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Let me state right off the bat that this advise does not apply to the most dangerous criminals in our society, since they have bought immunity for themselves.  Wall Street banksters looting the country's coffers, war profiteers, war criminals, regulators on the take, and businesses that handle hazardous materials who through gross negligence cause dozens of deaths, need not worry about this advise, since they are immune thanks to influence peddling corruption, and our two-tiered justice system.

These criminals are the most dangerous because their actions result in direct and indirect harm to society, to the people, at a massive level.  But again, they don't need to worry, and should feel relatively safe in knowing that they can continue their crime spree, pillaging, and enriching themselves without fear of justice or retribution (as long as they don't too sloppy).

No, this advise is for regular folks.  The first thing you need to know and understand is that there is a massive total-information-awareness surveillance dragnet covering the entire country, from sea to shiny sea (also from our Northern and Southern borders).

Secondly, you need to understand that our prison system has become an industry, with a rapidly increasing, for-profit sector that depends on "growth," thus creating incentives to incarcerate the greatest number of people.

Thirdly, understand that if you commit, are believed to have committed, or are suspected of having been somehow involved with, in certain types of crimes for which the government has essentially eliminated due process under the law, habeas corpus, the right to legal representation, and the right to remain silent, you could be subject to not only indefinite detention, but extra-judicial execution--and that of course also applies to U.S. citizens.

Also, you need to be aware that as the corporatist powers pushing this agenda on our system of government find no significant resistance from an increasingly docile and submissive (and subjugated) population, they will continue expanding the legal justification under which the government can kill you extra-judicially, or detain you indefinitely.

And of course, this only applies to certain type of alleged crimes.  But in addition, in almost every other area of criminal law, the system is finding ways to slowly increase penalties, fines, and the consequences of merely being accused of a crime.  For example, in some state employers can now check to see if you have arrested for any reason, as part of a employment background check.  It doesn't matter if you were innocent or not.

So in essence, the best advise is to be as compliant as possible with the dictates of the corporate state.  Follow the program; do not make any waves.  Don't worry about the endemic corruption at the top.  Keep your head down, and your nose to the grindstone, or if you prefer the hamster on a wheel metaphor, then just keep on it, making sure you keep up with the speed as needed by the oligarchs.

And forget about effective social justice and anti-corruption activism, since once you engage in it, there are multiple ways in which you could find yourself ensnared in the rapidly-expanding national security net.  You could even be accused of being a terrorist threat by merely joining an activist group.

So if you are a regular criminal, stick to basic run-of-the-mill crimes.  Yes, if you are a minority, statistically speaking, you are still more likely to be sentenced to death (depending on the crime), to be treated much more harshly throughout the whole process, etc., but at least you'll still have some rights (as long as you don't run from the police, since in that case, you are likely to be shot death), including the right to remain silent, and the right to be considered innocent until proven guilty.

So be good; be obedient.  Go to work (if you have a job), watch TV (don't miss any of your favorite reality TV and HBO great shows), share your jogging and hiking stats on facebook and twitter, or share that video of the dancing chihuahua, but try to avoid  engaging in your civic responsibilities as a citizen in the face of massive corruption.

Remember, there is nothing you can do against the criminal oligarchy (arrangement between corporatist cartels and their puppets in government), since they have bought immunity for themselves.

Don't worry too much about injustices, about the poor (who thinks of them anyways), about the infirm, about the sick, about the old, about the vulnerable.  The conditions are being set (austerity, etc.) for them to fall through the cracks into irrelevancy, and eventual demise.

You just worry about you and yours, understanding that we're kind of moving towards economic Darwinism, and as such, you need to be strong, push your productivity as much as you can so the extra profit that result from it goes directly to the ruling class (at a faster and faster rate).  As long as you are able to keep up, you'll be relatively okay, especially if you turn the other way when you see those around you falling into poverty, homelessness, and despair.  Remember, it's all about your own survival--survival of the fittest.

So there you have it.  Be good and be obedient, but if you have to commit a crime, stick to the run-of-the-mill variety; don't get too ambitious (leave that to the thieves at the top).  And try to keep up with the rapidly expanding rationale under which citizens can be spied on, indefinitely detained, or assassinated extra-judicially.  You'll want to stay away from those things.

