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It usually takes fresh thinking to bring about positive changes in government, and sometimes it takes fresh faces.  We had a great example of that in Silicon Valley last week as Jessica Rosenworcel and Ajit Pai, the two new Commissioners at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), visited with a coalition of technology business leaders to discuss ways to foster innovation and economic growth in tech industries, particularly telecommunications.

What made this visit so refreshing is that it involved two senior regulators going to Silicon Valley to listen to entrepreneurs and innovators and better understand the needs of the high-tech community. To make business work and to keep entrepreneurs innovating, the right business environment must be in place – an environment that promotes and accelerates the invention and application of new devices and technologies.  The FCC is key to helping establish an environment that promotes regulatory certainty to enable growth and innovation throughout the entire telecom ecosystem.

In recent speeches and statements, both of these Commissioners have addressed the need for quicker decision making by the FCC and leadership to advance infrastructure investment throughout the industry.  For example, Commissioner Pai recently stated that “the FCC should be as nimble as the industry we oversee”, he said the FCC should ensure that it isn’t a barrier to investment and innovation – by making well thought out but quicker decisions in order to spur broadband investment, facilitate growth and create jobs in telecom.

Commissioner Rosenworcel acknowledged during her visit, how the high tech sector promotes innovation with speed and alacrity.  After meeting with industry leaders, Commissioner Rosenworcel noted that “[t]he digital economy is growing fast and there are lessons to learn from its energy.”  Technology changes rapidly – new devices are invented, new applications are created, new services are brought online and new opportunities enrich consumers’ lives.

To keep our high tech sector growing and innovating, the nation’s policymakers should ensure that we eliminate unnecessary and burdensome barriers that innovators and entrepreneurs face when deciding to invest and deploy in the next generation of facilities, services and applications.  In order to continue our leadership role in the deployment of advanced broadband services, the high tech sector needs regulatory certainty, and quick FCC decision making.  A strong, bipartisan approach will be needed to set the right policies for our high tech economy to thrive.  Fortunately for the FCC, two Commissioners last week took the time to witness what is needed first hand and to listen to the experts — and who came back to DC showing that they understand the needs of our Nation’s high tech community.

We look forward to new and exciting prospects for consumers in technology, and we look forward to the continued great work of Commissioners Pai and Rosenworcel.

Mike Montgomery is the Executive Director of CALinnovates

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (0+ / 0-)

    www.calinnovates.org @CALinnovates

    by CALinnovates on Tue Aug 07, 2012 at 02:27:53 PM PDT

  •  FCC's mission (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sark Svemes, erush1345, Sharoney
    make available so far as possible, to all the people of the United States, without discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex, rapid, efficient, Nation-wide, and world-wide wire and radio communication services with adequate facilities at reasonable charges
    Notice that you do not address this. Basically you are a special interest group and this is a press release. The fact that regulators are coming from your segment of the market does not fill me with joy.
  •  Spam diary. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sharoney

    User is presumably being paid to post this.

    What's the policy on that here?

    •  Good question. (0+ / 0-)

      It's also posted at Huffpo--word for word, BTW.

      Stuff like this is one of the reasons why I don't come around here much anymore. At least on FB and Twitter the reader can block spam like this ourselves.

      Hey, Monty--you want to push your agenda here? Then buy a KosAd instead of clogging up the diary stream with spam diaries.

      "The truth will set you free...but first it'll piss you off." - Gloria Steinem

      by Sharoney on Wed Aug 08, 2012 at 08:42:52 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Uncertainty! Regulation! (and bears!) Oh my! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    G2geek, Sharoney
    The FCC is key to helping establish an environment that promotes regulatory certainty to enable growth and innovation throughout the entire telecom ecosystem.
    ..........

    ....the nation’s policymakers should ensure that we eliminate unnecessary and burdensome barriers that innovators and entrepreneurs face when deciding to invest and deploy in the next generation of facilities, services and applications.  In order to continue our leadership role in the deployment of advanced broadband services, the high tech sector needs regulatory certainty, and quick FCC decision making.

    All the catch-phrases are there.  Same old same old...

    Let me guess - the industry wants less regulation (unless it is the type found in the upcoming Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP), or the failed SOPA, PIPA and ACTA)?  Big Surprise.

    the FCC should ensure that it isn’t a barrier to investment and innovation – by making well thought out but quicker decisions in order to spur broadband investment, facilitate growth and create jobs in telecom.
    Which generally means "we want government money to do these things, but once we have them, don't even think about telling us how to use them or what to charge for them.

    And, in return, we get this, Corruption is responsible for 80 percent of your cell phone bill :

    This is about how your phone bills are five times what people pay in much of the rest of the world for the same quality of service:

        Americans continue to have a small number of expensive, poor quality cell phone providers. And how much does this cost you?

        Take your phone bill, and cut it by 80%. That’s how much you should be paying.

        You see, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, people in Sweden, the Netherlands, and Finland pay on average less than $130 a year for cell phone service. Americans pay $635.85 a year.

        That $500 a year difference, from most consumers with a cell phone, goes straight to AT&T and Verizon (and to a much lesser extent Sprint and T-Mobile). It’s the cost of corruption.

        It’s also, from the perspective of these companies, the return on their campaign contributions and lobbying expenditures. Every penny they spend in DC and in state capitols ensures that you pay high bills, to them.

    And as for that broadband?

    Let's hope it doesn't end up like Carly Fiorina's foray into fiber-optics.

    But, sure, nobody can say that the regulators haven't been there for the technology companies.  Whether its in the best interest of the average consumer is yet to be seen.  So far, all we have gotten is lesser quality at a higher price for many of these new technologies, but that trend will have to be broken at some point.

    I hope.

    "One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors." - Plato

    by Bcre8ve on Tue Aug 07, 2012 at 06:18:22 PM PDT

  •  just say ISDN. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sharoney

    30 years in the industry speaking here.  

    ISDN does everything SIP does, but does it better and securely.  High quality audio, circuit-switched reliability, faster installation and lower total cost of ownership.

    In the USA, ISDN is only available in the form of "PRI," expensive circuits of 8 - 23 voice channels for business users.

    In Europe and elsewhere, you can get "BRI," inexpensive circuits of two voice channels suitable for residential & home office use.  

    ISDN also makes telecommuting utterly seamless, reducing commuter automobile trips and climate impact.  

    If Europe has it, there's no good reason we can't have it, particularly since it was developed right here by Bell Labs.  

    "Minus two votes for the Democrat" equals "plus one vote for the Republican." Arithmetic doesn't care about your feelings.

    by G2geek on Tue Aug 07, 2012 at 07:55:53 PM PDT

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