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The 19th of March is the very sad ten year anniversary of the extremely failed foreign policy leading to the destruction of much of the Country of Iraq and the people of that was led by the United States, I find trouble calling it that anymore, as it abandoned the main missions following 9/11 and the military sent in to accomplish same. Afghanistan winds down as those still serving in try and accomplish at least a small part of those missions.

My subject title above comes from a Press Release of a Brown University: 'Costs of War' Project description of their newly released report on the Iraq War and some eight year occupation of.

I caught this article that was just posted:

Iraq war costs U.S. more than $2 trillion: study

March 14, 2013 - The U.S. war in Iraq has cost $1.7 trillion with an additional $490 billion in benefits owed to war veterans, expenses that could grow to more than $6 trillion over the next four decades counting interest, a study released on Thursday said.

The war has killed at least 134,000 Iraqi civilians and may have contributed to the deaths of as many as four times that number, according to the Costs of War Project by the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University.

When security forces, insurgents, journalists and humanitarian workers were included, the war's death toll rose to an estimated 176,000 to 189,000, the study said.

The report, the work of about 30 academics and experts, was published in advance of the 10th anniversary of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq on March 19, 2003.  read more>>>

In the press release you'll find this video:

As it starts out with this:

March 14, 2013 - More than 190,000 people have been killed in the 10 years since the war in Iraq began. The war will cost the U.S. $2.2 trillion, including substantial costs for veterans care through 2053, far exceeding the initial government estimate of $50 to $60 billion, according to a new report by scholars with the "Costs of War" project at Brown University's Watson Institute for International Studies. The 10th anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq is March 19, 2013.

Along with a partial breakdown of what's in the report:

Among the group’s main findings:

    * More than 70 percent of those who died of direct war violence in Iraq have been civilians — an estimated 134,000. This number does not account for indirect deaths due to increased vulnerability to disease or injury as a result of war-degraded conditions. That number is estimated to be several times higher.

    *The Iraq War will ultimately cost U.S. taxpayers at least $2.2 trillion. Because the Iraq war appropriations were funded by borrowing, cumulative interest through 2053 could amount to more than $3.9 trillion.

    * The $2.2 trillion figure includes care for veterans who were injured in the war in Iraq, which will cost the United States almost $500 billion through 2053.

    * The total of U.S. service members killed in Iraq is 4,488. At least 3,400 U.S. contractors have died as well, a number often under-reported.

    * Terrorism in Iraq increased dramatically as a result of the invasion and tactics and fighters were exported to Syria and other neighboring countries.

    * Iraq’s health care infrastructure remains devastated from sanctions and war. More than half of Iraq’s medical doctors left the country during the 2000s, and tens of thousands of Iraqi patients are forced to seek health care outside the country.

    * The $60 billion spent on reconstruction for Iraq has not gone to rebuilding infrastructure such as roads, health care, and water treatment systems, but primarily to the military and police. The Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction has found massive fraud, waste, and abuse of reconstruction funds. read more>>>

 Just a bit earlier Media Matters had this in a news letter they sent out:

BLACKOUT: Networks Ignore Report Finding Massive Waste In Iraq Reconstruction
March 11, 2013 - Broadcast and cable news networks have largely ignored a new report which concluded that the United States' rebuilding efforts in Iraq squandered billions of dollars due to widespread fraud, abuse, and waste.

Last week, Stuart Bowen, the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction, released a report concluding that of the $60 billion the U.S. has spent on reconstruction projects in Iraq following the 2003 invasion, at least $8 billion of it was "wasted."

In the five days since its release, only PBS and MSNBC have offered substantial coverage of the report. read more>>>

As the news media quickly went and covered the House Speaker bellowing about how their must be a big conspiracy coming from the White House as the public tours were suspended and related to cost being quickly cut because of the Sequestration bill.

Keep in mind this from the 'Costs of War' Project and in the block quote above:

The Iraq War will ultimately cost U.S. taxpayers at least $2.2 trillion. Because the Iraq war appropriations were funded by borrowing, cumulative interest through 2053 could amount to more than $3.9 trillion.

