Skip to main content

From the beginning, the defining irony of the never-ending debate over Obamacare is this: health care is worst in those states where Republicans poll best. The map of the states with the worst health care systems largely mirrors GOP strongholds in the electoral college. Red state residents are generally the unhealthiest and more likely than their blue state cousins to be uninsured. Nevertheless, the New York Times reminded readers on Friday, Republican governors and legislators are rejecting the ACA's expansion of Medicaid that could bring health insurance to millions more of their residents.

As Robert Pear reported, "The refusal by about half the states to expand Medicaid will leave millions of poor people ineligible for government-subsidized health insurance under President Obama's health care law even as many others with higher incomes receive federal subsidies to buy insurance." The cruel ironies don't end there:

Starting next month, the administration and its allies will conduct a nationwide campaign encouraging Americans to take advantage of new high-quality affordable insurance options. But those options will be unavailable to some of the neediest people in states like Texas, Florida, Kansas, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi and Georgia, which are refusing to expand Medicaid.

More than half of all people without health insurance live in states that are not planning to expand Medicaid.

As you'll see below, the impact of that rejection is staggering.

The Urban Institute estimates that 5.7 million uninsured adults with incomes below the poverty level would gain coverage except that they live in states that are not expanding Medicaid. That includes almost 1 million Floridians and another 1.5 million in Texas, people who will be forced to go without health insurance despite the fact that Washington would pick up the bill for their states through 2017 and 90 percent of it after that. Despite leading a state with the 46th ranked health care system and 30 percent of those ages 18 to 64 uninsured, Governor Rick Perry declared the Lone Star State would have nothing to do with Obamacare's expansion of Medicaid. As Politico recounted the scene in April:

"Texas will not be held hostage to the Obama administration's attempt to force us into this fool's errand," he said, flanked by Republican Sens. John Cornyn and Ted Cruz and Reps. Joe Barton and Michael Burgess.
Of course, the real hostages are the millions of uninsured in states governed by Republicans. As Roy S. Mitchell, the executive director of the Mississippi Health Advocacy Program lamented, ""there's going to be a huge void" as many uninsured poor people find that they are not eligible for Medicaid or insurance subsidies. "There will be an outcry."

Especially when those lower-income red staters find out about the final, cruel irony of their Republican leaders' rejection of the Obamacare Medicaid expansion. In keeping with the persistent dynamic of red state socialism, blue state taxpayers would have helped pay for it.

(For more background, see "Health Care is Worst Where Republicans Poll Best.")

Originally posted to Jon Perr on Sat May 25, 2013 at 11:52 AM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  universal healthcare will be universal telephony (6+ / 0-)

    service since it will be the cities subsidizing rural service, a cruel but ultimately necessary irony not unlike rural electrification

    Especially when those lower-income red staters find out about the final, cruel irony of their Republican leaders' rejection of the Obamacare Medicaid expansion. In keeping with the persistent dynamic of red state socialism, blue state taxpayers would have helped pay for it.

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013

    by annieli on Sat May 25, 2013 at 12:10:59 PM PDT

  •  Medical business will suffer (8+ / 0-)

    People will still get sick and go to doctors and hospitals in those states.   They won't have coverage, but they will get care, and the medical industry will be left holding the bag for the costs.

    It is bad policy to block the expansion of medicaid, but I don't think it will stand for very long, especially when hospitals start to suffer, and the best doctors and nurses move to states where the have a better chance of getting paid.

    Religion gives men the strength to do what should not be done.

    by bobtmn on Sat May 25, 2013 at 12:22:51 PM PDT

    •  It has been happening for years. A Democratic (0+ / 0-)

      Governor, Phil Bredesen, threw over 300,000 of the sickest Tennesseans off the Medicaid rolls, and drastically cut benefits for almost 400,000 more Tennesseans, several years ago.

      Please see below:

      The Drive to Save Lives

      The Governor’s Plan for TennCare:  What’s Really Going to Happen?

      On February 18, 2005, Governor Phil Bredesen submitted a revised version of his TennCare plan to the federal government.

      The Governor’s new plans for TennCare will have a detrimental impact on the health care and health outcomes of 719,000 TennCare enrollees—that is more than half of the roughly 1.3 million people currently enrolled in the program.

      In fact, under the Governor’s proposal: 323,000 enrollees will be cut from the TennCare program altogether and will be at great risk for joining the ranks of the uninsured.

      396,000 enrollees
      , no matter how sick, will have drastically limited health care services and treatments.

      If you read on, you'll see how ridiculously pathetic the benefits of the TN version of Medicaid are.
      For instance:  Inpatient hospital days will be limited to 20 per year; outpatient hospital visits will be limited to 8 per year, etc.
      And, although medical services are still one of the most booming sectors in Nashville, TN, it did take a hit for some time, after all the cutbacks.

      Unfortunately, it didn't change anything.

      Mollie

      "Only he who can see the invisible, can do the impossible."-- Frank L. Gaines


      hiddennplainsight

      by musiccitymollie on Sun May 26, 2013 at 12:34:02 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Is it the worst thing, short term? (0+ / 0-)

        Let all those hillbillies who think they are voting for the party of "personal responsibility" realize what they have actually gone and voted for.

        •  Did you read my comment closely, Faito? (0+ / 0-)
          A Democratic Governor, Phil Bredesen, threw over 300,000 of the sickest Tennesseans off the Medicaid rolls, and drastically cut benefits for almost 400,000 more Tennesseans, several years ago.
          So "where did all those hillbillies go wrong?"

          From their experience and viewpoint (folks on the Medicaid program, that is), since Democratic Governor Phil Bredesen almost destroyed the Medicaid program in 2005.

          So, is it really fair to criticize them for not voting for a Democratic President in 2008 or 2012?

          Somehow, I don't necessarily think so.

          The way to win the vote of low income Americans is to foster programs that 'help' them.

