campaigns should, too.  They should plan on that from the beginning, and change their act when it gets stale, like any other road show.

                            But I don't think the reality of a shelf-life makes media-centered campaigns useless.  I think OWS should respond to the media losing interest in the old act by coming up with a new act - and I think they will.

                            Art is the handmaid of human good.

                            by joe from Lowell on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 12:44:51 PM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

            •  You're right. And it's message was unspecific... (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              semiot, joe from Lowell, WB Reeves

              ...at any given moment at an Occupy event, or even just a day at an Occupation when someone had the mike, the topic being addressed could span such an amazingly broad range of issues that it was hard to identify what the "movement" was about.

              I'm not even saying that's a bad thing, really -- voice was given to many issues no one had been speaking about forcefully enough to crowds in public places. But it had the effect in the eyes of a lot of people of watering down the overall "message."

              I spent a fair amount of time at Occupy Boston, and I know it wasn't just a ragtag bunch of kids with time on their hands and no urge to shower, but that's how it was portrayed constantly. But more often than I care to recall I watched adults visit, interested and even leaning toward supporting the effort, and within a short time be turned off by some of the less fortunate individuals walking around giving orders or "greeting" in belligerent tones. Example, and I watched this multiple times, someone comes in carrying donations of clothing or food, and is accosted by a person with a "badge" of some sort on identifying him as part of the team, demanding "Where do you think you're going with that food?" The man was clearly mentally ill, but why give him a responsibility like that in the first place?

              What do you think people think who heard or read about the high-intensity debates about whether sex offenders should be encouraged to participate? Easy to say, "Well screw them, who needs them?" But the fact is they are needed. And I would say especially the more mature, i.e., older, ones, who hear that and think, "Oh, yeah, forget it. And my daughter's not going down there."

              I sympathize on the one hand with a movement that says, "Screw you if you don't get it or you don't like what we're doing. By now you should." But taking a look at where this thing ought to be now and where it is, I'd say that's not been such a remarkably clever marketing strategy. And they can harrumpf all they want and say "We're above marketing strategies." But it sure looks to me like they could use one, and maybe it's too late. I sure hope not.

              I was willing to stick around despite a lot of the unpleasantness I witnessed right within the camp. Was there the night the police came and busted up the camp. And my time spent there was worth it, but maybe I'm more patient than a lot of the people who visited, looked, and concluded, "Oh, nice idea, but I don't think so." But I haven't heard much about Occupy lately. And we could sure as hell use something that got people out into the streets, making demands.

              Ich bin ein Wisconsiner!

              by Apphouse50 on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 03:54:06 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  Yes, Public places. That means everyone. If (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            peregrinus, Don midwest

            people are camping out they make this public space unavailable to others. What happened to my right and that of others to use these public spaces?

            Progressives will win only when we convince a majority that they, too, are Progressive. And... It’s the Supreme Court, stupid!

            by auapplemac on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 07:22:45 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  It's a movement that's just been born (41+ / 0-)

          The teabaggers had over three decades of corporate sponsorship of propaganda outlets, subornation of Federal judges, and takeover of the mainstream media behind their "success."

          The labor movement had decades of bloody conflicts with police and National Guard before labor rights were finally legislated into existence.

          The civil rights movement marched and worked for decades before their issues came to a head.

          Change takes a long time in American politics, and none of the basic changes start out in a political party.  Parties are coopted by a successful movement, when the party leaders find it in their interest to play along.  

          Occupy is just being born.  It will have many iterations and manifestations before its eventual success arrives.  The fact that those it threatens comfort themselves with illusions of its demise.  But that's an inevitable stage in the growth of a social change movement.  As the famous mistranslation of the Gandhi quote goes:

          First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, then you win.
          Like Kubler-Ross' stages of grief, these are not sequential developments, but general stages in an evolution.  It is natural to see movement forward and back, and more than one stage at a time in different places.  Last September the ignoring stopped, and the ridicule and fighting began.  Now ignoring is more popular again, but that doesn't mean the process is finished.  We will win when working class conservative whites see the virtue in making common cause with progressives on economic populist issues.  That's where we're going, and it'll probably take a lot more pain for them to get ready to join us.  Alas.

          When Free Speech is outlawed, only outlaws will have Free Speech.

          by Dallasdoc on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 04:20:44 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  terrific comment, DD, truly Top Comment worthy (11+ / 0-)

            I, too, think that Occupy will do a lot of morphing before it finds the form that will prevail in the uprising against the plutocracy.

            I don't believe you can kill the human spirit; it will push up and up until it finds a viable form.

            I belong to the “US” of America, not the “ME,$,ME,$,ME,$,ME,$” of America!

            by SeaTurtle on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 05:26:21 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Dd - I do think the camping phase is over (6+ / 0-)

            I think that the mayors and police chiefs have learned that they have the best legal position if they toss out the campers the first night, as soon as the Occupy group stays beyond the posted closing time or violates any city law, ordinance, or rule. That seemed to be the biggest lesson learned by city officials from the initial Occupy encampments.  

            "let's talk about that"

            by VClib on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 05:32:20 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  I have one question... (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            auapplemac, DRo

            It's an honest question, and one I don't entirely know the answer to:
            Where did the hippies go?

            That, too, fits your model of 'new-born social movements' - a closer fit, I think, then the others you mentioned.  But after Altamont, where did it go?  How did the hippies of the 60's become the oppressive ruling elite that dominate the press and politics today?

            And what will prevent the same from happening to Occupy?

            •  You're confusing Yuppies with Hippies. (14+ / 0-)

              The conservatives were very successful at marginalizing the hippie name...they lumped a lot of people into one catagory that included anti-war protesters, civil rights workers, teachers, environmentalists, entertainers, feminists, and many more groups that they saw as a threat to their power. They convinced a lot of people - through the media - that this loose coalition of people were kooks. They made them the butt of jokes, and when it moved into prime time cartoons, then a whole new generation had a skewed image of who they really were. I was called a hippie, even by my own family, although I certainly didn't resemble the image you see portrayed in the movies. I was anti-establishment and rebellious, which was equated to the hippie movement.

              The Yuppies where a group of people who tried to capitalize on the free love movement. They were faux cool. They weren't committed to change, they were only interested in getting something for nothing. As soon as the movement ended, they became the soulless group of affluent people we are fighting now.

              The hippies are still here, although our numbers are dwindling because of age...and many of us are having to fight online now, instead of in the streets because we're aging, and our physical efforts are limited.

              •  I don't mean to slight hippies, (5+ / 0-)

                I have a huge deal of respect for the gains that came from them, in everything from civil rights to sexual liberty.  My parents were both involved in the movement to varying degrees.  My mother swam in the reflecting pool and participated in the sit-ins at segregationist business in Durham.  But she's now almost conservative - she still votes democratic, but she's bought into a lot of the anti-immigrant rhetoric, and is increasingly uncomfortable with having to pay for young peoples stuff - like education.  It's been a distressing transformation to watch.

                I think the parallel between Occupy and the hippie movement is very much appropriate.  Like 'hippies', Occupy is very much a decentralized movement composed of a number of different ideological motivations.  And, as you point out, the demonization of hippies was largely successful.

                •  You make some very good points. I'm sorry your (6+ / 0-)

                  mother is less sympathetic to the movement now, but people change, and sometimes they change because of bad experiences.

                  I'm thankful your mother had the courage to fight to end segregation...you should be very proud of her, and believe me, it took a lot of courage to participate in that struggle.

                  As some of the diarists have pointed out, OWS is in its early stages so it is natural for it to experience problems, but believe me, there are some very astute and intelligent people involved in that movement, and more importantly, they are committed to their cause, and in the end, that will make them almost unstoppable.

                  Nameste...

                •  I don't know your mom or her story (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Don midwest, WB Reeves

                  However, there were many "hippies" who were just along for the ride because it was popular and fun to be a hippie.  There was a lot of social pressure like always.  The movement's philosophy did not run deep in many of the people who showed up and looked the part.  I suppose this will be found to be true of the Occupy movement as well.  

                  I was wise enough to never grow up while fooling most people into believing I had. - Margaret Mead

                  by fayea on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 10:34:33 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

            •  Where is the draft? (16+ / 0-)

              Where are the rigid social conformity and old-fashioned sexual mores of the 1950's and before?  The hippies had a huge influence on national culture, and won a lot of the battles they fought for change.  The fact that you don't see that is the measure of their success.

              When Occupy wins it won't look like campers in a park.  The park and the tents are not the essence of the movement.  The rights of working people, the cause of the middle class, and counterbalancing the overwhelming power of money in our society are the essence of the movement.  It is a swing of the pendulum away from corporate conservatism, which has tried to throttle New Deal America and labor unions, which was a reaction to an earlier period of economic royalism.  This tug of war is old in our country, and it goes on and on.  The task of our time is to reclaim from the country from the oligarchs, just as our forebears have done before, again and again.

