Skip to main content

Welcome to bookchat where you can talk about anything...books, plays, essays, and books on tape.  You don’t have to be reading a book to come in, sit down, and chat with us.

1 Challenge Books 003

When I think about writing Bookflurries each week, sometimes a word jumps into my mind and I say, “What?”  Then I think about it for a while to see what it has to do with reading.  Tunneling into a book means to me diving deeply into a subject or a place and really getting to know it, thoroughly.  At the present moment I am tunneling into Czechoslovakia just before and during WW II, the Y service in WW II, and London starting from about AD 50.

I will say that tunneling is a different experience from dipping into an Ice Cream Sundae and I do like to do both.  The thing about tunneling is that it takes time and it takes commitment even if I read only a few pages each night.  It may be why I seem to do it more often in the winter when there is time to spend.

There are many images of tunneling that come to mind as I explore this metaphor.  There are the miners who labor beneath the earth, digging out tunnels bit by bit to reach the coal, diamonds, or gold.  Reading about miners makes me aware of the terrible danger of such work.  Then, there are the necessary tunnels for transporting goods and people that are dangerous to build.  When hubby and I traveled in the mountains we often drove through short tunnels or under snow sheds built for protection against avalanches.  

There are books that require us to tunnel into them and the reward for doing so is great.  They are worth it.  The author has done detailed research and presented it to us in a readable format.  We must be willing to dive in and go deep and dig out the nuggets that will stick in our minds.  

It can be daunting to approach and begin a book that will require months of reading.  I give kudos to readers at Bookflurries who have managed many books that I could not read.  I am always interested in hearing about them even if I can not read them.

Prague Winter by Madeline Albright is about her country and not much about herself.  It is an explanation of what happened to it and it is well worth the time to read about a country that was proud of being Democratic while being surrounded by countries that were not.  It is interesting to read because I had already read To the Castle and Back by Vaclav Havel.  It also tells us about her family who died in the death camps.  

So far, the London book, A History of London by Stephen Inwood, is going well.  I read London by Edward Rutherfurd a few years back and many, many other fiction stories set in London so I am prepared for this book and willing to tunnel into it for months of pleasure.  

I have been tunneling for a second time into a character who has so many different layers to discover.  Camilleri’s Inspector Montalbano on the outside is ornery and yells a lot.  He seems preoccupied with good food and yet when we pay attention to his thoughts and his self-questioning, we learn so much more about him and it raises the stories above being murder mysteries set in Sicily.  I tunnel into this complex character and I am surprised over and over again.  There is the favorite walk to the rock by the lighthouse where he has cried.  There is the olive tree where he sits as he puzzles over cases that are as gnarled as the tree’s branches.  There is the sea that he swims in.  I find him endlessly interesting as his thoughts are revealed.

Tunneling into books often means immersing oneself so much that the rest of the world seems pale by comparison.  It takes courage to dive in and explore so deeply, but we learn so much that way.  When we come up at the end of the story we have grown.

What books or characters have you tunneled into?  Is it worth it?  Are you being rewarded or just hanging in stubbornly for whatever good bits pop up?  

Diaries of the Week:

Write On! We have these fears.
by SensibleShoes
http://www.dailykos.com/...

On the Joys and Importance of Reading and Learning
by Andrew C White
http://www.dailykos.com/...

SNLC, Vol. CCCLVIII / SN@TO 14: Maria Stuarda Edition
by chingchongchinaman
http://www.dailykos.com/...

NOTE: plf515 has book talk on Wednesday mornings early

Originally posted to Readers and Book Lovers on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 05:00 PM PST.

Also republished by Progressive Friends of the Library Newsletter.

Poll

What are your favorite January activities?

2%1 votes
32%11 votes
0%0 votes
11%4 votes
2%1 votes
0%0 votes
0%0 votes
0%0 votes
5%2 votes
2%1 votes
2%1 votes
0%0 votes
11%4 votes
2%1 votes
23%8 votes

| 34 votes | Vote | Results

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  welcome (38+ / 0-)

    How to find the group Readers & Book Lovers:

    http://www.dailykos.com/...

    or click on the heart by our tag and we will come to your page.  Please stop by and visit as you can comment in diaries now for a longer time and there are some really interesting diaries there.

    Susan from 29 has made our schedule so you can click on it and read the diaries...thanks, Susan!

    All Times are EDT, EST

    Readers & Book Lovers Series Schedule

    DAY TIME (EST/EDT) Series Name Editor(s)
    SUN 6:00 PM Young Reader's Pavilion The Book Bear
    Sun 9:30 PM SciFi/Fantasy Book Club quarkstomper
    Bi-Monthly Sun Midnight Reading Ramblings don mikulecky
    MON 8:00 PM Monday Murder Mystery Susan from 29
    Mon 11:00 PM My Favorite Books/Authors edrie, MichiganChet
    TUES 5:00 PM Indigo Kalliope: Poems from the Left bigjacbigjacbigjac
    alternate Tuesdays 8:00 AM LGBT Literature Texdude50, Dave in Northridge
    Tue 8:00 PM Contemporary Fiction Views Brecht, bookgirl
    WED 7:30 AM WAYR? plf515
    Wed 8:00 PM Bookflurries Bookchat cfk
    THU 8:00 PM Write On! SensibleShoes
    Thu (first each month) 11:00 AM Monthly Bookpost AdmiralNaismith
    Thu (third each month - on hiatus) 11:00 PM Audiobooks Club SoCaliana
    FRI 8:00 AM Books That Changed My Life Diana in NoVa
    SAT (fourth each month) 11:00 AM Windy City Bookworm Chitown Kev
    Sat 9:00 PM Books So Bad They're Good Ellid

    ……………………….

