Skip to main content

Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest banner
Want the scoop on hot races around the country? Get the digest emailed to you each weekday morning. Sign up here.
Leading Off:

MI-11/WATN?: This Thad McCotter story is just unreal:

As U.S. Rep. Thad McCotter's short-lived presidential run fizzled last year, the Livonia Republican turned to another aspiration: writing a TV show.

"Bumper Sticker: Made On Motown" starred McCotter hosting a crude variety show cast with characters bearing the nicknames of his congressional staffers and his brother. They take pot shots about McCotter's ill-fated bid for the White House while spewing banter about drinking, sex, race, flatulence, puking and women's anatomy. It features a cartoon intro and closing snippet with an Oldsmobile careening through Detroit and knocking over the city's landmarks. The double-finned car has a Michigan license plate reading: "Made on MoTown."

The News obtained a copy of the script from a former staffer who offered it as evidence of what the five-term congressman was pitching while in elected office and the tawdry humor unbecoming of a public official who had become disinterested in serving the 11th Congressional District.

Some amazing stuff:
Some congressional staffers included in his 42-minute pilot episode dated Oct. 17, 2011, were the same longtime employees who handled the collection of petition signatures that botched his chances of getting on the Aug. 7 primary ballot. The character named "Wardo," the nickname others acknowledge is used for District Director Paul Seewald, dresses in a matador costume, gets drunk on a whisky-laced Slurpee and runs off stage after puking.

"Chowsers," the nickname for Deputy District Director Don Yowchuang, leers at women's body parts and snaps cell phone pictures of them, goes "cougar hunting" and repeats the line "I'm Thai."

Seewald and Yowchuang received substantial pay increases in the first quarter of this year—19 percent and 32 percent, respectively, compared with previous quarters, according to records from Legistorm.

Much, much more at the link. Okay, wait, I gotta quote one more bit:
In "Bumper Sticker," conservative commentator S.E. Cupp is cast as guest on the pilot. Cupp, a regular guest on cable political shows, also has appeared on "Red Eye" and co-hosts MSNBC's "The Cycle."

McCotter tries to ask serious questions of the columnist, while his sidekicks chime in by asking how she "keeps that great stripper bod?" and whether "D-Cupp" is dating anyone. In the script, Cupp is disgusted by the "train wreck" of the show.

It's unclear whether Cupp knew of her role in the pilot. Reached by e-mail, she didn't want to talk about McCotter.

Yow!

Senate:

AZ-Sen: Hah! That's chutzpah! A Republican tracker shadowing Democrat Richard Carmona's campaign, taking a break after his camcorder's battery died, asked Carmona, a physician, if he'd look at a lump on his leg! And Carmona, being a freakin' mensch, actually did so, diagnosing a hematoma—but also advising the tracker to consult his own doctor. No kidding!

HI-Sen: A labor-backed group called Working Families for Hawaii is spending $36K on radio ads on behalf of Rep. Mazie Hirono in the Democratic primary. This is their first expenditure of the cycle, though in 2010, they shelled out almost a quarter million to help Colleen Hanabusa defeat GOP Rep. Charles Djou.

MO-Sen: Former Arkansas governor and failed presidential candidate Mike Huckabee cuts an ad for Todd Akin, who is seeking the GOP Senate nomination. You can pretty much guess what Huck touts about Akin's record (repeal Obamacare, defund Planned Parenthood, true conservative, etc., etc.), but the editing is weirdly herky-jerky, with frequent "sped up" clips that seem to serve little purpose except to jar the viewer.

OH-Sen: Dem-aligned Majority PAC is out with a new ad attacking Republican Josh Mandel, hitting some mostly familiar themes: his absenteeism as state treasurer, his extreme devotion to fundraising, and his support for a Republican budget plan that's denounced in the spot as costing "300,000 Ohio jobs." The group says the ad is on the air "in the Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Dayton, Toledo, Zanesville, Lima, Charleston-Huntington, and Wheeling-Steubenville markets." Whew! We'll know how big the buy is just as soon as they file an independent expenditure report.

