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I live in Iowa. This is a rural state. We have nearly 25,000 bridges spanning at least 20 feet that carry highway traffic. Their average age is 42 years. Nearly 22% are rated structurally deficient by the Federal Highway Administration’s (FHWA) 2010 National Bridge Inventory (NBI).

NBI data is released annually and provides a significant level of detail on the condition of over 700,000 bridges nationwide. Bridges are inspected every two years, unless they’re in “very good” condition (four years) or “structurally deficient” (every year.) This data was released in February 2011.

Click on the map to view the linked online version. There, you can click on your state and see the statistics such as these for Iowa. I find the data disturbing.

Despite billions of dollars in annual federal, state and local funds directed toward the maintenance of existing bridges, 69,223 bridges – more than 11 percent of total highway bridges in the U.S. – are classified as “structurally deficient,” according to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). Structurally deficient bridges require significant maintenance, rehabilitation or replacement.

Come below the orange traffic interchange for more information.

You can also get a look at the individual bridges within a 10 mile radius of your location using this linked picture. The map relies on the latitude and longitude provided by states. Inaccurate coordinates may be present. Many bridges may not appear in the proper location. While geolocation data (coordinates on the map) may be wrong, the information in the right hand box when you have clicked on a bridge is generally reliable.

Presentation of the Data


Data from the NBI report has been compiled into these interactives by the organization Transportation for America. They decribe themselves as...
A broad coalition of housing, business, environmental, public health, transportation, equitable development, and other organizations. We’re all seeking to align our national, state, and local transportation policies with an array of issues like economic opportunity, climate change, energy security, health, housing and community development.
They stress that our national transportation policy has barely changed since the 1950s. Today, is a very different world. The interstates have been built. Americans are paying higher gas prices. People are plagued with costly commutes and congestion. Bridges are crumbling. Population is more urban. We are breathing dirty air. Our climate is threatened. Many older, younger and rural Americans are stranded with antiquated, unsafe, and inadequate transportation.

Transportation for America offers a set of objectives and targets for the future.

Current Status of the Transportation Bill


Here are quotes from an entry on the T4 America website blog of June 29, 2012 by Stephen Lee Davis.
More than 1,000 days after the last transportation bill expired, Congress finally voted to approve a new transportation bill just moments ago. Unfortunately for those hoping for a bold step into the future, this bill represents a definite step backwards, the last gasp of an outdated 20th century program.

The Senate had done the hard work of carefully crafting a forward-looking, bipartisan bill that passed with an overwhelming majority.

Unfortunately, this final bill moves closer to the House’s disastrous HR7, which was too contentious and unpopular to garner enough votes to pass. This final negotiated bill has been called a “compromise,” but it’s really a substantial capitulation in the face of threats by the House to include provisions with no relevance to the transportation bill — the Keystone XL pipeline, regulation of coal ash and others.

As a result of this “compromise,” the bill dedicates zero dollars to repairing our roads and bridges, cuts the amount of money that cities and local governments would have received, makes a drastic cut in the money available to prevent the deaths of people walking or biking, and ensures that you have less input and control over major projects that affect you and the quality of your community.

Despite record demand for public transportation service, this deal cut the emergency provisions to preserve existing transit service, does little to expand that service and actually removed the small provision equalizing the tax benefit for transit and parking.

This is a two year transportation bill. Long range planning for the improvements to our bridges calls for a more comprehensive approach than a short duration bill. The problem of our crumbling infrastructure will not go away. We have already had one major disaster with the collapse of the I-35 bridge in Minneapolis in 2007. There were 4 dead, 79 injured, and 20 missing in the immediate aftermath.


What Can You Do?


Take a few moments to explore the interactive map of your state linked at the top of this diary. Click on it. Click on your state. Get a sense of how your state is dealing with bridge safety and maintenance.

Click on the linked image below the squiggle. Enter your home town. See where the reported bridges are within a 10 mile radius. Are you driving over any of these structurally deficient bridges.