          Unfortunately, the way that the ACA is written--remember, it was written by a member of the insurance industry and Senatorial staffer--Liz Fowler--it allowed for an 'opt-out,'  

          So now, the same poor folks that suffered under TN Democrat Governor Phil Bredesen, now will not be helped by the ACA.  Or, at least not those that make 100% of FPL or lower).

          The Democratic Party must get back to being the party of FDR and LBJ, if they want to put these voters back in their column.

          Mollie

          "Only he who can see the invisible, can do the impossible."-- Frank L. Gaines


          hiddennplainsight

          by musiccitymollie on Tue May 28, 2013 at 06:44:18 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  What is the Status of Medicaid "Clawback" (0+ / 0-)

      Of costs from estates of the deceased?  You never hear it mentioned....

      •  A Collateral Loan & Death Tax on your Estate? (0+ / 0-)

        "A Collateral Loan"

        Wikipedia:

        Medicaid Estate Recovery is the process initiated by U.S. state governments for recovering payments they made under the Medicaid program to program beneficiaries. The government recovers the sum of payments from the estate at the time of death of the program beneficiary.
        The recovery is authorized and required by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993.[1]
        I hope some of the health insurance jocks here can explain how this works.  It seems if you are old and poor, you get the shaft.
        •  Some States Farm Out the Recovery. (0+ / 0-)

          Estate Recovery

          The State of Michigan recently terminated the contract for Health Management Services (“HMS”).  HMS was the Texas company that was hired by the State to manage their estate recovery program.   The contract with HMS provided that they were paid on a contingency basis.

          With that relationship ended, the estate recovery program will now be managed internally, specifically through the Mass Torts and Probate Unit, a division of the Third Party Liability Division of the Medical Services Administration.

          Somehow this type of action does not support that Obama enthusiast smugness.
      •  CSM (0+ / 0-)

        Clawback!

        In the face of soaring Medicaid costs, Tennessee and every other state are required to set up a Medicaid estate-recovery program. Many have been launched only recently, and some – like Tennessee's – are becoming more aggressive. Often, they target the home because it's all that's left after beneficiaries have spent their assets to pay for nursing-home care.

        But the varied ways in which states are going after these assets have produced confusion, anger, and even lawsuits. When a loved one dies, some families are stunned to lose the home, too, advocates say.

        Yes it is true!
      •  Good question. Now that the Medicaid 'asset test' (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        splashoil

        has been eliminated, how will folks do to protect their assets, in the event that they have a period of unemployment.

        This apparently applies to only those folks over the age of 55.  

        But heck, how are folks that age supposed to build back their life's savings, if they should have a major expense (like 'open heart surgery,' or something) while they are unemployed and on Medicaid?

        This is very worrisome.

        Mollie

        "Only he who can see the invisible, can do the impossible."-- Frank L. Gaines


        hiddennplainsight

        by musiccitymollie on Tue May 28, 2013 at 02:01:23 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  You are correct. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          musiccitymollie

          Age and Income status automatically enroll you in Medicaid.  You have no choice or access to the "exchanges."  Your assets are then up for grabs.  This is a feature, not a bug.  Mention this in one of these enthusiast diaries and there is stone silence.

  •  Well, this is what you get (6+ / 0-)

    when you choose to pass a very complicated plan with a million moving parts that are easily sabotaged by bad faith Movement Conservatives because preserving the free-market insurance companies and hospitals ability to make money is just as important as people's health, and you assume the GOP will support their plan when Democrats they want to fail no matter what the costs to the country pass them.

    A mess.

    I don't understand how anyone can be shocked by the GOP or by the Right in 2013. Assume the worst. They will top it. The vast majority of the problems the ACA are facing are problems because some very, very smart people chose not to see the GOP that is rather than the GOP they wished was. At no point in time in the healthcare reform process was it a secret that this is exactly what the GOP was going to do. At the State level, at the federal level. The reasonable voices were not just in the conservative minority, they were a microscopic outlier.

    Where bad faith and maliciousness is free to gum up the works on a variety of fronts, bad faith players who thrive being malicious are going to gum up the works on a variety of fronts.

    I give Obama a lot of credit for being motivated purely by the best of intentions. He wanted millions to have access to affordable healthcare. He's a hero for that.

    President Obama and the Democratic Party passed a Movement Conservative healthcare plan, in good faith, and their reward was to be told that the Movement Conservative healthcare plan was "Socialism" and laden with "death panels".

    As much as I see Obama as a hero for his efforts, he lack of recognition of how much bad faith governs his opposition is frightening to me. I don't know how much worse the GOP can get. They have shown him, repeatedly, that his being elected, and re-elected, is an impeachable offense to the Right. They just need something to hang that on.

    What is scary is that it appears that the Obama years have not been bad enough to eradicate this magical wishful thinking about the GOP and Movement Conservatism eventually discovering the importance of good faith and good governance if you just clap and believe that bipartisan Tinkerbell will come back to life if you just believe.

    It is frustrating, extremely frustrating, to see that the connection is rarely made between the parts of the country that are the most ill-served by Movement Conservatism also being the places where a counter-argument to Movement Conservatism are the least likely to occur.

    Why don't people ever recognize that Movement Conservatism is a failed ideology?

    Because nobody is making that argument to them.

    We have been plagued by Low information voters for decades. There is no excuse for assuming, at every step of the way, insanely, that the masses will be more educated open-minded and easily made aware in the 21rst century. That is as insane as assuming the GOP will not be the GOP that we have, but the GOP that many in DC wish existed in going about their day to day lives as policy-makers.

    Things don't discredit themselves in American politics. Bad ideas and bad policies fail upward in America. You get rewarded for being wrong, not punished.  

    I am constantly surprised by people's surprise at the GOP's bad faith. It's not a secret. It's who they are. They are sociopaths and liars bought and paid for by corporate America and the merely rich to the very, very rich.