              When Free Speech is outlawed, only outlaws will have Free Speech.

              by Dallasdoc on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 06:20:43 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  I think the parallel is still very apt, (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                peregrinus

                You might be right that 'occupy' can win as a mentality, but you compared Occupy explicitly to several organized movements - the Tea Party, labour, and civil rights.  These all had staying power in the form of permanent organizations, congressional caucuses, lobbying operations, etc, that have, in the case of labour and civil rights, survived for decades.  The hippie movement did produce major changes (including producing most of the modern civil rights movement), but the movement itself has vanished as a coherent entity.  They also failed at many of their major political goals - Richard Nixon won two terms in office, and the war outlasted the movement by half a decade.

                •  Movements don't start on the inside (13+ / 0-)

                  They start in the grassroots and when they show enough backing and power "leaders" emerge to play the inside game.  Successful social movements need both, if they want to achieve political ends, but that doesn't mean the inside game needs to be played right away.  Without enough independent support and power moving inside the power structure is likely to get you coopted and marginalized.

                  Hippies never had primarily political goals.  Sure, some went clean for Gene, but they were a minority.  That generation wanted to change the culture and the society they lived in, and in that were pretty successful.  The cultural movement of the 60's fundamentally changed this country in ways Richard Nixon couldn't begin to dream of.

                  Occupy has explicitly political goals, but they don't intend to play the electoral game right away.  If the movement is successful I don't think we'll see Occupy endorsing candidates.  Instead we'll begin to see candidates endorse Occupy.  It's a powerful message that has proved extremely potent in American politics before.  I think the PTB know that it can be again.

                  When Free Speech is outlawed, only outlaws will have Free Speech.

                  by Dallasdoc on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 07:06:02 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Yes, and they got Richard Nixon and Reagan, etc. (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    ozsea1

                    There was a definite push back from the general public.

                    If they had really changed things that were important to most people, then why did McGovern who supported so much of the hippie movement get squashed by Nixon?

                    The only movements that actually accomplished major change were abolitionists, suffragettes, civil rights and unions. And, they were all singleminded and convinced enough Americans to succeed (except for abolitionists - a war was fought to make that successful).

                    If you don't bring the public with you, you lose. That's America.

                    Progressives will win only when we convince a majority that they, too, are Progressive. And... It’s the Supreme Court, stupid!

                    by auapplemac on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 08:20:27 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Well yeah, that is human nature (2+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      joe wobblie, fayea

                      We are the original pushme-pullme creatures.

                      To live a creative life, we must lose our fear of being wrong. -Joseph Chilton Pearce

                      by glitterscale on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 04:26:25 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                    •  Why do you think (3+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      Don midwest, fayea, Dallasdoc

                      that people globally have rejected the OWS movement and it's goals? They haven't as people everywhere are losing their rights civil and human, their means to make a decent life, all for the the 'theory and implementation of oligarchical collectivism. People aren't going to just roll over for the profit and power of the would be masters of the universe. This NWO is not 'inevitable' or even sustainable.  

                      The political system in our country no longer represents not only the people but our 'national interest'. It is busy dismantling our laws and civil and human rights.  Fear is all the 1% has and their comes a time when that is not enough. When ordinary people have no parliamentary means to address their grievances they have nothing to lose by hitting the streets. They always do when the oligarchy goes too far with their nightmare visions of power and greed.      

                      OWS is the flip side to the inevitable NWO in which we all are supposed to roll over and accept viscous anti-democratic global capitalism and senseless endless war on terra. All  political systems globally have been taken over by entities that are  ant-democratic and are touted as TBTF.  Their message is simple and to the point 'This is not what democracy looks like' And 'Do not be afraid'.

                      The public is under siege, public is now a dirty word. Look at the polls nobody likes what they are doing except the fearful and authoritarian lovers. I hear over and over in the real world 'What choice do we have?' as regards to politics. I also hear, this is not working.

                      OWS is not extreme it's not really even ideological, nothing radical about democracy or equality.  QWS is just the beginning because people do have the power to reign in the !% and their NWO is too big not to fail. They are too arrogant and top heavy not to.

                      The Democratic party needs to fight for the 'public' in order to bring them along. Ass backward politics that offer only fear, austerity and misery billed as 'better then' just cannot hold. OWS is just getting started and   it may morph and change but it isn't going to go away. The way things are going they just may be real TBTF.                

            •  Whoa, please! The hippies did not become (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Dallasdoc, Don midwest

              the oppressive ruling elite.  Who did become the ruling elite are those who were against us hippies from the beginning.  People in my age cohort were not all hippies.  There were many young Republicans.  I can name them from my senior high school class and I'm pretty sure those smug superior sneering conservatives are in the ruing elite now.  Those of us who were really hippies in the sense of politically progressive are still here and still fighting.  I may look different than I did 40 years ago, but my political perspective is no less progressive.  And don't discount what we did accomplish in our youth:  Civil rights, women's rights, end the draft, voting from age 18, many advances in environmental causes......
              Why didn't we do more?  First of all, only human, large obstacles, had children to raise.  And then a series of very demoralizing assassinations.  And then to top it off:  Disco!!!!   Could you possibly bring into fashion anything more materialistic and nihilistic?  

              I was wise enough to never grow up while fooling most people into believing I had. - Margaret Mead

              by fayea on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 10:26:53 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  Consider this sentence when turned around 180 deg (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ozsea1, shaharazade, fayea
            Parties are coopted by a successful movement, when the party leaders find it in their interest to play along.  
            It's been more my experience that:

            Successful movements are co-opted by political parties when movement leaders find it in their interest to play along.

            The test of whether we're willing to stand up to the thugs that wrote voter suppression laws is this: Are you willing to hold hands with someone that needs hand holding in order to qualify to vote?

            by Richard Cranium on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 10:14:16 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  what d-doc said. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Dallasdoc

            I endorse his entire comment, even the punctuation.

      •  I think many of the people on this site are (13+ / 0-)

        unaware of how many groups have formed - within the last two years - with the sole purpose of changing the current political climate and to end the economic disparity that is destroying our nation. OWS has certainly garnered more attention, but they are not alone by any means, and many of the groups that I am aware of are communicating with each other and they are collaborating to achieve the same goal.

        That is why Obama and Congress have conspired to shut them down. That is why the President has armed local police forces to the max and why he has employed Homeland Security to monitor their activities. They know how real a threat they are to their re-elections. OWS is not an Obama supporter, but the do not support the Republicans either. That is why Congress passed a bill to make it a felony to protest under certain situations and that is why the President signed it into law.

        Big mistake.

        Time has taught us that no matter how hard authorities try to stifle people's anger, the more they create enemies who will become more determined to throw them out. I wouldn't be surprised if the government hasn't labeled OWS as a domestic terrorist organization. In the end, it will create a lot of turmoil that might tear our nation apart. I remember too well how LBJ's policies during the Vietnam War tore our nation apart and how it hurt the Democratic Party.

        There is no way the current political direction of our country can be sustained. The average citizen is too angry.

        I think these organizations will make their voices heard before November; if not, then you can expect the next president's term to be a very volatile one.

      •  It Didn't Kill Itself--A Police Crackdown Did (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Dallasdoc, davekro

        Do you also think Rodney King beat himself on that video?

        •  If a police crackdown (0+ / 0-)

          can kill a movement, it's an admission that the movement wasn't much of a movement to begin with.

          Nothing that OWS has experienced thus far compares to the level of repression unleashed against the popular movements of the 1960's and I don't accept this as an excuse for their failures either.

          Heck, I don't even agree that OWS has been "killed."

    •  that's what you all keep pleading for (31+ / 0-)

      over and over again. and yet the periodic nature of these pronouncements suggests that they are in vain.

      if it were dead, critics wouldn't keep paying such attention to it, pronouncing it over and of no interest at all.

    •  LOL. SO certain that the "boogie man" is dead.... (31+ / 0-)

      I'm sorry.  I just have to laugh.  "Occupy" is not a brand name.  It's really just another word for dscontent with growing economic inequality and lack of alternatives.  I see NOTHING in either major party that will make the inequality and discontent go away.  However, maybe you think that we have finally become completely hypnotized and will now even put up with starvation or work camps.  Maybe so but I really don't think we will.

      The real power in America is held by a fast-emerging new Oligarchy of pimps and preachers who see no need for Democracy or fairness or even trees, except maybe the ones in their own yards, and they don't mind admitting it. ~ Hunter S. Thompson

      by Saint Jimmy on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 02:49:15 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Also wanting it not to happen (26+ / 0-)

      won't mean it won't. The cold, hard fact is that inequality is getting worse, and there's no end in sight. Sooner or later, push will come to shove. It is inevitable. People can only take so much. When they have nothing left to lose, the food riots begin.

    •  ? (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KJG52, elwior, Ginny in CO
      Occupie killed itself and will stay dead.

