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(L-R) U.S. Senators John McCain (R-AZ), Charles Schumer (D-NY), and Marco Rubio (R-FL) attend a news conference on comprehensive immigration reform at the U.S. Capitol in Washington January 28, 2013.   REUTERS/Gary Cameron
Sens. John McCain, Chuck Schumer, and Marco Rubio discuss their vague-ish "framework" for immigration reform.
Republicans can't win a national election given their demographic problems. Per 2012 exit polling, whites made up 72 percent of voters and Mitt Romney won them by a dominant 59-39. Yet President Barack Obama won reelection by an easy four points.

So Republicans don't need to win the Latino vote, they just need to dig into that massive 44-point Democratic advantage. But as I've noted before, it's hard to play nice with Latinos when signing on to comprehensive immigration reform would mean 13 million new Latino voters, or a net eight million new Democratic voters. Remember, Obama won the 2012 elections by five million.

So there is little incentive for the GOP at large to indulge in any reform effort. While standing in the way of reform would cost Republicans more of what little Latino support they retain, the alternative isn't that much more palatable.

But while the party at large isn't much interested in reform, there are individual Republicans who won't survive future elections without winning a greater share of the Latino vote. Let's go below the fold to see who these potential targets might be.

Nevada Sen. Dean Heller, who was narrowly elected last year, has gone from talking about "amnesty" and opposing the DREAM Act, to suddenly sounding conciliatory on this Senate proposal. He lost Latinos by 40 percent. In six years, a repeat performance would spell certain doom.

Indeed, two of the four Republicans hammering out the bipartisan "framework" are from Arizona (John McCain and Jeff Flake), while Florida's Marco Rubio is both looking at his own state's demographics, and at a potential national run. Both of those would require significant Latino support. (South Carolina's Lindsey Graham is more worried about the national party's prospects than his own. He's an anomaly.)

Utah's Orrin Hatch has been okay on the issue in the past, and the Mormon church is at least good on this issue. Utah, in fact, is quite tolerant of immigrants. Ted Cruz in Texas is an unreconstructed teabagger and has been strategizing with hardliners on the issue, but John Cornyn has been more outwardly flexible.

Georgia is 8.8 percent Latino, North Carolina is 8.4 percent—both will be competitive enough that the Latino vote can make a difference, hence putting pressure on their Republicans (Johnny Isaakson and the retiring Saxby Chambliss in Georgia, and Richard Burr in North Carolina) to vote the right way. Mark Kirk in Illinois will face an uphill fight no matter what, so he better not further alienate his state's 16 percent Latinos (and Asians, too).

And while Latinos aren't a huge percentage of the populations of Ohio (3.1 percent) and Pennsylvania (5.7 percent), the competitive nature of both states should give both Rob Portman and Pat Toomey reason to think twice about lining up on the wrong side of this issue.

That makes 10 Republicans who would have a selfish reason to buck their party in support of reform, plus Graham. There may be a handful of other yes votes from the GOP, perhaps Alaska's Lisa Murkowski, maybe Susan Collins. Who knows. I wouldn't count on it. But there is certainly room to get to 60 even with expected Democratic defections.

The same concept would hold in the House—find those Republicans who represent districts with heavy Latino (and/or Asian) presence and pressure them to vote for reform. In years past, this notion might be a pipe-dream with little chance of success. Maybe it's a pipe dream this year! But given the clusterfuck of a caucus that Speaker John Boehner has in his hands, there may be a chance yet, particularly if Democrats promise to throw extra drones at the border. Republicans really like drones at the border.

Originally posted to kos on Mon Jan 28, 2013 at 03:49 PM PST.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Drones are so bipartisan. (13+ / 0-)

    Who doesn't like a good old fashioned drone?

    •  Hellfire Fun for the whole family nt (3+ / 0-)

      I want 1 less Tiny Coffin, Why Don't You? Support The President's Gun Violence Plan.

      by JML9999 on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:04:49 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Question to the wonks: (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        TheLizardKing, JML9999

        I find the proposed legislative process for enacting immigratoin reform interesting. Are the Republicans laying the groundwork for ignoring the Hassert Rule?