Do it all for the good of Corporate America.  They are counting on you!

/SNARK

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Comment Preferences

  •  And....Remember If You Pull A Bombing Incident (6+ / 0-)

    on the American people, you may slink away for a day or two, but you will get yours.  You will be met w/ might, & your firepower will be matched & then some.  

    Just ask suspect #2 who was soon found cowering under a boat.  That smirk got wiped off his face within days.

    If & when that particular homicidal criminal survives, he will find out what it's like when you are not a white collar criminal, when corporate America has no inclination to cover or rescue you.  Sometimes justice does still prevail
    in the United States.  

    •  That's part of the diarist's point, (5+ / 0-)

      only some laws are upheld. It's a great thing the bombers were caught, but how about those who wiped out trillions of dollars of middle class net work, destroyed families, motivated suicides?

      The vast middle corporate citizenry is too complicit and anesthetized with creature comforts and conveniences and a false sense of personal security to even see the problems, let alone have the stomach to demand the sweeping reforms that would be necessary to address them.

      Frankly, I'd rather take down Exxon or Goldman Sachs, the way we're taking down RushBeckistan, than elect another "better" Democrat who's going to wind up singing for the bankster choir.

      by Words In Action on Sun Apr 21, 2013 at 07:22:14 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Advise is a verb. (8+ / 0-)

    Advice is the noun you are looking for.

    •  It's been advised before, ... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      WakeUpNeo

      apparently he's not open to the advice ... and doesn't care about the impression created.  So be it.

      "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity, and I am not sure about the universe." -- Albert Einstein

      by Neuroptimalian on Sun Apr 21, 2013 at 12:49:10 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I know what you mean. Sometimes when I run (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Neuroptimalian

        across a typo or a grammatical error while reading a prestigious publication like The Wall Street Journal, or The New York Times, I just shake my head in disapproval.

        I have to be more careful, especially since it is this type of stuff some people may use to avoid engaging in any substantive discussion of the subject at hand, instead choosing to discredit the entire argument being presented by focusing on a typo or grammatical error.

        Point well taken.

  •  What sort of crimes are you advising... (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Smoh, Darmok, exlrrp, misslegalbeagle, emelyn

    ...us to avoid?

    Setting off bombs in the middle of crowds and shooting people?

    Yeah, I can see why one might want to avoid engaging in such activities.

    Your advice makes perfect sense.

    Not sure why you label it as snark.

    •  Assembling in protest is now shackled with (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Ray Pensador, DelilahOhMy

      ever-increasing limitations as to make it virtually meaningless.

      Meaningful protest thus requires breaking all kinds of laws, resistance of the arrest for which one can expect truly brutal treatment.

      Frankly, I'd rather take down Exxon or Goldman Sachs, the way we're taking down RushBeckistan, than elect another "better" Democrat who's going to wind up singing for the bankster choir.

      by Words In Action on Sun Apr 21, 2013 at 07:25:02 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  What, the advice to keep your heads (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Byrnt

      down while 90% of the population sees its income and wealth dwindling?

      Yes, it's just great that the vast majority are satisfied with that program.

      Frankly, I'd rather take down Exxon or Goldman Sachs, the way we're taking down RushBeckistan, than elect another "better" Democrat who's going to wind up singing for the bankster choir.

      by Words In Action on Sun Apr 21, 2013 at 07:27:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  DUI is now worse (0+ / 0-)

    than armed robbery.

    If you don't submit to a breath test and basically make your confession - then the law is stacked against you since now the state has to prove your guilt.

    The care of human life and happiness, and not their destruction, is the first and only legitimate object of good government. - Thomas Jefferson

    by ctexrep on Sun Apr 21, 2013 at 05:21:10 AM PDT

  •  So, punish "blue collar" crime less? (0+ / 0-)

    Blue collar crime penalties should match white collar crime, is that the message?

    It seems more like a chicken/egg issue; is the problem the criminal justice system or the economic system where the separation of rich from poor continues at breakneck speed?

  •  Wrong. (8+ / 0-)

    "In certain types of crimes for which the government has essentially eliminated due process under the law, habeas corpus, the right to legal representation, and the right to remain silent, you could be subject to not only indefinite detention, but extra-judicial execution--and that of course also applies to U.S. citizens."