      H'mm. I'm not terribly into this, anymore.

      by Knarfc on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 03:19:47 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Occupy showed a remarkable ability to adapt. (9+ / 0-)

      I'm optimistic.  There are clearly some very intelligent, capable organizing minds in the movement's leadership.  I wouldn't write them off.

      Art is the handmaid of human good.

      by joe from Lowell on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 03:37:29 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  based upon my experience with local Occupy (28+ / 0-)

        Some of the truly most intelligent people I have met were among the leaders in my local Occupy.  One young man simply blew me away with his incredible intellectual ability.  These people are not just "pie in the sky types,"  they realistically know what they are up against but not to fight back is worse.  The younger people in the Occupy movement are trying to save their (and our) future.  Without the changes Occupy espouses, their futures are very bleak and they know it.

        What many do not truly get about Occupy is that it is first and foremost a social movement, not a political movement in the terms of Democrats and Republicans.  IMHO, the greatest changes in our ways of thinking and our society come out of social movements, not from organized political parties.  

        Occupy is definitely not dead.  

        "Growing up is for those who don't have the guts not to. Grow wise, grow loving, grow compassionate, but why grow up?" - Fiddlegirl

        by gulfgal98 on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 03:57:24 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  If they're smart, they'll stop camping. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          peregrinus

          The encampments no longer serve any purpose except to alienate people who agree with us about the basic economic equality issue.

          If, as you say, they're "intelligent", Occupiers will get out of the parks and into hearings, public meetings, editorial columns and election campaigns. Politely, with effectively crafted strategic messages.

          •  The media has been ignoring (13+ / 0-)

            massive protests in the street since the buildup to the Iraq invasion, if not before.

            The camping was unusual enough to attract attention, and that was what was required at the time.

            Government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth - Abraham Lincoln

            by Gustogirl on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 04:30:42 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Which proves my point. (0+ / 0-)

              If the media ignores something--or shows it only as violent scofflaw radicals and crazy people who fight the police--that strategy is a failure. You have to try something else.

              The camping stopped being "unusual" a month after OWS.

          •  Dracowyrm - the camping phase is over (3+ / 0-)

            see my longer comment upstream.

            "let's talk about that"

            by VClib on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 05:34:18 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Seriously Dracowyrm, (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            davekro, gulfgal98

            Your comments only reveal a very superficial understanding and awareness of ows, what is behind it and the actions and process involved.

            Nor do you seem to see it in a long vision of the history of societal change through revolution. All of which has been steadily changing since Gandhi introduced peaceful, non violent resistance. The addition of cell phones with cameras, social networking and the Internet, very new forms of resistance and revolution are being developed, globally.

            If you have not been involved in any actual activist groups, or at least keeping tabs on your local ows activity at their website, you have too few pieces to grasp what is going on. That is without meeting any of the people, like the ones cited here, that are very smart, very savvy and totally committed.

            One of the intelligent strategic changes in this new form of resistance is not to have easily identified leaders at the top. Easy targets for assassination by loonies, time and energy wasting harassment and other distractions. This lack of the inspirational leader is another reason many people are sure the movement has died.

            No, the world is changing. You can't just use the past to predict what will work or be used now. And if you spout opinions based on what you read here and other places, they will come across as uninformed. Chris Hedges is easily one of the best people to listen to. He has more access to any mike than most. I strongly suspect  the discouraged, disbelievers and despairing are his target audience.

            "People, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed and redeemed; never throw out anyone. " Audrey Hepburn "A Beautiful Woman"

            by Ginny in CO on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 07:48:45 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  I can't agree. They still need to grab media attn. (0+ / 0-)

            The general public isn't going to pay the movement any mind at all if they leave the streets and limit their actions the way you advise.  Remember, this isn't about getting 51% to support House Resolution A Billion and One.  This is about shifting the popular consciousness.

            Art is the handmaid of human good.

            by joe from Lowell on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 01:02:14 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  I think the thing to keep in mind (0+ / 0-)

          is that the assaults continue.

          As was pointed out, the 1% have not stopped, the oligarchy is established and thriving, and Americans, that is the middle class are still getting the short end of the stick.

          So long as the status quo remains in place so will the "Occupy mindset." Are people starting to pay attention? You bet they are. They are at the very least starting to question the very system they have supported, and it has been leaving a bitter taste.

          It is all about time. Eventually sooner or later people get tired of having the crap beat out of them by the politicians, the media, government...yes even the 1%.

          The spark is still there and it will catch fire again, it just takes a little time. Time is on our side, history shows us that.

          "We can either have democracy in this country or we can have great wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we can't have both." Louis Brandeis

          by wxorknot on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 07:04:53 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  "organizing minds"? (0+ / 0-)

        Then Occupy has morphed beyond recognition and has ceased to be what it set out to be. Organized? Just have your favorite progressive congressperson declare an "Occupy" caucus and get it over with.

        •  "Occupy" always showed good organizing skills (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Don midwest, davekro, allergywoman

          Tent cities with medical tents and trash cleanup crews take a lot more organizational skills than merely stuffing a bunch of Tea Party whackos onto a fleet of buses paid for by a consortium of billionaires.

          On the other hand, your comment history shows a propensity for trolling.  You have amazingly few un-HR'd comments.

          "First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win". Mohandas K. Gandhi

          by DaveinBremerton on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 05:29:22 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  I think you misunderstand the term "organizing." (0+ / 0-)

          I'm not talking about putting different-colored sticky tabs on documents to keep them straight.

          I'm using the term in the sense of "labor organizing" or "community organizing."

          Art is the handmaid of human good.

          by joe from Lowell on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 01:05:09 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Occu pie? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      glitterscale

      "We the People of the United States...." -U.S. Constitution

      by elwior on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 05:12:56 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  peregrinus, ever heard of a phoenix? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dilutedviking, aliasalias

      the human spirit does not give up under the sort of oppression we are suffering....

      I tend to think that Hedges is right.  It will resurface and perhaps it will take a new form....... but people will not let the plutocracy enslave them.

      I belong to the “US” of America, not the “ME,$,ME,$,ME,$,ME,$” of America!

      by SeaTurtle on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 05:22:49 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I'm all for that (0+ / 0-)

        Hopefully it will be something new and really creative.  Camping out with drum circles,  dope,  fighting cops,  and covering it all with commie lite - the people's this,  the general secretary, er assembly that,  is such old news.  Been there done that, man.

        •  @Peregrinus (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Brooklyn Jim, davekro

          You seem like you must have watched a lot of MTV in your lifetime. Your comment "Been there done that, man" illustrates a lack of attention. Income inequality was SOOO last September! Did you ever attend an occupation or just armchair camp it while watching fox news?  

        •  "fighting cops" yeah, you're in touch (snark) (0+ / 0-)

          I used to have hope. Now I just see most Dem's audacity in maintaining the corporate status quo... UPDATED: With OWS, I now feel hopeful again! May the OWS movement strengthen, grow and become a catalyst for significant change.

          by davekro on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 10:08:16 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  why sure, and the msm sez Lindsay Lohan is the (6+ / 0-)

      most important thing in the world, so it must be true!

      Did you honestly miss the massive miltarized police suppression, the 7000+ arrests?

      Did you see any news coverage on the massive, massive rallies this weekend in Italy, Spain and Portugal? Hundreds of thousands.  

      But hey if the msm didn't cover it, I guess it didn't happen.

      Your willful ignorance makes you complicit.

    •  You know, (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      aliasalias, happymisanthropy

      wanting an important socio-economic movement to end, just because you really, really, really want that movement to end, doesn't mean it will happen.

      Society will evolve without you, thanks very much.

    •  Concern troll (0+ / 0-)

      Disregard.

      I could eat a bowl of alphabet soup and shit a better argument than that - Author unknown

      by TigerMom on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 09:58:28 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  as much as you want, really really really want (0+ / 0-)

      occupy to be dead, as you have from the beginning, doesn't mean it will happen.

      all morals are relative, but some are more relative than others.

      by happymisanthropy on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 01:21:04 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Furthermore... (0+ / 0-)

      Pronouncing something "dead" without backing up your point doesn't make it true.

      This head movie makes my eyes rain.

      by The Lone Apple on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 02:44:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Maybe. (21+ / 0-)
    Our dying corporate class, corrupt, engorged on obscene profits and indifferent to human suffering, is the guarantee that the mass movement will expand and flourish. No one knows when. No one knows how. The future movement may not resemble Occupy. It may not even bear the name Occupy. But it will come.
    Since no one knows, no one knows.  

    The belief that oppression creates a reaction is true in my view, but Wisconsin shows that many support the oppressors.  This is not Egypt.  Hedges is trying to rally the troops.  He's trying to "keep hope alive."  Fine with me.  

     

    I'm from the Elizabeth Warren and Darcy Burner Wing of the Democratic Party!

    by TomP on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 02:14:59 PM PDT

    •  I think this is more than Hedges simply (16+ / 0-)

      trying to "keep hope alive," though your points are well taken.