    We are going to end up with universal single-payer healthcare. When there is no other choice but that or bust. It's how America works in the age of not making a partisan, ideological counter argument to Movement Conservatism. Because eventually their will be no other choice but to adopt it when the current reform attempt is crippled until it becomes as untenable as the status-quo was.

    I am a Loco-Foco. I am from the Elizabeth Warren wing of the Democratic Party.

    by LeftHandedMan on Sat May 25, 2013 at 01:49:17 PM PDT

    •  This is my rec (16+ / 0-)

      Too late to hit the button, so this is my tip of the hat.  Yes, yes, yes!

    •  Excellent rant! (9+ / 0-)

      I do believe that even those of us who are continually surprised by the GOP are beginning to get the message...

      I am constantly surprised by people's surprise at the GOP's bad faith. It's not a secret. It's who they are. They are sociopaths and liars bought and paid for by corporate America and the merely rich to the very, very rich.
      The republicans are sociopaths and liars.

      When someone is impatient and says, "I haven't got all day," I always wonder, How can that be? How can you not have all day? George Carlin

      by msmacgyver on Mon May 27, 2013 at 06:16:14 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  "When you choose to pass..." (6+ / 0-)

      It wasn't exactly a choice. It seemed to be all they could get.

    •  I fear the financial numbers about to hit the USA (0+ / 0-)
      •  ZeroHedge is not a credible source. (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Pluto, Sherri in TX, Wee Mama, murrayewv

        #1-6 in this list are obvious propaganda.  They use raw numbers to present things in the most scary light.  OOOOHHHH!!  BIIIIIIIIGGGG  NUUUUMMMMMMBBBEERS!!!

        Debt/GDP is a much more reasonable calculation, but that wouldn't scare people.

        #7 is a big "So what?".  In 1946, the US was a much larger share of world economic production.  This tells you absolutely nothing in isolation.  Put it into a narrative.

        #11 is a testament to technology and roboticization.  It's not at all clear that this means anything at all.

        #13 is also meaningless without explicitly adjusting for Oil.  And for bonus points you get some hints of racism.

        #15 is another attempt to use BIIIIGGG NUMMBBBEERSS!! as propaganda.

        #16 you finally get to a straightforward statement that might be an actual issue.

        Ye gods why do people repost this absolute crap?!

        -7.75 -4.67

        "Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose."

        There are no Christians in foxholes.

        by Odysseus on Mon May 27, 2013 at 07:12:55 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Wrong (0+ / 0-)

          #6 - It's 56 Trillion and we only have 320 million people in the country.  That's $175,000 fopr every person in the U.S.  We've never had numbers like that.

          #7 - It tells everything. The trend is in the WRONG direction, because the global economy is eating us alive.

          #11 - Oh that's comforting! What's the plan for remedying that other than mass unemployment?

          #13 - And yet the dollars are flowing towards Mexico and away from us. That makes us a net debtor. If you think that's a good thing, try again. And stop with the race card crap.

          #15 - Yes, another bad number because it's so lopsided.

          These are terrible numbers and they're nothing to sneer at, pal.

    •  Libertarian? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      eps62

      "Free market policies" that promote a cartel? LOL

      Ignorance is the problem. not lack of good moral principles. Good people can be LIED TO and mislead, and that seems to be the modus operandi of the billionaire-financed  "Tea Party"

    •  Reality Bites (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Timmethy, eglantine, Khun David, murrayewv

      What was the alternative?

      I hope that you don't seriously believed that Obama and the Democrats could have passed Medicare for All. Any reform would have had to accounted for what Paul Starr calls the American health policy trap:

      "A costly and complicated system that has left a growing minority of Americans without financial protection in sickness but has nonetheless satisfied enough people to make it difficult to change. The key elements of the trap are a system of employer-provided insurance that conceals its true costs from those who benefit from it; targeted government programs that protect groups such as the elderly and veterans, who are well-organized and enjoy wide public sympathy and believe that, unlike other claimants, they have earned their benefits; and a financing system that has expanded and enriched the health care industry, creating powerful interests adverse to change."

      Sometimes it seems that Barack Obama big sin -- at least to progressives -- was that he recognized reality and chose to deal with it instead of taking a quixotic approach with little chance of success.

      "There is no room for injustice anywhere in the American mansion." Lyndon Johnson

      by pkgoode on Mon May 27, 2013 at 07:38:32 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I think Democracy is broken... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tb mare

      Years after Dodd-Frank was passed, it is emphatically being undermined by lobbyists for Wall Street that outnumber lobbyists for Main Street by a huge ratio. And they have inside help from Republicans.NPR Fresh Air interviewed journalist Gary Rivlin on how a law passed with votes from both sides can still be completely defanged.

      Atul Gawande has written on how at the turn of the 20th century agricultural practices changed when after two years of stiff opposition Congress finally passed the Smith-Lever Act, establishing USDA Cooperative Extension Service to help small farmers. When changing such large national enterprises such as agriculture and healthcare, one needs to play the long game.

      HOWEVER, I think that era has passed, when reason dominated the thinking of both major political parties. The reelection of Hiker-extraordinaire Sanford shows that. Democracy in USA is completely broken, and until this party is annihilated politically, there is no relief in sight.

      Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd. Voltaire

      by Suvro on Mon May 27, 2013 at 07:52:28 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I don't see why the federal government, Congress, (0+ / 0-)

      cannot pass a law that establishes a program that states cannot refuse on behalf of their citizens.

      The elevation of appearance over substance, of celebrity over character, of short term gains over lasting achievement displays a poverty of ambition. It distracts you from what's truly important. - Barack Obama

      by helfenburg on Tue May 28, 2013 at 03:32:18 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  We need a longer amount of time (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tb mare, Matt Z

      to hit that Rec button!

      Consider this my virtual Rec. Well said, sir, well said.