    I am reading:

    Captain Flandry: Defender of the Terran Empire (part 5 of the Technic Civilization Saga) (pg. 241 of 397)

    Challenge books:

    Prague Winter by Madeleine Albright (pg. 286 of 416)

    The Enemy Is Listening by Aileen Clayton (pg. 79 of 350)

    A History of London by Stephen Inwood (pg. 41 of 937)

    We left the cave, yesterday, to see three grandbabies.  I got to read to two of them and one read to me.  :)  Much fun!

    What are you reading or hoping to read?

    Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

    by cfk on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 10:20:03 AM PST

  •  What I'm reading (18+ / 0-)

    Just finished

    Now reading
    Cooler Smarter: Practical tips for low carbon living by the scientists at Union of Concerned Scientists, a great group. These folk make sense, concentrating on the changes you can make that have the biggest impact with the least effort.

    Thinking, fast and slow by Daniel Kahneman.  Kahneman, most famous for his work with the late Amos Tversky, is one of the leading psychologists of the times. Here, he posits that our brains have two systems: A fast one and a slow one. Neither is better, but they are good at different things. This is a brilliant book: Full of insight and very well written, as well.

    What hath God wrought? by Daniel Walker Howe. Subtitled "The transformation of America 1815-1848. I am reading this with the History group at GoodReads.  This is very well written, and does a good job especially with coverage of the treatment of Blacks and Native Americans.

    The hard SF renaissance ed. by David G. Hartwell.  A large anthology of "hard" SF from the 90's and 00's. I think Hartwell takes SF a bit too seriously, but the stories are good.

    On politics: A history of political thought from Herodotus to the present by Alan Ryan. What the subtitle says - a history of political thought.  

    Snakes can't run by Ed Lin
    A mystery/police procedural set in NYC's Chinatown in the 1970s. "Snakes" is a slang term for illegal immigrants.

    Far from the Tree: Parents, children and the search for identity by Andrew Solomon.
    The title comes from the phrase "the apple doesn't fall far from the tree". This book is about apples (children) who did fall far from the tree (parents). This book got amazing reviews and it grabbed me from the opening:

    "There is no such thing as reproduction. When two people decide to have a baby, they engage in an act of production, and the widespread use of the word reproduction for this activity, with its implication that two people are but braiding themselves together, is at best a euphemism to comfort prospective parents before they get in over their heads"
    I don't agree with all that Solomon says, but this is a book to make you think about deep questions of humanity.

    [Rayburn: A Biography] by D. B. Hardeman. A very admiring look at Sam Rayburn, former speaker of the House.

    Just started
    He, she and it by Marge Percy. Really only a couple pages into it, but it's near future dystopian SF set on Earth.

  •  A frozen good evening to you. (14+ / 0-)

    Bitterly cold outside, so reading involves getting under the quilts.

    I'm slowly reading Palinuro of Mexico by Fernando del Paso.  It's a really big book, and I'm enjoying it.  A perfect, slow read for the frozen tundra.  Was it WC Fields who said, "It's not a fit night for man nor beast?" Anyway, that applies here.

    And now, off to where it is warmer.

  •  What rserven said. (13+ / 0-)

    I had to go to the mall today, so in addition to what I HAD to buy (and I do mean HAD to...it was a crucial bit of clothing & the mall bus is close to my apartment...and who wants to spend more time in 15 degree weather than they have to?)...so anyway.

    There is a bookstore at the mall.  And I went there, yes I did.

    I am currently tunneling into Terry Pratchett's Snuff.  I also found a discounted copy of Carl Hiaassen's Star Island -- a trade pb for only four bucks!  Sweet!

    I was sorta-kinda hoping the store would have something new and fantastic from either Iain Pears or Mary Gentle: no such luck in either sf or fiction.  But I'm delighted with the Pratchett and Hiaassen novels.

    To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

    by Youffraita on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 05:10:20 PM PST

  •  Well this morning I didn't know what I'm reading (15+ / 0-)

    but, for now I'm reading:

    Dining With The Doctor: The Unauthorized Whovian Cookbook by Chris-Rachael Oseland  I think I'm going to try the banana and Nutella Daleks.

    Also reading: No Exit by Hamilton C. Burger which is a YA book that my daughter was interested in. And as one of us reads all books before she does, I've started it. It won't take me long to finish, it'll likely be done today or tomorrow morning. This is a story about kids who fight city hall to get their community center re-opened in a small town.

    I'm not sure what's next yet. I have some samples I've down loaded I may read to decide if I want to buy the book. I have a few other freebies I've down loaded.

    "Madness! Total and complete madness! This never would've happened if the humans hadn't started fighting one another!" Londo Mollari

    by FloridaSNMOM on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 05:10:53 PM PST

  •  Tunneling... (12+ / 0-)

    Reminds me of what Neal Stephenson does in his novels like Cryptonomicon and The Baroque Cycle.  

    In Cryptonomicon, he focused on the various ways that encryption was used in world war II and the kinds of people that worked on it -- without getting us bogged down in a wonky history.  Instead, he teaches us an enormous amount of history on the subject while leading us on a very entertaining hunt for Nazi gold.  I tell you, Nazi gold can keep any book from becoming wonky.  

    In the Baroque Cycle, he focused -- tunneling, tunneling -- on a few different subjects, but mostly on (and, oh god, doesn't this sound dreary) the economic system of Europe during the late 17th century.  Instead, we get to meet a gay and paranoid (from mercury fumes) Isaac Newton who is obsessed with alchemy -- turning lead into gold -- pirates on the high seas, including Blackbeard, a harem girl who is rescued and becomes a courtesan to Louis XIV, and a man trying to invent for Liebniz and Peter the Great a mechanical computer that operates off of what are essentially punched binary cards made of gold.

