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Rep. Steve Pearce, speaking in Las Vegas, Nevada, at Western Republican Leadership Conference, Oct. 19, 2011
Screw Teddy Roosevelt for establishing National Parks.
It was no surprise that Mitt Romney chose Hobbs, New Mexico, to announce his energy plan back in August. That little city of 45,000 is home to Steve Pearce, the Republican who represents the state's 2nd District in the House of Representatives. And Pearce is a big fan of Romney's plan to turn the permitting process for energy development that is now handled by the federal government to the states. That would include national forests. Here's Pearce at the Colorado Conservative Political Action Conference last week, where Romney put in a surprise appearance:
America, each state, the public lands were given back to the states after they were chartered. But in the West, starting with Teddy Roosevelt who had the big ideas of big forests and big national parks, they held that land. And so the next chart shows you the effect on us in the West. Just understand this is the education. The red is of course bad. We’re starved in the West for education funds because of policies that Mitt Romney sat and listened to Rob Bishop and myself explain when it came to Hobbs. He knows that if we want to reverse the trend, we’ll reverse this trend of public ownership of lands starving education.
The excuse for having the states take over public land is always that the resources are better understood at the local level and can be better used if they are in the hands of local officials and not the supposedly jackbooted federal bureaucrats.

But did you catch Pearce's actual message? Ultimately, this is not just about taking public land out of the hands of officials at the Bureau of Land Management or Department of Agriculture and turning over its management to the states. It's about making the states a conduit for selling public land to private parties.

This isn't a new idea. It emerged in earnest with the so-called Sagebrush Rebellion in the 1970s and morphed into the Wise Use movement in the '80s and '90s. Condensed to its essentials, it combines laissez faire capitalism with a romanticized version of the Old West as foundation for an argument in favor of turning over tens of millions of acres of federally owned land to the states and to private ownership.

Most recently, the backers of this effort, like Rep. Jason Chaffetz, the Utah Republican, have openly called for selling huge swaths of federal land. Introduced last year, his bill, HR 1126, would mandate the auctioning of 3.3 million acres in 10 Western states. That's not the end goal; that's just to get their feet wet. The Utah legislature passed a bill this year demanding that the federal government surrender 30 million acres to the state. The governor signed it.

Romney and Pearce and all the others back an extremist approach that would smash more than a century of effort to protect public land. Pearce makes it clear in the disdainful tone with which he discusses Teddy Roosevelt's role in all this.

In the mildest version of their extremism, everything but National Parks, wildlife refuges and designated Wilderness Areas would be opened to energy and other development when the land wasn't sold outright. Underfunded, understaffed state regulators would soon be overwhelmed by pressure for project approvals from energy giants and others with legislative clout at the state level. Given the added corporate influence that will soon become apparent at the state level as a consequence of funding made possible by Super PACS, it is not hard to imagine what those public lands will look like if these guys get their way.

At The New York Times, Timothy Egan wrote in September:

The great, unfenced public domain, much of it forested or hidebound in sage and mesquite, is the envy of the rest of the world only because a few visionary souls bucked the powers of their day. [...]

As for state control—why should anyone think a governor here in Salt Lake City would be any less of a steward than someone in a federal uniform?

Here's why: The states, of course, are cash-strapped, and want these lands only so they can industrialize them quickly, with minimal regulations. If you want to know what our public lands would be like under states in the pocket of oil companies, just look at the closing days of George W. Bush's presidency, when drillers pressed to scar up land near some of the most iconic national parks and monuments in the Southwest. Only a change in administrations, and lawsuits that back the people's right to manage the lands properly, stopped them in their tracks.

Improvements can and should be made in the manner federal land is governed. But the best way to achieve that is by taking into account the wants and needs of all Americans who seek to use and to protect public land, not to sell it to the highest bidder. But that's the goal of these Teddy Roosevelt haters. Contrary to the Woodie Guthrie song, in their view, from the Redwood Forest to the Gulf stream waters, this land was made for them alone.