      Meddle not in the affairs of dragons... for thou art crunchy and good with ketchup.

      by Pariah Dog on Tue May 28, 2013 at 05:12:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Perry: "Texas will not be held Hostage" - lol .. (8+ / 0-)

    ..so as a side note about takers and makers because that's one of the the central tenets of the RWNJ fearmongering about the "un-American "dangers of socialism"

    The republicans complain about the 47% “takers” that pay no tax lie they are in states that are predominately republicans in southern states

    Yes, remember that 47% the RWNJ got all exercized about paying no taxes (a lie)  Those "urban" others, Cadillac queens and now immigrants who are a 6.3 trillion dollar threat to our very nations survival? Heritage’s Jim Demint (another lie)

    Where Are the 47% of Americans Who Pay No Income Taxes?

    The Atlantic - DAVID A. GRAHAM - SEP 17 2012, 7:17 PM ET

    the 47 percent figure represents all of those who pay no income tax, rather than the Democratic base. His  [Romney, Ryan et al.] problem is that those people are disproportionately in red states  http://taxfoundation.org/... -- that is, states that tend to vote Republican:
    Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

    And another graphic by MSNBC:

    Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

    Thx Jon Perr

    http://www.theatlantic.com/...

    •  Since the 47% is heavily made up of the (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      thomask, musiccitymollie

      young, the old, and the working poor that would make sense.

      “The future depends entirely on what each of us does every day.” Gloria Steinem

      by ahumbleopinion on Sat May 25, 2013 at 03:49:19 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Exactly! ;-) N/T (0+ / 0-)

        Mollie

        "Only he who can see the invisible, can do the impossible."-- Frank L. Gaines


        hiddennplainsight

        by musiccitymollie on Sun May 26, 2013 at 12:35:58 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  This isn't just the young, old and working poor... (0+ / 0-)

        "Indeed, tax credits such as the child tax credit and earned income tax credit have become so generous that a family of four earning up to about $52,000 can expect to have their income tax liability erased entirely."

        We need to get rid of a lot of those credits and make the whole thing flatter unless I can get a credit for wearing blue jeans on Thursday during full moons and while being an avid drinker of Diet Coke with lime.

        The tax code resembles swiss cheese with all the holes it has and it's too damn complex with credits, subsidies and penalties for every group under the sun. It isn't working well and Turbotax and the rich make out like a bandit because of the complexity.

        A yearly tax return should fit on a postcard and should take less than an hour to figure out.

        •  Why is "simplifying" the tax code a good thing? (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          musiccitymollie

          Simple does not equal fair.

          "Mit der Dummheit kämpfen Götter selbst vergebens," -Friedrich Schiller "Against Stupidity, the Gods themselves contend in Vain"

          by pengiep on Mon May 27, 2013 at 06:45:36 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Well it isn't fair now... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            eps62

            It's like a bowl of spaghetti and no one can keep track of all the rules and regs.

            That's what causes offshoring. People say the hell with it and move assets offshore. Or they go to a cash only black market and stop paying altogether.

            There's a limit to the amount of complexity you can introduce before things break down. Our tax code is there.

            •  taxes (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              tb mare, musiccitymollie

              Ever use TurboTax?  It ain't that hard.  I earn a modest middle class salary with a rental condominium, but do my own taxes in a few hours.  I feel no need to offshore my income.  Most Americans use a short form or some version of TurboTax for small businesses and rentals.  You are a new user here and seem to have arrived with an agenda that doesn't relate to to middle class reality.

              You shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you mad. Aldous Huxley

              by murrayewv on Tue May 28, 2013 at 05:07:33 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  I think I will go rob a bank (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      OregonWetDog

      and threaten to provide healthcare to anybody who f$*#s with me.

      Snnce healthcare is SOOOOO threatening...

    •  What about those that don't file at all? (0+ / 0-)

      Does this take that segment of the population into account?

      •  Folks who don't file at all? Very low income (0+ / 0-)

        folks don't have to, below a certain income level.

        The Moment Of Truth calls for a flatter tax--it is a giveaway to the wealthy.

        Please read it.  Section II, Tax Reform, Pages 28-35.

        Don't take my word for it.  Here's what Illinois US Rep Jan Schakowsky says about it:

        The Sham Of Simpson-Bowles

        . . . In one of its few specific points, for example, Simpson-Bowles mandates a top individual tax rate of 29 percent “or less.”

        Much like the vague Romney proposals, the Simpson-Bowles plan would make up the shortfall by eliminating tax loopholes, suggesting options such as having employees pay taxes on their health benefits.

        Not only is this likely to increase costs to middle-income families, it could threaten coverage altogether.

        The proposal for corporate tax reform would eliminate taxes on profits earned overseas, rewarding companies that move jobs offshore. . . .

        Mollie

        "Only he who can see the invisible, can do the impossible."-- Frank L. Gaines


        hiddennplainsight

        by musiccitymollie on Tue May 28, 2013 at 02:16:57 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Stupidity? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      eps62

      Maybe we need to focus on funding public education more aggressively in those states?

  •  Red States = You can't cure stupid (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BadKitties, kurt

    GOP officials let their states go without health coverage?
    Who keeps electing these selfish ideological a**holes?

    •  Indoctrinated, ill-informed ideologues. n/t (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Eric Nelson

      "...Males are biologically driven to go out and hunt giraffes.” —Newt Gingrich in 1995

      by BadKitties on Sat May 25, 2013 at 07:02:21 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  In Florida, it's a combination ... (7+ / 0-)

        ... Bible-thumping ideologues and unreconstructed racists are part of it, but the Republicans have also been very successful at gerrymandering here, to the point where over 90% of incumbents (including the few Democrats) routinely win re-election.

        In my part of the state (Ocala/Marion County), I haven't been able to vote for a Democrat with a snowball's chance in hell of winning, either in the state legislature or for U.S. Congress, in years.

