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The New York Times:
Now senior Republicans have come forward to declare that 11 million people deserve a chance at full membership in American society. For a party whose presidential candidate less than three months ago was in full denial, wedded to a fantasy-based strategy of deporting a population equal to that of Ohio, this marks a welcome reacquaintance with reality. It puts the Republican Party closer to alignment with the moderate, pragmatic approach to immigration that most Americans accept. [...]  There is the real possibility that this road to reform will be illusory, stacked with obstacles, detours, dead ends and quick exits. While the senators’ memo envisions faster citizenship paths for immigrants with advanced degrees, farm workers and the young students known as Dreamers, it is vague about the rest of the 11 million. The requirements for green cards and citizenship could be made so extreme, disqualification so easy, and delays so long, that too few would have any real hope of qualifying.

President Obama plans to speak on immigration on Tuesday. We hope he stands firm on a realistic hope for citizenship, and acknowledges the unnecessary toll that overbroad enforcement — including his own — has taken on those whose legalization he has lately been championing. There is a moral, not just practical, case to make for bringing the failed immigration system in line with American ideals. Millions of immigrants, unshackled from fear, could be fully participating in the life and prosperity of the United States. Mr. Obama should make the case for them and see their path through to the end.

The Washington Post:
It’s an important starting point, but only a starting point, for what should become serious negotiations between the White House and lawmakers. [...] If the fledgling bipartisan plan provides a jolt of momentum toward bona fide negotiations, it will have been a success.
Former New Mexico governor Bill Richardson:
[T]he Supreme Court ruled emphatically that immigration is the responsibility of the federal government, not the states. While I am certainly sympathetic as a former governor with the issues that states must deal with as a result of illegal immigration, the onus is on Congress to pass an immigration plan.

Unless we come to grips with all aspects of the immigration issue, we are going to end up with the same impractical, expensive and ineffective solutions we have had for years.

More reaction below the fold...

Laurie Roberts at The Arizona Republic:

The broad tenants of this plan make sense. The question is, are there enough pragmatic Republicans to get the job done?

Before the screaming begins, I would ask those who already oppose this proposal to answer two questions:

If not now, when?

If not this, what?

EJ Montini chimes in at the same publication:
On one of the Sunday morning shows, McCain said, “What’s changed, honestly, is that there is a new, I think, appreciation on both sides of the aisle — including maybe more importantly on the Republican side of the aisle — that we have to enact a comprehensive immigration reform bill.”

What he means, essentially, is that unless Republicans want to continue losing elections they are going to have to appeal to more than angry middle-aged white guys.

This is a good thing.

Switching topics, Susan Milligan at US News & World Report looks at the GOP's "attempted electoral sabotage":
A handful of states—unsurprisingly, battleground states controlled by the GOP at the state level but captured by President Obama in the presidential races—are considering changing the way they allocate electoral votes, basing the outcome not on the popular vote across the state, but those within each congressional district. The winner-take-all system almost all states now have is surely not entirely fair, since someone who got 49.9 percent of the vote could walk away with no electoral votes. But assigning electors by congressional district is even less fair, since it would typically diminish the power of voters in big cities (which tend to go Democratic). In Pennsylvania, for example—a commonwealth Obama won by five points—the new scheme would have assigned Republican Mitt Romney 18 electoral votes, and Obama only five.
Frank Smyth at MSNBC previews the upcoming testimony of NRA CEO Wayne LaPierre and highights how far (or low) the NRA has gone:
Back in 1934 Prohibition had just ended and many Americans felt that the era of gangsters firing fully-automatic, drum-fed Tommy Guns, killing rivals and innocent bystanders alike, also needed to end. Sounding nothing LaPierre today, then-NRA chief executive officer Karl T. Frederick told Congress:

“I have never believed in the general practice of carrying weapons. I do not believe in the general promiscuous toting of guns. I think it should be sharply restricted and only under licenses.”

