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The attorney general of the United States branded him a "terrorist," and with good reason. His bombings killed two people and wounded over 150 others. "Radicalized" as a child, his acts of terror were motivated by his extremist religious ideology. Armed and dangerous, he eluded a massive federal manhunt, likely with the support of his sympathizers. After he was finally captured, he led authorities to his hidden cache of 250 pounds of dynamite. And even after he was sentenced to prison, the foot soldier of the Army of God used his constitutionally-protected free speech rights to taunt his victims from his cell.

That terrorist isn't Boston Marathon killer Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, but Atlanta Olympics and Birmingham clinic bomber Eric Rudolph. And despite the steadily growing body count of Rudolph's fellow travelers in the radical anti-abortion movement, his Miranda rights were never in question.

Tsarnaev is another matter. Despite the absence of clear evidence so far that the Tsarnaev brothers were part of a larger, international conspiracy, Republican leaders including Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), John McCain (R-AZ) and Kelly Ayotte (R-NH) have demanded the American citizen captured on U.S soil be held as enemy combatant and his Miranda rights withheld even if, as former CIA Former CIA Deputy Director Phillip Mudd put it, Tsarnaev's slaughter "looks more to me like Columbine than it does al Qaeda." And while former Bush Attorney General Michael Mukasey declared Monday, "Make no mistake—it was jihad," former blog of the year Powerline asked, "Why does evil make liberals stupid?"

Powerline's John Hinderaker might have paused to consult with Sarah Palin first. After all, during the 2008 election, the Republican vice presidential nominee denied that the likes of Eric Rudolph were terrorists at all. When Brian Williams of NBC asked "Is an abortion clinic bomber a terrorist," Palin said no:

"There's no question that Bill Ayers via his own admittance was one who sought to destroy our U.S. Capitol and our Pentagon. That is a domestic terrorist. There's no question there. Now, others who would want to engage in harming innocent Americans or facilities that uh, it would be unacceptable. I don't know if you're going to use the word terrorist there."
But when Eric Rudolph was captured in 2003, Attorney General John Ashcroft did use the word "terrorist" there. That May, Ashcroft had this to say about the man who bombed the Atlanta Olympics Centennial Park in 1996, a gay nightclub and abortion clinic the next year and detonated another device at a Birmingham clinic in 1998:
"Today, Eric Robert Rudolph, the most notorious American fugitive on the FBI's 'Most Wanted' list has been captured and will face American justice. American law enforcement's unyielding efforts to capture Eric Robert Rudolph have been rewarded. Working with law enforcement nationwide, the FBI always gets their man. This sends a clear message that we will never cease in our efforts to hunt down all terrorists, foreign or domestic, and stop them from harming the innocent...

The American people, most importantly the victims of these terrorist attacks, can rest easier knowing that another alleged killer is no longer a threat."

And to be sure, Eric Rudolph was a deadly threat. After pleading guilty to the bombings in Georgia and Alabama in April 2005, Rudolph in his rambling 11-page manifesto released in 2005, Rudolph explained that the motivation behind his crusade of carnage was legalized abortion and "aberrant sexual behavior," as you can read below the fold:

"Abortion is murder. And when the regime in Washington legalized, sanctioned and legitimized this practice, they forfeited their legitimacy and moral authority to govern."
As CNN noted at the time, Rudolph said he had "nothing personal" against victims like off-duty policeman Robert Sanderson (killed in the Birmingham blast) and nurse Emily Lyons (who lost an eye and suffered other injuries). But he also had no remorse.
In his statement Wednesday, he said that while homosexuality does not pose a threat when kept in private, the "attempt to force society to accept and recognize this behavior" should be met with "force if necessary."

Rudolph also shed light on his intentions regarding the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. He called it an opportunity to shame the United States for its legalization of abortion. He said his goal was to knock out Atlanta's power grid and shut down the Olympics.

