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John Nichols at The Nation hopes for an anti-austerity SOTU:
Tuesday’s State of the Union address is the right moment for President Obama to make a clean break with the austerity lie in combination with a firm embrace of the growth agenda that is needed. [...] Ryan and the Republican proponents of austerity are for making deep cuts in order to balance budgets at any cost—except, of course, taxing their wealthy campaign donors. As such, they are more than ready to render cherished programs such as Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, as well as vital services such as the Post Office, so dysfunctional that Americans will start thinking the unthinkable: that these programs should be privatized. [...]

Simply opposing austerity is not enough. The president must present a specific growth agenda that has a goal of expanding job creation initiatives and strengthening families and communities.

Lawrence Summers at Reuters urges also hopes that the president will steer Congress away from it's deficit and debt obsession towards a pro-growth agenda:
There should be little disagreement across the political spectrum that growth and job creation remain America’s most serious national problem. Ahead of President Obama’s first State of the Union address of his second term, and further fiscal negotiations in Washington, America needs to rethink its priorities for economic policy. [...] We can do better. With strains from the financial crisis receding and huge investment possible in energy, housing and reshored manufacturing, the United States faces a moment of opportunity unlike any in a long time. The economy could soon enter a virtuous cycle of confidence, growth and deficit reduction, much like it did in the 1990s. But this will require moving the national economic debate beyond its near-total preoccupation with federal budget restraint.

Yes, fiscal restraint is necessary in the medium term to contain financial risks. But unlike in the 1990s, when reduced deficits stimulated investment by bringing down capital costs, fiscal restraint cannot be relied on to provide stimulus now when long-term Treasurys yield less than 2 percent. A broader growth-centered agenda is needed to propel the economy to its “escape velocity.”

For more on why President Obama needs to refocus on growth over austerity in his SOTU, head below the fold.

Bloomberg's editors:

From our standpoint, Obama -- and the nation -- would be best served by focusing on challenges such as immigration, inequality and climate change. [...] The political payoff may not be as great as it is with, say, gun control. But the economic consequences will be far greater. [...]

Any economy that continues to offer disproportionate rewards to those at the top, however, isn’t sustainable. As part of a larger deal with Republicans that includes long-term spending cuts, Obama should push to limit the sizable deductions, credits and exemptions that benefit wealthy taxpayers. (Senator John McCain, a Republican, just said he might be open to such revenue.) Obama could also seek to expand the earned-income tax credit to help two-parent families and low-income adults without children.

A more fruitful approach is to expand opportunity and increase the size of the economic pie. Two priorities are paramount: increasing early-childhood education, to give low- income children a running start; and expanding the number of Americans who graduate from college, to bolster workplace skills and wages. Education savings accounts, which work like 401(k) retirement plans but can be used only to pay for sanctioned education expenses, would help.

Jonathan Capehart at The Washington Post is looking for a word about poverty:
Specifically, I’m looking for the president to use the word “poverty” or “poor.” Because of the relentless focus on the middle class — those in it and those who aspire to join the club — poverty and the poor often go ignored or unremarked. That’s not to say that those issues are not important to Obama. Quite the contrary, as any honest assessment of his record that goes deeper than the headline-grabbing actions would show. Still, use of the words “poverty” and “poor,” especially its impact on children and in this particular address, would be the thunderclap of attention needed to kick start a renewed effort to do something about it.
The New York Times is looking for voting rights protection in the address:
President Obama has a long agenda for his State of the Union address, but it is important that he not forget the most fundamental democratic reform of all: repairing a broken election system that caused hundreds of thousands of people to stand in line for hours to vote last year. It is time to make good on his election-night promise.
Those seeking political power by making voting more inconvenient will resist reforms, but a better system would actually be good for both parties and, more important, the country.

Long lines are not the inevitable result of big turnouts in elections. They are the result of neglect, often deliberate, of an antiquated patchwork of registration systems that make it far too hard to get on the rolls. They are the result of states that won’t spend enough money for an adequate supply of voting machines, particularly in crowded cities and minority precincts. And they are the result of refusals to expand early voting programs, one of the best and easiest ways to increase participation.