The New Jersey Star-Ledger calls Chris Christie out on his tea party antics:

In a move that took no one by surprise, Gov. Chris Christie yesterday again disregarded the pressing needs of the working poor, this time by vetoing a bill to increase in the minimum wage.

That fits a pattern. His first budget effectively raised income taxes on low-wage families by scaling back the earned-income tax credit. He has also ended health care coverage for thousands of low-wage families, closed down Planned Parenthood clinics that served them, and tried his best to raid huge sums of money from a trust fund set aside for affordable housing. In each case, the target is the working poor.

It is revealing that even as he knocked down these supports, he was arguing that New Jersey could afford an income-tax cut that would skew heavily toward the wealthy. Make no mistake, this is tea party economics.

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Comment Preferences

  •  somebody say (4+ / 0-)

    "Squeeze me" ?
    c'mon and squeeze me ?

    * Join: The Action: End the Bush Tax Cuts for Richest Two Percent * Addington's Perpwalk: TRAILHEAD of Accountability for Bush-2 Crimes.

    by greenbird on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 04:38:38 AM PST

  •  I live in a red rural part of the country. (23+ / 0-)

    And the guys will sit around talking about Mexicans for hours. Of course none of them have ever seen a Mexican and wouldn't know one if they did. One does hate to take away their "bonding" talk. But that's what happens when the Steelers don't make the play offs.

    We're fools whether we dance or not, so we might as well dance.

    by PowWowPollock on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 04:43:27 AM PST

  •  Hey Mitt! Feel stupid yet? (7+ / 0-)
    For a party whose presidential candidate less than three months ago was in full denial, wedded to a fantasy-based strategy of deporting a population equal to that of Ohio, this marks a welcome reacquaintance with reality.

    "Michael Moore, who was filming a movie about corporate welfare called 'Capitalism: A Love Story,' sought and received incentives."

    by Bush Bites on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 04:51:08 AM PST

  •  Three cheers for "amnesty" (6+ / 0-)

    These "illegal" immigrants are as American as any one of us. Most have been here all of their lives, and many are even now just children, brought here by the decision of their parents, not themselves. A reasonable, humane, common sense policy to allow them to attain citizenship and live without fear and in peace is vital to our nation's future growth. It's hard to rationalize what conservatives may be thinking when they continue to pander to the extreme know-nothing crowd and demand the immediate deportation of 11 million human beings. Amnesty isn't so bad when it helps real people and protects our economy.   -  progressive

    •  Reagan had an amnesty (6+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skohayes, judyms9, SueDe, Woody, tb mare, Stude Dude

      and the RW has been trying to hide that fact ever since.  Point is that we have a fragile economy and if we did deport every undocumented worker, the economies of several states would crash again.  Better to document them and make them part of the mainstream instead of the Black or Gray labor Market

      •  The right wing has now begun claiming (5+ / 0-)

        that Reagan's immigration reform was a failure, mainly because the illegals kept coming.  They're having more and more problems rationalizing Reagan's sainthood and some of the policies he implemented.  It's pretty entertaining watching them trying to thread that needle.

        "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

        by SueDe on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 05:40:28 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Clinton Passed NAFTA And MFN With China (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Woody

        And the Democratic Party has been trying to hide that fact ever since.

        62% of all illegal immigrants are from Mexico at the same time that Mexico has dominated the U.S. family based immigration system since the 1986 IRCA.

        I won't be coming home tonight, my generation will put it right - Genesis 9:3

        by superscalar on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 05:41:33 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Christie needs another hurricane..... (8+ / 0-)

    .....before he becomes unpopular again.

    "Michael Moore, who was filming a movie about corporate welfare called 'Capitalism: A Love Story,' sought and received incentives."

    by Bush Bites on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 04:55:02 AM PST

  •  I wish the best (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tb mare

    for ALL that are involved in this process, and for those will be impacted by the outcome....