      I'm "THE" Troubadour," and not "Troubadour" without the article. We're different people here at DK :)

      by David Harris Gershon on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 02:28:29 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I absolutely agree with you here. (9+ / 0-)
      shows that many support the oppressors
    •  You. Can't. Stop. Progress. (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      elwior, TomP, aliasalias, pgm 01

      History suggests he's right. Long term, mankind WILL progress despite itself.

      Of corset, no way to know for certain, but there is reason for hope.

      This post is dedicated to myself, without whom, I'd be somebody else. Though I'd still be an asshole. My Music: [http://www.myspace.com/beetwasher]

      by Beetwasher on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 03:49:31 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Well actually you can (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        joe wobblie

        If you look at what happened in 2000, we actually came full stop. There was no working on anything anymore. After all government can't do anything right? But even corporations decided to take everything overseas including "their" money.

        To live a creative life, we must lose our fear of being wrong. -Joseph Chilton Pearce

        by glitterscale on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 04:39:59 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Wisconsin was a diversion from direct action (17+ / 0-)

      Andy Kroll has a take on that at TomDispatch.

      I suggest that many support the oppressors because the Democrats are not offering a clear enough alternative. Look at Wisconsin--the party nominated a union-bashing mayor. George Lakoff and Elisabeth Wehling discusses the Wisconsin effort in terms of failed Democratic "framing." I think this is a major problem. The GOP presents a coherent, values-based worldview. It's awful but that is what it is.

      Democrats, in response, accept GOP frames on "overweening public unions," "government budgets being like family budgets," etc. and just counterpose that they will manage austerity with more fairness.

      The Democratic Party--divided by its addiction to corporate money and Wall Street and its countervailing need for Main Street votes and labor union activism--cannot muster a coherent, values-based counter-narrative to that championed by the Right.

      For what such a narrative should look like, read FDR's acceptance speech upon being renominated in 1936. A sample:

      For too many of us the political equality we once had won was meaningless in the face of economic inequality. A small group had concentrated into their own hands an almost complete control over other people's property, other people's money, other people's labor - other people's lives. For too many of us life was no longer free; liberty no longer real; men could no longer follow the pursuit of happiness.

      Against economic tyranny such as this, the American citizen could appeal only to the organized power of government. The collapse of 1929 showed up the despotism for what it was. The election of 1932 was the people's mandate to end it. Under that mandate it is being ended.

      The royalists of the economic order have conceded that political freedom was the business of the government, but they have maintained that economic slavery was nobody's business. They granted that the government could protect the citizen in his right to vote, but they denied that the government could do anything to protect the citizen in his right to work and his right to live.

      Today we stand committed to the proposition that freedom is no half-and-half affair. If the average citizen is guaranteed equal opportunity in the polling place, he must have equal opportunity in the market place.

      These economic royalists complain that we seek to overthrow the institutions of America. What they really complain of is that we seek to take away their power. Our allegiance to American institutions requires the overthrow of this kind of power. In vain they seek to hide behind the flag and the Constitution. In their blindness they forget what the flag and the Constitution stand for. Now, as always, they stand for democracy, not tyranny; for freedom, not subjection; and against a dictatorship by mob rule and the over-privileged alike.

      The brave and clear platform adopted by this convention, to which I heartily subscribe, sets forth that government in a modern civilization has certain inescapable obligations to its citizens, among which are protection of the family and the home, the establishment of a democracy of opportunity, and aid to those overtaken by disaster.

      Clearly there is a need to continue to be engaged in the electoral arena (although Hedges would probably disagree at this point; I'm pretty sure he has completely written off the Democratic Party). But there is a strong argument that the electoral detour in Wisconsin was deeply dis-empowering.
      •  Direct action **doesn't work**. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        sviscusi

        The idea that marches and street protests have any significant effect in the modern mediated US is simply wrong. It may feel good to march and chant and feel like you're not alone, but it is nonpersuasive and alienating to most voters and elected officials.

        The original Occupy Wall Street, because it was narrowly targeted at a clear opponent and about ONE issue, succeeded in changing the national conversation...briefly.

        All the stuff around the rest of the country? Nada. Changed the conversation about park permitting.

        •  what does work? voting? (0+ / 0-)

          see all the comments on this diary about how the two parties support the 1%

          how many of the obamabots are paid staff members?

          oh no, I will get HR for using that banned term

          how about democratbots?

          read the comments about the dems have not had new ideas for decades, maybe 50 years since medicare

          I just made up democratbots and now that I have said it twice, along with obamabots, i will get hide rated at least a dozen times.

          *
          The serious point is our country has narrowed the dialogue into the back and forth between the political parties.

          And they are not dealing with the real issues.

          The banksters are still running the show.

          The military and security state continue to gain ground.

          The environment is under attack.

          There was never enough done to get jobs back.

          The ONLY hope is direct action, in the street, to stand up to the powers of the oligarchy and the security state.

          Obama is not standing up to the power structure.

          •  He's the best you're going to get. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            VClib, TomP

            You can take that to the bank.

            So you have a choice: work with him, or quit.

            The world isn't black and white. It's shades of gray. You can have darker gray or lighter gray. Understanding the world through a series of bumper-sticker oversimplifications like the above does zero good for anything except the egos of those who congratulate themselves that they know so much better how things should be done than those who are actually doing the work.

            •  Actually we need to listen (4+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              joe wobblie, semiot, davekro, fayea

              and when somebody tells us that there is only this black and white line and we have to be here or there, that is when we can say for sure that there are alternatives to that black and white world.

              For instance, LGBTs now have Obama's support for same sex marriage. For instance, dreamers now have a small slice of the dream (along with a great incentive to vote Obama.)

              We haven't asked hard enough for what we want and we haven't done it in a thoughty way. Neither of those groups could get more than Obama could deliver. But they got what he could deliver. There is no reason on earth why we shouldn't get Obama to 1) drastically reduce drone use, 2) drastically reduce energy costs of the military, 3) drastically reduce energy costs of government buildings, 4) have conferences at the white house with some of the disenfranchised folks in this nation and work to overcome the draconian voting obstruction bills and 5) do the same for homeless and unemployed folks and increase those folks abilities to take advantage of HAMP (what may be left of it) and whatever parts of the ACA will be left after SCOTUS chops it.

              AND for his second term 1) fire Holder and put in a fire breather (maybe if it promised to do this we would have more enthusiasm in giving him the democratic congress and senate to get it done!) and 2) fire Geithner with the same reasoning.

              To live a creative life, we must lose our fear of being wrong. -Joseph Chilton Pearce

              by glitterscale on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 04:52:53 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  I'll save them the trouble, Don midwest: (7+ / 0-)

            "I'm sick and tired of splutter, spit....and if you don't agree with me, then you're a moron...spittle, splat...and I hope you're going to like having Romney for a President...you're an idiot...you're not a Democrat...why don't you go back to Firedoglake...this is the greatest president evah...you're a troll...drool, rant....

            There, that ought to help get Obama re-elected!

            The ONLY hope is direct action, in the street, to stand up to the powers of the oligarchy and the security state.
            Nice comment.
        •  Yes, the civil rights movement never existed (10+ / 0-)

          And didn't accomplish anything.

          Also the wave of CIO union organizing and sitdown strikes in the 1930's achieved nothing.

          Act-Up--complete failure.

          You are just completely wrong on the facts.

          •  Are you Rip Van Winkle? (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            VClib

            NONE of what you describe happened in the era of modern media. Even in the late 50s, most news was still disseminated by papers.

            I am quite well informed by history, thank you. Even up to the point of understanding that things are different now than they were 50 years ago.

            Oh, BTW...Act-Up WAS a complete failure.

          •  The anti (Vietnam) war movement (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            joanneleon

            accomplished nothing, nor did the Women's Movement or the Gay Rights Movement.
              The best thing to do is to find a place to hide.

            "We the People of the United States...." -U.S. Constitution

            by elwior on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 05:21:09 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  So what was the Tea Party? (0+ / 0-)

          A collective hallucination? If direct action doesn't get the goods, as Maddow likes to say, how to explain their success in turning popular opinion against the President's healthcare reform?

          Yes I know that they later turned to elections, which is what you'd like to see happen with those activated by OWS but the electoral victories would have not occurred without the galvanizing effect of direct action.

      •  Nice comment, CT Hank. (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        3goldens, elwior, joanneleon, pgm 01
      •  Spot on, (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        pgm 01

        CT Hank.


        "Justice is a commodity"

        by joanneleon on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 06:21:51 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  It is indeed time for everyone to decide if they (8+ / 0-)

    worship the rich or believe in a strong middle class!

    "But Brandine, you're supposed to be in Iraq stopping 911!"

    by leftyguitarist on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 02:15:23 PM PDT

  •  The reason that "Occupy"came to be is still here (18+ / 0-)

    thus ... kind of a no-brainer I'm just a fraction of lots of support nationwide.

    "Four more years!" (Obama Unencumbered - The Sequel)

    by jwinIL14 on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 02:17:41 PM PDT

  •  Great diary. And so true. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Saint Jimmy, elwior, Dallasdoc, gulfgal98

    Thank you.