While the New York Times was among outlets covering the Tsarnaevs carnage report that "Investigators Dig for Roots of Bomb Suspects' Radicalization," with Eric Rudolph there was no mystery. Just days after his capture, Time summed it up on June 9, 2003:
Rudolph did epitomize the modern militiaman. After his father died in 1981, his mother moved the family from Florida to rural Nantahala, N.C. When she enrolled Eric and his siblings in school, she refused to give their Social Security numbers, fearing the government could track them. She introduced them to several churches that followed "Christian Identity," a rabidly anti-Semitic philosophy; in ninth grade, Eric wrote an essay denying that the Holocaust took place.
Whether or not the Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev were part of or supported by a larger network of conspirators remains the most critical question surrounding their Boston terror campaign. But they quickly found out they had no place to run and no place to hide. Eric Rudolph was another matter altogether. He eluded a five year federal manhunt despite the $1 million bounty offered for his capture. As Time noted, that may not have been just because the survivalist skills he mastered in the forests of North Carolina:
Since he didn't look as if he had stumbled out of a cave, investigators believe Rudolph must have received help over the years. "If he's been living in a mobile home, you'd assume quite a few people knew he was there," says Ronald Baughn, a retired federal law-enforcement agent who helped investigate the Atlanta and Birmingham bombings. Indeed, Rudolph had become a local folk hero. In Murphy, T shirts and coffee mugs appeared saying RUN RUDOLPH, RUN.
Of course, Eric Rudolph has had plenty of company among the extremist ranks of the violent anti-abortion movement. In 2003, Presbyterian minister Paul Hill was executed for his 1994 murders of a Florida abortion provider and his bodyguard in 1994. Would-be Texas clinic bomber Paul Ross Evans and James Kopp, the killer of Buffalo physician Barnett Slepian, were also American terrorists who enjoyed their full due process rights. And among those the Army of God calls "Prisoners for Christ" is Shelley Shannon. In 1993, Shannon was sentenced to 10 years in a Kansas prison for shooting Dr. Tiller in both arms outside his clinic. Two years later, Shannon pled guilty to setting fires to abortion clinics in Idaho, Nevada, Oregon and California. And as the New York Times recounted in 1995, Shannon was quite clear as to whether she considered her crimes terrorism:
Handcuffed and nondescript in jailhouse blues, Shelley Shannon, a housewife from rural Oregon, stood before a Federal judge here on June 7 and admitted waging a terrorism campaign against abortion clinics and doctors.
As it turns out, Shelley Shannon had a big fan in Scott Roeder, the man who assassinated Dr. Tiller in 2009. Roeder, who used to visit Shannon in prison, now has jailhouse well-wishers of his own. They include the Rev. Donald Spitz, the director of Pro-Life Virginia, who calls Roeder an "American hero."

Among other definitions, the Code of Federal Regulations as defines terrorism as "the unlawful use of force and violence against persons or property to intimidate or coerce a government, the civilian population, or any segment thereof, in furtherance of political or social objectives." When American citizens like Eric Rudolph, Timothy McVeigh, Shelley Shannon or Dzhokhar Tsarnaev commit terrorist acts within the United States, they nevertheless still retain all of their constitutional rights to a speedy trial, to a jury of one's peers, to legal counsel and against self-incrimination. (Sadly, that includes the First Amendment right of free speech, which allows Eric Rudolph to author a book and mock his victims from his prison cell.) As Andrew Rosenthal noted, Sens. Ayotte, Graham and McCain cannot claim otherwise:

The Supreme Court ruled in 2004, in the case of Yaser Esam Hamdi, that the United States has the right to hold an American citizen as an enemy combatant -- when he is captured on a battlefield in another country. The author of that decision, Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, went out of her way to mention the "narrow" applicability of the ruling.
As inconvenient or uncomfortable as it may be for some to admit, U.S. law requires that all American domestic terrorists must be treated equally, regardless of their religion, ethnicity or political cause. As UC Irvine School of Law Dean Erwin Chemerinsky put it, "There is no exception in the Constitution, or ever recognized by the Supreme Court, for especially horrible crimes or for ones that can be labeled terrorism." Horrible crimes, that is, committed by American terrorists like Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and Eric Rudolph.