TX-Sen: The Texas Conservatives Fund, a pro-David Dewhurst super PAC which spent over $2 million boosting his candidacy before the primary, is getting back into the game. They filed an independent expenditure report for some $59K on "advertising and production," targeting Ted Cruz in the runoff That's a rather small sum for a television ad, especially in Texas, but it could be for radio—or it might really all just be for production costs (which would make it a pretty expensive shoot). Either way, be on the lookout for new paid media from the group soon.

WI-Sen: Businessman Eric Hovde has released his own internal poll of the GOP primary, showing him not far behind ex-Gov. Tommy Thompson. In the survey from OnMessage, Thompson takes 34 percent while Hovde is at 29. Ex-Rep. Mark Neumann trails with 16 and Assembly Speaker Jeff Fitzgerald is all the way back at 7. Fourteen percent were undecided. That's fairly similar to what we've seen in other recent polling.

Meanwhile, Hovde's personal financial disclosure is now available, so now we know not just that he's rich, but how rich—within a range. Actually, it's a pretty broad range—anywhere from a cool $58 million to a monster $240 million—since PFDs don't require you to state exactly what your assets and liabilities are worth. And there are still plenty of questions about Hovde's finances, since, like any good uber-1%er, he has some mysterious offshore holdings in the Cayman Islands, a notorious tax haven.

Gubernatorial:

NC-Gov: Well, well, well. Looks like the conservative Civitas Institute has a very different outlook on the North Carolina governor's race than they did a little over a month ago—perhaps because they switched pollsters, or perhaps because they included a third-party candidate, or perhaps for both reasons. Civitas's latest poll, from SurveyUSA, now has Republican Pat McCrory leading Democrat Walter Dalton by just a 46-44 margin, with Libertarian Barbara Howe at a rather high 7 percent.

Back in May, Civitas employed Republican pollster National Research to conduct a survey, which found McCrory ahead 48-36 (sans Howe). The new poll also has Romney leading Obama 50-45, so you can't accuse it of being overly-favorable toward Democrats—and it looks like McCrory is trailing the top of the ticket, which strikes me as unexpected.

House:

CT-05: Former U.S. Attorney Stan Twardy has released the findings of his internal inquiry into an illegal fundraising scheme allegedly perpetrated by former staffers for Democrat Chris Donovan and says he's found no evidence that Donovan had any knowledge of the purported wrongdoing. However, Twardy was unable to interview several key players in the story because Donovan's former finance director lawyered up after his arrest (as did other fired staffers who have not been directly accused). A federal investigation is still pending.

FL-13: GOP Rep. Bill Young, ass—or just incoherent?

CONSTITUENT: Hi, I’m (inaudible) how are you? Happy Fourth of July. Jesse Jackson, Jr. is passing a bill around to increase the minimum wage to 10 bucks and hour. Do you support that?

YOUNG: Probably not.

CONSTITUENT: 10 bucks, that would give us a living wage.

YOUNG: How about getting a job?

CONSTITUENT: I do have one.

YOUNG: Well, then why do you want that benefit? Get a job.

I actually vote for incoherent ass.

IL-02: On June 25, Dem Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr.'s office revealed that the congressman had been on medical leave since June 10, being treated for what they called "exhaustion." Now his staff is saying that Jackson's condition is "more serious than initially believed" and that he has "grappled with certain physical and emotional ailments privately for a long period of time" and is being treated at an in-patient facility. Jackson is 47 and was first elected to Congress in a special election in 1995.

MI-03: Steve Pestka (D): $574K raised (includes self-funding), $690K cash-on-hand. Note: Pestka's campaign told me they did not "have the exact breakdown" on how much Pestka put in, but his press release reports both fundraising and cash totals down to the exact dollar ("$573,846"). So I find that claim hard to accept.

NY-13: As paper ballots are finally being tallied in the NY-13 Democratic primary (New York 1's Grace Rauh is keeping a running tab on Twitter), Adriano Espaillat's campaign just won a favorable ruling from a judge who says that he will now oversee the counting process. The judge also forbade the New York City Board of Elections from certifying any results "until further order of this court." But unless Espaillat can show some serious problems with how the vote proceeded, he looks unlikely to make up the roughly 800-vote gap between himself and Rep. Charlie Rangel.

