Skip to main content

Open Thread for Night Owls
Fresh off his bus tour with the common folk (well, some of them, anyway), Mitt Romney is turning his attention back to his own base: people who give him bucketloads of money. He will be spending the weekend in a private little get-together in Park City, Utah, with a hundred or so of his top fundraisers, people who have each raised at least $100,000 toward the grand dream of making Mitt Romney the leader of the free world. According to the Washington Post, it is expected to be a who's who of Republican stars, including vice presidential contenders like Paul Ryan and Bobby Jindal, 2008 nominee John McCain, and absolutely no press of any sort allowed.

Having a fun little weekend with your top donors is not exactly new. It is widely understood that giving someone a bucketload of money entitles you to a certain level of access to that candidate, and that the more money you give, the more access you expect to get. A few thousand dollars might get you a picture of you and your favored future government official shaking hands; a six-figure sum will get you a weekend of dinners, dancing and golf with your candidate and numerous close advisers.

There were a few other things in the story, though, that stood out a bit. The first is the omnipresence of Super PAC strategist Karl Rove, a man who has done his level best to make American politics meaner, more vapid, and less truthful throughout his long career, but who can only finally come into his own personal Golden Age now that the Supreme Court has declared his style of politics-for-sale to be, officially, the transcendent one:

Bush strategist Karl Rove, who helps run American Crossroads, the well-funded GOP super PAC, is planning to speak at the retreat, said the fundraiser, who was not authorized to speak publicly about the event. Rove’s appearance could raise questions because of campaign finance laws barring any coordination between super PACs and actual campaigns.
Could raise questions, they say. No doubt, but coordination rules are so lax already that the two men hardly need to exchange words in order to plan their mutual strategy. Rove's group are the attackers, willing to smear whichever Romney opponent needs smearing the most, in order to advance Romney in any particular state or group. Romney himself can simply content himself with his usual stump speeches, and count on uncoordinated groups to pick up on whichever new talking points his campaign might insert, of their own volition. No, in the case of Karl Rove, this might simply be a case where Mitt Romney just sincerely owes this fellow a few free dinners. And, perhaps, considerably more than that.

But Rove is not the only Bush-era figure who will be at the retreat. On the contrary, the program reads like a Bush family reunion:

Other guests slated to appear include former secretaries of state Condoleezza Rice and James A. Baker III, former Florida governor Jeb Bush, Republican strategist Mary Matalin and conservative political commentators Bill Kristol and Fred Barnes.
From the people who brought you the Iraq War, and who tried mightily to sell it, defenders all of the worst presidency since we first started debating what a "worst presidency" might entail, now presenting Mitt Romney! The newest model in a long line of Republicans, Mitt Romney will bring you all the fresh, new ideas of ten and twenty years ago, repackaged for today's modern tastes.

Many of the fundraisers themselves, no doubt, are veterans of the Bush years. And the other stars of the event are hardly outsiders in the Republican Party, either. Even the young upstarts are hardly upstarts, but people who have been carefully groomed and cultivated—in the Jindal case, to hilarious results, and in the Ryan case, as a true celebration of the Republican Party's final triumph over the principles of grade-school math.

Much can be said of the Democratic Party as well, of course. The Obama ranks have included no small number of Clinton-era figures; while the exuberance and expansiveness of his 2008 voter base could be counted as remarkable, neither Obama himself nor his administration can be supposed as anything but evolutionary, when compared to Clinton's own years. This is not meant as compliment, or insult: just observation.


This little Deer Valley jaunt serves as another reminder of how stagnant our politics has become. Mitt Romney is a machine candidate; he was from the very start the preferred candidate of the Money, and in the Republican Party especially, the Money decides the path to be taken. The few ideas he does announce, when he deviates from his script of blaming the Obama presidency for anything and everything bad about the world, are wholehearted endorsements of Bush-era economic policy, Bush-era deregulation efforts, Bush-era anti-environmental efforts, Bush-era foreign policy belligerence, and so on. If anything, they are toned up a bit from the original Bush versions, in keeping with the new conservative insistence that doubling down on all of those things will no doubt work out better the second time around. The ideas, though, have not changed. If the Romney campaign deviates from George W. Bush administration policy in any substantive way, I would love to hear of it.