    May today be greater than yesterday, and tomorrow be greater than both! Go Ravens!

    by secret38b on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 04:56:17 AM PST

  •  It will be interesting to see what ends up (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    judyms9, Egalitare, Woody, tb mare

    in an immigration bill.  I'm going to keep my eye on the business press for clues, because it is business owners and corporate CEO's who will determine how the bill is finally structured.  I suspect it will be something like:  keep cheap labor cheap (don't impose any minimum wage rules); keep farm and ranch labor unregulated (and seasonal - call them "guest workers") and keep the path to citizenship long and arduous.

    "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

    by SueDe on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 04:56:41 AM PST

    •  I welcome the arguments to... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tobendaro, tb mare, SueDe

      ...legally and permanently enshrine what to me amounts to involuntary indentured servitude on millions of people and families.

      Let's keep them defending and justifying that.

      When you are right you cannot be too radical; when you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative. --Martin Luther King Jr.

      by Egalitare on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 05:05:24 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  their guest worker program will do exactly (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Egalitare, SueDe

        that as a sort of redux of the old anti-Chinese immigration rules of 1880-1920.  The new wrinkle would be that any children born to the guest workers in this country would be born as citizens of their own country.  The RW is dedicated to destroying "anchor babies"

        •  It can't work (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          SueDe, entlord

          Don't get me wrong. I understand how they might try to structure it legislatively, maybe even how it might be implemented and enforced in the very short term. But the inherent contradictions in attempting to impose an economic caste system in a nominally open society will catastrophically fail much sooner than the proponents assume and that anyone sane would fear.

          When you are right you cannot be too radical; when you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative. --Martin Luther King Jr.

          by Egalitare on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 05:45:30 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  If that's the case (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          entlord

          can we make it retroactive and exclusive to Michelle Malkin?  Maybe we can deport her fucking ass back to where her parents came from.

          This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

          by DisNoir36 on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 05:58:42 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  So much for that lofty 70% approval rating (7+ / 0-)

    Christie may (probably - though Bush 41 seemed unassailable right after the Gulf War. Just sayin'....) win re-election, but it'll be closer than the Village would have us take as a foregone conclusion, and actions like this will probably allow NJ Democrats to retain legislative control. More will come. It's just in his nature.

    My relatives in Orange County are a tiny sample, but they remember the whole of Christie's record, so I have some degree of confidence that Sandy won't provide Christie complete political immunity.

    When you are right you cannot be too radical; when you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative. --Martin Luther King Jr.

    by Egalitare on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 04:59:05 AM PST

    •  It'll be enough to get through Nov 2013 (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tb mare, Stude Dude

      If the elections were in 2014 I'd be more confident in him coming down enough but we're talking a mere 10 months away.  Plus you can be certain that come election time people will be reminded of the 1 year anniversary of Sandy to refresh their memory of how Chris Christie parted the Atlantic Ocean.

      This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

      by DisNoir36 on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 06:01:42 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Immigration Reform is in the best interests of the (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ratcityreprobate, mdmslle

    GOP.......ergo.....They'll blow it.

  •  I know I'm a cynic, but (6+ / 0-)

    I suspect that the republicans are creating a diversion from gun control and how important that issue is.


    The religious fanatics didn't buy the republican party because it was virtuous, they bought it because it was for sale

    by nupstateny on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 05:03:09 AM PST

  •  Did the Arizona Republic REALLY print this? (22+ / 0-)
    "The broad tenants of this plan make sense."
    "tenants of this plan"? Really? Have these tenants been eating too much? And how many tenants live in this plan? Is the rent high? Perhaps if the gang put tenets into the plan instead of tenants it would be less of a lift, though perhaps more difficult politically....

    Sweet Jeebus. Even the editing in right wing newspapers is going to hell.....