        It seems like the House is actively inviting the same legislative process for immigration reform that they used for dealing with the fiscal cliff: Senate proposal which is later adopted by House Democrats and a handful of Republicans. The budget is also set to at least begin the same way.

        This would be how immigration reform could pass a Republican controlled house. The dead-enders could vote against the bill, just not block its path to passage.

    •  Ironic (0+ / 0-)

      considering the right wing blogosphere is up in arms at "drones spying on us".  In particular in border states.

      Statist republicans like drones, because it means more control and more money for pet projects and arms manufacturers, where as the Glennbeckers and paulbots do not.   It's interesting.

      95% of all life forms that once existed on earth are now extinct. It is only a matter of time until the Republicans follow suit.

      by PRRedlin on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:41:48 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  The Republican Party can't even figure out (8+ / 0-)

    what they stand for and who they represent. I foresee huge battles within the party on lots of issues, including this one.

  •  That's Why They're Talking Electoral College (15+ / 0-)

    reform.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Mon Jan 28, 2013 at 04:08:27 PM PST

    •  "Reform," (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Eyesbright, ActivistGuy, mattc129

      not reform.  Gotta use quote marks, because their "reform" is actually highway robbery.

      The most violent element in society is ignorance.

      by Mr MadAsHell on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:21:42 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  In this era (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mr MadAsHell

        the era of the hegemony of Reaganism-Thatcherism, pretty much all reform is "reform" as you designate it.  You have to search mighty far and wide for any that isn't "market-oriented" or whatever the euphemism of the month is.  This is true not just in the US, but on something very much like a global(-ized) basis.

        Ever get the feeling you've been cheated?

        by ActivistGuy on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:43:49 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Making immigration reform a scam. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Eyesbright, ivorybill

      Under the Electoral College reforms that are being proposed, the votes in more densely populated areas will count less than those cast outside of major cities and towns.  Minorities and immigrants tend to live in urban areas more than out in rural areas.

      The Republicans really are looking at every possible option to avoid having to accept the mosaic that is America.  They want to cherry-pick the tiles they like and chip away those that they do not.

      •  sorry (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ivorybill

        but this already is the case.  Take california and montana for example.  California may have more electoral votes, but montana has 3.  if you divid california's by it's population, and montana's by its population, you will see that a vote in montana is worth 8 votes in california, even with electoral college.  The only way to make this fair is to either to to a national vote, or to increase the number of electoral votes to properly represent the people.

        95% of all life forms that once existed on earth are now extinct. It is only a matter of time until the Republicans follow suit.

        by PRRedlin on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:44:02 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  That was by design to give states more (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ivorybill

          equality regardless of their size - and the votes are apportioned on the basis of population counts - maybe not as well as they should be, but they are - and you have both the House and the Senate to create more balance of representation.

          The proposals for splitting the EVs within states would do the opposite by creating significant disparity within the states - and there is no check and balance intrastate to offset that political disparity.

          Whether or not you like the Electoral College right now, you will certainly dislike the Republican's proposed function of that body much, much more.

          And the big picture here is that the Republicans are working on every possible front they can think of to rig our system so as to discount voters they don't like and promote voters that they do.

          •  oh i agree (0+ / 0-)

            and it is a throwback to the "states" era.  Which is why I would like to see a national vote rather than electoral college.  

            I'm from PA, a state that mulled over changing the electoral college voting rules in this past election, and, may do the same after the 2014 elections (if tom corbett wins reelection).

            95% of all life forms that once existed on earth are now extinct. It is only a matter of time until the Republicans follow suit.

            by PRRedlin on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 10:05:51 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Your state would be one of the most (0+ / 0-)

              dramatic examples of how screwed voters could be by the proposal.

              I'm not saying that advocating for the National Popular Vote is something you should set aside, but in the face of this attack, I'd be really careful not to give false equivalency to the lie that the Electoral College is just as bad either way - and also prioritize the issues - one is an imminent threat - specifically the EV rigging propositions that are emerging now - whereas changing a Constitutionally established body is a long-term proposition.