Over at CNN, Van Jones hopes to hear about climate change:
In his second inaugural address last month, President Barack Obama forcefully articulated a case for confronting the climate crisis. In his State of the Union speech on Tuesday, I encourage him to lay out a plan on it.
I realize Congress can be an obstacle. A few years ago, the right and left discussed how best to tackle the climate crisis. Today, it has become an article of faith among some conservatives to ignore science and deny there is a human-made crisis at all. Just last week, Sen. Marco Rubio, the oft-touted 2016 GOP savior who will deliver the Republican response to the State of the Union, falsely claimed there was "reasonable debate" on the issue.
There isn't. There is no alternative but to act.
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Comment Preferences

  •  Expanding early voting would be a great way (31+ / 0-)

    to increase participation.  In more civilized countries elections aren't held on a work day--they're held on weekends.  In Australia, from what I understand, you can vote on the beach while wearing a bikini if you want to.  Voting is compulsory there.

    We pretend to be the world's greatest democracy, yet we make it difficult for our citizens to vote.  And we all know whose interests that serves!

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 04:38:51 AM PST

  •  What not being covered by FMLA now means for us (9+ / 0-)

    Last evening the school at which I have been teaching, and from which I have been on leave since we found out about Leaves on the Current's cancer, decided that since I would still have to be out from time to time to help with her condition that they would like to replace me.  That led me to reflect, and when I reflect I write.  This post, whose title is the subject line of this comment, is the result.

    I invite you to read.

    Peace.

    "We didn't set out to save the world; we set out to wonder how other people are doing and to reflect on how our actions affect other people's hearts." - Pema Chodron

    by teacherken on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 04:39:55 AM PST

    •  That is heartless and horrible what they are doing (3+ / 0-)

      Teacherken.  

      Follow PA Keystone Liberals on Twitter: @KeystoneLibs

      by wishingwell on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 04:44:06 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I was struck by a chart on FMLA worldwide (8+ / 0-)

      to discover the US is a third or fourth world country in terms of FMLA or paid leave.  Many countries offer as much as 3 months paid leave routinely while the US offers none.  bottom line is the FMLA, even if you qualify, is insufficient

      •  Another program for the people (7+ / 0-)

        who can afford to go without pay for 12 weeks.

        "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

        by SueDe on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 05:21:40 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  FMLA is (8+ / 0-)

        only useable by the well off or the reasonably well off.  Someone I work with has stage four colon cancer.  She is desperate to keep her job and can take no time off other than what is absolutely needed for treatment.  

        Justice For Will Will spent his brief, courageous life fighting for the rights we all take for granted. Please share his story to support the fight!

        by KibbutzAmiad on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 05:22:14 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  that is a common situation for so many families (4+ / 0-)

          now that two paychecks and family coverage is essential for survival.  When this is no longer possible, families have to start living off their savings and many Americans have not saved as much as they needed to.  Most Americans are 3 months away from being homeless, while the experts recommend families sock away 2 years salary or about $100K against tougher times.  Yeh, sure

        •  A friend was fired last year (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          KibbutzAmiad, ColoTim

          for using FML. Of course, the company trumped up a lie for the reason she was let go, also making her have to go through many appeals to get unemployment, and speak with a lawyer about it. She could not afford to actually hire a lawyer, but did find one sympathetic to her situation who advised her pro bono.
          She really can't work full time, as she has a disabled child, and regularly has to take time to deal with out of town med appointments. And since it does not become available until after a year of employment, she's really screwed as far as being able to work is concerned. And she wants to work.

          Only thing more infuriating than an ignorant man is one who tries to make others ignorant for his own gain. Crashing Vor

          by emmasnacker on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 07:23:33 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  Where I work (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Amber6541

        you can receive full pay for a short term disability (3 months max, I think), which includes before and after pregnancy, cancer treatment, surgery, etc.
        Saved my butt last year when I had back surgery.