Originally posted to Meteor Blades on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 07:51 AM PDT.

Also republished by DK GreenRoots, New Mexico Kossaks, and Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Ah yes, Steve Pearce, the Rep. who doen't even (11+ / 0-)

    try to hide the fact that the GOP trains poll workers in illegal tactics

    "I'm sculpting now. Landscapes mostly." ~ Yogi Bear

    by eXtina on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 07:54:17 AM PDT

  •  If Romney wins, National Parks are gone! (17+ / 0-)

    They will be privatized.  You can't get a national park back once it's been turned into Disneyland.

    When the Republicans take control, things change for decades and sometimes permanently.  We are truly fighting for the future of this country, and if you stay home on election day, I hope you are the one that suffers the most.

  •  Hoping that political cartoonists (16+ / 0-)

    will start publishing images of oil/fracking rigs in beloved State/National parks.  

    Just New Mexico re: national parks:

    13 national parks
    1,545,616 visitors to national parks (in 2011)
    $67,931,000 economic benefit from national park tourism (in 2010) »
    Look at the lovely graphic at this National Park Service site on New Mexico

    That's a hell of a lot land to exploit (aka, despoil, fuck up, permanently destroy).

    " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

    by gchaucer2 on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 08:06:33 AM PDT

  •  You got that right! (4+ / 0-)
    Improvements can and should be made in the manner federal land is governed.
    Is it OT to share that in researching a diary oninspiring 350.0rg rally we participated in last week that I was very distressed to learn that the Obama administration opened up public lands to Big Coal?  
    Big Coal Scores on Wyoming’s Public Lands
    Obama Opens Up Western Public Land for More Coal Development
    But that action would be NOTHING compared to what might happen if the state Govs like our dipshit TX Gov Rick Perry  or say, the 'rotund' Gov of Florida, were in charge ! OMG.

    Federal control is important and we should keep it paramount.  And, as you say, improvements can be made....

    Move Single Payer Forward? Join 18,000 Doctors of PNHP and 185,000 member National Nurses United

    by divineorder on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 08:19:13 AM PDT

  •  Pearce (10+ / 0-)

    He's been about that kind of thing all along.  He's profoundly ridiculous on many fronts.  For example: back when there was a lot of fuss over a destructive epidemic of forest fires a decade or so back, there was a lot of talk about cutting policies in the National Forests, centering on controlled burns and thinning.  Pearce?  A lone voice for giving top priority to funding efforts to find marijuana being grown in the National Forests.

    "If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the problem." Eldridge Cleaver, Black Panther Party (quoted by Paul Ryan without proper attribution)

    by Land of Enchantment on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 08:22:20 AM PDT

  •  I'm all for letting federal lands revert to (9+ / 0-)

    their original owners.

    I can’t decide who’s cuter – the dead guy with the arrows in his chest, or the guy in the ditch with the seeping wound. -- Game of Thrones (Heard on Set)

    by prodigal on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 11:28:31 AM PDT

  •  Is Sarah Palin writing his word salad for him? (2+ / 0-)

    Jeebus, this has to be the most inarticulate thing I've ever read that didn't fall from Sarah Palin's gob.

    America, each state, the public lands were given back to the states after they were chartered. But in the West, starting with Teddy Roosevelt who had the big ideas of big forests and big national parks, they held that land. And so the next chart shows you the effect on us in the West. Just understand this is the education. The red is of course bad. We’re starved in the West for education funds because of policies that Mitt Romney sat and listened to Rob Bishop and myself explain when it came to Hobbs. He knows that if we want to reverse the trend, we’ll reverse this trend of public ownership of lands starving education.
    Can someone please decode that for me?  No, on second thought, don't.  I don't want anyone injured in the attempt.
    "...starving education"?
    Someone please just drug my museli now.