              Because the Democrats have done such a terrible job at keeping a reasonable presence in state politics across this country - and because the DNC stupidly shutdown the 50-State Strategy (IMO) - the National Popular Vote has zero chance of getting anywhere right now - and the voter suppression tactics are being enacted widely and freely.  That's the ugly reality we face right now.

  •  The melting pot of many nationalities we call the (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Arlys, TomP, inclusiveheart, Eyesbright

    U.S.A. needs far fewer representatives who prefer their underwear starched.

    Father Time remains undefeated.

    by jwinIL14 on Mon Jan 28, 2013 at 04:08:50 PM PST

  •  It looks like there is a definite (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MBishop1, SueDe

    list of Republicans who may get behind immigration reform.  I hope people from those states make the phone calls and send some letters to the Republicans listed.

    Say "No" to Chained CPI.

    by Arlys on Mon Jan 28, 2013 at 04:13:21 PM PST

    •  Kos - Who are these Democrats (0+ / 0-)

      you refer to as "expected Democratic defections."  Do we really have Democrats who are stupid enough to vote against a reasonable immigration bill?  Or are you assuming any immigration bill supported by these Republicans won't be reasonable?

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 10:08:21 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Immigration "reform" (0+ / 0-)

      It's just the same old scam: secure the border, and deny immigrants a real chance at legalization

  •  on this issue,if Rs want in:they/compromise;not us (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TheLizardKing

    clime parches on. terms: ocean rise, weather re-patterning, storm pathology, drout-famine, acceptance of nature.

    by renzo capetti on Mon Jan 28, 2013 at 06:06:19 PM PST

  •  I am very optimistic that (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Rockydog

    reform WILL pass. There will be noise from the right but we got this. :)

  •  This is the smart move for Republicans (4+ / 0-)

    They may lose some interest from the hard liners, initially.  However, they will ultimately need to peel Hispanic votes to avoid extinction.  

    "If the misery of the poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin." Charles Darwin

    by Rockydog on Mon Jan 28, 2013 at 08:46:12 PM PST

  •  Drones Is A Good Idea (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eyesbright, TheLizardKing, askew

    The government has been using planes to catch speeders and hunting for marijuana plants for years.  If drones are safe and are cheaper than real planes I say go for it.

    "Don't Let Them Catch You With Your Eyes Closed"

    by rssrai on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:08:42 AM PST

  •  Gerrymandering won't do it. (0+ / 0-)

    House Republicans are on a self destructive path. They're welcome to it.

    The victorious strategist only seeks battle after the victory has been won, whereas he who is destined to defeat first fights and afterwards looks for victory.

    by Pacifist on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:10:29 AM PST

  •  All of this bipartisanship gives me such a warm (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    greenbell, Ron Thompson

    feeling inside. McCain, Schumer, Rubio. If only Alan Simpson and Dick Durbin could have joined them.

    "Life is short, but long enough to get what's coming to you." --John Alton

    by Palafox on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:13:44 AM PST

    •  LOL, exactly my reaction to the big smiles (0+ / 0-)

      Don't leave out Mr. Bowles.

      •  Bowles is more concerned with (0+ / 0-)

        "reforming" financial industry regulations and protecting tax loopholes for the wealthy than immigration.  When the budget and taxes and "reforming" entitlements once again take center stage, he'll have a lot to say.

        "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

        by SueDe on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 10:13:16 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  As respects Lindsey Graham.... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eyesbright, Ron Thompson
    South Carolina's Lindsey Graham is more worried about the national party's prospects than his own. He's an anomaly.
    Replace "anomaly" with sycophant and you've got it right!  His head is so far up McCain's "___" (I'm trying to be a Lady) all he sees is brown!