Originally posted to Jon Perr on Tue Apr 23, 2013 at 11:18 AM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Now lemme see, Eric Rudolph (30+ / 0-)

    is a white , Christian, hetero, male with a clearly "merican" name. No, that couldn't account for any difference in treatment by the right. Right?

    And OMG did you just make me have a moment's respect for John Ashcroft?

    We view "The Handmaid's Tale" as cautionary. The GOP views it as an instruction book.

    by Vita Brevis on Tue Apr 23, 2013 at 11:38:12 AM PDT

  •  There is a whole culture of Rudolph types (10+ / 0-)

    People who post comments online at places like Huffington Post, let along gun manufacturer blog ammoland.com, or on FB, are more and more strident in sounding like any one of these right wing extreme foamers at the mouth might just decide to take the guns and ammo they have been stockpiling and go somewhere and do something with it.

    The environment around the gun control argument has brought this element out and it is a bit alarming, considering how many people in how many places this involves.  

    Those who are opposed to gun control may include genteel suburbanites with nice cars who collect guns, but it also includes people who are in the prison and white supremacist sub culture.  One might indeed wonder why they would not want more scrutiny.  

    hope that the idiots who have no constructive and creative solutions but only look to tear down will not win the day.

    by Stuart Heady on Tue Apr 23, 2013 at 12:01:35 PM PDT

  •  Wait (6+ / 0-)

    Isn't Rudolph a German surname?  Why do we continue to let these violent Barvarians into this country?  

  •  I feel sorry for Dave Vitter. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Calamity Jean

    Graham, McCain and Ayotte must have been raiding his stash of diapers. Pant pissers.

    Repeal the 2nd amendment.

    by Calouste on Tue Apr 23, 2013 at 08:09:11 PM PDT

  •  They Aren't Taking Away Tsarnaev's Rights (5+ / 0-)

    They're taking away yours.

  •  Is anyone at Justice saying that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (8+ / 0-)

    will not be afforded the same rights as any other US citizen?
    I must have missed that.  

    The fact that there is an investigation as to why he became a free lance jihadist should not be upsetting to anyone, either.

    I don't get posts like this.

    The patellar reflex is a deep tendon reflex which allows one to keep one's balance with little effort or conscious thought.

    by SpamNunn on Tue Apr 23, 2013 at 08:16:38 PM PDT

    •  The diarist isn't commenting on DOJ, (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jeff in nyc, WB Reeves, Dodgerdog1

      but on these politicians-

      Republican leaders including Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), John McCain (R-AZ) and Kelly Ayotte (R-NH) have demanded the American citizen captured on U.S soil be held as enemy combatant and his Miranda rights withheld

      Oh for crying out loud!

      by 4mygirls on Wed Apr 24, 2013 at 04:25:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The last time I checked, they don't get to make (0+ / 0-)

        that call.  We have a Constitution that takes care of this type of thing.  That's why it's so important to respect it in its entirety, even when we disagree with someone.  

        The patellar reflex is a deep tendon reflex which allows one to keep one's balance with little effort or conscious thought.

        by SpamNunn on Wed Apr 24, 2013 at 07:42:11 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I think the outrage is about certain Senators (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Be Skeptical, jeff in nyc, Dodgerdog1

      seeming to CALL for him not to get those rights maybe? The whole "enemy combatant" thing bothers me too so I'd get that.

      In this case, I don't get all the fuss over Miranda because I see no evidence to suggest the state plans to use his statements in court so far. I don't really have an issue with the Quarles exception used properly anyway (some seem to, I guess), but last I'd heard they actually DID read Dzhokhar Tsarnaev his Miranda rights. They may have gotten a confession before (it's been reported both ways) but whether or not they'll seek to use that confession in court is not clear. If they don't seek to use it in court (and if it was pre-Miranda, it seems to me that it'd be wiser not to with potential legal challenges since the other evidence is so densely in their favor), it really doesn't matter when they read his Miranda rights.