The Citizens United case will likely further entrench machine politics, by making it even more difficult for non-machine candidates to gain traction. The Romney efforts against his primary opponents illustrate the pattern perfectly; while the political strategies remain the same, the easy cash with which to execute those strategies now allows the preferred candidate of any special interest group that just happens to be extraordinarily wealthy to carpet bomb his opponents long before they can achieve a broader viability. Even without that, though, the same faces and notions have no trouble persisting election after election, and even decade after decade. There is no second act in American politics, because the first act simply never ends.

The wolf in charge of shepherding modern American conservatism, Grover Norquist, observed a while back that it did not really matter which Republican was put in the presidency so long as they could sign their own name. His point was a valid one. No matter which Republican wins the nomination, the same figures would still hold sway; the same narrow group of people would be selected from, to govern and to give advice; the same money handlers would be present, collecting from the same groups and companies, demanding in return the same policies and agendas.

It really ought to be too soon, however, for the Bush-era crowd. A mere one presidential term away from the levers of power would seem an egregiously small sentence for the foulups, misdeeds, and general incompetence that characterized that group in nearly everything they chose to undertake. It is a bit soon to undertake more deregulation, premised exactly the same as the last rounds, or to shake our fist at another Middle Eastern country with a four-letter name, for the same reasons as the first, or to hurt the poor even more, or to coddle the rich even more, or to inflate the deficit bubble even more earnestly, declaring once again that it no longer matters, or any of the rest of it. Americans have famously short memories, but the Bush crowd started peeking up over the hedgerows after a mere two years out of office, and two years later have declared themselves and their ideas officially vindicated, on their own say-so. And so more of the same is on the menu, now. The political punishment for badly fucking up the nation lasted, in the Republican Party, for considerably less time than it has taken many victims of the recession to find new jobs. And the Republican political figures have been able to count on more sympathy, and far more generous welfare.

It is easy enough to be hostile at a crowd of the wealthy and connected having a private, no-press-allowed Park City retreat with their newest candidate of choice. The perceived elitism grates, and the recognition of just how few people are truly involved in deciding what choices the rest of the democracy will ever be presented with is infuriating every single time. But this crowd, in particular, seems worthy of scorn. It is a get together for the same money to bond with the same figures, and the same ideologies, and the same proposals, and in some cases the very same people that are responsible for so much of the misery that lies just outside the resort gates. They are happy, because things have worked out well enough for them, all things considered. Nobody can claim that the Republican Party as sobered up in the last few years—the opposite would seem to be obvious, and I think the Congress has moved on to methamphetamine use, or bath salts—but they are certain they are ready to retake the wheel.


Blast from the Past. At Daily Kos on this date in 2003:

Yes, we've found mass graves in Iraq. Oddly enough, most date back to the uprising after the Gulf War, the one where we encouraged the Shia and Kurds to rise up against Saddam and then let them be slaughtered. It's as if we unleashed a pit bull in a petting zoo and then express astonishment at the dead bunnies and chicks lying around. Then, a few weeks later, say that we need to take over the petting zoo because the owner lets pit bulls run around and kill things.

The fact is that the Shia are not stupid. They know who betrayed them, who turned their back as Saddam attacked and killed them and now uses those bodies to ward off criticism of the occupation. They don't want us there any more than the Sunni do, they just haven't unleashed their guerrilla war, yet.

For apologists of our occupation of Iraq, the dead Shia are convienent, like a handy talisman to ward off criticism. Despite years of Amnesty and Minority Rights Groups reports, despite the Southern no-fly zone, the only value the Shia had was as a way to indict Saddam's government. The fact that 15,000 Shia guerrillas sat in in Iran would usually get overlooked.