  •  Why would it go away? (10+ / 0-)

    Nothing has been solved.

    I only hope it comes back as peaceful as it has been.  I mean, how many times can you be punched in the face and turn the other cheek?

    “I freed a thousand slaves. I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves.” - Harriet Tubman

    by Publius2008 on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 02:49:55 PM PDT

  •  backwards (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Gooserock, ColoTim, VClib

    OWS isnt an insurgency, its a counterinsurgency.  its success relies on winning the citizenry over, not on merely continuing the fight.  

  •  Yeah, right. I support many of the goals of Occupy (4+ / 0-)

    but if they think there's going to be popular uprising, I've got some swampland in Florida to sell them. Boomers are too worried about retiring, middle aged and many younger are obsessed about American Idol and what/who Lindsay Lohan did last night, and a good portion of the millennials think that showing up and trying once means success.

    WTF!?!?!?! When did I move to the Republic of Gilead?!

    by IARXPHD on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 02:52:49 PM PDT

  •  I hope you and Hedges are right! I'm optimistic (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    elwior, Saint Jimmy, Flyswatterbanjo

    about the possibility.

  •  Revolution is organic and spontaneous. (6+ / 0-)

    Hedges is one smart dude, but what he wrote is intuitive. Some people write about it. Others just know it.

    http://otherwise-occupied.tumblr.com/ @OOccupied

    by jvantin1 on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 02:56:10 PM PDT

  •  Didn't mean that as a putdown of Hedges. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    elwior, BigAlinWashSt

    I just mean that what he communicated in words, many know in their guts.

    http://otherwise-occupied.tumblr.com/ @OOccupied

    by jvantin1 on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 02:56:48 PM PDT

  •  So you're claiming that any kind of march or (4+ / 0-)

    protest in the future will be Occupy. Well, if you're using this definition Occupy is certainly alive. In fact, there was a march in NYC just yesterday. I'm sure it was Occupy as well.

  •  Ever since Occupy "mic checked" Obama (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    johnny wurster

    they have been dead to me.

    •  Awww, poor little brand name loyalist! Well, I (15+ / 0-)

      guess you've assumed that the president and the party are our only hope!  Good luck with that.

      Look, this isn't a bunch of ex preppy boys and sorority girls upset because daddy couldn't buy enough influence for them to get that big job.  These are angry people.  Angry because they have nothing.  Angry because they can't afford a college education.  Angry because their aging parents have little left.  Angry because they and/or their friends have significant health problems that they don't have the MONEY to address.  Angry because the steps taken to address their anger and misery are pathetic and have not worked.

      This isn't rah rah red team, rah rah blue team.  This is fucking real and you're upset about a mic check?

      Wow.  I don't know what to say.

      The real power in America is held by a fast-emerging new Oligarchy of pimps and preachers who see no need for Democracy or fairness or even trees, except maybe the ones in their own yards, and they don't mind admitting it. ~ Hunter S. Thompson

      by Saint Jimmy on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 03:22:45 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Why? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      BigAlinWashSt

      The answer to that question would make for an interesting comment.

  •  I'm not so sure (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Gooserock, KJG52, New Rule, miriam

    As a historian (so by default, a pessimist), I can see that the norm throughout the human experience has been subjugation, exploitation, and oppression. In turn, the normative response to these injustices by the populace oppressed by them has been to submit.

    Husband looking for work in NoVA/DC! Skilled in web content manag. & Photoshop. Please email me at adorgan@hotmail.com if you have any leads!

    by fille americaine on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 03:15:04 PM PDT

    •  Democracy Has Been a Fluke of the Late New (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dracowyrm, fille americaine

      World era combined with a transitional economy that was briefly able to be democratically owned.

      Has anybody demonstrated a democratic society where most of the wealth and economic production were in the hands of a few globally-based aristocrats?

      Braveheart couldn't even get his nobles to support forming a country. Too many important foreign interests.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 03:27:30 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Excuse me (0+ / 0-)

      but as a historian, surely you are aware that it is just as factual to say rebellion against such conditions has been a "norm" of human experience.

  •  Corporatists, Banksters and Corrupt Politicians (5+ / 0-)

    and their greed and avarice,  really represent what is at the core of our national problems.    The issues are not as much about conservatism or progressiveness but that is how the Parties and pundits play it our because it keeps them in money and in power.    

    Hopefully OWS re-emerges as a unifying force with a singular focus to offset the forces of political corruption, and global corporatism.    The divide is not along existing ideological and Party lines and they are not necessarily beneficial in unification,   just as both have made laws to make protest more difficult.      There is money coming from strange bedfellows to keep OWS in check and that money controls the politicians of both Parties.      

    Victims of bigotry are the poorest, least influential members of society.......never the wealthiest, most educated, most overrepresented in high levels, and most influential. Bigotry hurts the least influential. To claim or say otherwise is absurd.

    by dailykozzer on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 03:17:43 PM PDT

  •  The Change has Just Begun (5+ / 0-)

    Occupy convinced me that now is the time to begin setting up a completely separate way of life.  Disconnect the TV cable, recycle everything, shop only at locally owned stores, convert the oil furnace, buy generics and organics, do everything possible to crumble the feet of clay at the base of the international corporations.  The protesters may have dwindled at the moment but a huge amount of energy has been released into the grassroots.  Everything will be built over from scratch, but not before the colonizers try to reduce us to utter servitude.  More defiance will face more pain.  The next four years will change everything.

    •  Divesting from the corporatocracy! Right now I see (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      aliasalias, semiot, fayea

      the current phase as building the alternate media.  There are dozens of Occupy-related newspapers, bulletins, websites, livestream channels, radio and tv shows.  

      We're also seeing specific and targeted examples of corporate control like Occupy Monsanto shining a light on not just Monsanto's control of the food supply, but writing laws to benefit them and not the people and installing their people in the FDA.    

      This is only the beginning.

    •  Occupy Kansas City (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      fayea

      has morphed into (for one thing) a sponsor of community gardens in the heart of the city.  This is a fantastic and practical way to connect with and help people.  It shows that the movement is far from dead and will probably take many forms as it matures.

    •  Caution: We hippies did the back to the (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Don midwest, WB Reeves

      land thing.  While we had a lot of nice individual lives result from it, I think in the long run it sorta sapped our movement's continued influence.  While we were living lives of voluntary simplicity, working in food coops, forming communes, the Really Big Money powers moved right in and took over the government.  
      If you disconnect from cable, there will be many others who won't.  You will not have effectively changed or curtailed cable or the corporate messaging crawling into the masses heads like earwigs.  

      I was wise enough to never grow up while fooling most people into believing I had. - Margaret Mead

      by fayea on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 11:06:14 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  OWS is dead. Long live Occupy! (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jiffypop, sviscusi, elwior, semiot, WB Reeves

    The next iteration of this effort needs to be current and original, and not merely an effort to recreate last fall.  When rock bands try to make another version of their breakthrough debut album, it's called a sophomore slump.  It's good to see that Occupy people have adapted.  It's a very real danger that the movement could become the equivalent of the anti-war tent set up across the White House in the 1960s.  

    OWS allowed itself to become a movement about police tactics, and here you are, still flogging that same old pie fight, insisting you were NOT WRONG ON THE INTERNET about the DHS conspiracy theory.  When this happens, the core message about economic inequality and the outsized power of the financial industry gets drowned out.  Other movements, such as the civil rights marchers, succeeded in using stories about police abuses to gain attention and sympathy for their cause, without this loss of message discipline.

    Art is the handmaid of human good.

    by joe from Lowell on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 03:34:01 PM PDT

  •  Dangerous trend in the US - "shooting a video is (6+ / 0-)

    more dangerous than shooting a gun". There is a concerted effort by police forces throughout America to nip protests in the bud by restricting press coverage.

    It is very ironic that this trend is being covered mainly by Russian press which shows just how much American freedoms have been eroded.

    •  No, guns are much more dangerous. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      TheGeneral

      Just ask anybody who's been shot with a gun and with a camera which he preferred.

      "The disturbing footage depicts piglets being drop kicked and swung by their hind legs. Sows are seen being kicked and shoved as they resist leaving their piglets."

      by Bush Bites on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 04:56:03 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Oligarchy does not know how bad things are (10+ / 0-)

    The 99% sees the rapid decline of the country.

    Several economists, e.g., Krugman and Stiglitz, noted right at the start that a larger stimulus was needed. And it needed to be a stimulus in investment, not a stimulus in consumption.

    The politicians are not taking actions to reduce suffering and put the country back on track.

    What used to be cherished institutions, the schools, are now another problem area of the commons from which resources are to be extracted.

    Thirty years of trashing government has worked. Who would in their right mind go to work for the government or go into education? Then there are the private companies who treat employees as numbers to be moved around to fit the latest fad. Employees in many companies have less voice than before and they are truly scared to speak up.