        The practical upshot of that is that our legislators don't have to answer to the people, except the rabid base they've packed their districts with.

        I vote we run Rick Scott out of Florida on a high-speed rail.

        by ObamOcala on Mon May 27, 2013 at 05:53:35 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  In a nutshell... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          eps62
          The practical upshot of that is that our legislators don't have to answer to the people, except the rabid base they've packed their districts with.

          When someone is impatient and says, "I haven't got all day," I always wonder, How can that be? How can you not have all day? George Carlin

          by msmacgyver on Mon May 27, 2013 at 06:18:33 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  On the bright side, several red states (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    musiccitymollie

    have signed up.  Tenn., W.Va., and Ark., are in the blue.  The neighboring states will become aware of a difference in access.  
    People's minds have to be changed; we already knew that.  

    It gets on my nerves, and you know how I am about my nerves...

    by ciganka on Sat May 25, 2013 at 11:58:54 PM PDT

    •  That's 'news' to Tennesseans, LOL! Has something (0+ / 0-)

      changed?  [I guess it's possible.]

      However, there's no mention of this on the State of TN website, and there's this headline from USA Today:

      Tenn. gov won't expand Medicaid to cover uninsured

      Chas Sisk and Tom Wilemon, The Tennessean
      11:48 a.m. EDT March 27, 2013

      Tennessee's governor is one of the last GOP governors to make a decision on Medicaid expansion.

      NASHVILLE — Tennessee will not expand its Medicaid program under the Affordable Care Act, but instead will pursue a state-based plan, the state's governor said Wednesday.

      Gov. Bill Haslam said he wants to leverage federal dollars to purchase private health insurance for Tennesseans without coverage who can't afford it.

      But the federal Department of Health and Human Services has not signed off on his idea. . . .

      Mollie

      "Only he who can see the invisible, can do the impossible."-- Frank L. Gaines


      hiddennplainsight

      by musiccitymollie on Sun May 26, 2013 at 12:46:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Just going by the graph in the article? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Jon Perr

        It says "leaning yes", but sounds like this is not the true state of affairs...

        It gets on my nerves, and you know how I am about my nerves...

        by ciganka on Sun May 26, 2013 at 02:17:50 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Map is a Little Dated from Late April... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          musiccitymollie, ciganka

          ...and also doesn't include footnotes that Tennessee like Arkansas was looking for a waiver to try privatized Medicaid.

          •  Thanks for the clarification. n/t (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            musiccitymollie

            It gets on my nerves, and you know how I am about my nerves...

            by ciganka on Sun May 26, 2013 at 11:17:11 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  No, problem. That's why I added, 'it's possible (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ciganka

            that something's changed.'  It often does, LOL!

            But considering the generally very 'hateful' attitude toward 'the poor' in the State of TN, I'm honestly not surprised that unless Gov Haslam could further privatize Medicaid, he would decline to participate.

            What to do about this?  I wish I had the answer.  ;-)

            Now, regarding:

            ""there's going to be a huge void" as many uninsured poor people find that they are not eligible for Medicaid or insurance subsidies.
            While I agree, I would also assign some blame to the folks who 'penned the law.'

            It can, and should be changed, if it was indeed a unintended consequence.

            When the Administration wanted to eliminate some of the beneficiaries (mostly SSDI) from qualifying for Medicaid or Health Exchange subsidies under the PPACA (in 2011), they got the amended law through Congress to accomplish that.  

            They did this by changing the 'definition of MAGI,' which determines eligibility for Medicaid and the Health Exchanges.  And, the vote was 'unanimous' in the House and Senate.

            Which shows that 'if there's a will, there's a way.'

            Here's an excerpt and link to the article below.  This change went mostly 'under the radar,' with the exception of many health care advocates, etc.

            Senate Passes Repeal of 3% Withholding Opposed by Businesses

            Health-Care Offset

            That method would change the 2010 health-care law to include the nontaxable portion of Social Security benefits in the definition of income used to calculate eligibility for government health-care programs. It would move some people from Medicaid into subsidized coverage in new health-insurance exchanges and would push others out of subsidized coverage.

            This was in the same bill that also provided companies with tax credits ranging from $5,600 to $9,600 for hiring unemployed veterans.  (Undoubtedly, a 'good thing.)

            It passed the House by a 422-0 vote; the Senate by 95-0, 1 Present.

            It even had some Democratic co-sponsors.  Here's the list.

            Bottom line: We need to continue to 'lobby' our lawmakers for needed changes.  This can be accomplished, if there is enough 'public pressure' to do so.

            Thank you for your diary.

            Mollie

            "Only he who can see the invisible, can do the impossible."-- Frank L. Gaines


            hiddennplainsight

            by musiccitymollie on Sun May 26, 2013 at 11:37:53 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I am from Oklahoma, so I am always hoping (4+ / 0-)

              for there to be light at the end of some tunnel.  Sounds like you Tennesseans have just as tough row to hoe as we Okies do - sorry to hear.  I was so excited and hopeful at first...

              It's the contempt for the poor that galls me.  Did everyone in these states forget the past and the kind of poverty that so many of our families came out of?  

              It gets on my nerves, and you know how I am about my nerves...

              by ciganka on Mon May 27, 2013 at 03:01:44 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Jesus (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                eps62

                "What you do to the least among us, you do to me."

                Christians believe Jesus was the Son of God, but most fail to connect that to the belief that we are ALL the Sons and Daughters of God.

                The consequence of doing evil to the Sons and Daughters of God is well-documented by history. Judgement Day is every day.

              •  They don't care about the poor, but they do care (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                ciganka

                that someone might get a benefit from a government
                program because that would defeat their opposition to government generally, their "small government" mantra.  If the government is allowed to do something good for people, then people might not hate government.  Can't have that.