WA-01: A new group called Progress for Washington just shelled out $21K on mailers opposing Suzan DelBene's candidacy in the Democratic primary. Though it's a classic shadowy super PAC, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer's Joel Connelly reports that the man whose name is on the independent expenditure report, p.r. exec Jeremy Pemble, "has endorsed Democratic rival Laura Ruderman and given $1,500 to her campaign." As for the flyer itself, it attacks DelBene by saying: "Nearly every business Suzan DelBene ran eventually failed." A DelBene spokesman says the claims are garbage, but you already knew that at least one of them was deeply problematic, considering that DelBene was an executive at... Microsoft. Still there, I think.

Other Races:

AL-Sup. Ct.: Charlie Mahtesian flags a fascinating, if depressing, article in the Birmingham News about a major sea-change in the politics of electing judges in Alabama. Plaintiffs' attorneys had almost always supported Democratic candidates—against Republican nominees put forth by big businesses that wanted to see monetary judgments against them reigned in—but now that's changing.

With the state Democratic Party a husk of its former self and putting forth few viable candidates, trial lawyers are now picking between the lesser of various GOP evils and contributing to Republican candidates who are seen as more friendly to their cause. Remarkably, one such judicial nominee is none other than the notorious "Ten Commandments judge," Roy Moore, who's received almost 20% of his funding from plaintiffs' lawyers in his bid to regain his position as chief justice. (Moore was removed from the bench in 2003 for refusing to move a monument of the Decalogue from his courthouse.) Evidently, Moore must have been the least-bad option in the GOP primary, and now he's set to cruise to victory in November.

CA-Init: A new Field Poll paints an interesting, and somewhat complicated, picture of the tax initiative being offered by Gov. Jerry Brown in November. The poll gives the proposal a decent chance of passage, with 54 percent leaning in favor of it versus just 38 percent opposed. By way of contrast, two competing measures (the more broad-based tax package being proposed by attorney Molly Munger and a third initiative targeting multi-state corporations) are running about even in terms of support and opposition.

However, while voters may be leaning towards passing Brown's package, they are also mighty pissed about Brown's vow to immediately slash the education budget midyear should his tax package fail at the ballot box. The trigger cuts to K-12 education, referred to in some corners as "the ransom note," are opposed by 72 percent of voters, with little disparity by party. (Steve Singiser)

Grab Bag:

House: The folks at the National Journal have put together a cool interactive map of fall television airtime reservations made so far by the three biggest players on the House scene: the NRCC, the DCCC, and the Dem-aligned House Majority PAC, which recently made a bunch of reservations in conjunction with the SEIU.

Oregon: PPP has some Oregon miscellany, finding the state closely divided on legalizing same-sex marriage and marijuana, among other things.

Originally posted to Daily Kos Elections on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 05:00 AM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  Okay so basically the staffers stuffing up the (7+ / 0-)

    Paperwork and forging signatures is really becoming more and more understandable by the day.

    Is McCotter crazy? or I am crazy for being curious about the pilot! Well in a so bad it's good kind of way.

    Town Planner, 30 years Old, Election Junkie, Thinks John Boehner is starting to be worried about holding the House...

    by CF of Aus on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 05:07:02 AM PDT

    •  Cotter is just weird (7+ / 0-)

      and claims he never wrote the script in his Capitol office, preferring instead to write in his garage where he could smoke.
      But isn't pot allowed in the Capitol?
      ;>

      "Tax cuts for the 1% create jobs." -- Republicans, HAHAHA - in China

      by MartyM on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 05:45:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Have to admit, I haven't had time... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Amber6541, CF of Aus, MartyM

        ...to ever pay attention to this guy, except to occasionally note that "I think he's creepy but I don't specifically know why." Once I heard him being interviewed (was working in the next room so I didn't know who it was), and whatever he was talking about, he sounded a tiny bit intelligent, so I thought perhaps I had had something of a misimpression.

        Thanks so much for showing me just how right my first impressions of him actually were!

        Ick.

        Ich bin ein Wisconsiner!

        by Apphouse50 on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 08:15:41 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  No, I think weird CRAZY. After recent (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Amber6541, CF of Aus, MartyM

        revelations, decided he was a nut. But this is just about certifiably crazy for anyone holding office above dog catcher to be doing.