    I tell you, any wonky story that isn't fixed by Nazi gold can be fixed by pirates and harem girls.  

    Neal Stephenson is one hell of a smart guy.  He leaves me in awe.

  •  Character (16+ / 0-)

    As I age, I am becoming less tolerant of fiction that does not have interesting characters in it.  

    Even some non-fiction:
    I have read the first three volumes of Caro's bio of LBJ. Now that was one interesting man.  

    Fiction:
    I know I bring up Discworld and Terry Pratchett nearly every week, but he does so much so well. Characters! Holy smokes!  Nearly ALL his characters are interesting. Even his bit players tend to be interesting. I mean, you couldn't call Angua one of the main characters - but she's fascinating. All his heroes have flaws, nearly all his villains have redeeming qualities.

    One reason I like Robert Parker's Spenser novels so well is that the main characters (Spenser, Susan, Hawk) are fascinating (I know, some think Susan is just there to be female or something, but I disagree)

    Robert Heinlein, for all his flaws, created interesting characters (and, again, some think him sexist - but look at, say Friday - would a sexist create a female character who is an assassin (more or less)?

    The Rostnikov novels by Stuart Kaminsky are full of interesting characters - and they grow and change over the series (which is a problem with the Spenser novels - you could read them in any order and not miss much).

    The Burke novels (particularly the earlier ones) by Andrew Vachss are darker than midnight, but Burke, Max, Michelle, the Mole et al are interesting people, and very different from me and each other.

    lots more.

  •  Tunneling! (11+ / 0-)

    The difference between actual, physical tunneling and tunneling into a subject, is that the only risk posed by the latter is that it will make you want to tunnel some more.

    I read Curzio Malaparte's Kaputt, not remembering that it was about World War II, on the recommendation of some other author I had read (maybe Milan Kundera, but I can't remember).  The next book I read, Peter Gay's Weimar Culture, was something I found in a used bookstore when I was looking for something else.  Suddenly, I was tunneling into WWII Germany, and it occurred to me that it was time to read William T. Vollmann's Europe Central, a novel mainly concerning Germany and Russia in WWII.

    But I've got a horribly short attention span because there are so many other subjects to tunnel just a short way into, so I think I'll be emerging from this particular tunnel when I'm finished with Vollmann.

  •  Inspector Montalbano (14+ / 0-)

    Last week, I read the episode featuring the dead horse on the beach outside his house, in which he blurts out to Livia that Ingrid is there for dinner. How much longer can they sustain this strange long-distance relationship complete with her jealousy? As far as tunneling him goes, it took several books for me to see what his men see in him, in spite of his downright abusive tone at times.

    Speaking of abusive, I'm about 2/3 finished with Gillian Flynn's Gone Girl -
    a match made in hell indeed!

  •  Tunneling Through Various Interpretations (15+ / 0-)

    From TV Tropes: Alternate Character Interpretation

    • In The Iliad, Odysseus' character floats on the Manipulative Bastard line; sometimes it's good (with Thersites) and sometimes it's bad (with Achilles). Later Greeks (and Romans) were much less kind to the character. The Athenian tragedians tended to portray Odysseus as an amoral sneak. Euripides even blames him for throwing Hector's young son Astyanax off the walls of Troy, an atrocity more traditionally attributed to Achilles' son Neoptolemus. Both Sophocles (and Ovid later in poetry) rake him over the coals for destroying Ajax, though it's possible that Homer would have as well.
    • Frankenstein: There are two ways to see Victor Frankenstein — either he is a tragic and naive scientist who - in his enthusiasm - bit off more than he could chew and paid a horrible price and suffered too much for it and has every right to be emo... OR a selfish asshole who tried to keep his PR clean by abandoning the monster and got what was coming to him and he's being whiny about it.
    • With John Hughes' 'The Breakfast Club,' some consider the actual moral to be "no one actually learned anything."
    • Is Christine attracted to The Phantom of the Opera, or is she motivated by pity and a desperate need to keep her Stalker with a Crush from going even more Ax Crazy than he already is? The original novel (while somewhat ambiguous) skews towards the latter, fanfic overwhelmingly prefers the former, and in the musical it depends on which actress you see. And that doesn't even get into the various interpretations of Erik himself... several decades of adaptations does that to a guy.
    • The Catcher in the Rye: Holden Caulfield is either a tortured intellectual who is driven insane by the general falseness of people and his increasing isolation from them, or a spoiled, racist, misogynistic, prudish, hypocrite, who doesn't know how to act properly in public. Or both? Or just, you know, a teenager?
    • If you haven't watched "Lost" yet & don't want to be spoiled, you might want to skip this one, but many have argued the "Man In Black" (aka the smoke monster who's the principal antagonist at the end of the series) has a point & is somewhat sympathetic compared to what he's fighting against. The character was kidnapped as a child by the guardian of the island, his mother murdered, betrayed by the woman who kidnapped him, and all of his actions spur from just wanting to leave an island he was forced to inhabit.
    • In Pride and Prejudice, Caroline Bingley can be read as the most sympathetic character - she's clearly in love with Darcy, and then Deadpan Snarker Lizzie strolls in and steals him from her. Most people see her differently as a sort of Regency Alpha Bitch, but maybe she was just meant to be the kind of clingy flirty girl that Darcy wasn't into just to contrast with Elizabeth.
    •  oh, wow! Wonderful, as always!! (11+ / 0-)

      I have an opinion about almost all of these. I will be interested in what others here think!