As the continuing obstruction by the obstructionists who, back then, rubber stamped all costs and related to costs refuse to acknowledge that any of this is yet paid and that will continue to grow. As will the rubber stamped wants of that administration and not related to either war.

“We are dealing with veterans, not procedures—with their problems, not ours.” —General Omar Bradley, First Administrator of the Veterans Administration

"If military action is worth our troops’ blood, it should be worth our treasure, too — not just in the abstract, but in the form of a specific ante by every American." -Andrew Rosenthal 10 Feb. 2013

"You cannot escape the responsibility of tomorrow by evading it today." - Abraham Lincoln

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Comment Preferences

  •  This Political Cartoon (9+ / 0-)


    Was making the rounds on a number of sites this morning:

    Very astute for the cartoonist to have the cheney winking!

    “We are dealing with veterans, not procedures—with their problems, not ours.” —Gen Omar Bradley, First Administrator of the VA

    by jimstaro on Thu Mar 14, 2013 at 12:42:19 PM PDT

  •  Thank you (5+ / 0-)

    I especially zero in on this and am grateful you included it:

    This number does not account for indirect deaths due to increased vulnerability to disease or injury as a result of war-degraded conditions. That number is estimated to be several times higher.
    Think just for a moment about people with health conditions that needed hospitals but suddenly have many of their hospitals bombed out.  Hundreds of thousands died due to the collective foolishness of the US.  Such a horrible tragedy that didn't have to happen.

    I'm glad to hear about this study and will dig deeper into it.

    I'm not liberal. I'm actually just anti-evil, OK? - Elon James White

    by Satya1 on Thu Mar 14, 2013 at 12:51:22 PM PDT

  •  Iraq: 10 Years After (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    llbear, mrkvica, Otteray Scribe



    Costs of War

    You can read the papers at above link!

    “We are dealing with veterans, not procedures—with their problems, not ours.” —Gen Omar Bradley, First Administrator of the VA

    by jimstaro on Thu Mar 14, 2013 at 01:19:38 PM PDT

  •  How'd that work out, McCain? (4+ / 0-)

    It's mind-boggling that these a-holes have never been called on their claims: WMD! Welcomed as liberators! The war will pay for itself! It'll be over in a couple weeks or months!

    stay together / learn the flowers / go light - Gary Snyder

    by Mother Mags on Thu Mar 14, 2013 at 01:19:54 PM PDT

  •  And the cost of the Afghanistan War (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jimstaro, mrkvica, Otteray Scribe

    $1,432,000,000 and climbing.

    People forget that this is also a cost of war:
    $44 billion was appropriated to VA for 2009 to provide medical services to veterans X 10 years = $440 billion.

    Where would the US be now with an additional $2 trillion to spend?

    Those who fought the war in Afghanistan won it. Get them out of Afghanistan NOW . . . It's long past time. Those who want to wage the next war in Afghanistan are condemned to lose it.

    by llbear on Thu Mar 14, 2013 at 02:54:48 PM PDT

    •  And These, (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      llbear, mrkvica, Otteray Scribe

      As noted by the woman in the video as well as the papers as to the reports, aren't even close, just estimated as close as they can.

      Like for the Veterans care and more related to the VA in the decades coming the VA is now finally trying to build a modern system to handle everything as it rushes at them. That should have been built and funded to maintain and add new technologies to Long Ago, decades ago, not to mention Nothing Was Done When They Started Both Wars and even as both got bogged down into long occupations!!

      “We are dealing with veterans, not procedures—with their problems, not ours.” —Gen Omar Bradley, First Administrator of the VA

      by jimstaro on Thu Mar 14, 2013 at 03:03:11 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The Growing Case Load Requests (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      llbear, mrkvica, Otteray Scribe


      That everyone is screaming at the VA about, not surprised that's DeJa-Vu all over again, some are coming from the multiple or single tours early in both wars and related to PTS, just like our brothers that's hitting many a number of years after getting out, and that's just one issue!!