    A celibate clergy is an especially good idea, because it tends to suppress any hereditary propensity toward fanaticism. -Carl Sagan

    by jo fish on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 11:30:21 AM PDT

    •  Not to excuse Pearce's wingnuttery (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Senor Unoball

      but he's referring to the fact that property taxes, levied only on private property not on public lands, are what fund public education.  So regions with a high proportion of public lands, have trouble funding education.  There is some kind of scaled compensation payment that comes back from the Feds to help make up this shortfall (forget what it's called) -- but of course right-wingers would kill that wherever they got the chance.

      "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

      by lgmcp on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 11:43:11 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Thank you for the context. Too bad Pearce (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        lgmcp

        couldn't supply it.  I guess speaking in code becomes a habit after a while.

        A celibate clergy is an especially good idea, because it tends to suppress any hereditary propensity toward fanaticism. -Carl Sagan

        by jo fish on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 11:54:21 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I think the education argument (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        lgmcp

        is merely a red herring to attract voters.

        Don't ask me nothin' about nothin'. I just might tell ya the truth -- B. Dylan

        by ponderer on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 12:02:39 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  New Mexico - most Fed $ back, per dollar paid in (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        lgmcp, willyr

        For every dollar NM pays in federal tax money it gets back $2.63 from the Federal government, even more than perennial, whining "get the Feds to leave us alone"   Alaska.  Sure some is for Los Alamos, or credits to energy companies (some of whom pay no federal taxes whatsoever), but plenty goes back to the state itself and its residents.  

        Here's the top 10.

        1. New Mexico: $2.63
        2. West Virginia: $2.57
        3. Mississippi: $2.47
        4. District of Colombia: $2.41
        5. Hawaii: $2.38
        6. Alabama: $2.03
        7. Alaska: $1.93
        8. Montana: $1.92
        9. South Carolina: $1.92
        10. Maine: $1.78

        Mother Jones link: http://www.motherjones.com/...

        •  Yes, Republicans dissing Federal involvement (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Habitat Vic

          are always and everywhere disingenuous, but ESPECIALLY those on that list.

          "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

          by lgmcp on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 12:18:51 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Yes, and specifically, what about Impact Aid (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Habitat Vic, lgmcp, trumpeter

          Hello? Impact Aid is a DOE program that gives federal $$ to states to help cover education expenses for areas where the federal government owns land.  The aid is dependent upon the impact - i.e. if it's a military base where you have military w/ children, the aid  is more, versus just open land owned by the federal government.

          so his complaint is b.s.

          Liberalism is trust of the people tempered by prudence. Conservatism is distrust of the people tempered by fear. ~William E. Gladstone, 1866

          by absdoggy on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 12:26:50 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  That is, of course, (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        lgmcp

        before they shut down the Department of Education and privatize all of the schools.

        :/

        I am not religious, and did NOT say I enjoyed sects.

        by trumpeter on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 01:29:49 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Good point (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        lgmcp

        In Oregon those payments for the Feds' untaxed timber lands to the counties are stopping and a half-dozen counties are going bankrupt.

        No one gets a cent from gold and metal mining on federal land, although the mining companies make billions.

        Federal Coal leases pay some money to the States.

        When this problem isn't fixed, it give Pearce and his ilk a good issue.

  •  States rights! States rights! (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Senor Unoball, NeverThere, trumpeter

    Funny how invoking them always seems to be associated with unsavory objectives.

    Mitt Romney treats people like things. And he treats things - corporations - like people.

    by richardak on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 11:30:23 AM PDT

  •  Pearce would have been one of the guys (7+ / 0-)

    ..cheering the chopping down the last tree on Easter Island.

    Perhaps one day the Fourth Estate will take their jobs seriously. Or not.

    by Anthony Page aka SecondComing on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 11:31:15 AM PDT

  •  Similar bill in Arizona. (6+ / 0-)

    Reminds you of the early 20th century when TR set aside the Grand Canyon. The chambers of commerce and AZ territorial legislature went nuts! Oh, they screamed, he'll destroy economic development, no jobs!