    Chris Hedges notes that the oligarchy is out of touch and the problems are getting worse and people are going to revolt. The tactics of the security state have been tested on the OWS demonstrators which has slowed down actions, but the downward trend will not go away so we can predict something will happen.

    OWS is the most important political movement in my lifetime. I will be 70 next year.

    Something outside the parties is needed to stand up to what Chris Hedges in other works calls what has happened, namely,  a corporate coup d'etat

  •  Yesterday our group, (9+ / 0-)

    The Raging Grannies, joined Occupy outside the Apple store in Palo Alto. There was a music fair going on in PA so University Ave was closed off and there was a lot of foot traffic and a captive audience.  Occupy had rallied outside Walmart, Pizza My Heart and Whole Foods before they joined us. A member of the San Jose occupy group is running for office. Occupy isn't dead. The corporate media wants us to ignore them because they're not "hot" anymore and to a certain extent that has worked, but Occupy is far from dead.

    48forEastAfrica - Donate to Oxfam> "It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness." Edna St.V. Millay

    by slouching on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 03:56:27 PM PDT

  •  Read the history of labor (9+ / 0-)

    It's been a long time since I did, but I do remember that a lot of movements came and went in the 50 years before they gained major power in the '30s.  The National Labor Union, the Knights of Labor, the American Railway Union and the other railroad brotherhoods, and only later the IWW, the AFL, and the CIO.  It was a hard road, but they got there.

    It would be a tragedy to spend 50 years "getting there" now.  But the labor unions in those days were segregated -- by trade, by sex, by race.  Except for a few guys like Debbs who saw the big picture, it took them a long time to think about pulling together.  

    This time around, people can and will make common cause for the greater problems that affect us all; there are fewer barriers to unity on the big issues.  My great fear has been that "reform" would be led by demagogues, and imagine my relieve when Occupy eschewed demagoguery for a collective model.  

    The collective model may be low and it may be slow compared to a shiny (wo)man on horseback who promises to solve all your problems if you just follow him/her blindly.  But it will get us to, as Debbs might have said with his love of biblical language, the promised land.

  •  Occupy elementary school (10+ / 0-)

    Happening now in Oakland: Lakeview Elementary School

    Parents, teachers and community activists have relied on the help of Occupy Oakland protesters to build their tent city and supply food for the crowd of approximately 30 people who have been camping there since the protest began on Friday, June 15. The encampment is an effort to keep open five elementary schools—Lakeview, Lazear, Marshall, Maxwell and Sante Fe—that OUSD board members voted to close at the end of this school year.

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold...The best lack all conviction, while the worst Are full of passionate intensity" -W.B. Yeats

    by LucyandByron on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 04:04:28 PM PDT

  •  Such Baloney..... (9+ / 0-)

    Occupy is alive & well in Olympia, Washaington state.  We plan to get an initiative on the ballot in November for a public utility district.  Our current system is Puget Sound Energy.  They are foreign owned (Canada & Australia).

    We have the highest power rates in the entire state.  That needs to stop.  Even cleanup crews after a storm are from out of state.  They come from places like Texas, & taxpayers in this state pay higher rates.....somebody has to pay for the Texas crew hotels.  And....it certainly isn't going to be Puget Sound Energy.

    They are also aggressive as heck.  When the Nisqually Indian Tribe wanted to put in a jail right in the backyard of a gated community, Puget Sound Energy applied the muscle.  We're taking part of your acerage for the jail or else.  Or else we will put our power poles smack dab down the middle of your horse trail.

    A nasty company.  Occupy is out there every day getting the 12,500 signatures we need for the November ballot.

    The Occupy obituary is premature, folks.  

    •  That is a perfect example of what Occupy should (0+ / 0-)

      be doing.  Is Occupy getting credit for what they are doing?

      The biggest thing Occupy did was to change the national debate about financial inequality.  I don't think that can be reversed and that is a good thing.

      In the future, this is exactly the kind of thing they should be doing, as is running for office.

  •  & we should care about this because...why, again? (3+ / 1-)
    Recommended by:
    Frank Knarf, sviscusi, WB Reeves
    Hidden by:
    Saint Jimmy

    Because Chris Hedges has ever been a reasonable or accurate political analyst?  

    No, can't be that. He specializes in screeching hyperbole and wishful thinking.

    Because more framing of those opposed to the inequities of our economic system as pot-smoking kids, crazy people and criminals who battle the police would somehow be good for the original cause?

    No...guess that's not it, either.

    Because feelgood self-indulgence designed mostly to make those protesting feel heroic rather than actually effecting change will contribute to substantive reforms?

    No. Three strikes, yer out.

  •  Occupy has to grow.... (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    karmsy, elwior, sunny skies, Quicklund, semiot

    ....and lose some of its intensity and purity as it wends its way into the non-activist populace.

    Instead of campouts, it should disseminate its ideals in a million conversations in coffee shops, church halls, bars, lines, or wherever people congregate without a specific political purpose - since no matter why you're there, you're getting screwed.

    Screwed by the 1% banks, by the insurance companies, by price-fixing oil companies, by stores seemingly never dropping the prices.

    It takes as little as moving your accounts to credit unions or planting a little garden....

    9-11 changed everything? Well, Katrina changed it back.

    by varro on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 04:23:23 PM PDT

  •  Hedges... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    elwior, Don midwest, Quicklund

    ..forgot one:

    Those who have the largest megaphones in our corporate state serve the very systems of power we are seeking to topple. They encourage us, whether on Fox or MSNBC, to debate inanities, trivia, gossip or the personal narratives of candidates. They seek to channel legitimate outrage and direct it into the black hole of corporate politics. They spin these silly, useless stories from the “left” or the “right” while ignoring the egregious assault by corporate power on the citizenry, an assault enabled by the Democrats and the Republicans. Don’t waste time watching or listening. They exist to confuse and demoralize you.
    Then there is the guy on HBO, who told you to go register to vote.  You conveniently forgot him.

    I can only imagine how that pissed you off.

    Actually taking a step to participate in our political system instead of standing off to the side waging a finger at it is especially "confusing" & "demoralizing."

    Your Romneybot is a high maintenance android, Tea Party. He can't properly function unless you are constantly downloading your bullshit into his neck port.

    by wyvern on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 04:32:24 PM PDT

  •  Looking forward to it! (6+ / 0-)

    It's a very important movement that has done a great deal to change the political conversation in this country.

    We can probably safely assume future Occupy protests will be met with the ususal harassment, violence and subterfuge, but its well worth the effort.

    "We must not confuse dissent with disloyalty." Edward R. Murrow

    by Betty Pinson on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 04:33:44 PM PDT

  •  I think it's over. (0+ / 0-)

    You can prove me wrong, but it will have to be with something more substantial than tying up traffic.

    "The disturbing footage depicts piglets being drop kicked and swung by their hind legs. Sows are seen being kicked and shoved as they resist leaving their piglets."

    by Bush Bites on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 04:54:20 PM PDT

  •  The corporate media wants so (7+ / 0-)

    badly to kill Occupy. I kid you not, they are doing everything in their power to strangle it--with their distortions and misinformation, their stonewalling. Thanks for the diary.

    It'll be the youth that save us, if anything does.

    It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

    by karmsy on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 05:15:48 PM PDT

    •  Where else will the youth go? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      karmsy, semiot

      They can't afford to be educated, there are no jobs for them...their unemployment numbers are through the roof.  

      •  Middle-aged people (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Militarytracy

        these days look enviously at the youth because "there is so much age discrimination," but maybe the outlook for the youth, themselves, is not so bright...

        It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

        by karmsy on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 07:51:02 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I feel awful for our kids (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          karmsy

          Our daughter and son-in-law are still out there doing it.  We help, and we've told them that if everything goes to hell we all go down together.  But those two are not the norm in their age range.  And worse, they feel lonely at times because so many of their peers have had to move back home and don't know where to go from here yet.  It is a lot of energy that those kids pack, and the foundation of the economy they are inheriting is destroyed, the social contract nuked, the meritocracy made into a sham.

          You add a few older activists who know some of the ropes to this soup, someone's got problems.  The kids will slash the tires of the vans driving up the nursing home to pick up the boomers to go make their bought and paid for vote :)

  •  Occupy doesn't need "advice" from non-participants (10+ / 0-)

    Sooo much concern trolling about how bad Occupy makes the left-wing look.   Most likely coming from people that never participated in it, in the first place.  

    When you people figure out the Perfect Protest, go do it.   Until then, stop pissing all over those who are out there doing something.  

    The Patriot Act: IOKIYAD!

    by Beelzebud on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 05:44:39 PM PDT

    •  This isn't an official Occupy site (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      sviscusi, Kickemout, Kevvboy

      You can't decide who reads your diary or not, or who comments or not.