        “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

        by skohayes on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 06:00:28 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Sorry to hear this Ken. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ColoTim

      As I've mentioned before my wife is a teacher and I know from personal experience that teachers really have it tough - your schedule is really tied to the school year and any illness or pregnancy can get you fired.  My wife had to take a drastically short maternity leave in order to be back for the first day of school.

      It is all about the stabililty of the school year for the kids.  I understand this but I also understand that teachers need to be compensated for such a rigid obligation.  

  •  unchanged because ... ? (0+ / 0-)
    Only one country, the United States of America, has actively to limit the Court’s jurisdiction and to prevent other countries from cooperating with it. However, its opposition has diminished significantly in recent years as the work of the Court has shown the US government’s concerns to be unfounded.
    Yes, we can't ?

    (see sig ...)

    There is no Article II power which says the Executive can violate the Constitution.--@Hugh * Addington's Perpwalk: TRAILHEAD of Accountability for Bush-2 Crimes.

    by greenbird on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 04:40:51 AM PST

  •  I am literally (9+ / 0-)

    praying he says:

    1. austerity does absolutely nothing to improve the economic conditions of a nation and

    2. austerity is utterly immoral, inflicting needless suffering on the most vulnerable

    I am weary to the point of desperation of this nonsense.  This is truly not rocket science.  Harming those who will put every dollar they possess into the economy is a special kind of evil.

    Justice For Will Will spent his brief, courageous life fighting for the rights we all take for granted. Please share his story to support the fight!

    by KibbutzAmiad on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 04:49:09 AM PST

  •  Cokie Roberts to Michael Steele: The GOP consists (8+ / 0-)

    of a bunch of old white guys and you.......LOL

  •  I'm Looking For One Word in the President's SOU (8+ / 0-)

    And what's that word?

    INFRASTRUCTURE

    Bridges, roads, municipal utilities are badly in need of repair and rail needs upgrading for high speed trains.  Combine that need with the fact that we have plenty of unemployed skilled workers who are waiting to tackle these projects, and you have the perfect storm to both create good paying jobs and produce a modern day infrastructure to boost economic growth well into the future.

    We only lack one thing, FEDERAL FUNDS and the courage to spend those funds on the things we need to create jobs and put the nation's economy on steady path of growth.

    "Some men see things as they are and ask, 'Why?' I dream of things that never were and ask, 'Why not?"

    by Doctor Who on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 05:01:52 AM PST

    •  yep quit padding bankers' expense accounts (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Doctor Who, KibbutzAmiad, DRo, tb mare

      with bailouts at 0% interest.  The interstate system today is the best example of what we were and what we have become

    •  So.. how much more in taxes are you willing (0+ / 0-)

      to pay to pay for these endeavors?  10%? 20%? 50%?

      Personally, I agree with you about infrastructure.  But I think a lot of infrastructure projects could be paid for by cutting out a lot of wasteful projects (pork) we have in the federal budget.   But a massive number of infrastructure projects would probably still require tax increases.  I am not willing to borrow any more than the almost trillion per year we already are.

      •  How about borrowing the money, (7+ / 0-)

        since we can do so at about 2% for thirty years?  This is called "investment."  It's not at all necessary for the government to pay-as-you-go, even though that is something the Republican deficit scolds would have you believe.

        "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

        by SueDe on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 05:50:11 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  No.. it is called "borrowing".. (0+ / 0-)

          I love that term "investment".  It's kinda like people who say their car is an "investment".  No, it's not.  It loses value every year.

          An investment is something which pays dividends.  Put a million dollars into a mile of roadway, and in five years it needs it again.

          But, it's a necessary expense that we've been ignoring for years.  I have no problem spending the money on it, but roads and bridges are not investments.  They are expenses. We should raise taxes to fund them.  Let's stop asking our children to pay for crap we want now but don't want to pay for.