Take some time to contact your senator and representative. Let them know how you feel about the importance of having safe bridges in your community. Let them know if you think this issue deserves a longer term and more comprehensive approach in the future.

Originally posted to SciTech on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 08:10 AM PDT.

Also republished by Community Spotlight.

Poll

How many structurally deficient bridges are near you?

8%5 votes
19%11 votes
15%9 votes
14%8 votes
28%16 votes
14%8 votes

| 57 votes | Vote | Results

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Comment Preferences

  •  How do the bridges rate for your community? (54+ / 0-)

    I would like to hear from you after taking time to look at your state and your community. Is this an important issue for you? Do you drive over deficient bridges?

    Thank you for taking time to look into it and commenting.


    Universe started with a Big Bang. It's big, getting bigger, and mostly dark.

    by jim in IA on Mon Jul 02, 2012 at 06:10:04 PM PDT

    •  As you know, I live just south of you (12+ / 0-)

      in Misery...and work for a federal agency closely associated with highways. :)

      Our lacklaster bridge standards stem from a variety of issues.

      1) For decades, MoDOT was poorly run and horribly inefficient. Their motto was "employment first, infrastructure last."  As a result, they raised a generation of state residents who wouldn't give them squat for money because they knew it would be frittered away with no discernable benefit.

      That began to change 7 or so years ago when the state Transportation Commission finally hired a MoDOT director who knew how to lead.  There was discernible improvements across the board within 2-3 years of his directorship.  So much so that public perception of MoDOT softened significantly.

      2) Lowest state gas tax in the country.  Hoorah for us!  Cheap gas for all!  Shitty roads for all!  This goes back to #1 to a certain extent.  Nobody would support raising the gas tax so that MoDOT could hire 1,000 more employees.  The usual resentment  factor is at work here, part and parcel of Republican messaging.  "Why should I pay more so that somebody can get some cushy state gubmint job?"

      Now that people more or less trust MoDOT to do the right thing, of course we're a state of teatards so there ain't gonna be no taxes raised, nohow, nosirreeeebob.  It's so bad that MoDOT laid off 10% of it's work force just so they wouldn't lose federal matching funds in 4 years.

      So, the road infrastructure here is woefully underfunded and the majority state residents who bother to vote won't vote to pay for things they bitch about being chronically bad.

      Some have floated toll roads, namely the pipe dream of expanding I-70 to 6 lanes and the voters howled even louder at that.  So much so that raising the gas tax didn't look so bad.  Who knows where this will go.

      Again, it comes down to funding and an inability of the electorate here to realize that, duh, you pay for what you git.

      And I haven't talked about the usual rural/urban divide when it comes to parceling out transportation dollars.  Next door in IL, yes, the bulk of funds go north so all the red, rurl Repups in southern IL (aka Eastern Missouri) bitch about how they get nothing.  It's semi-flipped here in that the areas outside of KC and STL get far more road money than you'd see in other states.  That typical "I don't want 'those people' getting my road tax dollars" mentality also prevents us as a state from raising the state gas tax in order to fund road improvements.

      "I'm not writing to make conservatives happy. I want them to hate my opinions. I'm not interested in debating them. I want to stop them." - Steve Gilliard

      by grog on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 10:31:39 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  As you say... (7+ / 0-)
        voters howled even louder at that.  So much so that raising the gas tax didn't look so bad. Who knows where this will go.

        Again, it comes down to funding and an inability of the electorate here to realize that, duh, you pay for what you git.

        Perhaps if the average person had realized some growth in income and buying power and security over the last 25 years, they would be more willing to invest their tax dollars into maintaining and improving infrastructure. Instead, the average person has seen the wealthiest make out like bandits and suffer few if any consequences. And the infrastructure of the average person's home and car and savings has gone downhill.

        It is no wonder they lash out at proposals to spend money any where. "If I can't have mine, you can't have it either."