      "The disturbing footage depicts piglets being drop kicked and swung by their hind legs. Sows are seen being kicked and shoved as they resist leaving their piglets."

      by Bush Bites on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 07:21:04 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  definitely right about this (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Quicklund, semiot, davekro, fayea
      Most likely coming from people that never participated in it, in the first place.
      I had a conversation with a young (self identified Republican) who said that he was opposed to Occupy.  I asked him if he even knew what we stood for and offered to give him a single page handout listing the goals of the Florida Occupy groups.  He refused to take it saying he did not want to know more because his mind was made up.  

      I looked him straight in the eye and calmly asked, "how can you determine whether or not something has value if you refuse to learn about it first?"  His reply was that he did not have time to learn about us.

      IMHO, this is the worst kind of thinking. " Don't confuse me with the facts because my mind is already made up."  I am in my 60's and my mind is always open to ideas.

      "Growing up is for those who don't have the guts not to. Grow wise, grow loving, grow compassionate, but why grow up?" - Fiddlegirl

      by gulfgal98 on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 04:41:29 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Smart man (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    aliasalias

    We are hiding in the shadows and will be back stronger because we know the truth and we'll have the numbers.

  •  Occupy accomplished something important. (7+ / 0-)

    It was documented on Kos, with good statistics: Before Occupy, the #1 news story was deficits.  After, it was unemployment.  If they accomplished nothing else, shifting the window that far is a victory.

    After Citizens United, Occupy just might be the last bulwark against full-on feudalism.  My son and I brought them cookies.

    Early to rise and early to bed Makes a man healthy, wealthy, and dead. --Not Benjamin Franklin

    by Boundegar on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 07:01:09 PM PDT

    •  They didn't seem to have a follow up. (0+ / 0-)

      Marches and sit-ins get old after awhile.

      I was kind of surprised they didn't develop it into a real political movement, but they didn't.

      "The disturbing footage depicts piglets being drop kicked and swung by their hind legs. Sows are seen being kicked and shoved as they resist leaving their piglets."

      by Bush Bites on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 07:23:40 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I know committed Democrats (5+ / 0-)

    who only think Occupy is of any value if it translates directly to votes.

    Like the Tea Party.

    Pointing out the change in narrative due to Occupy (the president says "99%" in a major economic speech, and EVERYONE knows what he means) doesn't register with these people.

    Nor does the fact that the Democratic Party isn't exactly pandering to the people involved in Occupy, as the GOP did to the Tea Partiers. Pandering, hell; GOP co-opted and astroturfed the Tea Party to prominence.

    I'm looking forward to the Occupy Renaissance. I think it's bound to come -- but don't expect it to automatically help Democratic candidates.

    "I've had all I can stands, and I can't stands no more." - Popeye the Sailor Man

    by congenitalefty on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 07:13:20 PM PDT

    •  The Baggers got Repubs' attention by whacking... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Don midwest, Samulayo

      ....several of their top candidates in congressional and senate primaries.

      "The disturbing footage depicts piglets being drop kicked and swung by their hind legs. Sows are seen being kicked and shoved as they resist leaving their piglets."

      by Bush Bites on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 07:25:31 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Because we know the President (0+ / 0-)

      doesn't mean anything when he says the "99%"

      It is a joke, an insult, when he says it...on his way to and from the golf course or George Clooney's house.

      Until the OWS/Progressives primary more dinosaur dems nothing will change.

      Well except for the change that the tea-partiers are making happend.

  •  well hell... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MRA NY

    I read the diary and the comments but I still don't know if OWS has a chance in hell of making a comeback. I sure hope they do, it was so great and inspiring America needs them badly.

    America could have chosen to be the worlds doctor, or grocer. We choose instead to be her policeman. pity

    by cacamp on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 08:12:32 PM PDT

  •  Occupy was violently suppressed... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Killer of Sacred Cows, gulfgal98

    and acknowledging that is important. Because folks are regrouping and employing less visible tactics: focusing on issues in their community, recruiting, and organizing.

    •  I predicted at the start of OWS that it would (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Don midwest, semiot, scorpiorising

      undergo many iterations over a period of years. I also predicted right before OWS came into existence that America was headed for a revolution in 10-20 years; imo OWS was the shot across the bow. My guess is that Occupy (or the Child of Occupy) will follow a similar kind of timeline as occurred with the Egyptian Revolution -

      Egypt's Revolution Has Been 10 Years in the Making [looks like it's going to continue on for a while longer :( ]

      ...The Egyptian revolution, rather than coming out of the blue on 25 January 2011, is a result of a process that has been brewing over the previous decade – a chain reaction to the autumn 2000 protests in solidarity with the Palestinian intifada.

      Mubarak's iron-fist rule and the outbreak of the dirty war between the regime and Islamist militants in the 1990s meant the death of street dissent. Public gatherings and street protests were banned and if they did take place, confronted by force. Live ammunition was used on strikers. Trade unions were put under government control.

      Only after the Palestinian intifada broke out in September 2000 did tens of thousands of Egyptians take to the streets in protest – probably for the first time since 1977.

      ...It was in 2004 that pro-Palestinian and anti-war campaigners launched the Kefaya movement, which took on the president and his family.

      Though it failed to create a mass following among the working class and the urban poor, Kefaya's use of both social and mainstream media helped shift the political culture in the country. ...

      In December 2006, workers at the biggest textile mill in the Middle East, located in the Nile delta town of Mahalla, went on strike. The action followed two decades of a lull in the industrial struggle...The industrial militancy was soon to spill over into other sectors of the economy.

      ...By October 2010, there was definitely something in the air. It became normal to bump into a strike here or there while heading to work. Civil servants heading home from the office would pass by activists holding small protests in downtown Cairo. They looked, and very occasionally reacted. But they were witnessing visual displays of daily dissent...

      "It depends what the meaning of 'is', is"
      Platform of the Neo-Democratic Party
      Speaking out of one side of their mouth for the little guy, their nominal constituency, and the other for the plutocracy, their real constituency.

      by Sanctimonious on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 01:27:17 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  All those other movements (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Claudius Bombarnac, fayea

    Hedges compares to were in other countries, with deeply entrenched traditions of popular resisitance to power.  In the US there's a bare handful of young peoploe in each generation who feel that way, and once they've been thoroughly brutally beaten down by hegemony armed bodies of enforcers, to the thunderous applause and loud laughter of the overwhelming majority, they give up, go home and decide it just isn't worth the effort and the beatings, fighting on behalf of those who cheer you being beaten and laugh as blood streams down your face.  And they're probably right to so conclude.

    The law, in its majestic equality, forbids rich and poor alike from sleeping under bridges. ~ Anatole France

    by ActivistGuy on Mon Jun 18, 2012 at 11:01:07 PM PDT

    •  Most of you're saying was said of Egypt prior to (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Don midwest, Militarytracy, semiot

      last year:

      This is a revolution that erupted from a stagnant community that not even the most optimistic could foresee a meager chance for its occurrence. The Egyptian youth whom we accused of being hopeless, uneducated, non-belonging without a trace of understanding the meaning of nationalism, has surprised and raised admiration of the whole world and not the least myself. Those wonderful youth did, indeed, shock to the ruling system in Egypt. The youth who declared their decision to call for a demonstration on Jan 25th did not raise a moment of concern of any one. Most of us just dismissed this call as dream that never come true. Many a demonstration had been organized and failed to gather momentum of more that few hundreds, who were brutally and easily dispersed by the uncompromising, remotely controlled, state central police.

      On the 25th of January a wall has fallen, the wall of fear and submission. ...

      http://www.mzhelal.com/...

      Furthermore, fallout from the neoliberal policies that finally  pushed the Egyptians to the breaking point sounds eerily familiar to what is occuring here:

      Sadat began eliminating many of the “socialist” policies implemented under Gamal Abdel Nasser in the 1960s, thus paving the way for the introduction of neoliberal policies under Hosni Mubarak.

      These measures increased the level of poverty in Egypt, leading to massive disparities in wealth. Moreover, it led to the emergence of a new group of super-wealthy businessmen who benefited from their close ties to the Egyptian state. Hosni Mubarak’s son Gamal and steel tycoon Ahmed Ezz were prominent figures of this wealthy class. Both are now in prison, awaiting trials on corruption charges.

      Gamal’s rise to power is emblematic of how detached and corrupt the regime had become. “The line between businessmen and government was completely erased” by Gamal during this period, according to student activist Hanah Elsisi. Not only did he appoint many of these new rich businessmen to powerful government positions, but together they pushed through more of the neoliberal policies that had enriched them and impoverished most Egyptians. They were seen as being responsible for the regime’s almost total shutout of the opposition during the 2010 elections, giving the ruling National Democratic Party (NDP) more than 80% of the seats in parliament.

      Most of the movements that have emerged over the past decade have been a response to this transformation of Egypt from epicenter of struggles against colonialism and Zionism to defender of US imperialism and Israel, from a state based on the nationalization of industry and benefits for workers and the poor to privatization and the dismantling of the welfare state. It was not just a fight for liberal democracy and against corruption but for real self-determination, including freedom from US domination.

      http://www.leftturn.org/...