Now, this is why we went to war in Iraq. We had to save people who we condemned to death without a second thought.

It is hard to decide what is morally bankrupt, lies and distortions over WMD or justifying them by the dead we help lead to the slaughter.


Tweet of the Day:

@chrislhayes in our chat: "It sounds radical to say it now, but: every job should be a good job!" sad and true. http://t.co/...
@ddayen via web


High Impact Posts. Top Comments.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  Lawrence O'Donnell made a good point tonight (7+ / 0-)

    He said that it won't really matter if the radical righties on the Supreme Court only turnover the mandate part of HCR, because there was never an enforcement mechanism in HCR for the mandate anyway.

    I've never thought of it that way before.

    Sadly though, I think they're going to strike down all of HCR, because the righties on the court want to do what they always do - play politics.

    Chicago - Proud Home of the 1908 World Series Champion Chicago Cubs

    by Jeff Y on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 08:41:43 PM PDT

    •  The thing is, and no one seems to understand (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Jeff Y, msmacgyver

      that the mandate is not a mandate. It is a tax imposed on all citizens, albeit those that purchase healthcare get a deduction. The commerce clause is irrelevant, because the government is constitutionally empowered to levy taxes, and as we all know, they can give a loophole to whomever they want. If the court strikes it down, they are doing so for plainly partisan reasons. I personally think it helps dems no matter what they decide. If they strike it down, we will be more motivated to avoid Rmoney nominees, and if they don't, then the Rs have one less thing to screech about being unconstitutional. Like they've ever read the thing.

      “The real truth of the matter is that a financial element in the large centers has owned the government since the days of Andrew Jackson” -FDR

      by You know me man on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 09:16:52 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  LO is ridiculous. He's far too worried (0+ / 0-)

      about ratings than going after the truth. A poor excuse for a Keith wannabee.

      His nain schtick tonight was about Pawlenty being the VP nominee. Guess what, LO was Absolutely positive that no one else would be the Presidential nominee for the GOP than Pawlenty. He's a hack and a bad one at that.

      •  absolute certainty (0+ / 0-)

        You're right; the thing about LO is that he is always absolutely certain about his point of view.

        The Republicans are the ones who are supposed to be closed-minded, refusing to consider other points of view or other outcomes, but LO comes close to their modus operandi, although he is more progressive.  

        It's important to be inflexible about some givens, such as human rights, but LO assigns all of his "predictions" the same level of certitude as he gives to his creeds, and that dilutes the value of all his remarks.  

  •  so everyone here is going to put aside.... (5+ / 0-)

    .....concerns about ideological purity and how not-progressive enough Barack Obama is in order to stop the Repuke $ juggernaut, yes?  It should be a rhetorical question, but for some, it isn't.

    "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

    by chingchongchinaman on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 08:41:51 PM PDT

    •  "ideological purity" ha ha. I would accepted 10 (0+ / 0-)

      or 20% of what I wanted,

      IF he fought for it -

      instead, when it comes to Oligarchs vs. u$, THEY got over 90% of what they wanted.

      I did NOT vote for that - 'ideological purity' my ass.

      IF you're willing to accept being sold out, THEN accept it!  

      You have to insult those of us who are sick of 30 years of voting Democratic to be sold out ... to justify wallowing in the glow of being sold out ???

      have fun.

      I'm voting for EVERY Democrat who supports the Democratic platform of King County Democrats ... yawn.  

      rmm.

      Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look; He thinks too much: such men are dangerous

      by seabos84 on Thu Jun 21, 2012 at 06:34:13 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  testing nt (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW

    Fuck Big Brother...from now on, WE'RE watching.

    by franklyn on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 08:42:15 PM PDT

  •  Wait, the Romney bus tour (9+ / 0-)

    is already over?  Did he even get 4 seconds of usable video out of it?  I think the nun's bus tour is lasting longer and has more impact.