          •  No, it's an investment (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            SueDe

            Just like the car is, even though you borrow to buy it, because it returns value.  Without roads, businesses lack the ability to move their goods to those who would buy them, their employees lack the ability to get to work easily, and everybody lacks the freedom to choose a good place to live or work.  The returns are shown by the increased economic activity the road, or car, makes possible, and are recouped through increased tax revenue from the new business.

            From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. -Immanuel Kant

            by Nellebracht on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 11:15:14 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  Ever heard of Keynes? (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tb mare, Doctor Who, ColoTim

        He was right about government stimulus.

        The banks have a stranglehold on the political process. Mike Whitney

        by dfarrah on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 07:05:12 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  The GOP's idea (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Amber6541, Doctor Who, ColoTim

      was a private/ public partnership in an infrastructure bank.
      Of course, the second that Obama mentioned it in his first term, it became unconstitutional, "executive overreach" and other stupid things.
      I would love to see more investment in infrastructure, but with the states slashing spending, there are very few projects in the works that could affect unemployment NOW.
      It could take up to three years before any of this would create jobs.

      “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

      by skohayes on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 06:06:05 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  NK nuclear breakthrough ? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DRo

    There is no Article II power which says the Executive can violate the Constitution.--@Hugh * Addington's Perpwalk: TRAILHEAD of Accountability for Bush-2 Crimes.

    by greenbird on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 05:02:08 AM PST

    •  also google meets there, (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DRo

      to do what google do, i suspect: first, google; then, twitter; then, something good, i hope...

      There is no Article II power which says the Executive can violate the Constitution.--@Hugh * Addington's Perpwalk: TRAILHEAD of Accountability for Bush-2 Crimes.

      by greenbird on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 05:06:02 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  proly use link (0+ / 0-)

        bizarre blog post.
        suggest reading at link ?

        There is no Article II power which says the Executive can violate the Constitution.--@Hugh * Addington's Perpwalk: TRAILHEAD of Accountability for Bush-2 Crimes.

        by greenbird on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 05:54:28 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  What kind of kindergarten-level boorishness (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skillet, Amber6541

    and infantilism can we expect expect from our friends tonite? My guess: holding up signs that read "Obamasequester".

  •  Obama should walk into the audience grab Ted (0+ / 0-)

    Nugent by the throat, drag him into the isle and give him a long over due ass kicking on national television, return to the podium, say "sorry I couldn't let the opportunity be wasted" and go into his SOTU speech.

  •  Austerity does not work; while there are quibbles (6+ / 0-)

    about the difference between the US and EU or US and GB, the fact remains that austerity does not work and is not working in any country.  furthermore its track record is such that it does not appear to have worked in any country in the modern age.

    What does appear to work is federal intervention in the job market and direct investment in public works and projects.  Think WPA and CCC.  The GOP has suggested giving money to the states in block grants for them to do the work.  The problem is it makes no sense to give the money to states to do interstate projects.

    For that matter, our crumbling interstate system was once the wonder of the world.  Now it is antiquated and in serious need of repair.  The same for our bridges.  Enough public work needs exist to bring us almost to full employment but first we have to stop the sucking dry of the economy by a small group of people.  In the last 10 years (from memory) it seems 80% of the wealth generated in this country went to the top 2% or so.

  •  why am i posting this ? (0+ / 0-)

    besides its beauty, that is.

    post a link if you think you know.

    There is no Article II power which says the Executive can violate the Constitution.--@Hugh * Addington's Perpwalk: TRAILHEAD of Accountability for Bush-2 Crimes.

    by greenbird on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 05:16:06 AM PST

  •  interesting chart from WaPo (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DRo, skillet, skohayes, Amber6541, tb mare

    Republican nativists are even crazier if it's Obama's proposals.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

    "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

    by Greg Dworkin on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 05:17:32 AM PST

    •  Fascinating. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Amber6541, tb mare, ColoTim

      So this is our legacy - political polarization and bigotry.   The Republican party in its current manifestation can not die too soon.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 05:40:54 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I just hope the president in the SOTU (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DRo, rl en france, Amber6541, tb mare

    doesn't mention the pope, his abdication or his replacement.  Surely he won't - there will be plenty of speculation and spectacle in the coming weeks as the Red Beanie Brigade goes through the motions of appointing a new pontiff pontificate to lay down the law (of the 15th century) to the laity.