      "It depends what the meaning of 'is', is"
      Platform of the Neo-Democratic Party
      Speaking out of one side of their mouth for the little guy, their nominal constituency, and the other for the plutocracy, their real constituency.

      by Sanctimonious on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 12:39:18 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Make Demands (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Militarytracy

    The lack of them is why Occupy has floundered.

    Thankfully, a lot of us are very keen to make them http://coupmedia.org/...

    •  Demands of those in power is a weak (0+ / 0-)

      outcome for a revolution ... perhaps the weakest.  Just look at what is happening in Egypt now.  The ultimate objective is to "co-opt" the pillars of a society into supporting your ideas.  That means getting the police and military on your side.  A tall order indeed!

      Demands aren't the problem but a lack of planning is.

      "The real wealth of a nation consists of the contributions of its people and nature." -- Rianne Eisler

      by noofsh on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 05:33:44 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  As for Egypt, we outfitted that military (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        semiot

        We are to blame for the power they wield now.  It is our fault that Egyptians have a military coup on their hands.

        Secondly, OWS is up against deep entrenched power.  There was never going to be a victory in the first quarter, and the movement was always going to evolve.  It will continue to evolve and become many things based on what is needed in different communities.

        The need for the movement is not diminishing, the needs of the people for such a movement are increasing.

  •  "as the disparities grow. . .so will their (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fayea

    discontent."  Unfortunately, this is romantic thinking.  If this were true, monarchies would not have lasted.  Humanity's discontent will only grow if it outweighs their fears, which all dictatorships are keen to instill and to keep instilling.  Read Orwell.

    Old Hippies Never Give Up!

    by ravenrdr on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 03:11:23 AM PDT

    •  but monarchies have not lasted (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      fayea

      It all depends on your time horizon.  Sure it's romantic to think that disparity will instantly trigger sufficient discontent to have a revolution but it does occur.  Monarchies, oligarchies do fail but not without a movement with a well considered strategic plan.

      "The real wealth of a nation consists of the contributions of its people and nature." -- Rianne Eisler

      by noofsh on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 05:36:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Agree. It's kinda like saying all bleeding stops. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Don midwest

      Sure, but whether the patient is still alive is the question.
      Concentrating power at the top is unsustainable in the very long run.  And all pricks fall.  
      I'd just like to see the benefit to the 99% in my lifetime.  

      I was wise enough to never grow up while fooling most people into believing I had. - Margaret Mead

      by fayea on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 11:25:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  OWS 2.0 will be back (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Brooklyn Jim

    There's no doubt about it because conditions are right for more dissent.  What is in doubt is the objectives of OWS 2.0.  If it's merely protest then it will lose traction.  Protests are easy to ignore and break up.  A revolution is a serious matter.  Study the works of Gene Sharp to learn more.

    "The real wealth of a nation consists of the contributions of its people and nature." -- Rianne Eisler

    by noofsh on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 05:30:20 AM PDT

  •  will largest corp megaphones be ignored as usual? (0+ / 0-)

    just because talk radio can't be read or watched by the 'thinkers' and analysts and strategists?

    will OWS 'organizers' need 5 times the number of protestors for the same results just because no one is protesting the talk radio stations that were so instrumental getting us into this mess?

    will OWS continue to ignore the 1%'s most important weapon because it gives thinking people headaches to listen to it, while it beats the crap out of them with an invisible political 2x4?

    will the megaphones that that blanket and dominate most communities in the country 24/7 keep getting a free speech free ride to attack the protestors, distort their messages, encourage and excuse police violence, and enable media and politicians?

    will guys like hedges keep mentioning fox, a secondary tool for RW media, because it's easier to say than 'radio'?

    why keep ignoring the same coordinated megaphones that have been able to minimize all other protests the last 20 years, on local and national levels? those megaphones make fox possible.

    will protestors from universities and critics of democratic party and obama compromising continue to ignore the role their universities play in legitimizing RW radio in their communities because their sports programs broadcast on them?

    i hope for better but won't hold my breath.

    This is a list of 76 universities for Rush Limbaugh that endorse global warming denial, racism, sexism, and partisan lying by broadcasting sports on Limbaugh radio stations.

    by certainot on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 05:43:04 AM PDT

  •  What I want to know is how long it will (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Militarytracy, semiot

    take for the realization to sink in that managing the currency is a purely ministerial function and that trying to manipulate the economy by using currency as a handle is bound to fail.
    When the Greeks opted to stay in the Euro zone, they were merely expressing a preference for a single currency in a large region, rather than sticking to disparate systems that have to be constantly converted -- a big waste of time.

    Imagine if, instead two standards of measure, the inch and the centimeter, we had a different one for each state.  Indeed, having the two standards has proved an impediment, but the people who favor the inch continue to think it gives them some sort of territorial monopoly.

    The whole world is starting to read and write English, just as earlier, much of the Western world adopted Roman script and Arabic numerals. Writing systems are tools and some work better and are more easily learned than others.  But, using them to manipulate human behavior, especially to their detriment, is abuse.
    Money is also a tool.  And, like all other tools can be abused.  Using money to restrict access to necessary sustenance is abusive.  Arguing that there is not enough money to buy the necessities of life is abusive.  Money is both material and a figment of the imagination.  We can make as much of it as we need/want -- just as we can use as many letters of the alphabet to communicate as we need.
    Just as there used to be practical reasons for restricting letters and lines of print (the size of paper was a fixed limit), there used to be a real scarcity of the precious metal in which currency was cast to justify its restricted use.  But, even there the evidence of all the gold stolen from the Americas having disappeared from Spain in one generation tells us that the renewed scarcity was an artifice of man -- men who sequestered the gold in the vaults of the Netherlands as, in earlier times, churches and monasteries had converted the donations into ornaments and decorations to be admired, but not used in trade and exchange.

    People with few practical talents have long used their gift of gab to deprive producers of their surplus with lies.  That's what accounts, at the present time, for the reality that while we produce enough food to nourish 9 billion people, many of the 6 billion that actually inhabit the earth are near to starvation.  Why?  Because the incompetents are convinced that only the fear of starvation will produce the surplus they require.

    Ironically, mediating all exchange and trade with money makes those realities apparent. Accounts are useful, if we read them right.

    "In the name of the nation, and of the dollar and of the rule of law, you and your children shall sacrifice for the good of all." Rmoney's prayer

    by hannah on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 06:09:31 AM PDT

  •  I agree with you and Hedges (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Militarytracy, semiot

    Occupy has inspired a bevy of activism and not always under the name Occupy.

    Many of us have moved into various forms of activism and are literally occupying spaces in organizations and spurring them to action.

    We made protest popular again, we made direct actions popular again. Just because it doesn't have an Occupy banner over it doesn't mean we didn't influence and kick peoples asses into gear.

    Hell most of us in our local Occupy group are moving into the local electoral process and focusing on how we oust people from school boards, common councils, city offices, etc...

    Occupy is a theme and motive, not a singular 'thing' that requires an itemized list of demands or goals.

    Think Anonymous for activism.

    --Enlighten the people, generally, and tyranny and oppressions of body and mind will vanish like spirits at the dawn of day. - Thomas Jefferson--

    by idbecrazyif on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 06:19:18 AM PDT

  •  From Hedges article (0+ / 0-)
    The recent election in Wisconsin shows why Occupy should stay out of the elections,” Zeese said. “Many of the people who organized the Wisconsin occupation of the Capitol building became involved in the recall. First, they spent a lot of time and money collecting more than 1 million signatures. Second, they got involved in the primary where the Democrats picked someone who was not very supportive of union rights and who lost to [Gov. Scott] Walker just a couple of years ago. Third, the general election effort was corrupted by billionaire dollars. They lost. Occupy got involved in politics. What did they get? What would they have gotten if they won? They would have gotten a weak, corporate Democrat who in a couple of years would be hated. That would have undermined their credibility and demobilized their movement. Now, they have to restart their resistance movement.
    Gee, are we still allowed to speak such truths here?

    "I wish I could tell you, in the midst of all of this, that President Obama was waging the kind of fight against these draconian Republican proposals that the American people would like to see. He is not." -- Senator Bernie Sanders

    by Sagebrush Bob on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 06:34:14 AM PDT

  •  Student Loans, Jobs (0+ / 0-)

    I am grateful to OWS for at least shifting the narrative. We can't diminish that.

    Not only is there more talk about jobs than ever before, we're actually FINALLY addressing what a problem student loans (federal AND private) have become. I've been trying to talk about this for YEARS.

    Before OWS, the media barely touched on its impact. Now it's resulting in front page stories in major newspapers.

    Whatever OWS was and whatever it will become, I have personally seen some direct changes and things I think will benefit everyone.

  •  thanks for posting (0+ / 0-)

    Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell. --Edward Abbey

    by greenbastard on Tue Jun 19, 2012 at 08:09:30 AM PDT

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