  •  All I've heard is that (5+ / 0-)

    the feds are using the public safety exception to Miranda to ask initial questions before Mirandizing him.  Like, "are there any other bombs planted waiting to go off."  

    If the feds exceed the questioning allowed under the public safety exception, they risk having his statements surpressed - the same risk law enforcement takes whenever they push too hard against a constitutional right.

    Other than that, I haven't heard anyone with authority (the President, AG, DOJ people, etc.) assert that he shouldn't have the same due process and other rights as any other defendant.  Lindsay Graham's a goofball.

    •  I'm afraid that the good people of South Carolina (0+ / 0-)

      don't get that.  

      The elevation of appearance over substance, of celebrity over character, of short term gains over lasting achievement displays a poverty of ambition. It distracts you from what's truly important. - Barack Obama

      by helfenburg on Wed Apr 24, 2013 at 03:07:24 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Great job. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    slatsg

    Really, you have to ask what is wrong with Heckle and Jeckle -- why are they so enamored with war war time concepts.

    "Mr. President, I'm not saying we wouldn't get our hair mussed." General Buck Turgidson

    by muledriver on Tue Apr 23, 2013 at 08:25:26 PM PDT

  •  At the risk of being called a bigot again (0+ / 0-)

    This is really why we have terrorism.  Because violence as a method of change is not universally condemned, even though most would agree that just going out and killing people is wrong.  Some people have their pet exceptions, and they have to make excuses.  Like the fellow christian who protected Rudolph for five years as he hid in the appalachia.  These people, like Sarah Palin was mentioned here, think he is a good terrorist.

    In fact is arguable that his status as a white christian made the FBI bypass him and go with the other, more obvious suspect.  This allowed him to continue his christian war in the army of god.  Again, a good terrorist.  Like Lanza, who wan't responsible for his actions, he was bullied, and the gun control laws were not good enough, and we didn't give him the love and medical care he needed.

    This is not to say all christian are terrorists.  I just find it ironic that while a Islamic center was not allowed to be built near the world trade center because it would honor the terrorist of 9/11, several churches are still allowed to stand within a few blocks of the centennial Olympic park presumably honoring the christian terrorist.

  •  Tsarnaev is not part an approved ethnicity (5+ / 0-)

    Please consult the RNC for an updated list of approved ethnicities entitled to full Constitutional rights. All other ethnicites have only provisional rights, that can be withdrawn at the discretion of the appropriate House Republican committee chair, ranking Republican Senate committee member, or John McCain.

    Conservatives believe evil comes from violating rules. Liberals believe evil comes from violating each other.

    by tcorse on Tue Apr 23, 2013 at 08:27:29 PM PDT

  •  My question to Powerline; (3+ / 0-)

    Why does stupid make Conservatives evil?

    "We are not going to give up on destroying the health care system for the American people." - future President Paul Ryan.

    by Fordmandalay on Tue Apr 23, 2013 at 08:29:06 PM PDT

  •  I like Ashcroft's description of how Rudolph was (8+ / 0-)

    captured as a result of the seven year manhunt.  In fact- it was sheer, total happenstance:

    After a massive manhunt that included infrared scopes on helicopters and logs rigged with motion detectors, it was ultimately a rookie officer on patrol at 3:27 a.m. who spotted a man with a camouflage jacket, blue work britches and a stubbly beard behind a Save-A-Lot food store. N.C. police capture Eric Rudolph
    And I am thoroughly disgusted by this claim that America is a battlefield.  That's repugnant.  The minute we transition from thinking of this place as our home to thinking of it as a battlefield is the minute we have lost something very very precious.  

