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This may be one of those rare moments which I agree with Rep. Darrell Issa on something: The access to information is a human right.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

WASHINGTON -- One of the staunchest Republicans in Congress, House Oversight Committee Chairman Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), attended a Capitol Hill memorial on Monday for progressive activist Aaron Swartz, praising the fallen Internet icon's political courage and saying he has common ground with much of Swartz's legacy.

"He and I probably would have found ourselves at odds with lots of decisions, but never with the question of whether information was in fact a human right," Issa said at the memorial.

Swartz, who was one of the earliest minds behind Reddit, took his own life in January after fighting federal hacking charges for two years. He had long been an advocate for both an open Internet and the democratization of knowledge. Prosecutors pursued him for downloading millions of academic journal articles from the online database JSTOR, but Swartz had devoted much of his activist energy to liberating information. At age 14, he helped develop the Creative Commons license, an alternative to copyright that allows works to be shared freely, so long as they are not used for profit. The license is used heavily by Flickr and many other websites. Later, Swartz downloaded public court documents from the PACER system in an effort to make them available outside of the expensive service. The move drew the attention of the FBI, which ultimately decided not to press charges as the documents, were, in fact, public.

Now here's Issa on Aaron Swartz and how knowledge applies to the world:
Issa told a crowd of hundreds Monday night that Swartz's life's work resonates with him on a personal level.

"Ultimately, knowledge belongs to all the people of the world," said Issa.

Issa, who has a long history of partisan aggression towards Democrats on Capitol Hill, was one of only a handful of Republicans to attend the memorial for Swartz. Issa was also the first congressional Republican to oppose the Stop Online Piracy Act, a bill that Internet freedom activists ultimately stymied -- with Swartz playing a leading role in the fight. Issa has continued to embrace Internet freedom causes, though he has said he opposes one of its core policies, net neutrality.

However, this argument raised by Darrell Issa makes me pause for a moment:

On Monday night, Issa argued that the open access movement has strong ties to bedrock conservative principles -- a point that many Republicans have been reluctant to embrace.

"'Stick it to the man,' something from my generation, resonates with everyone here tonight," Issa said. "Ultimately, trusting a government is inconsistent with our founding words, 'We the people.' Aaron understood that … Our copyright laws were created for the purpose of promoting useful works, not hiding them. Our government and every asset of the government belongs to the American people. Not one piece of federal land is off your ability to walk through at your pleasure, unless there's a valid reason to prohibit that. That principle, I think Aaron and I would always agree on. The principle that we own our government, we own all the rights and privileges that God gave us."

So with this kind of statement, one ought to wonder where Darrell Issa was in 2002-2008.  There were plenty of people during the time who didn't have trust in the U.S. government.  Pretty much 98% (ok, 100%) of the people on Daily Kos thought that during 2002-2008, President Bush and his cabinet were corrupt and tarnishing the image of the U.S. in the world.

And Issa himself barely even once used the kind of fire in his Aaron Swartz speech towards gaining access to information from the Bush administration to get to the bottom of what's going on in the Iraq War.  Perhaps Issa should have been more vocal about IT as it pertains to Congress accessing information that only the Bush administration had access to.

But maybe Darrell Issa is working his best to advance the causes of "conservatism" more than he is in genuinely trying to be genuine.  

What do you think?

In the meantime, send your feedback to the San Diego County Democratic Party, run by Francine Busby:

8340 Clairemont Mesa Boulevard
Suite 105
San Diego, CA 92111
Phone:  (858) 277-3367
Fax:    (858) 571-0275
info@sddemocrats.org
Website:  http://www.sddemocrats.org/...

Originally posted to pipsorcle on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 03:24 PM PST.

Also republished by Knowledge Democrats and California politics.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Issa is evil, period, doesn't matter what he says. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Pam from Calif

    It matters what he does. He's an agent of evil.

  •  Interesting. And surprising. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lujane

    Ultimately the plutocracy can't survive for long without controlling information.  That Issa opposes that control may mean that in the last analysis, regardless of day-to-day pettiness, he may be on "our" side.

    Or do I go too far?

    The American Indian: Fighting Foreign Terrorism Since 1492.

    by penguins4peace on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 03:33:43 PM PST

    •  Issa's IT views make him an enigma (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      penguins4peace, Lujane

      The more IT gets developed over time, the more information is revealed, the more people learn.

      And conservatism or being conservative really limits information.  I've dealt with conservatives my whole life and I can tell you that they are not about information.  They are about just principle but not learning new things.

      I could go down the list but the bottom line is this:  Darrell Issa is really trying to make arguments on IT which he can't win.  I'm really happy that Issa is arguing for an IT renaissance but why wasn't he doing this years ago?  Seriously, where was he on this during the Bush administration?

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