        Wow. The Republicans have so many losers, and this one has been on tv a lot in the past so apparently they were unaware of how nuts he was, or else the guy went bonkers just last year?

        "extreme concentration of income is incompatible with real democracy.... the truth is that the whole nature of our society is at stake." Paul Krugman

        by Gorette on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 09:33:38 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  non-farm payrolls +80,000 (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MartyM, Aunt Pat, askew, Amber6541

    unemployment unchanged.

    Not as bad a miss as last month but not great.

  •  Payroll up only 80,000. Rate stays at 8.2 (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, askew, Amber6541

    “The country tried everything Romney says, and it brought the economy to the brink of collapse”

    by Paleo on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 05:32:05 AM PDT

  •  80k job added in June (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat

    Weaker then expected but unemployment % stayed the same.

  •  80,000 jobs added in June (6+ / 0-)

    you heard it here first.

    Male, currently staying in CA-24. Voting in RI-01, went to college in IL-01.

    by sapelcovits on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 05:37:59 AM PDT

  •  Larry Kissell - ugh (7+ / 0-)
    A Democratic Party feud emerged Thursday as African-American backers of U.S. Rep. Larry Kissell pulled their support after his decision not to endorse President Barack Obama and his plan to vote to repeal the health care law.

    http://www.charlotteobserver.com/...

    "Tax cuts for the 1% create jobs." -- Republicans, HAHAHA - in China

    by MartyM on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 05:47:03 AM PDT

  •  Indianapolis may seek to bring the (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KingofSpades, Aunt Pat, HoosierD42

    2016 Democratic Convention to the Indiana.

    http://indianapublicmedia.org/...

    20, Dude, Chairman DKE Gay Caucus! (College IN-09) (Raised IL-03, IL-09) Tammy Baldwin and Elizabeth Warren for Senate!

    by ndrwmls10 on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 06:05:49 AM PDT

  •  Ah Thad mccrapper -- my rep (5+ / 0-)

    This explains why he hasn't done crap for his district since being elected to congress. And I use to have lyn rivers as my rep -- someone you could count on.

    Born in Oklahoma Raised in Ohio Escaped to Meechigan!!!

    by MI Sooner on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 06:25:06 AM PDT

  •  Obviously, jobs number could be better (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tietack, Aunt Pat, askew

    but politically, I think as long as the rate is flat, and we are adding jobs, I dont think it's bad news for Obama.

    July will be a month to watch. A lot what was going on in June. There were the Greek elections and the European summit that seemed to produce some results toward dealing with the debt crisis. If that holds, perhaps a big if, maybe Europe fades as an issue at least temporarily.

    Gas prices and oil prices are also inching up, but they both remain fairly low. We'll see if that continues.

    Also, we'll see if last week's drop in jobless claims was part of a trend or not.

    All of this could impact July's numbers.

    •  I don't think I can say this enough, so (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Bud Fields, Gorette

      I will say it again: he needs a new proposal to rally the troops around. I know (a) he already has proposed things like the jobs legislation of last September and continues to talk about it/them, (b) people are wary of deficit spending, and (c) it's hard to talk about new stuff without people asking why this isn't being done now, and that there are probably other legitimate objections. Still, would saying "I have a proposal to plow $1 trillion into infrastructure (financed by a surtax on the rich?), and am ready to pass it right now, but the Republicans are blocking me. Not only that, but they want to increase your taxes while slashing them for their corporate pals!" or something along those lines really be a bad idea?

      Jack Donaghy: "We're nipping this in the bud. Jenna's going to issue a formal apology tomorrow on "Hardball"....you do know what that is, don't you?" Jenna Maroney: "Yes. Should I prepare a song?"

      by bjssp on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 06:48:38 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I agree. I'm hoping it comes soon. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Bud Fields, judyms9, Gorette

        Both Romney and Pres Obama seem happy with the status quo right now.  Both don't want to speak in specifics because they just get attacked and picked apart.  