    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing." - Edmund Burke ...I am not the NRA and I vote too..... - ME

    by CyberDem on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:14:29 AM PST

    •  they make such a cute couple though n/t (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      CyberDem

      95% of all life forms that once existed on earth are now extinct. It is only a matter of time until the Republicans follow suit.

      by PRRedlin on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:47:16 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Let me politely stick up for him (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      CyberDem

      I dislike the Republicans as much as anyone. But... I have to give Lindsey Graham a little teeny bit of credit here.  I've worked on immigration issues for quite a long time and he's always taken what is, for a Republican, a more open and progressive policy on immigration that was at least willing to look for compromise. He backslid in 2010 when everyone was scared of the Tea Party, but he's coming back to his previous positions now.  He was never near as much a bigot and racist, at least toward Latinos, as most in his party.  

      Orrin Hatch also was a supporter of the DREAM Act before the T-baggers threatened to primary him.  He's starting to drift back into a more reasonable position on immigration.  I don't think that he's a natural racist like so many other GOP senators.  

      Look, I don't like these guys, but I am willing to grant them a slight benefit of the doubt that maybe they are not haters, and maybe there is a small little bit of them that is worth a little praise or at least acknowledgement.

      “If the misery of the poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin.” Charles Darwin

      by ivorybill on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 10:15:45 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Sorry, but.... (0+ / 0-)

        .....Lindsey does not appear to have an independent thought or action.  If McCain passes gas it comes out of Lindsey's butt.

        IMHO....

        "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing." - Edmund Burke ...I am not the NRA and I vote too..... - ME

        by CyberDem on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 12:45:05 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  It seems their only real mission (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    koosah, Eyesbright, Silverleaf

    (besides keeping racists happy without attracting too much notice from their targets) will be to protect the interests of industries who rely on undocumented labor.  

    Because if construction workers, fruit pickers, and meat packers didn't have to live in the shadows, they might have to be paid a living wage and have a right to workplace safety.

    "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

    by lgmcp on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:14:44 AM PST

  •  There is a third possibility (5+ / 0-)
    So there is little incentive for the GOP at large to indulge in any reform effort. While standing in the way of reform would cost Republicans more of what little Latino support they retain, the alternative isn't that much more palatable.
    They could, however, promise the reform and then not deiiver it. Then they do not "stand in  the way of reform" nor do they get "13 million new Latino voters".

    That is my fear, especially given our addiction to 'compromise'.  That we will end up with something like the 'Clear Citizenship Initiative' that has nothing clear, nothing about citizenship, and initiates nothing but is held up by everyone (including dems) as a victory, giving the GOP cover on the fact that there are still not millions of new citizens,

    Really have to keep the pressure for real reform up.

    Most people say that what some people say is pretty stupid.

    by nullspace on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:17:47 AM PST

  •  It is bad statistics to say that 13 million new... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eyesbright, Vespertine

    citizens will mean 13 million new voters and 8 million new democracts.

    Of those 13 million new citizens, probably 5 million are below the age of 18.  That would mean they can vote.

    And Latino citizens vote in lower numbers than other whites.  So while eight million more voting democrats is more like 4 million more voting democrats. And while that is still a lot, your numbers are misleading.  

  •  This all depends on (0+ / 0-)

    Boehner being really incompetent and the Teabaggers being unable to organize . . . .

    Ok, yeah, I'm starting to see where this works...

  •  This is a loser issue among their Anglo base (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    koosah, bobinson, Eyesbright

    That is the real problem. They may gain Latino votes, but do not under-estimate the extent to which anti-Latino sentiment is prevalent in the country. I live in a diverse community that is about 50% Hispanic. I'm fine with that. But I have encountered a lot of people who just grit their teeth when they hear someone speaking Spanish, and want the whole lot of them, legal and illegal, gone somewhere else. It is ugly, and it is not rational, but it's pretty pervasive. And those people vote, unfortunately.

    •  Yes, but what would they do, vote for a Democrat? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dinotrac, pimutant

      They will grumble, perhaps rant and rave, but they will still vote for Republicans on election day.

      “The future depends entirely on what each of us does every day.” Gloria Steinem

      by ahumbleopinion on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:29:02 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Where Would The Bigots Go? (0+ / 0-)

      They've built a home with a three-car garage in the Republican Party. They'll piss and moan and maybe throw out some elected officials in primaries, but to the national operatives whose livelihood depends on a strong Republican Party, the only alternative to increasing their support among Hispanics is the grave. They'll make sure Boehner gets this passed.