    "There's no ideology [t]here [on the right]. It's just about being a dick." Bill Maher, June 22, 2012.

    by caseynm on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 05:08:55 AM PST

  •  I seem to remember the Nez Perce were not (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes, tobendaro, tb mare

    delighted when the neighborhood suddenly included Euro immigrants.  We know how that turned out.  Maybe the current residents, as the children and grandchildren of immigrants, should accept that the next wave is coming and we cannot turn back the sea.  Caligula declared war on the sea and we know how that worked out

  •  Mean old behemoth Chris Christie (4+ / 0-)

    certainly isn't living up to his gubernatorial responsibility to watch over the welfare of all his citizens, not merely the rich. More un-Christlike behavior can hardly be imagined.

    Thanks for the APR, Georgia!  Nice color graphic too.

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 05:13:56 AM PST

  •  Immigration is on the top of the agenda (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    maryabein, Woody

    After 2008 election the people wanted the economy fixed and Wall Street reigned in. Obama attacked health care.

    After the 2012 election the people still want the economy fixed and Wall Street reigned in. Obama is attacking immigration.

     I'm seeing a pattern here.

    ¡Cállate o despertarás la izquierda! - protest sign in Spain

    by gjohnsit on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 05:14:32 AM PST

    •  What people don't understand (6+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DRo, skohayes, judyms9, coppercelt, tb mare, askew

      is healthcare and immigration are keys to fixing the economy long term. You want a easy way to increase the tax base? Prevent millions of people from working under the table for cash.

      •  If you really wanted to fix the economy (3+ / 0-)

        You would regulate Wall Street (including reimposing Glass-Steagall and start enforcing the law by throwing the criminals in jail), and you would throw out the free trade agreements that have gutted our manufacturing sector.

         Immigration is more of a social issue than an economic one. It isn't going to bring back any jobs.

         Health care is both a social issue and an economic one, but Obamacare is not going to fix the economic side because it doesn't significantly reduce the tax burden on small businesses. Only single-payer health care would do that.

         So now, Obama's tactics aren't fixing the economy.

        ¡Cállate o despertarás la izquierda! - protest sign in Spain

        by gjohnsit on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 05:47:50 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          tb mare, Stude Dude, gjohnsit

          Regulate Wall Street?  They're having a hard time implementing Dodd-Frank and the Volker Rule.  Seriously it's not gonna happen any time soon.  You and I both agree that these rat fucks should be strung up by their balls or at least thrown in prison like Iceland did but its not gonna happen.  I know it, you know it and it's very likely that Obama realized soon after his Wall Street buds told him to put in Geithner that he wasn't gonna be able to do jack shit either.  

          So he's doing it around the edges.  Fix healthcare to lower costs and get more people on healthcare which politically will help in the long term.  Fix immigration and it will help the economy marginally but politically it will benefit his party immensely.  Do a few things for the LGBT community and get them behind your.  Do a few things for other groups and get them behind you as well.  Once you get enough people behind you and demanding change maybe the rest of the assholes in DC will get the hint.  

          I mean for fucks sake look what happened with filibuster reform.  If there was one thing that needed to be changed NOW, that was it and instead the assholes running the Dem party cowered in the face of the opposition and gave into the GOP's demands.

          Obama isn't going to be able to fix the economy until the GOP is thoroughly annihilated along with all the DLC/Blue Dog/Third Way asshole Dems who enable the GOP to fuck everything up.

          This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

          by DisNoir36 on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 06:19:34 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  Keynesian (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        gjohnsit

        John Maynard Keynes famously observed, In the long term [that you speak of], we are all dead.

        Meanwhile, we need jobs.

        Obama could help the economy by shutting his damn mouth instead of constantly spouting the Republican talking point about the need to cut the deficit.

        In economic terms, we do not need prolonged austerity. That is exactly the wrong policy for an economy lacking demand due to massive unemployment. Instead, we need a much larger deficit this year and next year and maybe the year after that. So we need much greater government spending. We need many more government jobs -- instead of cutting and then freezing federal, state, local, and school system jobs. On the economy, the one we live in today, not the one that will be affected some years in the future by policies that will be debated for a year or two before passing.