    Absolutely NOT true.  American citizens arrested in the US are entitled to the full panoply of constitutional rights.  You can assert that this all you want, but you're just wrong.  

    •  Occupy-related and whistleblower-related (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      arendt, DelilahOhMy

      experiences tell a different story.

      Also, the other point, which is that crime like marijuana possession and petty theft are dealt with ridiculous harshness to fill for-profit prisons, while white collar criminals obliterate families and walk the streets free from even the reasonable threat of prosecution, is entirely true.

      Frankly, I'd rather take down Exxon or Goldman Sachs, the way we're taking down RushBeckistan, than elect another "better" Democrat who's going to wind up singing for the bankster choir.

      by Words In Action on Sun Apr 21, 2013 at 07:17:03 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Exception to Miranda rights (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DelilahOhMy

      I think you are wrong.

      We just heard this week about an American citizen who was arrested and will not be given required Miranda warnings because of a previously unheard-of exception involving public safety.

      We know of two infamous cases of American citizens executed by the government without trial, legal defense, or even a sentence - one citizen was not even charged with a crime.    

      And three days ago, I was stopped while using a public thoroughfare, and told if I did not sumit to a police search, I would be not be allowed to continue with my law-abiding and peaceable business.

      The full panolpy of constitutional rights includes the right to a Miranda warning, the right to a trail by jury and to defend oneself in a court of law, and the right to be free of unreasonable search and seizure.  That you have not yet had your constitutional rights violated does not mean such violations are now commonplace.

      "The fool doth think he is wise: the wise man knows himself to be a fool" - W. Shakespeare

      by Hugh Jim Bissell on Sun Apr 21, 2013 at 08:08:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  It's only "previously unheard of" if you don't (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        emelyn, sewaneepat, WakeUpNeo, HamdenRice

        know criminal procedure.  I learned about Quarles in law school - it's not a secret.  It's been the law for 30 years.  

        Like I said, Americans arrested within the United States.  Things ARE different when the person is outside the country.  I don't know the details of what happened to you, so I can't comment.  But to say that the government has categorically suspended habeas and is indefinitely detaining Americans is wrong, and frankly, stupid.

        •  You are still wrong (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Ray Pensador

          Even Americans out of the country are still gauranteed  by the consitution - in theory tho' no longer in practice - the protection of due process when accussed by American prosecutors of breaking American laws.  

          Of course you cannot comment when I or other Americans are routinely subject to illegal police searches.  The only comment to be made is that such searches are illegal under our written laws but allowed nonetheless - facts that counter your original assertion.

          What is truely stupid is those people (some who claim to be highly educated) who defend the everyday overturning of citizen rights previously protected under our constitution.

          "The fool doth think he is wise: the wise man knows himself to be a fool" - W. Shakespeare

          by Hugh Jim Bissell on Sun Apr 21, 2013 at 09:04:44 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  The protection from illegal searches in public (0+ / 0-)

            areas has long been more theoretical than real. This isn't anything new or recent. It was common When I was a kid over 40 years ago. It's well established that such searches aren't necessarily Constitutional violations.

            I'm not defending this. I am pointing out that it doesn't represent some new encroachment on Constitutional liberty.

            Nothing human is alien to me.

            by WB Reeves on Sun Apr 21, 2013 at 11:55:40 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I am following this with great interest, and your (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Ray Pensador, WB Reeves

              comment really helped me frame my own thoughts.  You are correct in that this has gone on for years, but I also think that maybe we are seeing more of it.  

              The old Alien and Sedition Act also gets dusted off and brought out from time to time, plus now we have some new rules and regs in place for this sort of thing.  

              These actions seem to be broadening and expanding.  Plus, we saw a lot of emergency procedures go in place in terms of people being told to stay in, a city shut down.  

              I am still trying to process this.  There is such a vast ability out there; we never really had to think about it on this level before.  Are we just all suddenly subject to getting ordered around and herded around by large groups of armed forces backed by tanks and other equipment?   If so, is this too creepy for us?

              Is there even a way to put the toothpaste back in the tube?  