    And sadly, Karl Rove is going to be an example of one of those over-stuffed, under exercised, nasty people who live longer than many who attend the poor and suffering.  So, atheists 1 -- believers 0.  Oh -- I'm a pantheist and hoping he is cremated so as not to fuck up Walt Whitman's sense of the universe.

    Vi er alle norske " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

    by gchaucer2 on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 08:42:32 PM PDT

  •  Tipped for Recognizing That a Republican Isn't the (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Jeff Y, JeffW

    one governing.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 08:53:16 PM PDT

  •  Romney tells GOP govs shutup about Good news (17+ / 0-)

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

    Romney Campaign Asks Florida Governor To Downplay Good Economy News

    NEW YORK -- There has always been friction between Mitt Romney and certain Republican governors over how best to frame the state of the economy. While the presumptive GOP nominee has argued during his campaign that the recovery is far too slow, the electoral implications for making that case in states that include Virginia, Ohio and Michigan are much more complicated.

    Republican governors Bob McDonnell of Virginia, John Kasich of Ohio and Rick Snyder of Michigan all must show that they are leading their states' economies in the right direction. Occasionally, that means discussing the economy in rosy terms, putting them at odds with the Romney campaign.

    Bloomberg News dug a bit deeper than usual On Wednesday night into how much friction this has caused, reporting that the Romney campaign has asked Florida Gov. Rick Scott to tone "down his statements heralding improvements in the state’s economy because they clash with the presumptive Republican nominee’s message."

    The story is well reported, going so far as to quote a Republican operative as saying that the ads being run by the Florida GOP seemed like they were crafted at President Barack Obama's re-election campaign headquarters.

    Not blaming Bush for the mess we're in, is like not blaming a train engineer for a fatal train wreck because he's no longer driving the train.

    by JML9999 on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 08:54:54 PM PDT

  •  Deer Valley is really quite a place (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    luckydog, OLinda, msmacgyver, tb mare

    Park City itself is crazy now, but I do remember it as a sleepy little mining town just as the ski thing was taking off. My dad and mom met there before WWII. I imagine my dad would be horrified if he could see it now, he was very much a lover of nature.

    "The scientific nature of the ordinary man is to go on out and do the best you can." John Prine

    by high uintas on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 08:55:20 PM PDT

  •  Anybody know how I can skip to the head of the (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JML9999, You know me man, Kellybee

    line to be held in contempt of Congress?

    Fuck Big Brother...from now on, WE'RE watching.

    by franklyn on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 08:56:10 PM PDT

  •  It ain't me. It's Mitt. (6+ / 0-)

    Chicago - Proud Home of the 1908 World Series Champion Chicago Cubs

    by Jeff Y on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 08:57:31 PM PDT

  •  Same Guys ... (6+ / 0-)

    "The Internet is the Public Square of the 21st Century"- Sen. Al Franken

    by Kdoug on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 08:58:47 PM PDT

    •  Oh yeah... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Kdoug

      ...uh huh...

    •  Every time Willard opens his mouth (4+ / 0-)

      about foreign policy/national defense we need to be reminding people that he's a cowardly draft-dodger, who ran away to France and lived in mansion when the bullets started flying in Vietnam.

      Chicago - Proud Home of the 1908 World Series Champion Chicago Cubs

      by Jeff Y on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 09:27:59 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  He's not a dodger, he went to France (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        indie17, Jeff Y

        to preach the word of God, who lives on an alien planet and left golden plates to be interpreted by Joseph Smith only to be lost later. It was way more worthy than fighting alongside your countrymen, especially since most of those doing the fighting were black, and they weren't equal until the late seventies in the eyes of the mormon church. Seems the Civil Rights Act helped God decide that they weren't supposed to be punished for being the spawn of Cain anymore. How fortuitous. Just like when Utah wanted to become a state, a holy revelation said polygamy wasn't required anymore to enter the "celestial kingdom"

        “The real truth of the matter is that a financial element in the large centers has owned the government since the days of Andrew Jackson” -FDR

        by You know me man on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 09:32:51 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  In my book, that still makes him a draft dodger (4+ / 0-)

          My dad was the son of right wing Nazerine preacher. He didn't try to hide behind his religion when he got drafted into Nam (a war that he thought was stupid and unnecessary from the very beginning).

