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Horserace snapshot since August 1, 2012

If you missed yesterday's battleground snapshot from kos, make sure to read it here.

The New York Times editorial board looks at Romney's personality, his inability to gain traction in this race, and his campaign of contempt:

Asked about the government’s responsibility to the 50 million Americans without health insurance, Mr. Romney said they already have access to health care: in emergency rooms. That, of course, is the most expensive and least effective way of providing care, as someone who once advocated universal care has reason to know. But it also reeks of contempt for those left behind by the current insurance system, suggesting that they must suffer with illness until the point where they need an ambulance.

Mr. Romney is free to pursue this shallow, cavalier campaign for six more weeks, but he shouldn’t be surprised if voters increasingly choose not to pay attention.

Meanwhile, the fallout from Mitt Romney's interview with CBS's Scott Pelley continues, as analysts savage his response on his tax plans. To recap, Romney said that it was "fair" that the mega-rich pay less of a tax rate than working class Americans. On top of that, Romney dodged all questions on just how he would pay for those tax cuts for the rich. Up first, The Washington Post editorial board:

NOW WE GET IT: Mitt Romney’s refusal to specify what tax breaks he proposes eliminating is not a matter of dangling tantalizing goodies in front of voters now, before the election, and postponing the painful part until later. No, Mr. Romney’s dodging is, he claimed in an interview broadcast Sunday, an example of his strong leadership skills. [...] This is leading by ducking. Mr. Romney is right that the American people do not benefit from intransigent, my-way-or-the-highway governing. But his answer ignores the difference between maintaining flexibility and hiding your cards from the people whose votes you seek. If leadership means never having to get specific, why then does Mr. Romney identify a particular number — 20 percent — for the amount he wants to cut rates? The answer is obvious: voter appeal.
Jonathan Bernstein:
The interview serves as another reminder that Romney’s insistence on certain specifics — tax rates, for instance, and several specific tax treatments he insists on protecting against reform — mean that his other “principles” of revenue-neutrality and keeping middle-income taxpayers from tax increases just don’t add up, as the Tax Policy Center told us.

Unfortunately, CBS’s Pelley didn’t follow up with a question on why some details are apparently perfectly fine while others would be the dreaded “Washington” way of doing things. Nor did he follow up on the mathematical impossibility of Romney’s tax policies. As bad as it is for Romney to still be peddling this stuff six weeks after the TPC made it clear that his math doesn’t work, it’s even worse for a network correspondent to not be prepared to challenge him on it.

Joe Nocera at The New York Times:
Thirty years ago, when Forbes published its first Forbes 400, a net worth of $75 million would get you on the list. Today it takes $1.1 billion. In the last year alone, the cumulative net worth of the wealthiest 400 people, by Forbes’s calculation, rose by $200 billion. That compares with a 4 percent drop in median household income last year, according to the Census Bureau. One would be hard pressed to find a clearer example of how powerfully income inequality has taken root.

Like Romney, Forbes magazine is a little defensive about this — and, like Romney, Forbes has adopted a self-justifying narrative. Luisa Kroll, one of the magazine’s “wealth editors,” nods toward “concerns” about income inequality in her introduction to the list, but she goes on to write that “a deeper analysis instills confidence that the American dream is still very much alive.” In fact, it does nothing of the sort.

The fundamental reason the Romneys pay so little in taxes is that the bulk of their income comes from investments and thus is taxed at the capital gains rate of 15 percent. Although Romney himself isn’t close to being rich enough to join the Forbes 400, his reliance on capital gains is a trait he shares with most of the ultrawealthy. It is the thread that ties together the Forbes 400

Eugene Robinson at The Washington Post writes about the "crime against democracy" -- trying to prevent people from exercising their right to vote:

Not coincidentally, this voter ID campaign has been particularly intense in swing states such as Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania. Invariably, advocates cloak the restrictive new measures in pious-sounding rhetoric about “the integrity of the voting process.” This sounds uncontroversial — who’s against integrity? — until you weigh the laws’ unconscionable costs against their undetectable benefits.

“But you need an ID to do a lot of things, like board a plane,” advocates say. Unlike commercial air travel, however, voting is a constitutionally protected right. To infringe or abridge that right — for no demonstrable reason — should be considered a crime against democracy.

Justin Sink at The Hill reports on what should be the major news of the item of the day. Paul Ryan basically admitted that Mitt Romney uses tax shelters to lower his tax rate:

Rep. Paul Ryan said Monday that running mate Mitt Romney would pay more than he does currently under tax reform proposed by the Republican presidential candidate.