      In The Iliad, Odysseus' character floats on the Manipulative Bastard line
      Yes, I have heard much about this, too.  He is one scary dude.  And yet, in the Odyssey, his time with his son, his old servant, nurse and finally Penelope seem to soften my thoughts.
      Frankenstein: OR a selfish asshole who tried to keep his PR clean by abandoning the monster and got what was coming to him and he's being whiny about it.
      I go with this one.  I am probably wrong.  :)
      Is Christine attracted to The Phantom of the Opera, or is she motivated by pity and a desperate need to keep her Stalker with a Crush from going even more Ax Crazy than he already is? The original novel (while somewhat ambiguous) skews towards the latter, fanfic overwhelmingly prefers the former, and in the musical it depends on which actress you see. And that doesn't even get into the various interpretations of Erik himself... several decades of adaptations does that to a guy.
      This is a hard one.  I agree that there are so many different ways of looking at her actions.  I have seen another big movie with Burt Lancaster which made Erik more sympathetic, too.  But I think he is manipulative and uses her love for her father to bad advantage.  I do think she pities him and that she has a hard time leaving him behind.  That scares me...
      The Catcher in the Rye: Or just, you know, a teenager?
      I go with this one.  I didn't really like him until he showed how he loved his sister.
      In Pride and Prejudice, Caroline Bingley can be read as the most sympathetic character - she's clearly in love with Darcy, and then Deadpan Snarker Lizzie strolls in and steals him from her. Most people see her differently as a sort of Regency Alpha Bitch, but maybe she was just meant to be the kind of clingy flirty girl that Darcy wasn't into just to contrast with Elizabeth.
      I think Darcy was onto her.  =:0  She did seem to represent the kind of person one would expect to chase him.  His poor cousin Anne was fragile and unwilling to play the part intended by her mother, and his sister was a sweetheart.  Darcy was lucky to meet Lizzie.  :)

      Thank you for a great post!!!!!

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 05:53:40 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  My 2 cents on a few of them ... (6+ / 0-)

      I didn't like Odysseus. My interpretation was that he made up all the crazy stuff that supposedly happened on his odyssey so he could drag his feet about getting home to his wife and other responsibilities. He is shown making up stories, so it seemed obvious to me.

      Victor Frankenstein, I think, represents God, and God's abandonment of his creatures. Like the monster, we're left without guidance, to be hurt, misunderstood, and desperately searching for meaning. I can't remember the details, but I think there is also a parent/child theme in the book? (I'm bad at book or movie recall.) Yes, Victor should have been there for his creature.

      Holden Caulfield -- yes, a teenager with all of the implications. But at least he's not phony. :)

      It's been a while since I've read P&P, though I have read it multiple times, and my impression was that Caroline Bingley was just conniving, boring and nasty. Hard for me to imagine that I might re-read and think she's benign.

      More noticeable to me is how in Mansfield Park, the Crawfords are so much more interesting and even likable than Austen's hero and heroine, who just seem so stuffy and boring. It's hard in this day and age to relate to someone getting so bent out of shape over young people staging a play among friends.

      Reminds me of a class in college on antiheros, which was really interesting: Satan in Paradise Lost, Defoe's Roxana: The Fortunate Mistress -- can't think of others offhand. I think we read The Beggar's Opera.

      cfk, have you ever done an antihero bookflurries? :) or one on supposed heros that are unlikable? There are so many in both categories!

      •  I have, but it was quite a while ago (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        melpomene1, Monsieur Georges, Brecht

        and it is always interesting.

        cfk, have you ever done an antihero bookflurries? :) or one on supposed heros that are unlikable?
        I will do so for you...thanks!

        I agree about Mansfield Park.  The earlier of two movies was awful, too.  A later one was much better.

        I think this is the one I liked better:

         Mansfield Park

            Director:
            Patricia Rozema

            Cast:
            Frances O'Connor,
            Jonny Lee Miller,
            Alessandro Nivola,
            Embeth Davidtz

        http://www.barnesandnoble.com/...

        Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

        by cfk on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 08:23:27 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I saw the MP movie you liked and liked it, too. (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cfk, Monsieur Georges, Limelite

          In fact, I do like the book. I just am not crazy about Fanny and Edward! I'd like to see Mary Crawford end up with someone interesting who could bring out both the good in her (as, I guess, Edward was sort of doing) and also let her wit sparkle -- or something like that! It's a book I think I should write myself, but probably never will. :)

          I'll keep an eye open for your antihero and/or antivillain bookflurries. It's very sweet of you to say you'll do one for me! Pshaw!

          •  I think you should write it. :) (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Monsieur Georges

            Jane Austen's father was a minister, of course, and so I often see something in the stories about how wonderful it is to be one...Sense and Sensibility, for example.

            I think Mary should have been allowed to save Edward from his stuffiness for sure.

            It is pathetic in the one film I didn't like when Fanny says drearily at the end,  "You will always have me, Edward," and he says, "Yes." or something equally dreary and they sit side by side not touching...yikes!!!  

            I always thought Jane would like the second movie better, too.  :)

            Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

            by cfk on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 08:42:45 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  I found "Catcher in the Rye" (5+ / 0-)

      one of the dreariest coming of age books ever written, one that did little to balance the hormonal misfortunes of growing up with the adventure of it.  And I didn't like Holden, which greatly mitigated my empathy for him.

      There is a book that imo, is everything "Catcher in the Rye" should have been.  It captures the vulnerability of coming of age, the awkwardness and discomfort, but also, the great humor and stunning friendships that develop under the onslaught of approaching adulthood.