          Romney not only supported the Vietnam war, he demonstrated in FAVOR of it before he ran away to France.

          Chicago - Proud Home of the 1908 World Series Champion Chicago Cubs

          by Jeff Y on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 09:38:48 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Sarcasm seems to have been lost (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Jeff Y, msmacgyver, JeffW

            of course he was a dodger.

            The point was that he dodged the draft to preach a completely daft religion. Which is more damning in my opinion. I know plenty of folks who were going to send their kids out of country if their number came up. But they opposed the war, instead of just trying to protect their silver spoon fed youth.

            “The real truth of the matter is that a financial element in the large centers has owned the government since the days of Andrew Jackson” -FDR

            by You know me man on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 09:44:45 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Does anyone know Romney's current position on (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Jeff Y, JeffW

              the Vietnam war? Does he know that it ended in 1975? Was he for it and later flip-flopped against it? Do they have dressage in Vietnam? Is Romney for or against dressage this week? Is dressage tax deductible? Is it business or personal?
              Only his army of accountants knows for sure!

      •  And, he got a very special kind of (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Jeff Y

        religious deferment.  At the time, only Mormons were given a deferment for religious service.

        When someone is impatient and says, "I haven't got all day," I always wonder, How can that be? How can you not have all day? George Carlin

        by msmacgyver on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 11:09:54 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  "Money itself isn't lost or made, it's simply (4+ / 0-)

      transferred from one perception to another." - Gordon Gekko

      In this case, it was transferred to JPMorgan, Bank of America, Citigroup Inc., Wells Fargo & Co., Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and Morgan Stanley.

      Your free market system, at your service, au voir.

    •  Thanks. Now I'll cry myself to sleep. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tb mare

      Sigh...

      Good diary, even for those in the other generations. Millenials should be on notice what can happen to them.

      Tipped, recd, curling into fetal position...

      © grover


      So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not. -- Me.

      by grover on Thu Jun 21, 2012 at 01:19:03 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I'm sure if I was on the bus tour, (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    franklyn

    I ate a bug. Sadly, I can't remember since someone shook up my etch-a-sketch memory.

    “The real truth of the matter is that a financial element in the large centers has owned the government since the days of Andrew Jackson” -FDR

    by You know me man on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 09:12:54 PM PDT

  •  Are we not men? (0+ / 1-)
    Recommended by:
    Hidden by:
    zizi

    "neither Obama himself nor his administration can be supposed as anything but evolutionary, when compared to Clinton's own years."

    Maybe on some things like marriage equality. On the economy and civil liberties? Devolutionary. At least he hasn't tried to end welfare again. Oh wait, food stamps.

    William O. Douglas- “I am for the individual over government, government over big business and the environment over all.”

    by WaltK on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 09:40:48 PM PDT

  •  I really hope Romco takes counsel from Kristol. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    msmacgyver, maryabein, JeffW

    That would likely put Christine O'Donnell high on the VP list.

    You know who else had "corporate experience"? Ken Lay.

    by here4tehbeer on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 10:58:09 PM PDT

  •  Stuck in my head today... (0+ / 0-)


    You know who else had "corporate experience"? Ken Lay.

    by here4tehbeer on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 11:28:36 PM PDT

  •  Been checking in to Kos all day.... (0+ / 0-)

    ...to see if the Democratic failure to protect food stamps would be noted on the front column.

    Maybe tomorrow.