    "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

    by SueDe on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 05:19:38 AM PST

  •  Need a new word. Austerity is thread-bare. (0+ / 0-)

    Worse, it's a one-way word:

    We don't want no freakin' austerity.  No way, man.

    Well then, what do you want instead? To throw money away that we don't have and to destroy our children's futures as they struggle and struggle never to break free of the chains you forge for them today?

    Well, we don't want no freakin' austerity. No way, man.

    It might be nice to use another word that also means you shouldn't throw money away, but doesn't mean you shouldn't invest: efficiency.

    No, no, man. We don't want to throw no money away. We want to use it efficiently. Put people to work. Get the economy moving. Make the country great again.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 06:10:28 AM PST

    •  Austerity from Republicans (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tb mare, ColoTim

      doesn't mean what you think it means.
      It means that they can spend all they want on defense (which doesn't have the word "efficiency" in their dictionary), but the country will collapse in anarchy if we don't cut Medicare.
      It means that you can lower taxes on the wealthy and on businesses, while eliminating deductions for mortgage interest and property taxes and raising sales taxes to make up for it (see Kansas). Magically, the deficit caused by this "broadening the tax base" will not appear until after Brownback is out of office in 2014 (no way he's getting reelected). In 10 years, Kansas will be hundreds of billions in the red.
      It means you fight like hell so that multi-millionaires can write off their private jet, but subsidies for green energy are just STOOPID.
      The way we've gotten out of the last 8 or 10 recessions is by spending- government spending. Getting more people to work reduces the deficit and the debt and increases revenues without having to raise taxes.
      Worry about "austerity" later.

      “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

      by skohayes on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 06:54:45 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Austerity comes from Democrats, not Republicans. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        skohayes

        That's part of the problem.

        Democrats are the ones who talk about austerity. Republicans talk about getting the fiscal house in order so that the economy can grow.

        Actual policies are a different matter, but Democrats do seem to buy the Republican pitch that the alternative to balancing the budget is reckless abandon.

        Maybe efficiency's not the right word.  Maybe "wise" is better. Wise investors get rich. Wise policies will get the country rolling.

        "Austerity" just sounds like "How dare you tell me I can't spend your money however I please".

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 07:24:41 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Republicans aren't talking about (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          dinotrac

          getting the fiscal house in order, at least not seriously.
          How can one yell and scream about spending and then refuse to cut the Defense budget?
          The defense budget has increased 68% since 2001, and that's without the war spending (Bush used emergency appropriations to keep the wars off the budget).
          All this money isn't keeping us safer, it's keeping our service members fed and housed, health insurance during and after service (veteran's care has gone up considerably for obvious reasons).
          Oh, yeah, and there's this:

          Exhibit A for this phenomenon is the F-22 fighter jet. Lockheed Martin was chosen as the prime contractor in 1991. But the plane did not become operational for 14 years, as lawmakers scrapped over which congressional districts would receive the subcontracts. While deadlines kept passing, taxpayers paid billions. Through the years of wheel-spinning, F-22 costs more than doubled in inflationadjusted terms per plane. The Air Force’s entire B-58 project—which produced the world’s first long-range supersonic bomber—took six years, from when the prototype first flew in 1956 till the final B-58 left the assembly hangar. Back when Pentagon spending was much lower, there was discipline about completing programs on time.

          Eventually, the original justification for the F-22 fighter—anticipated aerial duels above Europe against the Soviet Union’s best—faded away, as did the adversary. When the first operational F-22 finally entered an Air Force squadron in 2005, it was unclear what the plane would do, other than be something really cool for members of Congress to have their pictures taken next to. The F-22 has never been used in Iraq or Afghanistan: Either the plane is irrelevant to low-intensity war, or the Air Force fears one will get shot down by some cheap, old-fashioned weapon. The project was finally ended last year, but only after a nasty and protracted fight in Congress.