        Romney is heading over to Israel, the UK and Poland next month - I think Pres Obama should drop a big plan then.  If it was infrastructure, use Romney's trip destinations to drive home the point - about how much of a GDP percentage Israel, and the UK spend on infrastructure yearly and how embarrassingly little the US spends.  I liked the "We've spent a trillion dollars to rebuild Iraq and Afghanistan, let's spend some money to rebuild America" frame.  

        Problem being that they're more afraid of the GOP screaming "Tax and spend librul!!!"  spending money we don't have.  But the easy counter would be that the infrastructure spending is a NEED.  It's crumbling and will only get  more expensive.  If you have a leaky roof, you don't put off fixing it until you have money in the bank to pay for it - you get it fixed.  

         

        •  That's why I suggested (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Bud Fields, Gorette

          financing it with a surtax on the rich or something. (I'd really like it to be a financial transaction tax, but that's probably not going to happen for a few reasons.) It's almost like baiting him.

          Jack Donaghy: "We're nipping this in the bud. Jenna's going to issue a formal apology tomorrow on "Hardball"....you do know what that is, don't you?" Jenna Maroney: "Yes. Should I prepare a song?"

          by bjssp on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 07:08:28 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Have you calculated the rate of that surtax? (0+ / 0-)
            Still, would saying "I have a proposal to plow $1 trillion into infrastructure (financed by a surtax on the rich?), and am ready to pass it right now, but the Republicans are blocking me. Not only that, but they want to increase your taxes while slashing them for their corporate pals!" or something along those lines really be a bad idea?
            The Congress Joint Committee on Taxation estimated that the implementation of the Buffet Rule would raise $45 billion over the next decade.

            Last year, the federal government collected approximately $2.3 trillion in tax revenue - so to finance that infrastructure investment, you'd need a 50% tax raises. If you only want to tax the rich, you'd need a tax rate well above 10000%. You'd need to nationalize everything they own multiple times.

      •  I don't think I can say THIS enough (4+ / 0-)

        bj you keep complaining without merit that he needs some "new" plan that you somehow think is a magic pony.

        The AJA is the best policy prescription the Administration could come up with.  And it was several hundred billions of dollars, far more than anyone thought he would propose at the time.

        And he hammered it till the cows came home, and the GOP killed it.  He did exactly what you say now.

        And then he had his "we can't wait" initiatives, all kinds of policies implemented administratively without needing Congress.

        Those things all yielded what can be yielded politically.

        Now you think something else going through the same wash, rinse, repeat cycle is going to accomplish something different politically?

        Some people need to drop it that there's some sort of magic political pony.  There isn't.

        44, male, Indian-American, married and proud father of a girl and 2 boys, Democrat, VA-10

        by DCCyclone on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 09:16:12 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I don't think he focused on the AJA as much (0+ / 0-)

          as he could have. It needs to be a constant drum beat, and for various reasons, many of them understandable, it wasn't that.

          There's also the likelihood that a lot of people don't remember the AJA. Introducing it or something like it again would be new to a lot of people and would make it seem like he was trying something.

          I don't think it's a magical pony so much as it is a process of drawing a continued sharp contrast with the Republicans.

          Jack Donaghy: "We're nipping this in the bud. Jenna's going to issue a formal apology tomorrow on "Hardball"....you do know what that is, don't you?" Jenna Maroney: "Yes. Should I prepare a song?"

          by bjssp on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 10:17:35 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  You're wrong about all that (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            itskevin

            It WAS a constant drumbeat.  It was in the news for a long time in the fall.  There was vote after vote after vote in the Senate on its components, keeping it in the news.  The payroll tax cut was one component of that, and it was extended only earlier this year, meaning the AJA stuff was hammered at for a long time.

            And Obama makes sharp contrasts with the Republicans everyday.  Including bringing up the AJA during this latest stagnant period!

            bj you're just imagining things that aren't true.  What you say was tried and didn't work as you think it would.  Instead of acknowledging that, you're pretending it wasn't tried at all.

            44, male, Indian-American, married and proud father of a girl and 2 boys, Democrat, VA-10

            by DCCyclone on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 10:22:58 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  People may have lowered expectations (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DCCyclone

      But it's still a major vulnerability with truly undecided voters.