    Arizona has done pretty well economically by not destroying the Canyon, but not if these goonballs are allowed to mine it and every other national park.

    stay together / learn the flowers / go light - Gary Snyder

    by Mother Mags on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 11:31:52 AM PDT

    •  "Would You Also Flood the Sistine Chapel So (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Mother Mags

      Tourists Can Get Closer to the Ceiling?" was an ad dreamed up by the great David Brower and the Sierra Clubin the successful battle to stop a hydroelectric dam that would have flooded huge areas of the Grand Canyon.

      Proponents of the project---of course---had claimed how wonderful the backed up "lake" would be for people to boat on. They had yet to see the unfortunate results just north of there, where another dam was already backing up the Colorado River through the magnificent Glen Canyon---the "Place Nobody Knew" as photographer Eliot Porter called it.

      Thankfully Brower and the Sierra Club were successful, and we don't have another 180 mile long evaporating pool, as Edward Abbey referred to Lake Foul.

      Resist much, obey little. ~~Edward Abbey, via Walt Whitman

      by willyr on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 02:33:16 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Sorry Repubs, but those lands belong to me (7+ / 0-)

    You can't have 'em!

    Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance, among others, is fighting hard to protect wild lands in that state.

    I dread the day that the state of Utah would be given the federal land within its borders.

    I'm not familiar precisely with exactly what I said, but I stand by what I said, whatever it was. -- Mitt the Twit

    by Senor Unoball on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 11:32:39 AM PDT

    •   Jewels like Desolation & Nine Mile Canyons (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      trumpeter, Senor Unoball

      in Utah's federal lands, being oturned over to oil and gas drilling

      The cancellation of the Utah leases in early 2009 was just the first of several Obama administration initiatives that aroused anger here. The Interior Department moved to all but terminate a Bush-era legal loophole that had allowed more than 30,000 new wells on federal lands without individual environmental reviews, including nearly half of those approved by Mr. Stringer’s office through 2011. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar later announced a plan to protect wild lands in its inventory from any future drilling projects. “The public lands were the central candy store where the oil industry walked in and took what it wanted,” he said.

      ....

      The Vernal office recently approved a second project near Desolation Canyon, proposed by Gasco Energy, which includes 215 new wells on pristine land that environmentalists fought to protect from development. They have said they intend to challenge the project in court.

      “One of the crown jewels of American wilderness landscape has been left on the cutting room floor,” said Steve Bloch, a lawyer with the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance.

      This spring, contractors were building a natural gas pipeline through nearby Nine Mile Canyon — nicknamed the nation’s longest art gallery — where American Indians once pecked stick figures into sandstone walls.

      The bureau defended the drilling, noting that the gas company is paying for archaeologists to help preserve the canyon’s petroglyphs, but not everyone thinks that is adequate. Blaine Miller, a retired bureau archaeologist, warned that the dust, traffic and construction around the wells could damage the work, which is over 1,000 years old.

      Resist much, obey little. ~~Edward Abbey, via Walt Whitman

      by willyr on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 12:18:54 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Desolation Canyon (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        willyr, Senor Unoball

        The apex of my wilderness experience as a youth took place in Desolation Canyon, rafting down the Green River with Outward Bound.  Its beauty and isolation stunned me back then, and I am sure the same would be true today.  That such a place exists in its natural state is evidence of the wisdom of some men.  Allowing well-digging in such a place is evidence of the profound stupidity of others.

        •  Nothing like "River Time" (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Senor Unoball

          I did a self-guided raft trip with 2 friends about 10 years ago through Desolation Canyon and Gray Canyon...80 or more miles of alternating flatwater float and pretty big whitewater---house sized rocks in places---and it was a blast. Once you're on the river you lose all sense of civilization, all connection to anything but the Here and Now---especially the river. The rhythms of the river become your rhythm, and your senses completely attuned to what the river is doing. Time doesn't matter. Only the river.

          It's magical.

          Desolation and Gray's side canyons are also chock full of Anasazi rock art. There's one panel of pictographs and petroglyphs that's got to be 60 feet long...with hundreds of figures and handprints all over the place. Really an amazing place.

          Shhhhhh.