                The elevation of appearance over substance, of celebrity over character, of short term gains over lasting achievement displays a poverty of ambition. It distracts you from what's truly important. - Barack Obama

                by helfenburg on Tue May 28, 2013 at 03:41:45 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

            •  Christians (0+ / 0-)

              They have some of those in TN? Ones who read the Bible?

              •  Certainly. They read the Bible that says (0+ / 0-)

                no gays and no abortion.  You know, that one.

                The elevation of appearance over substance, of celebrity over character, of short term gains over lasting achievement displays a poverty of ambition. It distracts you from what's truly important. - Barack Obama

                by helfenburg on Tue May 28, 2013 at 03:42:41 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

          •  Iowa will accept expanded Medicaid funding (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            operculum, greengemini

            in a privatized system. A compromise plan passed the legislature last Thursday. It is likely to be signed by the governor. A waiver from the feds will be needed, but that seems likely.

            A week ago, the governor and the Republican-controlled House were still saying no to any expansion of Medicaid, so it's not surprising that the map has it listed as "will not expand."

      •  State-based (0+ / 0-)

        Means they will try to implement a plan that defeats the libertarian, market-based plan in FEDERAL LAW. Really? Are there Christians in Tennessee?

      •  Ohio (0+ / 0-)

        I could have sworn I read that Kasich had given his official okey-dokey for Medicaid expansion in Ohio. So why is it shown as "leaning no?"

        Perhaps this explains why no one answers or calls back when I try to find out what I'm supposed to do.

        I'm 62 and have seen America through some pretty fucked up times, but honest to god these past twelve years have been like a very bad joke that can't stop telling itself.

        Meddle not in the affairs of dragons... for thou art crunchy and good with ketchup.

        by Pariah Dog on Tue May 28, 2013 at 05:25:52 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Is there a time limit to the Medicaid expansion? (0+ / 0-)

      I can see a few joining up after their legislatures change.

    •  WV will expand Medicare.... (0+ / 0-)

      the increasingly Republican state legislature isn't too happy, but this is the difference in my schizophrenic state.  We ARE poor here, with lots of folks in bad health.  I think it will be an interesting data point vs. the Republican south.

      You shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you mad. Aldous Huxley

      by murrayewv on Tue May 28, 2013 at 05:11:24 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  This is what they voted for. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Apost8, mconvente, eps62

    "It strikes me as gruesome and comical that in our culture we have an expectation that a man can always solve his problems" - Kurt Vonnegut

    by jazzence on Mon May 27, 2013 at 05:38:02 PM PDT

  •  Alabama currently suffers (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    prndl, eps62

    From a lack of an adequate number of healthcare providers because it is hard to make it as one in the state.  We were ground zero for the pertussis outbreak, we were the petri dish brewing it.  Last week we scared the hell out of the CDC by having a mysterious illness seem to show up and a number of deaths were involved.  I think they were worried about it being MERS but looks like it was cold and flu virus related.  My daughter got a call from the CDC to find out if her children had received flu shots and they wanted to know if lack of affordable care ever prevented her from having her children vaccinated.

    Because of the climate here (it is an outdoor petri dish) and the fact that we are always one of the first hot spots for viral everything, it just seems like Alabama plays with fire every day and laughs about it.  And I feel like we put the rest of the nation at risk for future specific healthcare crisis.

    •  Why we call it "public health" (9+ / 0-)

      The people who want to keep other people from getting health care -- or at least want not to pay for anyone else's health care -- forget that we all live in the same petri dish. If my neighbor gets sick, that is my business (aside from caring about each other) because it makes it more likely that I get sick too. That's why I've never understood the insistence on NOT covering health care in any way for undocumented people -- don't you understand that they are picking your vegetables, or making the sandwiches at your local fast food joint, or changing the sheets in your grandmother's nursing home? And their children sit next to your child in second grade?

    •  Hope for Alabama? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Militarytracy

      Last I heard, Alabama suffers from a near monopoly on Healthcare insurance by one provider (BCBS?).
      The ONLY way I see out of this dilemma is IF self-insured pools in Alabama offer generous benefits at a low premium to out-of-state people.
      The state government can't stop such pools from offering plans to people out-of-state, even if the state refuses to set up healthcare exchanges.
      So, union members in Alabama: Time to step up for the whole state and offer to expand your pool to people outside the state. That way, money flows into the state and smaller insurance companies can begin to take on more people in Alabama who are higher risk. That puts the cartel into competition, and forces it to offer better plans. If they match the plans locally, they can't avoid offering the same plans nationally, and more money flows into the state.
      Know what I'm sayin?

      •  There are a few small blogs (0+ / 0-)

        Out of Montgomery that claim that some Republicans are saying they cannot turn their back on Obamacare.  One good source claims that some of the most powerful in the state house and senate...Republicans...are quietly beginning to put their foot down and raising the brows because they don't really think they can turn Obamacare away, not in reality at least.

        I still have some hope

        But then there is crazy fucking Bentley

        We shall see

    •  FYI (0+ / 0-)

      Pertussis outbreaks happened in several different parts of the country this year.  Herd immunity breaks down when people choose not to vaccinate their kids.

      Sigline? What Sigline?

      by Khun David on Tue May 28, 2013 at 01:41:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I got it living here the spring of (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Khun David

        2010.  I was very ill because I am also asthmatic when living here due to mold.  My husband was in Afghanistan too.  There were several other cases or I think my doctor would have been completely mystified about what was wrong with me.  I was very ill for months too with a disabled child to care for and a husband in Afghanistan.

        In Enterprise AL we only have three pediatricians serving the entire community.  One of those pediatricians only arrived a few months ago too.  Before that we had only two.  My daughter and her husband are among the thousands and thousands of uninsured.  She had to take one of my grandchildren to the doctor last week and that required $100 upfront, and another $100 upfront before any lab work would be done.  She was told this on the phone, literally don't show up without the cash.