      “The country tried everything Romney says, and it brought the economy to the brink of collapse”

      by Paleo on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 06:49:58 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I thought last month's were a game changer. (5+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        jj32, tietack, Audrid, askew, Bud Fields

        Then they weren't.  So it would make no sense for this incremental improvement over last month to have a strong effect when last month's seemingly narrative changing numbers didn't.  American voter:  "The economy sucks, but Romney sucks worse."

      •  This is a bad report and hurts us (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Inkan1969

        I've said before that not everything that matters in the fall will move poll numbers in the spring or summer.  That goes for Obama's Bain attacks, just because he's not pulling away from Romney in ballot tests doesn't mean they're not working.  And it goes the same for these weak jobs and unemployment reports, just because he's not suffering yet in ballot test and job approval polling doesn't mean it won't hurt him at the ballot box.

        I fear with each of these monthly reports that there is a higher chance than the month before that numbers will begin turning against us.  That remains true.  The numbers still might not move now, or even in August, but at some point this is likely to hurt if we don't move from "neutral" to "drive" again.

        For now, we just wait and see what the next few weeks of polling look like, and hope everything still remains stable.  But I'll tell you what, I'll be door-knocking again later this month, and I'm more nervous about what I'll encounter than I was before.

        44, male, Indian-American, married and proud father of a girl and 2 boys, Democrat, VA-10

        by DCCyclone on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 09:20:17 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I'm wondering if it even matters anymore... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bjssp, Bud Fields, Gorette

      Because Romney isn't trusted on the economy either.  If he comes out with any specific plan it will be to give more money to the filthy rich in hopes it trickles down to us if we play the good serfs - and I don't think that will sell anymore.  I think folks are fed up with the idea that you have to give the rick more and more.  

      Basically we're at a stalemate on what to do.  I would like to see Obama and the Dems come together on a plan, release it in detail and say "Look, the GOP will block this and anything we try unless it's a handout to the rich and a tax on the worker and the poor so if you want to try something different than the trickle down economics of the last 40 years you need to elect Democrats into the House and Senate".  Of course we had that for two years, and the Conservadems in the Senate blocked everything with their 60 vote threshold garbage - that would definitely have to change.  Because with the broken Senate system, the GOP will always have around 45 seats at the minimum, meaning they could block everything by enforcing the 60 vote threshold.

      •  Yes, I agree. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        jj32, Bud Fields

        I said much the same above, and just to be clear, the contrast would be even greater since Romney has boxed himself into a corner with his proposals.

        Jack Donaghy: "We're nipping this in the bud. Jenna's going to issue a formal apology tomorrow on "Hardball"....you do know what that is, don't you?" Jenna Maroney: "Yes. Should I prepare a song?"

        by bjssp on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 07:07:23 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I dont disagree with a big proposal in substance (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        judyms9

        I think it's what we need for the economy, for sure.

        But I think politically, the reaction might be, "where was this three years ago?"

        If I'm Obama, I continue talking about the American Jobs Act. The reaction to that might be, "it's old news", but Obama's response can be "damn right it is, you havent passed this, and it would make a difference." He probably wont say, damn, but you get the idea.

        I agree with what Steve Benen says here:

        It's only natural for the public to want to blame someone when they're frustrated, and Obama's the one in the Oval Office. If the president had a "push here to create jobs" button on his desk, holding him responsible might even make sense. But it wasn't Obama who laid off 600,000 state and local public-sector workers; it wasn't Obama who decided to leave construction workers idle despite the need for infrastructure projects; it wasn't Obama who told the Fed to sit on its hands; and it wasn't Obama who asked Congress to ignore job growth for the last year and a half.
        •  I do think Obama Campaign should make point... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          jj32

          on the public sector job losses - say something like "Spending cuts are job cuts" and make the point that if public sector jobs were at Bush levels the UER would be 7.8 or even lower.  

          GOP forces spending cuts federally and at various state levels and then tries to pin the numbers on Pres Obama and the Dems.  They (and we) can't let that stand.  

          •  Agreed (0+ / 0-)

            And I think they have started to do that, with Romney's criticism about Obama wanting to hire more teachers, firefighters and policemen. They are public sector workers, and they are well liked.