          Resist much, obey little. ~~Edward Abbey, via Walt Whitman

          by willyr on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 01:55:56 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  This (7+ / 0-)

    I live in one of the most beautiful states in the union, Utah. Local pols are salivating at the thought of getting their claws into all the public land here, the Nat. Monuments and Parks and Forests.

    When I read someone complaining about the federal money that goes to states like mine I want to tear my hair out. This. This is why that money goes there and it's worth every penny.

    "The scientific nature of the ordinary man is to go on out and do the best you can." John Prine

    by high uintas on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 11:33:58 AM PDT

  •  California is struggling to manage state parks (8+ / 0-)

    States don't have the resources no to manage federal lands. They can't even handle what they have now.

    Someone wants to steal federal land just like they stole land from the first peoples' governments.

    look for my eSci diary series Thursday evening.

    by FishOutofWater on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 11:35:45 AM PDT

  •  The 1% now owns 50% of America's wealth (5+ / 0-)

    ...and all they want now is the other half.

    "Do you realize that fluoridation is the most monstrously conceived and dangerous Communist plot we have ever had to face?" - General Jack D. Ripper

    by wilder5121 on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 11:37:24 AM PDT

  •  Most haunting movie (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Shirl In Idaho, Senor Unoball

    I've seen on this subject is John Sayles' Silver City.  Kris Kristopherson as the embodiment of libertarian Western arrogrance and greed seemed so creepy . . . and so real. There are a lot of creeps in that movie but Kristopherson's is the worst because he's the one with the long-range vision to rule everything.

    Don't ask me nothin' about nothin'. I just might tell ya the truth -- B. Dylan

    by ponderer on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 11:39:44 AM PDT

  •  People who think like Pearce should move to Mexico (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Shirl In Idaho, Senor Unoball

    I just spent a year there.  If they did the same, they would see where their policies lead.

  •  As a lifetime resident of the WEST (6+ / 0-)

    I must say I have heard this crap all of my life.  Especially in the 70's, 80's and 90's . . .and still.

    The big money boys have been drooling over the National Parks and Federal lands for as long as I can remember.  I remember especially Cheney and his cronies desperately wanting to take over huge swaths of Yellowstone and the Tetons National Parks to sell off to private $$$men.  Or to have special million dollar condos and private resort areas only accessible to the very wealthy.  The rest could be raped for oil or mineral extraction. . .and then of course the wild hunting reserve where they could kill as many of the wild animals as they wish to prove how manly they are.

    These idiots are disgusting beyond belief.

    JMO

    *the blogger formerly known as shirlstars

    by Shirl In Idaho on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 11:40:31 AM PDT

  •  I guess corporations, being people... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Senor Unoball, side pocket

    ...just want to enjoy a nice camping trip in the national parks, like the rest of us.

    Aldus Shrugged : The Antidote to Ayn Rand. ***Buy ALDUS SHRUGGED on amazon, and ALL royalties will be donated directly to Democrats in contentious Downballot races. @floydbluealdus1

    by Floyd Blue on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 11:47:54 AM PDT

  •  Just a reminder to the Sagebrush people... (3+ / 0-)

    It's not your land.  That land belongs to every American as patrimony from our ancestors.

    The Unites States purchased this land at a terrible and double price:  the expropriation/ethnic cleansing of Indians and the blood of soldiers who fought to enforce the expropriations.  We continue to pay for it through treaty obligations to the original owners, and those obligations will continue even if we sell the land.  

    By all means, let the states and localities consult, but don't forget the Libertarian principle that your right to punch ends at my nose -- and your right to pollute ends at my nose and at my well.

    "Politics should be the part-time profession of every citizen who would protect the rights and privileges of free people and who would preserve what is good and fruitful in our national heritage." -- Lucille Ball

    by Yamaneko2 on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 11:48:43 AM PDT

  •  okay, we should all just calm down, (0+ / 0-)

    Granted, the repubes want to take Federal land and rape it. But it's not going to be a legitimate rape, so, no legitimate harm no legitimate foul.