        Thanks, grog, for taking time to comment.


        Universe started with a Big Bang. It's big, getting bigger, and mostly dark.

        by jim in IA on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 11:42:41 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  well, it's no Madison County ... (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      badger, jim in IA, FarWestGirl, palantir

      (someone had to)

      and I wait for them to interrupt my drinking from this broken cup

      by le sequoit on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 04:45:40 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  This is appalling: (11+ / 0-)
    As a result of this “compromise,” the bill dedicates zero dollars to repairing our roads and bridges, cuts the amount of money that cities and local governments would have received
    In other words, the Transportion Bill did NOTHING to improve transportation. Like everything else we've gotten out of our Republican-controlled Congress, it does NOTHING productive.

    Thanks Jim. Very interesting stuff.

    Tell the people you love that you love them when you can. You don't always get another chance.

    by Melanie in IA on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 08:16:31 AM PDT

  •  Some of T4America's data (11+ / 0-)

    is old. Pennsylvania's is incorrect. We're down to roughly 4600 bridges structurally deficient and falling, not almost 6000.

    Also a two-year transportation bill has finally passed.

    i'll have to put on my transportation planner hat in a bit. this is disturbing data indeed, but "structurally deficient" doesn't necessarily mean "bridge will fall down."

    Rape apologia among progressives (well, anybody) is so very disturbing.

    by terrypinder on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 08:18:53 AM PDT

  •  One More Time... (8+ / 0-)

    The ASCE (American Society of Civil Engineers) regularly evaluates our nation's infrastructure and grades it on a scale of A to F, F being FAIL. currently our infrastructure gets a D; nearly at FAIL level.

    last I checked the ASCE estimated a cost of well over $1 Trillion dollars is needed NOW to repair our infrastructure, and build new infrastructure.

    for every $1 Billion spent on infrastructure, 50,000 jobs are created. these are good paying/good benefit jobs for architects, engineers, construction workers, truck drivers, etc.

    want safe bridges? want more Jobs?

    "A civilization which does not provide young people with a way to earn a living is pretty poor". Eleanor Roosevelt

    by Superpole on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 08:20:06 AM PDT

  •  You should crosspost at Bleeding Heartland. (10+ / 0-)

    Get more eyes in Iowa.  desmoinesdem at yahoo if you have trouble with it.

    We had one that was at 2 on a 10 point scale.  The council decided to replace it with a box culvert.  The whole thing was about $400,000, of which IA DOT picked up $300k.  Huge expense for a tiny burg like this.

  •  The map is totally off in terms of location. (5+ / 0-)

    I put in my address in WDM and the bridges around me on the map are about 35miles south and west of me.

    WTF!?!?!?! When did I move to the Republic of Gilead?!

    by IARXPHD on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 08:29:49 AM PDT

  •  here's a summary I found (5+ / 0-)

    Rape apologia among progressives (well, anybody) is so very disturbing.

    by terrypinder on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 08:48:23 AM PDT

  •  Interesting Diary and link ~ Thanks! (3+ / 0-)

    I am in So. Cal, and the mapping and data seem accurate as far as location. Based on some of the comments above, it seems like some of the data as to inspections may be stale...

    Either that, or some of the bridges in my area are behind schedule for their 24 month inspections (last dated Sept. 2009!!)

    In any event, this is a very interesting use of mapping data, and potentially a powerful tool for generating awareness of the condition of our national infrastructure.

    This is one aspect of an emphasis on The Commons which may unify our discussion of public policy.


    I'm a "No Rate" pariah. So when I give a comment "+110% n/t", please consider that a recommend. (That's my workaround fix to participating in this community!)

    by The Angry Architect on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 09:44:28 AM PDT

    •  Your remarks are appreciated. (0+ / 0-)

      It is not a perfect presentation of the bridge data, but it is useful and good to know.

      Thanks for stopping by today.