    No more "single payer." No more "universal coverage." Just say, "Medicare for every American."

    by masswaster on Wed Jun 20, 2012 at 11:44:35 PM PDT

  •  Jindal's just kidding himself. (0+ / 0-)

    He doesn't really think he's in the running, does he?

    "The disturbing footage depicts piglets being drop kicked and swung by their hind legs. Sows are seen being kicked and shoved as they resist leaving their piglets."

    by Bush Bites on Thu Jun 21, 2012 at 12:22:21 AM PDT

    •  After Sarah Palin? (0+ / 0-)

      Anything is possible in a Republican VP hunt. Maybe that's why Cheney got a new heart. So he could appoint himself VP again. After all, there is a war waiting to be started in the Middle East. And we will get cheap oil from the spoils of Iran. (Oh wait. Haven't we heard that one before?)

      There has never been a protracted war from which a country has benefited. The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting. - Sun Tzu

      by OHeyeO on Thu Jun 21, 2012 at 04:04:12 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  my q&a: (0+ / 0-)

    "so, where are those WOMD? not in iraq, then?

    in iran? oh, we can't allow iran to become a nuclear power?

    like north korea? well what if they already have?

    what do you think of these "computer virus" attacks against them - palatable? not?

    oh, please. what do you think of the world situation? of our "strategic weaknesses?"

    BECAUSE, YOU MOTHERFUCKING GODDAMNED WELL FUCKED IT UP FOR US BEFORE.

    WHY IN THE HELL SHOULD ANYONE EVER FUCKING LISTEN TO YOU AGAIN?? FOR ANYTHING??

    GRAB THAT FUCKING BROOM AND CLEAN OUT THE GODDAMNED BATHROOMS LIKE I TOLD YOU!! BURGER KING DOESN'T PAY YOU TO FUCKING TALK!!"

    YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE RICH TO WANT SOMETHING BACK FOR YOUR TAX MONEY OTHER THAN WARS. OUR ECONOMY IS BASED ON WEAPONS MANUFACTURING AND KILLING PEOPLE. ...SOMEDAY WE SHALL ALL BE ONE... WHY FIGHT YOURSELF???

    by theChild on Thu Jun 21, 2012 at 12:31:58 AM PDT

  •  Bush era redux (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW

    In 2002 Dick Cheney said, "deficits don't matter". It's high time to dust off that 10-year-old nugget of wisdom and make Romney and the other R blowhards affirm or reject that statement. If they accept it, they lose. If they reject it hit them hard on what else they disagree with Cheney about.

    Make it stick. Romney cannot be allowed to slipslide his way to the election as another Teflon candidate a la Reagan.

    •  Writer from Esquire Magazine (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW

      has written a brutally funny piece about the wingers reaction to the fast and furious scandool....

      What the Gobshites Are Saying: Fast & Spurious Edition
      By Charles P. Pierce

      Well, we seem to have a real rage-gasm on our hands now. The president has gone and said the conjuring words, "executive privilege," thereby presuming to do something once that the previous president did four times in a month back in 2007. And, as we know, for some odd reason —Ooh, ooh, I know! Ask me!— whenever this president does something that other presidents have done, it is a constitutional outrage of biblical proportions.

      It gets better. http://www.esquire.com/...
      •  That's no "writer!" (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        JeffW

        That's Charlie Pierce, the best fucking political writer on earth!
        ::
        Partial to the man.
        ::

        “No, Mitt, corporations are not people,” Warren said, to applause. “People have hearts, they have kids, they get jobs, they get sick, they love, they cry, they dance, they live and they die. Learn the difference.”

        by vicki on Thu Jun 21, 2012 at 04:06:35 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Nice try, "Great Commission Baptists..." (0+ / 0-)

    Sounds a bit too much like "Great White Hope," a.k.a., "Great White Hoax," a.k.a., "White Southern Baptists," a.k.a., "Southern Baptist Congress."