The Wisconsin lawmaker was asked during an interview with Fox Business Network whether Romney would pay more under his tax system.

"Yes, starting with people in the top tax bracket," Ryan replied. "Here's how it works. Higher income people can use lots of tax shelters to shelter some of their income from taxation. Close those tax shelters, more of their income is subject to taxation. That allows us to lower tax rates for everybody."

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Comment Preferences

  •  this is the one true APR (18+ / 0-)

    today's not my day ;-)

    here's another, though.

    "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

    by Greg Dworkin on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 04:52:46 AM PDT

  •  wonder how Ryan proposes to tax money (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ardyess, DRo, Onomastic

    moved out of the country and to tax havens.  There are dozens of loopholes that could be exploited to keep income from being taxed.  Matter of fact, Ryan should ask Mitt about offshore tax shelters since it appears Mitt has made use of abusive tax shelters in the past and a2009 tax amnesty to avoid paying mega-penalties and interest, according to news stories this morning, if I am understanding the teasers correctly

    •  Worse. (4+ / 0-)

      For his plan to work, he has to kill middle class loopholes too -- like mortgage deduction, charitable deduction, and probably family deductions.

      He never mentions that.

      Repubs started up the car, hit the throttle and sent it over the cliff, and now they're complaining that the black guy hasn't fixed it fast enough.

      by Bush Bites on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 05:10:45 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  A CPA on Eliot Spitzer's show (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tb mare

      yesterday evening explained that income (of any kind) earned by a person living in the U.S. was subject to U.S. taxes, and that what was done with that money after earning it, e.g., moving it to the Cayman Islands, did not preclude its being taxed.  He mentioned other reasons people might have for moving money to offshore accounts (he mentioned favorable treatment for trusts), but avoiding taxes on that money was not among them.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 05:22:54 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  However if a US citizen pays taxes on his money (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SueDe, tb mare

        and puts it into a Swiss account for example and buys British bonds with it, how will the IRS know about the profits from the bonds? (this is just a rough example)
        http://money.howstuffworks.com/...
        http://www.businessinsider.com/...
        The problem is not tracing the original income; it is tracing the income the after tax dollars generate after they are taxed the first time

        •  Ah, yes, I see the problem. (0+ / 0-)

          Does the U.S. citizen then owe taxes on those profits to the U.K.?  

          "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

          by SueDe on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 06:12:12 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  that is indeed the question as I don't know (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            SueDe

            enough about UK bonds to know to whom they would report such profits.  Also, the investor could always buy the bonds in a secondary market in a third country.  If you have $100M to invest, you can find avenues around country's taxation. I think it was Lenny Flank on another thread who observed the concept of nations is outdated in today's global economy

  •  campaign of contempt (8+ / 0-)

    about sums it up:

    Mr. Romney is free to pursue this shallow, cavalier campaign for six more weeks, but he shouldn’t be surprised if voters increasingly choose not to pay attention.
    His campaign has been an insult to the American people. He has given no specifics and refuses to be transparent witrh his taxes or medical records. We should show our contempt for him on Election Day.

    The Spice must Flow!

    by Texdude50 on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 04:59:51 AM PDT

    •  Mitt is just being Mitt and shows how a family (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Texdude50, SueDe, tb mare, thomask

      can lose its values in a single generation when the children are spoiled Mitt and Ann are both petulant and impatient.  First Ladies are usually seen as admirable (I cannot recall a First Lady who was disliked) but Ann seems to dislike almost everyone and the public returns the sentiment

      •  I disliked Barbara Bush, (0+ / 0-)

        she of the brilliant mind, but I may be alone in that.

        "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

        by SueDe on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 06:13:40 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I disliked Babs as she became more of a public (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          SueDe

          figure in trying to defend her sons' actions and hijinks

          •  We here in Texas just got a head start (0+ / 0-)

            on witnessing and having to endure her imperious and condescending behavior, as we suffered through W's governorship before he was elected president.

            "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

            by SueDe on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 11:01:20 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  the final straw was her overt effort to donate (0+ / 0-)

              $1M to a school district with the proviso that they had to use the money to buy son Neal's software.  She figured to get an IRS deduction for charity while skirting limits on gift deductions, all to help Neal get his software firm (after negotiating a sweetheart deal for him with Chinese government)

    •  It never occurs to Mitt that he's (0+ / 0-)

      interviewing for a job.