        People here are so poor and Medicaid so stingy and providers so few, this place is ripe for disease and mayhem.

  •  I live in Tennessee. I'm a stoke survivor. (9+ / 0-)

    My Cobra ends in four days. Effective June 1st, I go on the Romney plan, the emergency room.

    I'll be "self insuring" for a few months. I'm willing to risk it, but I assumed I would be able to get insurance in 2014. Surely they'll be something for Tennessee residents?

    Man, this GOP plan REALLY DOES get between you and your doctors.

    What is so unnerving about the candidacy of Sarah Palin is the degree to which she represents—and her supporters celebrate—the joyful marriage of confidence and ignorance. SAM HARRIS

    by Cpqemp on Mon May 27, 2013 at 05:46:05 PM PDT

    •  No to Medicaid (or maybe), yes to exchanges (6+ / 0-)

      Unlike Medicaid, the law says if a state refuses to set up an exchange for paying customers, the Feds will set it up and run it for them. So if you are not-quite-so-poor, you will have access to an exchange to buy insurance.

      I'm self-insured right now too and looking forward to having more options in 2014 -- but very nervous about what the actual cost will turn out to be. I know it's supposed to be capped at 8% or 12% of your income or something, but that's a lot of money.

    •  If you are 'eligible' for basic Medicaid, you will (0+ / 0-)

      NOT be eligible to shop in a Federal Exchange set up in Tennnessee.

      From the briefs that I've read, folks with annual incomes of 100-133/138% of FPL may be. There seems to be some argument there, between legal experts.

      Remember, according to the new law (ACA), folks with no income, who are below the age of 65, and therefore not enrolled in Medicare, must go into Medicaid.

      The 'asset-test' has been eliminated to make this a 'mandatory' program, for that category of people.

      There many 'middle-class' folks will likely find themselves in this program, if they are unemployed for over 30-days (starting in 2014, that is) and meet the 'income test' for Medicaid.

      IOW, say you have no wage income, but you have 'investment' income that exceeds the Medicaid 'income test.'

      I'm pretty sure that you would then be eligible to shop in a state or federal health exchange.

      But the law is very specific--everyone who meets the Medicaid income test, and who is not enrolled in Medicare (IOW--they are age 64 and under), will first be screened for Medicare and CHIPS.

      That is the baseline, for the ACA.

      Mollie

      "Only he who can see the invisible, can do the impossible."-- Frank L. Gaines


      hiddennplainsight

      by musiccitymollie on Tue May 28, 2013 at 02:34:19 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I live in such a bakkard state... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sherri in TX

    I am trying to get a medicaid provider number so I can see these people and my state wants them to skid.

    Kill medicaid and you also kill jobs.

    Such a brilliant synergy there.

  •  We'll Need To Crunch Annual Red State Death Data (4+ / 0-)

    ...to see how this kills people.

    The CDC publishes National Death Index, and it lags by about year. 2011 is now available.

    There’s always free cheddar in a mousetrap, baby

    by bernardpliers on Mon May 27, 2013 at 05:57:26 PM PDT

    •  The repubs will be able to get rid of that index. (0+ / 0-)

      Sequester it!  Then we won't know the effect that this has on deaths in red states.  See how easy it is?

      The elevation of appearance over substance, of celebrity over character, of short term gains over lasting achievement displays a poverty of ambition. It distracts you from what's truly important. - Barack Obama

      by helfenburg on Tue May 28, 2013 at 03:45:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Same changes to the map (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Karl Rover, mconvente, Odysseus, eps62

    The Democratic governor of KY announced he would support expansion, and expansion has passed the IA legislature, supported by the GOP governor.

    NH has gone the other way though. The Dem governor supports expansion as does the Dem controlled House, but the GOP Senate does not.

    Not sure what the deal is with NY. I've seen it as "leaning yes" on many more recent maps, but then I've seen quotes from Cuomo aides in charge of healthcare that say they definitely will expand. Not sure if expansion has actually passed the legislature yet.

    I think you will see a few more states come on board this year + next year(OH, AZ, ID), but unfortunately not more than that. Hope I'm wrong.

  •  They need ro run the ads in every state (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    3goldens, eps62, Sherri in TX, greengemini

    including those like my state, Texas.  The commercials should explain what they will get by applying.  Then Texas' representatives can explain why their constituents are not getting them.

    "But the problem with any ideology is that it gives the answer before you look at the evidence." - President Clinton

    by anonevent on Mon May 27, 2013 at 06:06:59 PM PDT

    •  That may be the best way to make the (0+ / 0-)

      republicans squirm and blink.

      I want to see cruz and Cornyn on my evening news explaining why a million and half people in this state are going to be denied health insurance.

      I am hoping to see some districts change hands in 2014 by running on Obamacare and the republican"s obstruction.

      Today's problems are yesterday's solutions. Don Beck

      by Sherri in TX on Mon May 27, 2013 at 08:11:05 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  make sure people know (6+ / 0-)

    there must be a massive educational campaign which informs people that "others just like you in state X are getting quality health care they can afford while you are not because your Republican Sen./Rep./Gov. X decided you were not worth it. So instead of taxes in our state helping you have affordable care, those dollars are helping people who need care in the next state. How long you going to let X sell you down the river?"