    Nice try though. We'll see you in November when we pummel your southern-fried hatefulness.

  •  Awww, Hunter. It's from Gilly (0+ / 0-)

    Talk about too soon gone.

    I'm tired of the poor dead Shia being used as a post-facto justification for our war in Iraq.
    ::

    “No, Mitt, corporations are not people,” Warren said, to applause. “People have hearts, they have kids, they get jobs, they get sick, they love, they cry, they dance, they live and they die. Learn the difference.”

    by vicki on Thu Jun 21, 2012 at 04:09:25 AM PDT

  •  Really??? (0+ / 0-)
    The newest model in a long line of Republicans, Mitt Romney will bring you all the fresh, new ideas of ten and twenty years ago, repackaged for today's modern tastes.
    You really think his views are that new? I think I hear more 1880s robber baron positions in store for us under President Willard.

    I do find interesting:

    Much can be said of the Democratic Party as well, of course. The Obama ranks have included no small number of Clinton-era figures; while the exuberance and expansiveness of his 2008 voter base could be counted as remarkable, neither Obama himself nor his administration can be supposed as anything but evolutionary, when compared to Clinton's own years.
    I have a theory: at the victory party on the night of the election, I think that after the acceptance speech, the newly elected President exits the stage and then finds, quietly, behind him one of the Old Men of the Democratic party. A Warren Christopher. Or a Tom Daschle. Or a Leon Panetta.

    They tap his shoulder, tilt their head, smile sweetly, and then gently say something like this:

    "That was a helluva campaign, son. Well done. Great ideas, plans, and rhetoric. But now I need to tell you how it's done."

    He then goes on to explain to the dropped-jaw, newly-elected, President in waiting that they need to fall in line. They need to do what the Party elders-- and make no mistake about it, in the Democratic Party as much as in the Republican, that means rich people including bankers-- expect them to do.

    Maybe the threat is implied and veiled. Maybe it's explicit. You won't have the support you need among the members of Congress who have already sold their souls. You won't get the money you need for your reelection. Or your library. Or your foundation. Or your book contract after you leave office.

    Maybe it's more sinister-- at the one time you need them most, the Secret Service might whoops! drop their attention.

    But whatever it is, it works pretty well...

  •  Romney & Co's very fine [uncoordinated] getaway. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tb mare

    If it looks like coordination (all those potentates with very similar beliefs in an outing together), and it sounds like coordination (listening to the same speeches about politics and philosophy and engaging in cross-badinage over the buffet tables), and it smells like coordination (Ah, the smell of campaign money!) ... why, maybe - just maybe - there might be some coordination going on.

    Obama and strong Democratic majorities in 2012!

    by TRPChicago on Thu Jun 21, 2012 at 05:41:35 AM PDT

  •  They SHOULD Celebrate! They OWN the field - with (0+ / 0-)

    their main 'opponents' being DLC Third Way New Dem yuppie scum sell out liars -

    it is Happy Days for the Aristocracy!

    And out here in the great state of Wishy-Warshy, instead of the first layer of yuppie sell out scum (obama, clinton, rahm, geithner...)

    I have their enablers, the next layer! Cantwell and Inslee - the kinds of 'leaders' who NEVER get in the way of the rightward run of the conventional wisdom...

    yawn.

    THE PROBLEM is not that fascist aristocrats are being fascist aristocrats - they're supposed to do WHAT, run day cares with family wage jobs (HA HA HA) ?

    THE PROBLEM is the fucking sell outs and their goddam enablers taking up leader paychecks on 'our' side.

    rmm.  

    Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look; He thinks too much: such men are dangerous

    by seabos84 on Thu Jun 21, 2012 at 06:29:45 AM PDT

  •  excellent essay (0+ / 0-)

    Hunter, this is an excellent essay!  Every word and every sentence seemed essential, making a compelling case.  I read, reread and reread it and learned each time!  Thanks!

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site