              It gets on my nerves, and you know how I am about my nerves...

              by ciganka on Mon Apr 22, 2013 at 03:20:58 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Again, this stuff isn't as unprecedented as (0+ / 0-)

                you may think.

                During the Urban rebellions of the 1960's, cities were essentially placed under military control when National Guard forces were mobilized to restore order. These actions were prefigured by activation of the Guard both by state and Federal authorities during the Civil Rights movement beginning with the Little Rock desegregation crisis which led to the 101st Airborne being deployed. The use of the National Guard for domestic purposes in this period culminated in the shootings of anti-war protesters at Kent state University in Ohio.

                In 1980, I participated in a mass mobilization to protest the murder of radical labor activists by Klan and Nazis in Greensboro, NC. A state of emergency was declared and the march was carried out under the guns of the military, complete with armored vehicles and snipers on roof tops

                My point isn't that the concerns you express are unjustified. To the contrary, I think they a far too serious for their expression to be undermined by exaggerated, counter factual claims and rhetoric. While I understand the sense of urgency and justified outrage that can lead to such errors, they are ultimately counter productive to the very resistance they are trying to promote.  

                Nothing human is alien to me.

                by WB Reeves on Mon Apr 22, 2013 at 10:51:46 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  I have read the Red Scare, People's History and (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Ray Pensador

                  am quite familiar with these patterns as well as the National Guard, urban riots, and even the Battle for Seattle.  

                  I have also spent some time in a conflict zone.

                  I think that the level of technology brought in and the shut down for the manhunt just took me by surprise.    

                  Maybe it is from living overseas for so many years, but it looks different.  It just seems frenzied.

                  I was also quite surprised on my first trip back home when they were announcing threat colors at airports.  

                  Sometimes it just flat looks weird, unexpected.  However, I do not spend enough time in the States to really have an opinion on it.  I am just reading impressions and trying to form some of my own thoughts.

                  It gets on my nerves, and you know how I am about my nerves...

                  by ciganka on Mon Apr 22, 2013 at 01:06:12 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

  •  Rampant white collar crime is the (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    arendt, DelilahOhMy

    predictable result of a society that glorifies greed. And moderate, pre-dominantly corporate Democrats are no less to blame for this than the corporate Right.

    Between this, de-regulation and lax regulation, white collar crime, which can financially kill tens of millions, as the financial collapse did, and result in the destruction of families and suicides, is treated like acceptable collateral damage by the vast corporate middle.

    Frankly, I'd rather take down Exxon or Goldman Sachs, the way we're taking down RushBeckistan, than elect another "better" Democrat who's going to wind up singing for the bankster choir.

    by Words In Action on Sun Apr 21, 2013 at 07:12:39 AM PDT

  •  Boycott committing violent and non-violent crimes (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    heybuddy

    The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

    by nextstep on Sun Apr 21, 2013 at 07:34:41 AM PDT

  •  Painful to read (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Ray Pensador, DelilahOhMy

    I find this painful to read, even as snark.

    Though Ray P. has clearly labelled this article as snark, I am of the opinion the article only too accurately describes the modern America's legal climate.  And sadly, I believe Mr. P. has in some areas minimized our awful legal predicament.

    One is the now criminal nature of what was formerly consider ordinary and law-abiding activities.  Today, by merely using the NYC public transit system, you have provided sufficient probable cause to give police reason to search your person.  Indeed, police in NYC routinely seize and search people who are doing nothing more than walking down the street.

    Another is police seizure without actual criminal proceedings.  During the Occupy Winter of '11-'12, protesters were routinely seized, held for a period of time, and subsequently released with all charges dropped - such charges being simply fabricated for the purpose of holding the person, or the cost of actually prosecuting weak charges being too great for the city to bear.

    To acknowledge in print that the wealthy and pwoerful  are indeed above the law, and such laws as those that provide protections for the innocent and accused are regularly ignored, is painful in the extreme.  To acknowledge that the majority of citizens have no more recouse through the courts or through elections is to admit that we no longer live in an enlightened democracy, but as vassals in a feudal state.

    "The fool doth think he is wise: the wise man knows himself to be a fool" - W. Shakespeare

    by Hugh Jim Bissell on Sun Apr 21, 2013 at 07:54:44 AM PDT

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