      "You say that you'll be able to raise our profits by 10% and cut our costs by 30%. How do you propose to do that? Give me some specifics. What techniques will you use?"

      "I'll tell you after you hire me. Oh, and once you hire me, you can't fire me for four years. That has to be in my contract."

      Long pause.

      "Uh-huh. Thank you for coming in to talk with us.  Next applicant!"

      Freedom has two enemies: Those who want to control everyone around them...and those who feel no need to control themselves.

      by Sirenus on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 07:35:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Paul&Mitt; trying to get the other to hold the bag (5+ / 0-)

    Neither wants to be the one who gets blamed for running the worst campaign in decades so Ryan is now starting a game of hot potato to see who is holding in on 11/6.

    •  Redstate: Erickson moans about the elitist (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ardyess, Onomastic, Remediator, singe, EcosseNJ

      termites undermining the Romney campaign. The crowd demands he name names.

    •  Cannot wait for the debates-- (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      singe, SueDe

      Presidential first on 10/3 on domestic policy, then VP on domestic and foreign policy 10/11 (sadly, the only debate), then on 10/11  Presidential again with foreign and domestic policy supposedly on the table. Will Biden make Ryan stand by his past positions and statements?  If so, will Mitt throw Ryan under the bus on 10/16?  Predict popcorn futures surging. . .

      •  Obama is not that good a debater. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tb mare, matx

        Romney is much more glib.  But then, when the president says something it makes sense, even if he hems and haws.  Romney, substituting chuckles for hems and haws, makes no sense whatsoever, and usually lies.

        "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

        by SueDe on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 06:19:09 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Paul Ryan thought this would be his ticket to (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      singe, tb mare

      Washington superstardom. How could Romney lose against this guy with the economy the way it is and, come on, he's black.

      Now Ryan has the challenge of not only losing, but also evading all blame for the loss if he hopes to have a future in GOP leadership. And that is assuming that he keeps his house seat.

    •  When the Republicans lose this election (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      maryabein, singe, coppercelt, tb mare

      there will be much finger-pointing from both right-wing pundits and the right's rank-and-file.  We will probably never hear from Romney again - at least as a candidate - but unless the Republicans also lose control of the House, we will be stuck listening to Ryan pontificate constantly as the Chairman of the House Budget Committee for at least two more years as he attempts to burnish his credentials for the 2016 presidential run.

      Please, please, if you're not already working for a Democratic candidate for a House seat now held by a Republican, volunteer today.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 05:32:55 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I am phone banking for Ny20 but my hope is that (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SueDe, tb mare

        even if we don't take back the House if Obama wins and we hold the Senate SOMEHOW they can start taking the melting of the poles seriously for god's sake!

        •  Good for you! (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          tb mare

          I'm not counting on House Republicans waking up and compromising, even after a drubbing.

          There are none so blind as those who will not see.

          "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

          by SueDe on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 06:23:13 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Not as long as the GOPs can filibuster. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          SueDe

          Ever seen the old Jimmy Stewart movie "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington"?  That's what a filibuster is supposed to be like....a last ditch argument to block or change a bill and you have to believe in it so much that you must physically stand up in the Senate Chambers talking until you literally collapse.

          The Repugs have changed the rules. Now you just declare a filibuster and go out to dinner. And the full Senate is blocked from bringing legislation to a vote. So much for the Constitution's mandate that a majority vote is all that's necessary to pass a bill in the Senate.

          And most people don't know what's going in. They talk about Dems "controlling" the Senate and don't know that the GOP is pulling this crap in order to block legislation.

          Work for your down-ticket candidates. The president can propose legislation, he can fight for legislation, but he can't write bills and he can't pass them. It's a three part government and if the GOP holds the House and gains the Senate, we're screwed.

          Freedom has two enemies: Those who want to control everyone around them...and those who feel no need to control themselves.

          by Sirenus on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 07:44:51 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Amen! (0+ / 0-)

            I must comment though that the Democrats in the Senate were complicit in forming the filibuster rules.  I remember back during LBJ's Senate days, a filibuster took 66 votes (or 2/3 of the Senators) to mount a filibuster, as it had since filibuster rules were first established in the 1800's.  It wasn't until 1975 that the Democratic-led Senate changed the rule so that it took only 60 votes.  No good deed goes unpunished.

            The constitution contradicts itself - it sets a mandate that only a majority of Senate votes is required to pass a bill, but then gives the Senate the power to write its own rules.