      "Temple of Gold" by William Goldman. A brilliantly funny and poignant tale of growing up and the friendships we form as we make that passage.  To this day, if I need a good cry, I reread the last few pages of that book.  Works every time.

      "A typical vice of American politics is the avoidance of saying anything real on real issues." Theodore Roosevelt.

      by StellaRay on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 08:35:10 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I don't think I know how to read without (12+ / 0-)

    tunneling. Good word for it, though.

    The first time that I remember clearly, I was in the seventh grade and read Gone With the Wind which led me all of the way from Bruce Catton's work on the Civil War to Douglas Southall Freeman and Shelby Foote. Come to think of it, I am tunneling still!

    And out here January is the time to get out and soak up some sun. For me it is also the time I have to take a daily walk around the property looking for irrigation system leaks due to overnight freezes.

    If the days weren't so short it would be my favorite time of the year.

    Only in the darkness can you see the stars - Martin Luther King, Jr

    by Susan Grigsby on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 05:53:07 PM PST

  •  I won't tell you about our weather today (11+ / 0-)

    But I will say there's definitely no snow here.

    I got the 1st part of the next Old Man's War book by John Scalzi, free from Audible. It is great, like the other books in the series. Also reading Fuzzy Nation and several health & fitness magazines. I've started reading Do Life, by a guy who lost 125 pounds - just a few pages in, it is interesting so far.

    I think I'm done with the Stephanie Plum books. They were cute, but too reliant on stereotypes. Maybe I read too many in a row. Got some Kim Harrison to listen to - once again planning to drive to Dallas, and will drive back with Neil Gaiman reading Neverwhere through the new car's speakers. I really mean it this time. Have to - if I don't trade in the Money Pit (my current car) before the 31st, I have to pay the tags & get it inspected. So, no matter what, it goes away now. Oh, I've also read Consumer Reports on new cars & Edmond's & other web sites about cars, since I have 0 knowledge about cars.

  •  "Tunneling" (11+ / 0-)

    is the grace of a good author.  One who builds their world in a way that leaves you a bug on the wall, right freaking there watching everything.

    In my long life of reading, I have found that this talent knows no genre specifically, and can in fact, invite folks into a genre they'd never otherwise explore.

    Steven King, long ago, was like that for me.  I don't do Horror, but many decades ago a great writer friend of mine put King's "Salem's Lot" in my hand.  He said "it's about vampires ostensibly, but it's really about the community where the story takes place.

    I was a doubter, but out of respect for him, I cracked open that book...and to my great surprise, fell in.  There were other King books in my future that engaged and amazed me.

    King is so prolific, that there was bound to be disappointments. And for me there were.  Don't read him much anymore, but those early King books, five or six of them, made me a bug on a wall I'd have sworn I'd never have chosen.  But King's best voice taught me that well...voice is everything.  Voice is the pathway to the tunnel, for me.  

    "A typical vice of American politics is the avoidance of saying anything real on real issues." Theodore Roosevelt.

    by StellaRay on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 06:09:25 PM PST

  •  I guess you could say I'm tunneling into Jane (11+ / 0-)

    Feather's books.  Just got finished with her trilogy about the English Civil War, now we're in the London of 1750.

    I used to tunnel into books about Roman Britain, particularly life on the northern frontier.  I'm still interested in it, but since I set that particular novel project aside, I haven't been reading as much about Roman Britain.

    For me winter is a time to write, as outdoor activities often aren't possible. We're in a deep freeze here in Northern Virginia.  They're even predicting four-letter word tonight!  Not much, only an inch, but that's still panic-worthy.

    Great topic tonight, cfk!  Stay warm!

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 06:36:40 PM PST

    •  Best wishes on the writing! (8+ / 0-)

      I am sorry about the cold and four letter word.  One inch can cause more trouble and be very slippery than more inches.

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 06:43:35 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I went to Penn State. (7+ / 0-)

        Four unplowed inches of four-letter-word are way worse than one, especially when you are driving up a road and many cars in front of you got stuck and you have to drive in the oncoming traffic lane b/c face it all the cars in your lane are stuck b/c someone at the top of the hill stopped for the stop sign which you NEVER do on an unplowed uphill road.

        NoVA doesn't get much snow.  Neither does MD, nor where I currently reside.

        All of the drivers in this region get scared b/c they don't know how to drive in snow.

        Penn State taught me how to drive in it...and NYC taught me that the best thing is to just take the bus or train.

        ;-D

        To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

        by Youffraita on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 07:25:35 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  oh, I have seen the hills (7+ / 0-)

          around Penn State!

          Wow!  I can't imagine driving there in the winter.  I remember cars in Flint getting stuck like that in the city on a small hill because of a red light.  I always forgot that Flint has so many hills until a winter storm showed me.

          But around here a few inches holds the car on the road if you head for the ditch where one inch gets packed down like ice.

          Of course, blowing can make huge drifts.  I have stories. :)

          I remember driving home from work late at night in snow that was coming down thick and blowing so hard, I could not see.  I was going very slowly and if it had been ice underneath...I was glad for all the new guardrails, too, because we have huge ditches and long drops in some places.  

          I am glad you don't have much snow, now!

          Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

          by cfk on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 07:32:31 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  State College had it right: (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            cfk, melpomene1, Monsieur Georges, Brecht

            Plow early and often.  Sometimes we'd get a foot of snow, and the plows came through every four inches or so.

            Down here where people freak out about snow...not so much.  They literally don't know wtf to do in a major snowstorm.