        •  Further, Obama assumed the states were doing (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          jj32

          their jobs and had shovel-ready projects planned when the stimulus was passed.  Obviously the states were not interested in their own infrastructures.  Obama did his part, but the 50 states dropped the ball, and that includes Christie and Scott who turned down project money that would have created jobs.

          Romney went to France instead of serving in our military, got rich chop-shopping US businesses and eliminating US jobs, off-shored his money in the Cayman Islands, and now tells us to "Believe in America."

          by judyms9 on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 09:04:50 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  A lot of it is expectations setting. (0+ / 0-)

            Knowing money will be spent in some way will up a lot of forecasts and make business confident in hiring, which can help us get to a better spot.

            Jack Donaghy: "We're nipping this in the bud. Jenna's going to issue a formal apology tomorrow on "Hardball"....you do know what that is, don't you?" Jenna Maroney: "Yes. Should I prepare a song?"

            by bjssp on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 10:20:54 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  I don't think that is as big of a problem (0+ / 0-)

          as you do. He can point to a lot of the things he's done or proposed to do over the years and would still like to do now.

          Jack Donaghy: "We're nipping this in the bud. Jenna's going to issue a formal apology tomorrow on "Hardball"....you do know what that is, don't you?" Jenna Maroney: "Yes. Should I prepare a song?"

          by bjssp on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 10:20:02 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  The Same S.E. Cupp? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dc1000, Bud Fields

    Is this the same S.E. Cupp who was at the center of another Larry Flynt/Hustler Magazine controversy not very long ago?   Can't wait to see the rightwing blogosphere spring to her defense against McCotter - but I won't hold my breath waiting.

    •  S.E. Cupp is annoying (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dc1000, WheninRome, askew, judyms9, Gorette

      I can't watch The Cycle because of her. She's shrill.

      •  What are your thoughts on D. Cupp? (0+ / 0-)
      •  "She's shrill & also... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Bud Fields, askew, Gorette

        ... claims that she would find it impossible to vote for an Atheist for POTUS.
        Her reasoning, as I perceived it, in her almost vehement brief diatribe on "CYCLE" yesterday is that without an Atheist President having a higher power to appeal to He [ such a President ] would see himself as being all powerful & as such would be dangerous.
        Ms. Cupp, in my opinion,
        has traded cerebral betz cells for her reasonably good looks.

        •  What makes it even MORE perplexing (0+ / 0-)

          and crazy is that she, herself is an atheist.  Talk about cognitive dissidence.  She said that she wouldn't want an atheist President because he would only be representing 10% of the population.  HELLO - presidents represent more than religion you foolish woman!  

          I think adding her to a show was a BAD MOVE on MSNBC's part.  I compare her to the utmost evil -- Ann Coulter.  MSNBC is for progressives.  S.E. Cupp would fit in fine on Fox.

        •  Saw that and thought it one of the dumbest (0+ / 0-)

          so-called rationales for a vote I have ever heard!

          Surprised they didn't laugh her off the set.

          Maybe they did after the cameras turned off.

          "extreme concentration of income is incompatible with real democracy.... the truth is that the whole nature of our society is at stake." Paul Krugman

          by Gorette on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 09:43:40 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  serious degeneracy. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    judyms9

    but kinda like finding a new species, innit ?

    Addington's Perpwalk: TRAILHEAD of Accountability for Bush-2 Crimes.
    * Join: OBAMA'S TRUTH TEAM *

    by greenbird on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 06:55:50 AM PDT

  •  Romney's foreign policy trip would include (6+ / 0-)

    a stop in Poland, but today, Obama is already there.

    That's Poland, Ohio for people who didnt click the link. :)  

  •  Got McCotter as rep. after redistricting... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Bud Fields, Gorette, KingofSpades

    forced out Dem. Congresswoman Lynn Rivers

    Rivers used to represent the Wayne County portions of McCotter’s current district, before it was reapportioned in 2002. That year she was forced into a primary fight with U.S. Rep. John Dingell, which she lost.

    When asked if she would run for Congress against McCotter, Rivers didn’t mince words.