    •  People may want the economy "fixed," (4+ / 0-)

      but they have no idea what that means in terms of a detailed plan.  Congress is still talking about what to cut to "balance the budget."  Until they start discussing how to create jobs (i.e., increase demand), they're going to get nowhere and very possibly make the economy even worse.

      Even the Democrats are talking about "entitlement reform" in terms of raising the retirement age and changing the way Social Security COLA's are determined.  Very few Democrats and zero Republicans are thinking in terms of allowing Medicare to negotiate the price of drugs or raising the earnings cap on FICA contributions.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 06:04:37 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  why (Newtown) cops have unions (9+ / 0-)
    At least one person, Officer Bean, said he has already received a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder. He said he had been unable to return to work since the shootings, and had needed medication to sleep.

    The officers and their union are reaching out to state lawmakers, hoping to expand workers’ compensation benefits to include those who witness horrific violence.

    “Our concern from the beginning has been the effects of PTSD,” said Eric Brown, a lawyer for the union that represents the Newtown police. “We estimate it is probably going to be 12 to 15 Newtown officers who are going to be dealing with that, for the remainder of their careers, we imagine, from what we’ve been told by professionals who deal with PTSD.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/...

    "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

    by Greg Dworkin on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 05:15:37 AM PST

    •  note on PTSD; sometimes the ones who are (7+ / 0-)

      the most affected will either compartmentalize the trauma or else go into a state of complete denial so that the PTSD plays out later in life in various self destructive behaviors.  I hope every responder in the tragedy is receiving some type of therapy, even the ones currently denying any adverse effects from the event

      •  very much available short term (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Egalitare, tb mare, entlord

        whether everyone avails is a different issue, but as I hear it, most have, and are open about it.

        issue is going to be longer term.

        "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

        by Greg Dworkin on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 05:44:58 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  thank you for hitting the nail dead on the head (0+ / 0-)

          while emotions are high, there are all sorts of resources available but PTSD is a long term or even life long situation.
          Availability of long term assistance is absolutely necessary

    •  A data point that might interest you. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tb mare, Greg Dworkin

      It's been estimated that Chicago's gun-death rate would actually be much higher than the current 500 deaths per year were in not for the fire department's high-performing emergency responders, who pick up about 1,500 gun shot victims a year and take them to the high-performing (and unfortunately) very experienced trauma ERs around the city.

      "Michael Moore, who was filming a movie about corporate welfare called 'Capitalism: A Love Story,' sought and received incentives."

      by Bush Bites on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 05:57:07 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  The military and first responders carry the (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DRo, tobendaro, tb mare, Stude Dude

    nightmares of the nation and are grossly underpaid and condemned for having unions and being government workers.  If only those overpaid bank CEO's could share the burden of carrying the carnage, but our values are skewed toward wealth and power.  Alas.

    Building a better America with activism, cooperation, ingenuity and snacks.

    by judyms9 on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 05:39:10 AM PST

  •  The GOP's swing to immigration (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DRo, Woody

    will alienate their Tea Party base (with Rush egging them on in the background) and not convince Hispanics to vote for them. According to polls cited in WaPo, Hispanics are (like most Americans) more worried about the economy and jobs.

    For starters, while immigration is an oft-covered topic, it’s not the top issue on Latino voters’ priority list. In a pre-election Pew Hispanic Center survey released last fall, a majority of Hispanic voters said education, health care and jobs/the economy were “extremely important” to them. But only 34 percent said the same about immigration.
    Meanwhile, Republicans think they can still push their agenda of shrinking government and cutting taxes for the wealthy (happening now in several red states), while ignoring the fact that these issues also affect Hispanics:
    Take the call for limited government, a cornerstone of the GOP’s political message. In a Washington Post-Kaiser Family Foundation survey taken last summer, 67 percent of Hispanics said they favor a “larger federal government with many services” over a “smaller federal government with fewer services.” Republicans expressed a dramatically different viewpoint in the poll, with 80 percent saying they prefer a “smaller federal government with fewer services.”
    What about another familiar GOP talking point: lowering federal spending and the deficit? In the same poll, 68 percent of Hispanics said it is more important to “increase federal spending to try to create jobs and improve the economy” than to avoid “a big increase in the federal deficit.” Seventy-three percent of Republicans said the latter is more important.
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

    They may attract a few Hispanics with this fake to the center, but they'll pay a price with their Tea Party base.