            Only once did Penn State close for snow while I was a student there.  It was a Friday at four p.m.

            Mostly we just suffered through the cold and slid across the ice-covered sidewalks.

            To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

            by Youffraita on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 07:53:36 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  When we first moved up here (3+ / 0-)

              there were only three plows for the county.  Only a main road got attention and some that I called main roads were not.  There was a ten foot high drift one year on the road leading out of our nearby town.  

              We would get plowed out...one lane...and it would blow right back in.  When I found out I was going to have a January baby, I freaked out. :)

              He had to stay in the hospital 45 miles away for jaundice and we brought him home during a storm that blocked the corner just after we plowed our way through the drift.  Fun!

              There are more plows now, thank goodness, but they can't do much when the winds blow.

              My daughter was told that her college never closed down in the winter and then that first year, it did. :)

              Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

              by cfk on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 08:00:55 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  LOL, cfk, I was a January baby (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                cfk, Monsieur Georges

                and from what Mom said, I was born (caesarian) during or just before a blizzard.

                Well.  This part of PA doesn't get blizzards...but the locals think they do if it's a decent snowstorm.  (Minnesota would laugh at what the locals here call a blizzard.)

                To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

                by Youffraita on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 08:05:29 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

        •  I have to say, too (3+ / 0-)

          That front wheel drive was a miracle that saved us so much pain on the big hill near us.

          We actually live on one of those glacial leftovers that make ripples across Michigan.  Where I grew up we were at the bottom of two of them, now my road is on top of one.

          Not to be compared to Penn State at all...

          Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

          by cfk on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 07:35:49 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  3 letter word is worse here (ICE) (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfk
  •  Reading (10+ / 0-)

    In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson - a good book for tunneling, the story of the American ambassador to Hitler's Germany and his family, replete with SS men and NKVD spies

    Fairy Tales from Before Fairy Tales: The Medieval Latin Past of Wonderful Lies by Jan Ziolkowski - a scholarly work with some new(ish) ideas about where fairy tales come from

    The Penguin Book of WWI Poetry - I've been on a WWI kick, having finished Pat Barker's Regeneration trilogy recently.  Even watched the movie whose electric therapy for "mutism" scene might make a good companion for the waterboarding scenes in  "Zero Dark Thirty."  Then I found a copy of the book of WWI poetry and Silent Night, the story of the 1914 Christmas truce initiated by the troops, in the Goodwill.  I'd done some research on that incident on Xmas Day and thought that synchronicity demanded the purchase of those books.

    Just finished the preliminaries to my analysis of the Chinese characters in Tao Te Ching this morning

    Tangled Hair - tanka poems by Akiko Yosano in Japanese and English, bought a second Japanese character dictionary for the next decade's worth of going through Japanese literature.  This stuff really stretches my brain.

    The Art of War by Kelly Roman and Michael DeWesse - a graphic novel with quotations from Sun Tzu laid over a revenge tale where a Chinese investment firm has taken over Social Security in a dystopian future.  Always good to reread Sun Tzu in whatever form.

    Solar is civil defense. Video of my small scale solar experiments at solarray.

    by gmoke on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 06:37:43 PM PST

  •  The problem with tunneling (10+ / 0-)

    is that you can get so deep, especially when you're trying to figure out what the hell was driving someone to do what they did.

    Or, for that matter, what in heaven's name someone was trying to say.

    My great-times-something grandmother was the interpreter for theologian Jonathan Edwards when he delivered sermons to the Kanienkehaga- the Mohawks.  She was praised, and valued, by Edwards and his contemporary evangelist Gideon Hawley, powerful testimonies from men for a woman of her time.  She was cousins with the reverend Jonathan Dickinson, founder of Princeton (the College of New Jersey, originally), and sent her sons to live with him.  All of them rejected "white" lives to live as Leni Lenape- Delaware Indians.

    And she very likely knew David Brainerd, still a hero to evangelist Christians.  Brainerd wrestled with, and never resolved, the fact that some of the Delaware Indians he was trying and failing to convert were having spiritual experiences as strong as any of his own.

    I am reading The Lives of David Brainerd, by John A, Grigg, and Jonathan Edwards: A Life by George M. Marsden.

    Create. Build. Serve. Encourage. Teach.

    by algebrateacher on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 06:39:25 PM PST

  •  Literal me ... (9+ / 0-)

    ... thought about Park City, the mining town:

    I have been driving out of this dirty temperature inversion to see the sights in and around the Sundance Festival.

    Above is the view from inside a once-decaying old garage on Park Ave. -- now the High West Distillery, which has been joined to an old house and serves drinks & food to exitees from the Town Lift. (Plus me and my friend.)

    They had an ice-slab bar outdoors, next to a steaming kettle of apple cider.

    Millions of us – the majority – must come together to insist that President Obama and the Democrats stand up and fight for the things we sent them there to do ... Michael Moore

    by MT Spaces on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 06:42:49 PM PST

  •  I'm back to having time to read. (9+ / 0-)

    I hadn't read a thing since October because I was so busy at work.   I haven't yet been up to choosing a book that needs tunneling but I did read Louise Erdrich's The Round House.   Finally!

     And I just finished The Patrick Melrose Novels by Edward St. Aubyn.  I found it fascinating that I could dislike characters so intensely and be  uninterested in the plot and yet LOVE how he wrote so much that it swept me along to the end (although I admit to skimming through parts of the second novel because I find drug induced hazes boring).  I haven't read the final novel that was just published, I'm on the list at the library for it.