    •  To be fair, white people are not (0+ / 0-)

      the only ones who object to/ fear the legalization of currently undocumented workers.  There are many Hispanic-Americans who aren't in favor of making citizenship available for those who immigrated illegally - at least those who came up from the south through Mexico.  A large number of these Americans came into the country through legal channels and may have family still waiting in lines to emigrate, and they see this reform as cheating to favor those already here.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 10:23:03 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Markos, could you elaborate on this: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eyesbright
    comprehensive immigration reform would mean 13 million new Latino voters
    Would that be immediately after its passage? If not, how soon? I'm also curious as to where you get that figure.

    If there is no accountability for those who authorized torture, we can no longer say that we are a nation of laws, not men.

    by MikePhoenix on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:20:04 AM PST

  •  Not for anything Brewer can put the kibosh on. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ahumbleopinion

    We're liable to end up with one/vote, one/drone and still end up without a single vote.
    Don't trust 'em.

    Fuck Big Brother...from now on, WE'RE watching.

    by franklyn on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:20:19 AM PST

  •  The bigger question for me is the House. (0+ / 0-)

    Senators represent an entire state, so there is some protection for those GOPers who come out for immigration reform.

    The House districts are a completely different demographic, so this could be another case where it'll pass the House with substantial Democratic votes and a few Republicans.

    I really hope Nancy is collection chits.

    The most violent element in society is ignorance.

    by Mr MadAsHell on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:23:59 AM PST

  •  Hahaha. BiPartisan support means only one thing (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Rich in PA

    THE WORKING CLASS IS ABOUT TO GET ROYALLY FU*KED.

    We have 15 million unemployed. Immigration reform is about to dump 15 million illegals into the job pool. What could possibly go wrong?

    This is another windfall for the Oligarchs who want to drive down wages. I know, I know. They are telling us illegals will only take jobs citizens don't want. Blah blah blah. Just like they lied to us about the H1-B visa program which has decimated jobs of US Tech workers -- yeah that's right, those were the good jobs. Shock Doctrine style -- never let a good crisis go to waste.

    "It is the world that has been pulled over your eyes to blind you from the truth." - Morpheus

    by CitizenOfEarth on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:24:53 AM PST

    •  Um...aren't they already in the job pool? (0+ / 0-)

      I mean, undocumented workers are mostly involved in agriculture. When workers left Alabama and Georgia after the crackdowns, almost 10 million dollars worth of produce was left to rot. If these individuals no longer need to worry about ICE raids, but still pay taxes and live honest lives, why shouldn't they be given an opportunity for citizenship? After all, net immigration has dropped to zero over these last few years.

      •  Different labor markets (0+ / 0-)

        The middle class pool of workers will likely not suffer increased job competition as these newly-minted legal residents will still live in poor neighborhoods and poor towns and their children will still have vastly lesser opportunities to educate and develop themselves.  Barring major change in social policy, that is.

      •  They cannot get jobs with major corporations (0+ / 0-)

        businesses that require a valid SS# -- you know, the GOOD jobs.

        There may be ways to structure reform such that they don't steal jobs from citizens just because they will accept lower wages. And that's exactly what has happened with the H1B program -- despite all the Washington spin.

        So fine. Specify which jobs they can take. Let them pick tomatoes -- fine with me. Otherwise this will result in a blood bath for the US working class.

        I sympathize with illegals.  I really do, but driving a stake into the heart of existing workers ain't the answer.

        "It is the world that has been pulled over your eyes to blind you from the truth." - Morpheus

        by CitizenOfEarth on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:53:10 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  They are already in the job pool.... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cali Scribe, Sixty Something

      and doing work for pennies on the dollar. If anything, the "oligarchs" are going to piss themselves now that they can't get around the minimum wage. At least the unemployed now won't be at a disadvantage when trying to get work....now that there is no inherent incentive for employers to seek undocumented workers, all those unemployed who say they are eager to do the agricultural and other work currently being done by undocumented folks will get their shot.