      Universe started with a Big Bang. It's big, getting bigger, and mostly dark.

      by jim in IA on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 10:03:10 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  We're #1, We're #1; wait a minute... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jim in IA, I teach music, marina

    I live in PA.  Specifically in Philadelphia, with 3 of the top 5 and 6 of the top 10 highest traffic deficient bridges.  Well, at least one bridge, the South Street/Spruce Street bridge over the Schuylkill River from Center City to the University of Pennsylvania has been fixed.  That was a pain for a couple of years.

    Ancora Impara--Michelangelo

    by aravir on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 10:08:10 AM PDT

    •  Being #1 here is not the goal :-) (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      PSzymeczek

      How up to date did the report seem to be for your Schuylkill River bridge? Was it just recently fixed?

      One more thing...I like your sig line. Here is a link to somethings you might like.

      http://stillshelearns.blogspot.com/


      Universe started with a Big Bang. It's big, getting bigger, and mostly dark.

      by jim in IA on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 10:17:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I can confirm (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        jim in IA, marina, WI Deadhead

        that this data is from 2009. when using statistics from Federal Highway, those numbers are for the prior year.

        The structurally deficient bridge data is reported each quarter and I collate it among other things into a quarterly report. The number for PA is 4,813 as of last quarter. It's roughly around 4,600 now although probably closer to 4,700.

        Rape apologia among progressives (well, anybody) is so very disturbing.

        by terrypinder on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 10:49:12 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I'm in Monroe County - #6 (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jim in IA, Justus

      40.1% of the bridges are deficient, and there are no fewer than 40 within a ten-mile radius of my house. Sheesh.

      There is a small bridge on the road to my gym that has been a one-lane bridge for, I think, at least a year. Half of it got washed out and it's just never been fixed. Just sandbags over some blinking warning signs...

  •  When this topic came up (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jim in IA, WI Deadhead

    I was surprised to learn that:

    McDonald also said that Iowa is fifth in the nation for the number of bridges, which is a reason for the large number of structurally deficient bridges, since every bridge will eventually age and deteriorate. But, there are other states with more bridges than Iowa that still find ways to do a better job at keeping bridges repaired. Five other states either have more bridges or just a few fewer than Iowa, but have a much lower percentage of structurally deficient bridges.
    There are more public road miles in Iowa than interstate miles in the entire 50 states.
    Iowa ranks 14th in the nation in number of miles of roadway. (2009)
    There are approximately 38 miles of road for every 1,000 people in Iowa.
    There are 2,664 bridge structures in Iowa that are made primarily of wood.
    Most of the bridges are owned by counties, more than 19,000. About 4K are state-owned and 1K are owned by cities/towns.

    http://www.iowadot.gov/...

    I drive over a deficient bridge built in 1934 in Iowa City every workday morning. Luckily, we have a prosperous county and can afford such repairs. The replacement project (pdf file) is scheduled to begin "any time now".

    •  Interesting stats about our roads and bridges. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      operculum

      It will be good when your bridge gets repaired. I hope it doesn't cause you a long time of detours.

      I understand that phrase "any time now". It can sometimes mean years will pass. I hope that's not the case.

      Thanks for you comments and help with the conversation.


      Universe started with a Big Bang. It's big, getting bigger, and mostly dark.

      by jim in IA on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 11:47:53 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  To my pleasant surprise (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jim in IA

    my state (Florida) has the least structurally deficient bridges (2.4%) of any state in the US.  We have a lot of really long bridges as well.

    "We are normal and we want our freedom" - Bonzos

    by matching mole on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 12:02:52 PM PDT

    •  Sorry to say there will be no prizes awarded... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      matching mole

      with this diary. It seems to be a Daily Kos policy of some sort.

      I'm glad you have good ones. Keep them maintained and they last decades.

      Thanks for checking in.