    •  You are a better person than I am :) (6+ / 0-)
      I found it fascinating that I could dislike characters so intensely and be  uninterested in the plot and yet LOVE how he wrote so much that it swept me along to the end...
      But I am glad you are enjoying the stories.  I am glad you will have some time to read.  I hope you find a great book for tunneling.  

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 06:51:30 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  late post; so finally finished..... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfk

        ......Les Miserables, and it seems appropriate, though not just, to see what happened to Thenardier at the end, beyond simply getting away with being a lying, exploitative jerk.  Clever of VH to hold back on that until the 3rd-to-last chapter, having settled Javert ~120 pages earlier.  Next reading is, of all things, The 900 Days by Harrison Salisbury, another one of those that's been on my shelf for decades, unread.  This one is for the book swap locale when done.

        "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

        by chingchongchinaman on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 07:45:33 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  My most recent tunneling experience, (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cfk, Limelite, Monsieur Georges

    has been an obsession with India.  I'm honest to say that I'm not sure I ever want to actually go there but am delighted to read my way through the history and culture of that country, in the way you are happy to be cozy in bed reading a scary story.

    India is a witchy bazaar of the beautiful and the unthinkable. I am attracted to the color and noise of that country, the spiritual story there, so much deeper and more ingrained than here, and  a "democracy" so different than what we experience here.

    A few of my faves out of many:  "Beyond the Beautiful Forevers" by Katherine Boo, non-fiction---but reads like a novel.  "The space between us" by Thrity Umrigar, fiction. "A Dead Hand," by renown travel writer Paul Theroux, fiction.

    "A typical vice of American politics is the avoidance of saying anything real on real issues." Theodore Roosevelt.

    by StellaRay on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 08:59:14 PM PST

    •  I read The Space Between Us, too (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      StellaRay, Limelite, Monsieur Georges

      and Vikram Seth's A Suitable Boy.  I told people the other day that I doubt I will ever re-read it.  If you would like it, I would send it to you and NOT need it back.  It is huge, but good for tunneling.

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 09:22:05 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  How kind of you. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfk, Monsieur Georges

        I will check out reviews on it and see if it's something I want to take on.  And if so, I'll Kos mail you. I'm not sure I'm hearing a recommendation from you on this book, but I am hearing a very kind offer, and again, thank you.

        "A typical vice of American politics is the avoidance of saying anything real on real issues." Theodore Roosevelt.

        by StellaRay on Wed Jan 23, 2013 at 09:41:13 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Recommendations (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cfk

      Rohinton Mistry, A Fine Balance
      Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
      John Keay, Into India

      I read obsessively too, before and after a 10-week trip there 4 years ago, and I would love to go again. Traveling around is difficult (I was 66 at the time), so I would pick a few places and tunnel into them, so to speak.

  •  Well, one thing I've been doing... (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Limelite, Monsieur Georges, sillia, cfk, Brecht

    I was recently reading a fantasy novel set in Europe; the author keeps jumping back and forth between the present day and magical events some centuries before which are rippling forward. It's set in a city that was the center of empires and has been around for centuries.

    When the author started talking about certain landmarks like a particular bridge, or a church with some distinctive  time keeping machinery, I realized I could do more than just picture it in my mind. Apple maps let me find them and see them in detail from above; wikipedia filled in a lot of details that weren't in the book along with pictures. I expect I could do the same for historic characters in the book.

    As it happened, I was reading the book in an e-format. I can only imagine what it would be like if an author started deliberately loading up text with links...

    The classic "Lord Kalvan of Otherwhen" by H. Beam Piper has a lot of battles laid out on an alternate time line Pennsylvania which he related to landmarks in this version of the earth. It would be interesting now to pull up maps/aerial imagery of the real Pennsylvania to better see the terrain he was describing.

    "No special skill, no standard attitude, no technology, and no organization - no matter how valuable - can safely replace thought itself."

    by xaxnar on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 04:09:03 AM PST

    •  What's the name (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cfk, Monsieur Georges

      of the fantasy novel set in Europe? Sounds interesting.
      I had the same experience with Connie Willis's books set in London--there is a LOT of geography in there, including the subway tunnels which were used as bomb shelters in WWII. I had some memory of these from my visits years ago but my husband knows London even better so we had fun discussing this.
      She does wonderful things with cathedrals...but I won't say anything else, don't want to spoil it.

      I love it that Obama's channeling Harry Truman: "I don't give 'em hell; I just tell the truth and they think it's hell!"

      by sillia on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 09:26:24 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Sounds more interesting than it was (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfk, Monsieur Georges, sillia

        It began with the people of a medieval town committing an atrocity against a woman for witchcraft - and her dying words curse them all.

        The alleged heroine of the story starts her part in this with a visit to NYC. A young woman from Europe taking a vacation, on impulse she gets her fortune told - and discovers she has been chosen to right an ancient wrong. Why or how isn't quite made clear, or why she has to go all the way to New York to find out about unraveling the curse when it's back in her home town.

        The book bounces back and forth between little episodes of the curse working out on the townsfolk, and the woman dabbling around with magic to try and figure out what is going on - and how she is supposed to fit into it.

        The main character has a lot of room for development - but spends most of the story being completely oblivious to the dangerous stuff she's playing with. The story is full of warnings and lots of ominous foreshadowing which she never seems to pick up on.

        The story builds to a cliffhanger after a rather unsettling sex scene - and then having 'lit the fuse' it abruptly ends, to be picked up in the next book in the series.

        I decided I'd seen enough. I really had to work to get to the end, such as it was.

         

        "No special skill, no standard attitude, no technology, and no organization - no matter how valuable - can safely replace thought itself."

        by xaxnar on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 04:04:34 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Title? (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cfk

          Thanks for the review, it sounds like it does have weaknesses but interesting nonetheless.