      As for H1-B, we simply don't produce the talent needed to stay on the leading edge of innovation in technology. We've always imported the best and brightest minds to complement our technology workforce and its served us well.

      •  Oh please, best and brightest to service (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        CitizenOfEarth

        generic file servers?  Anyone who has worked in IT knows it is pretty much a scam.   If you want to let in a few thousand with advanced degrees and highly specialized skills fine, but I wouldn't count Microsoft Access.  

    •  I agree with the other replies who note... (0+ / 0-)

      ...that undocumented workers are already in the pool, but I agree that there has got to be something suspicious, and beyond a purely electoral calculus (let's set aside any altruistic considerations as totally out of the question, of course), if Ds and Rs are getting together out of the blue to do this.

      You know, I sometimes think if I could see, I'd be kicking a lot of ass. -Stevie Wonder at the Glastonbury Festival, 2010

      by Rich in PA on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:48:00 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  They're already in the job pool... (0+ / 0-)

      ...doing jobs that no one else wants to do.

      The Grand Bargain must be stopped at all costs to protect the 99%.

      by cybrestrike on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:49:13 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I'm seeing some thinly-disguised racism (0+ / 0-)

      masked as "we can't afford it".

      Let's have immigration reform -- and include H1-B reform in that. As a resident of the Silly Con Valley, I see it firsthand. Expansion of job training and education programs for those in the technology field and in university STEM programs would be a major start, so that those folks can get the skills needed by the technology companies. And perhaps tax penalties for companies that go over a certain percentage of their workforce as H1-B holders.

      But that's another topic for another diary.

      There's only one rule that I know of, babies -- goddammit, you've got to be kind. -- Kurt Vonnegut

      by Cali Scribe on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:56:12 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  oh for fuk sake. (0+ / 0-)

        If you don't like what someone says, they have to be racist.

        "It is the world that has been pulled over your eyes to blind you from the truth." - Morpheus

        by CitizenOfEarth on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:58:23 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  I'd give you technology companies (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        CitizenOfEarth

        in Silicon Valley but they aren't importing them by the thousands into medium sized cities in the middle west because they want bleeding edge.  They want cheap.  

      •  I wasn't talking about you (0+ / 0-)

        personally but I've seen it in other comments.

        The fact is they're already here -- and they are paying taxes...not necessarily income taxes but sales taxes which goes more to support local communities and states. So it's not like they're a total drain on economies and services.

        And would there even be a debate about immigration reform if we were talking about, say, Swedish bikini models and not Latino workers?

        There's only one rule that I know of, babies -- goddammit, you've got to be kind. -- Kurt Vonnegut

        by Cali Scribe on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 11:19:36 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  My "reform" for H1-B would be as follows: (0+ / 0-)

        If you:
        1. Have a 2 year (associates equivalent) or greater degree from an internationally credited college or university.
        2. Can pass the TOEFL.

        You get a green card and all rights and privileges that go with it.

        I'd also want the expansion of job training and education programs you mention.

        The sad fact is it is very difficult to find people we want to hire in the tech industry. H1-B's aren't "taking jobs" or even driving down wages.

    •  Those millions of "illegals" you refer to (0+ / 0-)

      are already here - they're already in the job pool; they're just not paying income taxes, although many of them are paying FICA taxes (for which they'll never receive benefits) and all of them are paying sales and property taxes.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 10:27:36 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Steve Pearce in NM-03 House seat (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eyesbright

    given his district in Southern NM, should, in theory, have a demographic incentive to play nice.  But I can't imagine him playing nice, about anything.  He's an unreconstructed A-hole, still obsessed with stopping the hippies and the commies.  

    "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

    by lgmcp on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:24:55 AM PST

  •  Ted Cruz is still firmly in the grip of the (0+ / 0-)

    tea party who financed his campaign and gave him talking points for his rage.  But he's brand new and will have to have Texas Hispanics throw a few buckets of cold water in his face before he can slip the tea party grip.  Right now the Republicans in Texas have very few potential candidates who aren't bat-shit crazy, so Cruz may have a longer learning curve because of his support from the white lunatic fringe.