      Universe started with a Big Bang. It's big, getting bigger, and mostly dark.

      by jim in IA on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 12:09:30 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Twenty-four. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jim in IA

    There are twenty-four structurally deficient bridges within ten miles of my house, which is in Bloomington, Minnesota. Only one of those actually seems to be in Bloomington itself (the second closest one to my house!), almost all of them are north of me in Minneapolis. The I-35W Mississippi River bridge that collapsed a few years back looks to be just barely outside my ten-mile circle.

  •  Here's my favorite! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jim in IA

    A National Bridge Inventory sufficiency rating of 2 out of a possible score of 100

    I cross that baby about twice a week.  hold my breath every time.

    Can you call yourself a real liberal if you aren't reading driftglass?

    by CJB on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 02:38:46 PM PDT

  •  The bridge I cross most (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jim in IA

    is rated "4" on the deck (5s on the other components).  Supposed to be inspected once a year, last  inspection July 2009.

    The law, in its majestic equality, forbids rich and poor alike from sleeping under bridges. ~ Anatole France

    by ActivistGuy on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 02:49:28 PM PDT

    •  Worth noting... (0+ / 0-)

      the data for the interactives used above is probably not up to date. It is likely 2009. Since then, states and counties have had few funds to use for this work.

      Thanks for commenting.


      Universe started with a Big Bang. It's big, getting bigger, and mostly dark.

      by jim in IA on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 03:16:41 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  My state shows green, but there are 12 (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jim in IA

    red bridges in the circle around my small city. But when I typed in a tiny town that my son and I passed through 2 to 4 days a week over the last three years, I saw that a bridge we used those 2 to 4 days a week is red. There was a sign up about repairs to the bridge with a detour, but somehow it looks like that repair has been delayed.

    I wondered about that bridge as time went on and it turns out I was right to worry.

    "The object of persecution is persecution. The object of torture is torture. The object of power is power. Now do you begin to understand me?" ~Orwell, "1984"

    by Lily O Lady on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 03:07:00 PM PDT

    •  You must be in a unique part of your state. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Lily O Lady

      Thank you for checking it out.


      Universe started with a Big Bang. It's big, getting bigger, and mostly dark.

      by jim in IA on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 03:17:46 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Just my luck to have to drive over one of (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        jim in IA

        the few really bad bridges! The Tea Party is big in our area. The only tax they believe in the the "Fair Tax" (idiots!). That may have something to do with it. That and the fact that many grew up in a country which was building and improving infrastructure for many years. The red bridge in question was built in 1950 and the geezers (fulls disclosure-I'm a geezer too) probably still think of it as the new bridge! They probably haven't waked up to the fact that things have been going downhill for a while.

        "The object of persecution is persecution. The object of torture is torture. The object of power is power. Now do you begin to understand me?" ~Orwell, "1984"

        by Lily O Lady on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 03:37:42 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I like your observations about human nature. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Lily O Lady

          Just one question...at what age is one a geezer? I'm 65 and might be perilously close. I don't feel like one, on most days that is.

          Thanks for your comments.


          Universe started with a Big Bang. It's big, getting bigger, and mostly dark.

          by jim in IA on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 06:28:19 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Well, I'm 60, but I hurt my back (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            jim in IA

            back in the 90s and it makes exercise problematic. Our little city has privatized the management of the community pool, so free swim times are less of a priority than swim classes that they can make money from. So I'm still trying to find a way to exercise without hurting my back. Makes me feel kinda creaky.

            I'm living the libertarian dream, but it feels a bit nightmarish to me. I'm trying to convince my husband to move to New England where it's a bit bluer and cooler, too!

            "The object of persecution is persecution. The object of torture is torture. The object of power is power. Now do you begin to understand me?" ~Orwell, "1984"

            by Lily O Lady on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 06:46:38 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  Tons of deficient bridges in the Bay Area (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jim in IA

    More than I could count (so I went with "more than 15" in your poll).