      The country, yawns, DeJa-Vu all over again, and again.........................!!

      “We are dealing with veterans, not procedures—with their problems, not ours.” —Gen Omar Bradley, First Administrator of the VA

      by jimstaro on Thu Mar 14, 2013 at 03:08:54 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Health of Iraqi's After (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mrkvica, Otteray Scribe, cfk

    Is a section of the report diaried, this report below is another recent release, this is only one issue:

    Iraq's depleted uranium clean-up to cost $30m as contamination spreads
    Report says toxic waste is being spread by scrap metal dealers, and describes its 'alarming' use in civilian areas during Iraq wars

    6 March 2013 - Cleaning up more than 300 sites in Iraq still contaminated by depleted uranium (DU) weapons will cost at least $30m, according to a report by a Dutch peace group to be published on Thursday.

    The report, which was funded by the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, warns that the contamination is being spread by poorly regulated scrap metal dealers, including children. It also documents evidence that DU munitions were fired at light vehicles, buildings and other civilian infrastructure including the Iraqi Ministry of Planning in Baghdad – casting doubt on official assurances that only armoured vehicles were targeted. "The use of DU in populated areas is alarming," it says, adding that many more contaminated sites are likely to be discovered.

    More than 400 tonnes of DU ammunition are estimated to have been fired by jets and tanks in the two Iraq wars in 1991 and 2003, the vast majority by US forces. The UK government says that British forces fired less than three tonnes.  read more>>>

    Impact and implicatons of the use of depleted uranium in Iraq
    A decade on and depleted uranium contamination stills blights Iraq
    Mar 7 2013 - To mark the 10th anniversary of the 2003 invasion, a new report has highlighted continuing uncertainties over the impact and legacy of the use of 400 tonnes of depleted uranium (DU) weapons in Iraq. The report reveals the extent of DU's use in civilian areas for the first time.

    In a State of Uncertainty published by Dutch peace organisation IKV Pax Christi, has sought to do what the US has so far refused to do – reveal how widely the weapons were used in Iraq, and in what circumstances. It also analyses the costs and technical burdens associated with DU use, arguing that a decade on, many contamination problems remain unresolved – leaving civilians at risk of chronic DU exposure.  read more>>>

    And we still don't know all of what and how much of whatever was used in Falluja and surrounding in the surge!!

    “We are dealing with veterans, not procedures—with their problems, not ours.” —Gen Omar Bradley, First Administrator of the VA

    by jimstaro on Thu Mar 14, 2013 at 03:14:48 PM PDT

  •  On top of all the numbers above, (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jimstaro, annieli

    we have no way of counting the numbers of suicides or deaths which were the direct or indirect result of these wars.  How many widows and kids live in poverty or near poverty because the family breadwinner was killed, injured, or otherwise crippled mentally or physically? No one will ever know.

    How many divorces and broken homes?  How many spouses battered because a healthy family member left for war and came home an emotional shell with a short temper? How many murders that would not have happened?

    How many go to jail or prison as the result of being an emotional and moral cripple?

    The general who wins the battle makes many calculations in his temple before the battle is fought. The general who loses makes but few calculations beforehand. - Sun Tzu

    by Otteray Scribe on Thu Mar 14, 2013 at 04:03:56 PM PDT

  •  like dropping a nuke on Salt Lake City (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jimstaro
    March 14, 2013 - More than 190,000 people have been killed in the 10 years since the war in Iraq began. The war will cost the U.S. $2.2 trillion, including substantial costs for veterans care through 2053, far exceeding the initial government estimate of $50 to $60 billion, according to a new report by scholars with the "Costs of War" project at Brown University's Watson Institute for International Studies. The 10th anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq is March 19, 2013.

    Warning - some snark above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013

    by annieli on Thu Mar 14, 2013 at 06:30:09 PM PDT

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