            The history of the filibuster is really interesting.  It was started - or at least made possible - in the early 1800's because of some arcane argument by Aaron Burr, as I remember.

            "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

            by SueDe on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 10:54:27 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  pretty pics (7+ / 0-)

    "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

    by Greg Dworkin on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 05:05:03 AM PDT

  •  Really concerning is that (6+ / 0-)
    CBS’s Pelley didn’t follow up with a question on why some details
    not only did he not follow up, but he allowed rmoney to confuse and misstate that capital gains taxes are already taxed once through corporate tax rates.  This needed to be called out immediately.  Shame on Pelley.....
    •  I can't believe (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Onomastic, Remediator, ardyess, tb mare

      that with a staff as large as 60 Minutes' no one there noticed that blunder.  Sadly, Mitt said it so smugly that most likely many watching believed him.  Sad that 60 minutes broadcast that nonsense.  I think they too are culpable.
      They should get some angry comments for letting that slip by.

      Be the change you want to see in the world. -Gandhi

      by DRo on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 05:18:25 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  This is going to be a problem in the debates. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tb mare, DRo

        Romney speaks like he knows what he's talking about even when he doesn't, and lies with conviction whenever he thinks it better serves him.

        The president is thoughtful, pauses while he's thinking and chooses his words carefully.

        If the moderator of the debates is good enough, he'll call Romney on a couple of his "misstatements" early on, which will flummox him and cause flop sweat.

        "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

        by SueDe on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 06:28:59 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  The president knows the truth. (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          DRo, SueDe, ardyess

          And unlike Mitt, he doesn't get rattled when challenged.

          He's got a pretty good idea what Mitt will say. He'll be ready.

          Expect a little needling of Mitt. Just enough to get him hot and bothered.

          Remember, he's lived his whole life as a privileged, to -be-defered-to man. Treat him as an ordinary citizen and he gets bewildered, then frustrated, than angry.

          Freedom has two enemies: Those who want to control everyone around them...and those who feel no need to control themselves.

          by Sirenus on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 07:48:20 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  what you get when you rely on transcriptionists (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ardyess, BobBlueMass, Ohkwai, tb mare

      to masquerade as journalists

  •  Forbes is porn for money hoarders. n/t (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude

    Repubs started up the car, hit the throttle and sent it over the cliff, and now they're complaining that the black guy hasn't fixed it fast enough.

    by Bush Bites on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 05:13:07 AM PDT

    •  Money reports that 93% of Americans are (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Bush Bites

      satisfied with their insurance but forgets the 50M that do not have any sort of insurance

    •  Forbes is just giving its readers (0+ / 0-)

      an opportunity to pat each other on the back for amassing more and bigger truckloads of money (and to strike envy and admiration for the wealthy in the hearts of those merely rich by comparison).

      It's like a vanity press: when no one else feels your book is worthy to be printed and distributed by a recognized publishing house, you can arrange through a vanity press to have it printed yourself.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 05:46:47 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Forbes has "wealth editors"? (4+ / 0-)

    If only more people understood that the real "wealth editors" are people like Romney, cutting assets from the working- and middle-class to paste into their own accounts.

  •  New WAPO polls out this AM (9+ / 0-)

    have Obama up 52-44 in Ohio and 51-47 in Florida. If Romney doesn't do something fast, we may as well invoke the mercy rule and have the election tomorrow.

    •  He'll pull every trick he can in the debates. (0+ / 0-)

      That has to be viewed by Team Romney as Mitt's final shot.

      Repubs started up the car, hit the throttle and sent it over the cliff, and now they're complaining that the black guy hasn't fixed it fast enough.

      by Bush Bites on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 05:17:27 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  question is what tricks does he have? (0+ / 0-)

        From his Univision performance, he does not have a very empathetic persona and the debate offers the opportunity for more gaffes.  He does not think well on his feet.  I would have said his strategy for the debate would be no new gaffes

        •  They'll have him drilled pretty well. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          entlord, SueDe

          He won't ad lib....I guarantee that.

          He could just fall flat from reciting talking points all night, tho.

          Repubs started up the car, hit the throttle and sent it over the cliff, and now they're complaining that the black guy hasn't fixed it fast enough.

          by Bush Bites on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 05:43:22 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Romney has one great debate attribute (0+ / 0-)

          He can lie with conviction.

          "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

          by SueDe on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 06:32:03 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  And one great weakness. He gets rattled when (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            entlord, SueDe

            challenged. His sentences start to repeat and meander.