    It is just a bald, naked play for fear.  The GOP loves fear.  They peddle it, manipulate it, and grow strong off of it.  It's no wonder they want Americans not to think of this place as home, but to think of it as a perpetual battlefield.

    But when does this battle end?  When people stop hating us?  That's preposterous.  We have always been hated by someone.  We have always had those who wish us ill.  Thinking that we live in a battlefield of a war that will never end is just nauseating.  To think that is acceptable is a sign of gross, profound madness.

    I'm living in an age that calls darkness light.

    by electricgrendel on Tue Apr 23, 2013 at 08:32:04 PM PDT

    •  Fear-mongering, hate-mongering - the tools of (0+ / 0-)

      demagogues and that is what they are.

      The elevation of appearance over substance, of celebrity over character, of short term gains over lasting achievement displays a poverty of ambition. It distracts you from what's truly important. - Barack Obama

      by helfenburg on Wed Apr 24, 2013 at 03:14:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Republican/Bagger Hypocrisy (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Calamity Jean

    happens so frequently, that it's become both exhausting and boring.

    Also, I can kill you with my brain.

    by Puffin on Tue Apr 23, 2013 at 08:34:55 PM PDT

  •  sadly, we can see the same anti-muslim BS here (0+ / 0-)

    from some at DKos. We're no more immune to it than any other place.

  •  Does one have to be a Terrorist first to... (0+ / 0-)

    ...be labeled an Enemy Combatant? Whose job is it to assign these labels?

    And they scream... The worst things in life come free to us... Cause we're just under the upper hand... And go mad for a couple grams.

    by glb3 on Tue Apr 23, 2013 at 08:47:20 PM PDT

    •  The news media seemed to think it was theirs -- (0+ / 0-)

      headlines full of "terrorism" and "terrorists" within probably minutes of the event.  And then the public consumes it all without reflection or question.

      Some very emminent news personalities on NPR were peddling this as "terrorism" and the suspects as "terrorists" within days of the event.  

      Everybody seems to have just decided.... without evidence, reflection, examination....

      The elevation of appearance over substance, of celebrity over character, of short term gains over lasting achievement displays a poverty of ambition. It distracts you from what's truly important. - Barack Obama

      by helfenburg on Wed Apr 24, 2013 at 03:16:58 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Isn't this diary a little late? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Username4242, berrieh

    He has been given his Miranda rights.
    He has been appointed a free defense attorney.
    He has been charged.
    The charges have been made public.
    He will be tried in a civilian court, not as an enemy combatant.

    What exactly is the problem?

    •  I believe he was questioned without his Miranda (0+ / 0-)

      rights pursuant to some bogus and not judicially approved interpretation of the public safety exception to the Miranda ruling.

      The elevation of appearance over substance, of celebrity over character, of short term gains over lasting achievement displays a poverty of ambition. It distracts you from what's truly important. - Barack Obama

      by helfenburg on Wed Apr 24, 2013 at 03:17:59 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The Constitution (9+ / 0-)

    does not grant all of those rights to citizens...it grants them to persons.  I keep hearing people say "he's an American citizen, therefore...."  But EVERYONE has the right to trial, to counsel, not to self-incriminate, etc.  Citizens, legal residents, visitors, etc. (Yes, i know there are some differences when it comes to deportations and such, but I'm speaking of criminal trials and rights to due process, etc., when charged with a crime).

    •  But many politicians would argue that only (0+ / 0-)

      citizens have these rights and then only on "American soil".  They don't travel.  When you leave the country, they stay here.

      The elevation of appearance over substance, of celebrity over character, of short term gains over lasting achievement displays a poverty of ambition. It distracts you from what's truly important. - Barack Obama

      by helfenburg on Wed Apr 24, 2013 at 03:19:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Tsarnaev has been read his rights. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MrJersey, Calamity Jean

    It was reported in the Boston Globe this morning.  It happened at the time he was arraigned in his hospital bed.  He has also been appointed counsel.

    President Obama has also made it quite clear that Tsarnaev will be tried in civilian court.