          So, 20 years and hundreds of billions of dollars later, we have no F-22. Now we're starting the same fight over the F-35, the new tankers and the new Air Force One helicopter.

          Here's the worst part:

          In 2009, the Government Accountability Office estimated that Pentagon weapons projects were collectively $296 billion over budget.
          http://www.newrepublic.com/...

          Imagine where we would be if people would start doing something about waste and corruption in the Defense Department?

          “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

          by skohayes on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 07:59:22 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  They are, though. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ColoTim

            They may not be matching it with policy, but the rhetoric is that Republicans want to save your children and Democrats want to destroy them, and Democrats aren't doing much of anything to counter that.

            It's one reason why I like the sequester:

            It will take a nice big hunk out of Defense, a bigger hunk than comes from anything else.

            Subsequent negotiations are likely to be about putting things back into the budget, not slicing them out, and Defense will have the longest road to travel.  

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 08:06:54 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  That sequester is over ten years (0+ / 0-)

              They can cut federal jobs and still keep paying private contractors to waste $300 billion.
              We are also cutting the same amount from domestic spending.
              What it means is that more people will lose their jobs, and the economy will contract, just like it did last quarter.
              Not a good idea at all.

              “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

              by skohayes on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 03:42:20 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  The domestic cuts are smaller than the defense (0+ / 0-)

                cuts, and major safety net programs are exempted.

                Yes, it will not be a pleasant thing, but it will force some furious horse-trading that we will not otherwise see.

                It may even cause our leaders decide that it's not ok to treat millions of unemployed and underemployed people as collateral damage.

                Scary to those who are doing all right, perhaps, but how much scarier can it get for the long-term unemployed? The foreclosed?

                A great idea.

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 06:22:23 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

  •  Summers is a moron... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ColoTim

    According to Summers:

    There should be little disagreement across the political spectrum that growth and job creation remain America’s most serious national problem.
    Anyone--anyone!--who believes that bullshit cannot be taken seriously, and that includes Barack Obama. The right wing, which includes most all of the GOP, believes "America's most serious national problem" is Barack Obama, not the economy. They would cheerfully destroy the nation's economy if it meant getting rid of Obama, something they've been trying to do since 2008. Anyone who believes anything else is, like Summers, a moron.
  •  HOOOOOO BOY (0+ / 0-)

    You know what's coming, right?
    New Winger Conspiracy Theory Takes Flight

    In the wake of news that Sen. Lindsey Graham is threatening to block the nominations of Hagel and Brennan, there’s a whole new conspiracy theory bubbling up on the right. From ground zero of Obama era conspiracy theories comes the conspiracy theory to top them all: that CIA nominee John Brennan is himself a Muslim.

    “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

    by skohayes on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 06:34:11 AM PST

  •  this pervasive anti-austerity sentiment (0+ / 0-)

    is why i will continue to short the US dollar and US treasuries.

    and the notion, touted over and over and over again in the mainstream that greece is actually implementing austerity (they are not) is very telling...

    drowning in debt is inevitable if not imminent.

  •  Why steer away from austerity? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dfarrah

    There are, like 400 people in D.C. who love the idea.

    What the rest of us, including the world's top economists, think is irrelevant.

    Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we've been waiting for. We are the change that we seek. Barack Obama

    by delphine on Tue Feb 12, 2013 at 06:47:32 AM PST

  •  Will He Do It? (0+ / 0-)

    "Tuesday’s State of the Union address is the right moment for President Obama to make a clean break with the austerity lie in combination with a firm embrace of the growth agenda that is needed."

    The question is, will he do it?  Will he present at least a skeleton of a plan to get this country moving again?  Or has he schmoozed with the Republicans too hard and too long to offer us anything but Republican Lite?  We will just have to wait and see.

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