          I love it that Obama's channeling Harry Truman: "I don't give 'em hell; I just tell the truth and they think it's hell!"

          by sillia on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 08:45:10 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Okay, here you go (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            cfk, sillia

            "Come Hell or High Water: Part 1 Wellspring" by Stephen Morris. Here's the link to the paperback. I went with the Kindle edition.
            http://www.amazon.com/...

            "No special skill, no standard attitude, no technology, and no organization - no matter how valuable - can safely replace thought itself."

            by xaxnar on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 02:34:45 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Thanks, appreciate it! (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              cfk, xaxnar

              I'll see if it's something I'd like to read. Usually I stay away from anything with 'occult' in it but this seems different.

              I like medieval stuff, especially if they have plagues and Black Death and stuff. That's why I liked Connie Willis' Doomsday Book so much.

              I love it that Obama's channeling Harry Truman: "I don't give 'em hell; I just tell the truth and they think it's hell!"

              by sillia on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 07:14:26 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

    •  That does sound interesting (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      xaxnar, Monsieur Georges

      I often find myself running to wikipedia for information.  I love maps, too.

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 01:15:37 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  The thing is, it's so easy now. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfk, Monsieur Georges

        You can pull out a smart phone to do this. Run across a strange word, some historic reference, some bit of arcana, you can track it down with relatively little effort. Say the 'Macguffin' everyone has been trying to find turns out to be a trapezohedron, you can just google it to get the details.

        "No special skill, no standard attitude, no technology, and no organization - no matter how valuable - can safely replace thought itself."

        by xaxnar on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 04:14:33 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Somebody here got me started (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ferg, cfk, Monsieur Georges

    (speaking of time travel) on Connie Willis--thank you, whoever you are! After devouring the Doomsday Book, I started tunneling (or maybe hunkering is a better term in this case?) through all her WWII novels, and even the short stories. I LOVE her writing! And I find so many different levels to discuss.

    I noticed on Amazon some readers complaining that Blackout and All Clear were too long....?? Hah! I would have loved a thousand more pages!

    I love it that Obama's channeling Harry Truman: "I don't give 'em hell; I just tell the truth and they think it's hell!"

    by sillia on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 09:22:06 AM PST

    •  It was probably Youffraita :) (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      sillia, Monsieur Georges

      or me.  I like Willis, too.

      I liked Blackout and All Clear, but I had to wait between books which was not helpful.  Some people here would have been glad to have the whole story in one huge book.

      I thought it really showed what the war was like in trying to travel around England.  I felt as if I were there.

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 01:18:22 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  "Tunneling into a book means to me diving deeply (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cfk, Monsieur Georges

    into a subject or a place and really getting to know it, thoroughly."

    "Tunneling" is very evocative. You can tunnel, just a bit, into a book, simply by giving it 110% of your attention as it sweeps you away. which seems to fit with some of the comments upstream.

    I tunnel into my favorite music. I had an epiphany when I was 18. I listened to Sympathy for the Devil five times in a row: once to Mick's vocal, once to Keith's guitar, once to Bill's bass, once to Charlie's drums...can't remember the fifth, either another guitar or the african percussion behind Charlie.

    You can do this a lot with deep music - The Beatles, from Revolver on, for instance.

    Is there a way to do this with fiction? I can certainly imagine reading Ulysses for the joy of the wordplay, to visualize and smell Dublin, for Homeric parallels, for the system behind it all.

    But I've never actually done this, and few books besides Ulysses would inspre me to try. Songs and albums are a lot quicker!

    I do get captured by an author, so that I tunnel into their ouevre, reading four or five of their books in a row. I often find their world begins to resonate with my imagination, I get in tune with their favorite quirks and visions.

    Thanks, cfk, for always making me think - for making me tunnel a bit further into what fiction means to and does for me.

    "Every man has a right to utter what he thinks truth" Samuel Johnson

    by Brecht on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 04:08:13 PM PST

    •  I am glad to see you! (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Monsieur Georges, Brecht

      There is a lot more to tunneling than I could think of with a January frozen brain so I am glad that you thought of some.  

      Steinbeck spoke of having layers.  Reading to see what happened was one layer and then the reader had to dig deeper for the meaning and other layers.  

      I never thought about doing it with music...neat!

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 04:16:42 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Thanks, cfk. I'm glad to see you too. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfk

        I'll have internet at home, I think, later in February; and then you'll see more of me every week.

        I'm sorry your brain is frozen. I find hot coffee and tea help. But there's something to be said for just hibernating, too.

        Anyone who writes a great novel (the kind we want to read several times), ends up packing several layers into it, whether they consciously intend to or not. The thing about Joyce is, he did it very methodically, and he was really good at it. I expect, if I could read Finnegans Wake, I'd find a dozen books there.

        I've been reading a lot of interviews in The Paris Review. It's amazing how many authors in the '30s, '40s and '50s, when they're asked what modern authors influence or impress them, say Joyce.

        I'd say Tolstoy was a greater natural artist. And Shakespeare had a flow Joyce could only dream of. Whenever I read Joyce I can still see him, scurrying about behind his sets, screwing things in just a bit too tightly.

        "Every man has a right to utter what he thinks truth" Samuel Johnson

        by Brecht on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 04:34:03 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  lololol (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          chingchongchinaman, Brecht

          Well...this image will stay with me.

          Whenever I read Joyce I can still see him, scurrying about behind his sets, screwing things in just a bit too tightly.
          I am glad you will have the net again soon.

          Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

          by cfk on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 04:50:06 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site