    •  He was questioned before he was arrainged, I (0+ / 0-)

      believe.

      The elevation of appearance over substance, of celebrity over character, of short term gains over lasting achievement displays a poverty of ambition. It distracts you from what's truly important. - Barack Obama

      by helfenburg on Wed Apr 24, 2013 at 03:19:41 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes, he was... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Be Skeptical

        ...under the public safety exemption that allows the Miranda warning to be delayed.  There was a legitimate reason to believe there might have been more bombs or other attacks that were imminent.  The important thing is that he was read his rights as soon as it was determined that the threat had ended.

        Law enforcement organizations and the criminal justice system aren't flawless, and I'm sure with a little digging, we could find plenty of things they might have done better, but at least in this case, they're going by the book and sticking to the rule of law.  The right wing nut jobs can huff and puff all they want, but unfortunately for them and fortunately for the rest of the world they're not running the show any more.

        •  Sorry but I question whether there was legitimate (0+ / 0-)

          reason to believe there might have been more bombs or other attacks that were imminent.  I don't know and I suspect that you don't know either that he was read his rights as soon as it was determined that the threat had ended.  I wonder what the source is of your information that they are going by the book and sticking to the rule of law.  On Friday, when he was caught it was already 5 days from the awful, fateful day and nothing more had happened, so wherefrom the absolute certainty that other attacks were imminent, esp. since one suspect was dead and the other in custody?

          You are reassuring yourself of the legitimacy of FBI and DOJ actions without having any evidence whatsoever.  This kind of thinking is what is getting us where we are today.  And to suggest that all danger of subverting the Constitution has passed because "right wing nut jobs" aren't running the show anymore?  Excuse me?  What kind of simple blather is that.

          The elevation of appearance over substance, of celebrity over character, of short term gains over lasting achievement displays a poverty of ambition. It distracts you from what's truly important. - Barack Obama

          by helfenburg on Wed Apr 24, 2013 at 05:10:44 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  As I said in my first post... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Be Skeptical

            ...my source of information is The Boston Globe.  What makes you think that simply because a few days had passed between the bombing and the time of Tsarnaev's capture that no further attacks were planned?  Are you utterly unaware that the Tsarnaev brothers were tossing homemade hand grenades out the window of the stolen SUV as they were being pursued and tossed another pressure cooker bomb at the police (rather ineffectively) during the gunfight in Watertown?  What do you think they were planning to do with that pressure cooker bomb had they not been caught?  I don't know about you, but given that information, the possibility that other bombs might exist and that other attacks were planned is a conclusion that any reasonable person, law enforcement or not, would draw.

            I suspect I'm a little closer to first-hand information than you are, since it happens that the first bomb exploded literally three doors from my place of employment.  While I was safely ensconced at home that day, some people I know were at the finish line and witnessed the explosions.  Others who I am acquainted with were among the injured.

            I am quite well aware that the FBI and DOJ remain fallible and corruptible organizations even under Democratic administrations.  My point is that Tsarnaev was ultimately read his rights and afforded counsel (specifically the lead public defenders with experience defending other local accused terrorists), and President Obama has made it unequivocally clear that he will be tried in civilian court.  If Republicans were still in power, he would not have been read his rights and would be on a plane to Guantanamo as soon as he is released from the hospital.

            Critical scrutiny of government institutions is absolutely necessary to sustain an open, democratic society, but an attitude of total skepticism is what separates the conspiracy theorist from the responsible citizen.

  •  Eric Rudolph had lots of supporters... (0+ / 0-)

    I recall news stories while he was on the lam.

    The  FBI believed the rural anti-abortion sympathizers -  mostly white and Xtian - helped him survive in the wilds through the winter.

    Government leaned on those sympathizers - as far as I heard. If Rudolph was non-white, non-Christian or (gasp) an environmentalist his allies might have had a very different fate.