    There was a great comment attached to this article:

    no amount of smart moves from the national republicans is going to silence the primal screams of hate from their base.

    “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

    by skohayes on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 05:45:56 AM PST

    •  It ain't gonna do shit for them (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MRobDC, skohayes

      The reality is the Latinos aren't dumb.  Fortunately for us many don't watch Fixed News and they get their news from other sources which are not as pro GOP.  Plus they can smell bullshit a mile away so when the GOoPer tries to con them with offers to help them via tax breaks and smaller gov't they know they're about to get fucked.  

      The GOP is in a classic Catch-22 of their own making.   If they back immigration reform they know damn well Obama will take the credit and many Latino households will have his portrait hanging up in the kitchen or living room the same way my mom STILL has JFK and Clinton commemorative plates hanging up in her kitchen.  Obama and the Dems will get the credit and the Latino votes for at least the next generation.  Plus the racist Teabagging Nutsacks that comprise the GOP base will be turned off and try to Lugar them into retirement.  It's a win-win for the Dems and Obama.  Turn out Dem base, turn off the GOP base and make them crazier than they already are.

      On the other hand, if the GOP tries to block any meaningful immigration reform they will earn the wrath of the Latino communities who will turn out in higher and higher numbers to elect someone else by a margin of 50% or more.  As someone said, there are only so many angry old white people that you can appeal to.  On the plus side the racist Teabagging Nutsacks won't be so angry with them on this one issue but there's always the risk they go off the rails on something else, nominate another Akin and engage in really divisive and nasty rhetoric that will turn off moderate voters in the middle.

      So what's the GOP to do?  Support reform, tack to the middle on this issue in the vain hope of turning a few Latinos to their side and write off the Teabagging Nutsacks?  Or write off the Latino communities and any chance of ever winning the presidency without stealing it outright along with increasingly large swaths of the country all to appease the rabid and lunatic base and remain pure in their extreme ideology?

      This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

      by DisNoir36 on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 06:34:10 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I admit, it's fun to watch (0+ / 0-)

        But at the same time, at least we're doing something. Watching the Republicans tie themselves into knots on this issue is just icing on the cake. :)

        “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

        by skohayes on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 02:55:11 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Hispanics oppose Obama's policies (0+ / 0-)
      In the same poll, 68 percent of Hispanics said it is more important to “increase federal spending to try to create jobs and improve the economy” than to avoid “a big increase in the federal deficit.”
      But Obama and Senate Democrats seem quite ready to proclaim that cutting the budget deficit is the most important thing, slashing government spending, and even using this fake 'need' to cut Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid.

      If these are the Democratic policies, maybe the Repubs can get more Hispanic votes than you might think. Remember how the Repubs ran against us in 2010 with claims about Obama cutting Medicare. The White House seems to have forgotten.

  •  Today in Stupid Gun Stunts news (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    singe, Heart of the Rockies, tb mare
    Charlottesville police say the man who showed up at a Kroger grocery store with a loaded gun wanted to make a point.  On Sunday, an unidentified 22-year-old man carried a loaded AR-15 into the Kroger store on Emmet Street and Hydraulic Road, sparking not only a scare for customers and employees but also a 2nd Amendment debate.

    Charlottesville police drew their guns on the man after witnesses reported he brought a gun into the store. They restrained the man to ask him questions, but released him after they confirmed he is not a convicted felon, owned the gun legally and it was not concealed.