    "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

    by SueDe on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:35:41 AM PST

  •  It's change or become extinct. nt (0+ / 0-)

    "If the misery of the poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin." Charles Darwin

    by Rockydog on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:36:45 AM PST

  •  John McCain? (0+ / 0-)

    The guy who ran for senate showing wild-eyed mexicans storming through a hole in the fence, in search of white women to rape?

    Could this guy be a bigger hypocrite? A bigger a-hole?

    What is essential is invisible.

    by bebimbob on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:41:23 AM PST

  •  Heartening (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sixty Something

    I'm old enough to have seen the  initial promise of civil rights, women's rights and gay liberation begin.  To see those issues, once so hopeful, used as a political cudgel for decades.  To see Democrats give lip service to these issues, but at base to feel ashamed that they depended on women and minorities to get elected.

    So it's hard to explain the exhilaration I feel when it becomes clearer every day that the corner has been turned.  That doing justice by these key elements of the Democratic coalition has become not a political liability, but a political plus.

    I understand that the Village is still mired in its old fashioned notions about Archie Bunker being the only legitimate actor in American politics.  But anyone who has read Rick Pearlsteins's great, Nixonland understands how quickly Village wisdom changed after the mid-term elections in 1966.  After Johnson's landslide 1964 victory, the Village was convinced it would be liberalism forever.  But after the Watts riots (and lots of other riots) and a white working class backlash and then the 1966 mid-term losses (Ronald Reagen getting elected governor, an initiative that repealed California's Fair Housing Act) the Village consensus changed in a matter of months.

    I don't see that pivot in Village conventional wisdom happening so fast this time.  But I see it coming.  

    Glad I'm living to see it.  Time to keep struggling.

    This aggression will not stand, man.

    by kaleidescope on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:42:34 AM PST

  •  Sen. Graham (0+ / 0-)

        I think a simpler explanation for Sen. Graham's position is that he's John McCain's poodle, to borrow an expression from the British. When McCain found it necessary to oppose immigration reform in the run-up to his 2010 primary, Graham was nowhere to be seen on the issue.

  •  as a unemployed... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    greenbell

    ...computer programmer for quite a while I really can't get excited about any immigration package that does not drastically cut back on the H, and other visa's, used by corporations to put pay preasure on jobs here and facilitate moving the jobs overseas.

    We Glory in war, in the shedding of human blood. What fools we are.

    by delver rootnose on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:51:15 AM PST

    •  Where are you located? (0+ / 0-)

      ... and what is your skillset?

      In many parts of the country it is extremely difficult to find programmers and other tech workers right now.

      •  well that is part of the problem.... (0+ / 0-)

        ...my skillset is old.  I knoe mainframe assembler, cobol, and the like.  I like to think I am a quick learner.  I live in Chicago area but am very overweight and companies look at me and think insurance premiums not skill set.  So basically I am screwed.

        We Glory in war, in the shedding of human blood. What fools we are.

        by delver rootnose on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 09:52:15 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Ouch ... (0+ / 0-)

          The demand for mainframe programmers who know assembler or COBOL isn't what it used to be.

          Most places I know of are looking for C, C++, C#, Java, Ruby, Python, or something similar.

          Best bet is to freshen the skill set with a class or two, focus the resume on process knowledge and results, then be prepared to do any code questions in a reasonably modern language.

          I have no idea about Chicago, but I've not seen weight as a factor in hiring decisions around here (Seattle).

  •  Amnesty puts Texas electoral votes in play ... (0+ / 0-)

    ... a lot sooner. Obama lost Texas by 1.2 million votes. That's less than the number of undocumented immigrants currently in Texas.  An amnesty deal probably has a chance to make Texas blue at a federal level by 2020.

  •  The Way to Make this Happen (0+ / 0-)

    Is to start now on organizing these anti-incumbent efforts early and with as much energy as possible, particular with lots of PR coverage in the media so that no one has any illusion as to the outcome once the ball begins to roll.

    Its time to turn on to brighten the lights and let the cockroaches scamper for cover.

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