  •  While I agree Tsarnaev is entitled to his rights (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    4mygirls

    it is obvious that Republicans like Lindsay Graham do not really accept that he is just as American as Rudolph. He has a funny name (to them) and was not born here, so he is not a REAL American and therefore should not be treated like one.

    Republicans often seem to have problems accepting the Americanism of people who have foreign sounding names, accents, or non-White skin, and this is no exception.

    As much as it pains me to defend a terrorist, by defending Tsarnaev's constitutional rights, we are defending the rights of all Americans. The calls for him to be tortured and treated as an enemy combatant are appalling. He is an American who committed a crime on American soil, apparently not on behalf of any group, which makes this domestic terrorism despite his name.

    We Won't Let Republicans Replace Medicare with GOP Vouchercare!

    by CatM on Tue Apr 23, 2013 at 10:16:18 PM PDT

    •  Interesting. I read Graham as thinking that (0+ / 0-)

      treating Tsarnaev as if he has rights is just inconvenient - he's an "International terrorist" and we need to gather intelligence (i.e. who trained him in what camp in the remote hinterlands of Dagistan and sent him here) so we should be able to do any damn thing we want with him.  

      The elevation of appearance over substance, of celebrity over character, of short term gains over lasting achievement displays a poverty of ambition. It distracts you from what's truly important. - Barack Obama

      by helfenburg on Wed Apr 24, 2013 at 03:22:09 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I don't understand this story (0+ / 0-)

    I skimmed the first sentences of the paragraphs, but its relevance escapes me. I don't understand what the connection is. Yes, our rights are trampled on more and more, I get that.

    No rec and no tip for muddying the waters.

  •  Why do we keep ignoring Rudolph's racist roots? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    slatsg
    She introduced them to several churches that followed "Christian Identity," a rabidly anti-Semitic philosophy; in ninth grade, Eric wrote an essay denying that the Holocaust took place.
    Christian Identity isn't just anti-Semitic. It preaches white supremacy and that non-whites are subhuman "mud people." The most notorious Christian Identity "church" was the Church of Jesus Christ Christian Aryan Nations, formerly headquartered in Cour d'lene, Idaho.

    Are we supposed to believe that Rudolph imbibed Christian Identity's anti-Semitism but not the racism that underlies it?

    Nothing human is alien to me.

    by WB Reeves on Wed Apr 24, 2013 at 02:20:50 AM PDT

  •  Thank you for a very fine diary, Jon Perr (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    4mygirls

    Well said.

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Wed Apr 24, 2013 at 03:28:23 AM PDT

  •  To honor the murdered (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Jon Perr

    you should spell their names correctly. The Buffalo physician was Barnett Slepian, not "Bernard Slepien" whoever that may be.

    I appreciate the Rudolph comparison and this is a worthy post. But c'mon, 10 seconds of research (searching on the incorrect spelling "slepien" brings up the correct info) was all that was necessary.

  •  Let's use words with precision (0+ / 0-)

    Tsarnaev's "Miranda rights" were not withheld. Rather, he was subjected to custodial interrogation without first being told of his Fifth Amendment rights.

    The Miranda decision did not create rights. It recognized that an individual in custody, being questioned by the police, might say something incriminating without being aware that he did not have to respond to the questioning. The Miranda warnings are a device to ensure that an individual is aware of his constitutional right to remain silent and his right to an attorney before he decides whether to answer police questions.

    If he is questioned without first being informed of these rights (and if none of the exceptions to the Miranda rule is present), his statements may not be used against him in court. That is, the remedy of exclusion of un-Mirandized statements is the "right" at issue here. If Tsarnaev's statements to investigators are not determined to come within the public safety exception to Miranda and are not admitted against him in court, he will in fact be receiving exactly the same treatment as defendants with less "foregin" names.

    Police question suspects all the time without giving Miranda warnings and this does not violate the Constitution. A constitutional violation would occur only if such questioning occurred while the suspect was in custody and if his statements to police were admitted against him in court.

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