    “No chance at all,” she said. “That new district is probably not a good match for me.” She added that she has not been approached to run this year, but that she was in 2002 and declined...

    Before being represented by Rivers, McCotter's district (at least the portion that had been represented by Rivers) had also been represented for 30 years by William D. Ford

    ...an old-fashioned labor and lunch-pail liberal who served his working-class Michigan district in the U.S. House for 30 years...

    It was sickening to see the district that for decades had been represented by liberal congress members "represented" by a jerk like McCotter.  

    There's  a glimmer of hope

    In September of 2011, Roll Call pointed out that McCotter's district could be competitive "in a bad year for Republicans."
    and: McCotter Calls it quits

    Hopefully this November, the Democratic Party in MI will finally step up and wage a real battle to take back territory they've lost to jerks like McCotter.

  •  S E Cupp, avowed atheist, said yesterday (5+ / 0-)

    that she would not want an atheist for President because they won't have a higher power keeping them in check.

    She's an unnecessary mess. Krystal Ball is getting frown lines.

    •  unnecessary... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      askew, judyms9

      SE Cupp is worse than unnecessary; she makes a so-so, amateurish show like The Cycle completely unwatchable.

      Steve K. contributes an occasional insightful comment, while Krystal and the other guy are pleasant and unnecessary; a show can go on with or without them.  All three are okay as guest pundits who deliver small doses of chitchat that fills out the hour, but none of them have the credibility or strength to serve as hosts of a show.  

      MSNBC struck gold by giving Chris Hayes his own platform, but their current experiment with these four proves that MSNBC was just lucky on a few occasions; they are just as apt to elevate know-nothings as they are to present a vital host who elevates and educates viewers.  

      •  The Cycle reminds me of a high school lunchroom. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        WheninRome

        It also smacks of an attempt to mimic Fox's late afternoon blather.  MSNBC would be better off doing People-on-the-Street interviews with pedestrians in NYC.

        Romney went to France instead of serving in our military, got rich chop-shopping US businesses and eliminating US jobs, off-shored his money in the Cayman Islands, and now tells us to "Believe in America."

        by judyms9 on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 09:11:14 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  If I'd been there would've died in laughing fit! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      WheninRome

      "extreme concentration of income is incompatible with real democracy.... the truth is that the whole nature of our society is at stake." Paul Krugman

      by Gorette on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 09:45:49 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I don't know about you BUT (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Bud Fields, happymisanthropy, Gorette

    I'm feeling the THADMENTUM.

    Seriously, too bad he's not running this year.....I know it's bad and all because he's a spineless neocon, but at least it'd be an awesome trainwreck.

    Currently showing an amazed Mitt Romney on what the space bar does.

    by RVKU on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 08:01:22 AM PDT

  •  FL's Young, senile dementia (I can say that (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DCCyclone

    as I'm a senior and from FL now, so I hate this) and if you hear what he said, his series of responses, it comes across as great confusion on his part. No two ways about it.

    Unless you just want to call him a purposeful lying idiot, of course.

    "extreme concentration of income is incompatible with real democracy.... the truth is that the whole nature of our society is at stake." Paul Krugman

    by Gorette on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 09:37:54 AM PDT

  •  The DelBene mailer (0+ / 0-)

    I just got the garbage Suzan DelBene hit mailer. It went in the trash, where it belongs. The five WA-01 candidates have made a public show of not hitting on each other, and especially handing the R candidate (Koster) more negative ads, but it seems the gloves are coming off.

    A clarification though: she is not now at Microsoft. Her husband is (he's my senior VP, and dutifully shows up at debates and such, sitting quietly in the audience). And although MS as a whole is doing pretty well, which I think is David's point, the claim the mailer makes is about one of the divisions: we have several, with their own P&L. It also says she "helped" run Mobile; in fact she ran the marketing arm.

    It's pretty easy for a hit piece to blame the troubles of an entire division on one executive among many, but I have no insight into her role then. We pioneered smartphones, and paid the usual price of the pioneer (too much investment in V1 technologies).

    Use every man after his desert, and who should 'scape whipping?

    by UncleDavid on Fri Jul 06, 2012 at 08:38:57 PM PDT

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site