    Most appear to be freeway overpasses. Many are relatively short. Most were built in the 1960's or earlier. And let's not forget that we are severely quake-prone here. The only saving grace is that most of the listed spans are fairly short and, while deficient, are unlikely to come down, even in an earthquake, because of the way they're constructed.

    •  I think your reasoning is good. Still, be... (0+ / 0-)

      cautious of the routes you choose.

      Thanks for your comments.


      Universe started with a Big Bang. It's big, getting bigger, and mostly dark.

      by jim in IA on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 03:20:49 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Very often there is no choice (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        jim in IA

        Almost all of the freeway overpasses in SF proper were constructed in the 1960s or earlier. There are not really that many of them, and fewer than there used to be because the 1989 Loma Prieta quake damaged quite a few sections of freeway which were then demolished and not replaced, while other sections, while still stable, were removed later on and replaced with other arrangements. SF may be one of the few cities in the country with fewer miles of freeway than existed thirty years ago. What's left however consists of major arteries that are really tough to avoid.

  •  Some of the major bridges I use on a frequent (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jim in IA

    basis are either structurally deficient or obsolete.

    I-90/520 floating bridges,
    I-5 ramps to/from West Seattle
    Montlake drawbridge
    Boeing Access Road

    Oh and the auto counts are way off.  I know there are more than they are reporting.  The local teens are great at steeling the hoses used in the counters.

    "Death is the winner in any war." - Nightwish/Imaginareum/Song of myself.

    by doingbusinessas on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 04:11:08 PM PDT

    •  About those auto counts...I hate to admit... (0+ / 0-)

      we lived on a long straight gravel road in rural IL as a kid. One day, I noticed a rubber hose across the road. A car went by and I heard a noise in the ditch. It was a counter connected to the hose. Being a sciency type of kid, I experimented and found that if you pounded on the hose, it would register a noise in the box. I did that for a long time and then got bored.

      A couple of years later, road crews came to grade out the ditches and raise and pave the road. We ended up with this really nice blacktop road for five miles out of the tiny town of on 125 people. I don't know if it had anything to do with my actions. Probably not, but who knows.


      Universe started with a Big Bang. It's big, getting bigger, and mostly dark.

      by jim in IA on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 06:34:17 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Location errors make interactive map not valuable (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jim in IA

    Nice looking interactive map, but the "information" is garbage - it damages the credibility of the point you are trying to make.  

    I typed in my location in eastern Iowa. Only 3 of the 22 red tags were even in the right county.  Most of the tags are shown way too far north, way too far west, or both.  Most are not within 10 miles of the location.

    •  I was also disappointed in the IA data. (0+ / 0-)

      Others found their data was fine for their locations. Something seems really messed with the IA entries.

      Sorry it wasn't more useful to you.


      Universe started with a Big Bang. It's big, getting bigger, and mostly dark.

      by jim in IA on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 08:02:35 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  It's hard to tell. It looks like LA county is 7 to (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jim in IA

    12%

    We just rebuilt the 7th street off-ramp into Long Beach.
    It looks cool and works great.

    Great diary. Thank you.

    Please Vote for the Democratic nominee for President in 2012.

    by mungley on Tue Jul 03, 2012 at 11:56:07 PM PDT

  •  asdf (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jim in IA

    My little corner of the map shows a handful of bridges that are deficient; however, last summer, all the red ones I habitually travel were redone. I think the site may not be 100% up to date.

    Weathering Michigan's recessions since the '70s.

    by jennifree2bme on Wed Jul 04, 2012 at 12:29:13 AM PDT

    •  That's true. Entering the data from the... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jennifree2bme

      Federal reports is a massive project and takes a long time. The most recent data appears two years old. I'm glad your bridges are all fixed and safe.

      Have a good 4th.


      Universe started with a Big Bang. It's big, getting bigger, and mostly dark.

      by jim in IA on Wed Jul 04, 2012 at 04:50:50 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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