    Rmoney, the mayonnaise of modern politics; rich white pasty goo in a transparent container.

    by Sam Sara on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 11:59:50 AM PDT

  •  future generations... (0+ / 0-)

    Future generations can convert the remnants of once-grand cities like Detroit, the empty ruins of universities, the abandoned strip malls on the edges of many communities large and small. the auto graveyards and the depleted coal mines and exhausted oil centers into national parks.  The rusting rigs and crumbling spires will serve as semi- natural, weed-covered monuments to the ancients, who lived in a time when people could afford to dream.  

    But if the future generations go to, for instance, the national park of Pennsylvania, they'll have to take their own bottled water, as fracking and industrial wastes will have rendered the water there undrinkable.  

    Of course, the future generations may have to walk to get to any of these national parks, as the Republicans have no interest in repairing our failing infrastructure, and there will be no bridges or roadways other than those for the exclusive use of the moguls who own them.  (The moguls will have agreements with one another, so each will be able to use roads owned by the others until a few of them get even greedier, resulting in civil wars, with the soldiers for each comprised of indentured slaves made up of the impoverished masses descended from the ancients.)  

  •  This is one of the (0+ / 0-)

    most appalling concepts ever because as mentioned above once it's gone it's gone. Here in Sonoma county we are going in the opposite direction with our Open Space purchases. And even here in this progressive bastion there are those who are trying to subvert the concept and the law.

    Ceiling Cat rules....srsly.

    by side pocket on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 12:09:48 PM PDT

  •  Private VS Public My Take (0+ / 0-)

    In my experience watching this sort of stuff is that when gov't lets private industry extract timber or minerals off public land that the companies get a better deal.

    This depresses the prices that private owners of resources can get for their assets.

    In the absence of any severe shortages or price upswings I'd just as soon the gov't not let private companies take things off public land unless they pay above market value, because I want to see ordinary people be able to get the most $$ for their resources.

  •   (0+ / 0-)

    In my experience watching this sort of stuff is that when gov't lets private industry extract timber or minerals off public land that the companies get a better deal.

    This depresses the prices that private owners of resources can get for their assets.

    In the absence of any severe shortages or price upswings I'd just as soon the gov't not let private companies take things off public land unless they pay above market value, because I want to see ordinary people be able to get the most $$ for their resources.

  •  Make believe public lands history (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    trumpeter, Meteor Blades, willyr

    This statement has no basis in factual history, but I should not be surprised by that considering it comes from a repug's mouth:

    America, each state, the public lands were given back to the states after they were chartered. But in the West, starting with Teddy Roosevelt who had the big ideas of big forests and big national parks, they held that land.
    In the Public Lands Survey System, first implemented before Ohio became a state, the ownership and distribution of land was always done by the Federal Gov't. In the case of Ohio, they were mostly awarded to veterans of the Revolutionary War. Later, as part of the Land Grant College system initiated by Lincoln, each new state was awarded 2 out of 36 sections in a township in order to support education and a few other targeted initiatives. Later states, like Arizona were awarded more sections. But the rights to other lands, unless otherwise titled was held by the federal gov't.
    An example of this is the Homestead Act which allowed farmers to claim land from the federal government if they could successfully turn it into productive land, or the land gifted by the federal government to the railroads to encourage their construction. The leftover lands, lands that no one wanted, stayed in the hands of the Federal Gov't. This all happened long before the Republican President Teddy Roosevelt took office. Roosevelt did do a great deal to create a management and protection system for these leftover lands and to keep their resources from being stolen by private interest.
  •  Absolute parasites.... (0+ / 0-)

    I have never seen a more money-grubbing bunch of slugs in my life.  Nothing, absolutely nothing, has any value but commerical.  

    If money is speech, then speech must be money. Call your mortgage company and pay your rent now.

    by dkmich on Wed Oct 10, 2012 at 01:35:35 PM PDT

  •  Another GOP Congressman bites the dust... (0+ / 0-)

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