    Police say he was cooperative and did nothing illegal. Officers did find a note in his pocket spelling out his intent to express his 2nd Amendment rights. Police say they could not release man's name because he was not arrested.

    http://www.nbc29.com/...

    A quote from an NRA instructor:

    I think it reflects on all gun owners in a bad way," Davis said.  "I've talked to six NRA instructors this morning about it.  Why did he have that note in his pocket?  I think - this is my personal opinion - I think he expected to be shot, so they would have found the note and said he wasn't doing nothing.

    “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

    by skohayes on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 05:53:21 AM PST

    •  It's legal to wear a hockey mask, carry a chainsaw (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude, skohayes

      and stand around while elementary kids wait for their school bus but is it an example of good citizenship? It's easy to scare people, it's not so easy to help them deal with their fears once you have precipitated them. Assholes like this guy need to put down the Ayn Rand and pick up some Archie comics.

    •  No criminal record, but the guy isn't well. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tb mare, skohayes

      He just did a test drive to see what it felt like to be one of those people who walks into a soft target loaded to kill.

      I think the NRA instructor is right...the note is a red flag.

      Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right.

      by darthstar on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 06:28:56 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Brooksie laments the state of his party.I respond: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tb mare

    Brooks misses the reality that the bulk of Republican voters are not engaged by well thought out views on the role of government and it's relationship to free enterprise and such matters. Their voters have been fed the milk of resentment and non reality based views of the world by the likes of Grover, Rush, Rove, Reagan, Coulter, La-Pierre  and Robertson for decades. Jindal, Bush McConnell, etc. have assimilated the messages of such people and used them to grab some power but at a cost to the future of the Party. Now that they appear to want to change their clothing and put on more restrained outfits so as to win back a majority of the voting public, they are surprised to find that when they shed the garments of demagoguery they cast no reflection in the mirror.

  •  Grammar note to someone calling herself (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tb mare, Liberal Thinking

    a journalist:

    The broad tenants of this plan make sense.
     What does a "broad tenant" look like, anyway?

    "Why reasonable people go stark raving mad when anything involving a Negro comes up, is something I don’t pretend to understand." ~ Atticus Finch, "To Kill a Mockingbird"

    by SottoVoce on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 06:42:45 AM PST

  •  If Congress is involved, you know it'll be a mess. (0+ / 0-)

    Thump! Bang. Whack-boing. It's dub!

    by dadadata on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 07:07:31 AM PST

  •  Are you really a journalist if you don't know (0+ / 0-)

    the difference between "tenants" and "tenets"? Perhaps Laurie Roberts does have "broad tenants", but she ought to leave those issues behind when she comes to work.

    For if there is a sin against life, it consists perhaps not so much in despairing of life as in hoping for another life and in eluding the implacable grandeur of this life. - Albert Camus

    by Anne Elk on Tue Jan 29, 2013 at 07:21:55 AM PST

  •  Where's the Part That Protects Our Jobs? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Forward is D not R

    I don't see the part where this plan helps increase wages or provide more jobs.

    This is another distraction from the real problem. Republicans have simply made the calculation that to continue to lower wages they have to make peace on the immigration issue. If you normalize this, what you are saying is that we can continue to depress wages with immigrant labor.

    They need to balance this with something that increases wages. There needs to be a part that says if you are not here on a green card or already have U.S. citizenship you have to pay some amount extra for the right to work in the U.S. There should be a fee for coming in and working when you aren't actually a citizen here.

    And, it's also missing the piece that improves the situation in the home countries of these people. Where's the foreign aid piece for Mexico, Guatemala, and all the other poor countries that would improve their economies so that people don't have to leave home to get a job?

    Before we sign on to this plan I think we need to think carefully about the implications, especially the economic ones and the human rights ones.

  •  Laurie Roberts at The Arizona Republic: (0+ / 0-)

    Laurie Roberts at The Arizona Republic:

    "The broad tenants of this plan make sense."

    Who are these fat leaseholders of which you speak?

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