            If he starts the patronizing "my friend" crap when he's talking to the President of the United States, that will mean the internal bleeding has started.

            Freedom has two enemies: Those who want to control everyone around them...and those who feel no need to control themselves.

            by Sirenus on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 07:50:57 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  These Republican candidates (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tb mare

      deserve no mercy.  It's time for a little payback for Walter Mondale.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 05:48:24 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Not to mention (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tb mare

        Adlai Stevenson, Hubert Humphrey, Jimmy Carter and Michael Dukakis.

        Democratic candidates are always better human beings than Republican candidates, whether they win their elections or not.

        "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

        by SueDe on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 05:51:50 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  "Reeks of contempt." And it does, too. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dr Erich Bloodaxe RN, tb mare

    Romney-Ryan have a lot of explaining to do, and if Mittens' snotty replies on 60 Minutes are any measure, the GOP ticket is a deeply mean-spirited enterprise.  

    Also I love Eugene Robinson's phrase "crimes against democracy."   Very useful in framing what's grievously wrong with the modern-day Republican Party.  

    Spielberg's film Lincoln is due for a release later this fall.  Maybe Republicans should have requested an advance screening for their Tampa convention instead of the Eastwood appearance. A little group therapy might have been a good thing.  

    •  Ann's behavior is no better as she demands (4+ / 0-)

      deference or she refuses to appear

      •  Yep. I realize she is The Candidate's (0+ / 0-)

        spouse, and that there has to be a public relations effort of some sort or another.  

        But this is a woman who could have brought more to bear in the campaign by urging her husband not to be such an unfeeling weasel.  

        It may be that Willard Romney is not a man who thinks he needs advice from others, since he has more money than they do.  Ann may have given up years ago, or, as you say, she may be the same way.  

        •  I think she's the same way. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Remediator

          She needs to realize she's not talking to her country club pals now.

          The "Nail Ladies" are not going to be satisfied with the gracious chatelaine's" condescension.  

          Freedom has two enemies: Those who want to control everyone around them...and those who feel no need to control themselves.

          by Sirenus on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 07:53:37 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  His response on the tax fairness was the most (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tb mare, Remediator, Sirenus, One Opinion

    stupid thing from him I'd heard in seconds!

    Seriously - 'It's fair that we pay less because somebody else already got taxed on that money!'

    Well, no shit, Mitt.  Somebody else got taxed on all that money that was paid to workers for their work, too.  

    Money is, unless some fatcat is just sitting on it, in constant motion, and constantly being taxed pretty much any time it moves.  You hand it to a janitor for his work, he gets hit with payroll and maybe income taxes.  He buys a new toaster and pays sales tax.  The company that sold him the toaster (hopefully) pays income tax if they made any sort of profit.  Then they send that money on its merry way, to be income for a worker, an executive, or a stockholder, where it gets, or should get, taxed again, and so on and so on.

  •  Romney's brand of conservatism (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tb mare, alrdouglas

    The shrub was a self-labeled "compassionate" conservative.  After the 47% speech it's clear that Romney/Ryan are preaching Contempuous Conservatism


    My country, right or wrong; if right, to be kept right; and if wrong, to be set right.—Carl Schurz
    Give 'em hell, Barry—Me

    by KingBolete on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 06:39:36 AM PDT

  •  Capital gains should be taxed more (0+ / 0-)

    than regular income. The "argument" that is based on money already taxed doesn't fly with me.

    In my opinion, a country needs to make stuff, have a strong manufacturing base and, in this day and age, a strong service industry base. In other words, people who make stuff and people who actually do stuff to service customers.

    People who make money off capital gains don't make or do anything directly, and money that begets only money isn't the backbone of the economy, especially when it's vulture capitalism like Bain.

    So, in my opinion, capital gains should be taxed more, and vulture capitalism should be heavily taxed, if allowed at all.

  •  You do NOT need an ID to fly (0+ / 0-)

    Although they ask for a picture ID, and everyone ASSUMES it is required that it be state issued, that is not the fact.

    My son left for the airport without his license, flew DFW to Chicago and returned.  His ID:  his school ID and his debit card.  He couldn't quit laughing about how impressed the TSA people were that he had a Platinum debit card.  They let him right through.

    There is only a requirement that you prove yourself to be you, not that you have some particular type of ID.

    If you want to know the real answer: Just ask a Mom.

    by tacklelady on Tue Sep 25, 2012 at 06:58:52 AM PDT

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