  •  Health care insurance exchanges (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    3goldens, VeloDramatic, greengemini

    This innovation is the most revolutionary part of Obamacare.
    Basically, it throws asunder the state barriers to healthcare insurance purchases, and allows people to purchase insurance in any state.
    No longer are people (who live in states that have exchanges) restricted to buying a policy in their state. They can buy insurance policies anywhere in the country that offer the best deal.
    The state governors who have refused to set up exchanges in their state are attempting to defeat the creation of a national insurance market, a libertarian idea that will lead to the lowest cost and highest benefits insurance for a larger and larger population nationally, eventually creating universal national benefits through market forces.
    The biggest losers in that transformation are the four (FOUR?!!) largest insurance companies, who WILL lose market share to smaller, (now) regional insurance pools.
    It won't take long for smaller insurance pools (which includes labor unions and other self-insured entities) to realize their potential for growth and profits from out-of-state premium payers. Once that happens, there isn't a governor in the country that will be able to stop the movement toward universal benefits.
    They can refuse to set up exchanges, but they can't stop participation in exchanges by insurance pools in their own state, and they can't enforce regulations against the pools.
    The irony is that Republican Party politicians claim to be "libertarians" when they are using big government tactics to try to stifle the market-based reforms of the insurance market, and they are carrying water for corporate fascists who want to maintain a cartel.
    Eventually, the policies of the Republican Party politicians will be to deny, to their own constituents, the same benefits enjoyed by the majority of Americans. That can only be supported by the most irrational persons in the country, since they would be refusing to take advantage of the benefits enjoyed by everyone else for the sake of some idiot carrying water for billionaires. Perhaps if such persons do not see the foolishness of such loyalty, their children WILL.

    •  This is news to me. (3+ / 0-)
      No longer are people (who live in states that have exchanges) restricted to buying a policy in their state. They can buy insurance policies anywhere in the country that offer the best deal.
      How many here knew that Obamacare is about selling health insurance across state lines?



      Denial is a drug.

      by Pluto on Mon May 27, 2013 at 07:43:04 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I don't think you can buy insurance across (0+ / 0-)

      state lines. That is something republicans have suggested, but it wasn't included. Primarily because each state has different laws regarding what has to be in policies. By reducing policies to the lowest denominator, many states would see their policy requirements reduced.  

      There is a minimum that has to be in the policies, but many states have additional requirements added in.

      I agree competition should increase in many states as smaller companies will be able to compete against the monster carriers by being listed equally on the exchanges. That has lead to lower prices in California and Oregon.

      I do think that knowing you are paying taxes for medicaid and they are going to other states, but not your own, should make some people mad. If you are a person who would qualify, and democrats can educate that person on what they are missing out on, Texas may get a whole lot bluer the next go round.

      Today's problems are yesterday's solutions. Don Beck

      by Sherri in TX on Mon May 27, 2013 at 08:25:55 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Tells me that endemic poverty and illness (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RBinDLH, 3goldens, mconvente, eps62

    are just peachy keen, as long its 'those folks'.

  •  They have to start feeling stupid pretty soon (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RBinDLH, mconvente, eps62, greengemini

    I mean, those people living in those states who are still unable to get health insurance can't sit there forever while the other states do offer it.  

    Streichholzschächtelchen

    by otto on Mon May 27, 2013 at 06:19:28 PM PDT

  •  I wonder.. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RBinDLH, Odysseus, eps62, Leo Flinnwood

    if people will vote with their feet, and leave the stupid states. Especially if jobs develop more in states with a healthy work-force.

    This Rover crossed over.. Willie Nelson, written by Dorothy Fields

    by Karl Rover on Mon May 27, 2013 at 06:20:36 PM PDT

    •  Some wingers certainly think so (5+ / 0-)

      Got an earful again and again at a wedding this weekend about how the poor are going to move to the welfare states to get the free medical care Their Boy promised them to buy their votes.  

      The red states' economies will boom once relieved of that lazy, criminal element, though, so the joke's on Barry.  These were Foxaphiles from Indiana and Iowa at a Pennsylvania wedding, where the locals voiced no opposing views.  

      "Injustice wears ever the same harsh face wherever it shows itself." - Ralph Ellison

      by KateCrashes on Mon May 27, 2013 at 06:55:54 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The problem being (5+ / 0-)

      if one has an income around the poverty line, the costs of moving/relocating are relatively astronomical, if not impossible. Believe me, I would move if I could.

      The cruel thing in my case is my 2012 income fell below poverty only because a client was nearly two months late in paying me, so that income was realized in early 2013. I will be above the poverty line in 2013, as I was in 2011. But they are using 2012 income (from tax returns) to calculate the subsidies for 2014. I wonder how many people are in a similar situation to mine. I bet at least a million. Incomes fluctuate from year to year.

      curious portal - to a world of paintings, lyric-poems, art writing, and graphic and web design

      by asterkitty on Mon May 27, 2013 at 06:57:12 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  We sold most everything to move (3+ / 0-)

        It was a lot of stuff, and didn't really get what it was worth, but it gave us enough to start over. With a huge help from relatives in our new location.

        In a way, it was a very similar situation. A major part of our bankruptcy and foreclosure was due to medical costs from the Lovely Wife's work accident and her chronic hereditary condition. We're now in a country where she has (mostly) free medical care, a better climate, and access to relatives in the medical field.

        It was really hard to just leave.. but if you're staring homelessness in the face due to medical costs, you'll up and move to a better place anyway possible.

        This Rover crossed over.. Willie Nelson, written by Dorothy Fields

        by Karl Rover on Mon May 27, 2013 at 07:13:06 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  This is all ... (5+ / 0-)

    ..somewhat misleading.

    Meaning once Obamacare is no longer the object of right wing manufactured outrage & idiotic conspiracy theories, people in the red states will begin lining up for Obamacare in droves.

    I predict in 5 years (if not sooner)  in states like Mississippi, Louisiana  & Alabama there will be a mad rush in those states to sign up for Obamacare.

    (Where the hell else are these poor people going to go to receive better health care deals?  Petition Rush Limbaugh for charity donations?).

    That's when you'll see the hypocritical asshole Republicans governors of the aforementioned states begin to take credit for Obamcare, just like they now take credit for the Recovery Act (stimulus)  & the Civil Rights movement.

    To any Republican reading this, I request you write a diary about why Republicans are such assholes. I promise to tip & recommend such a diary.

    by wyvern on Mon May 27, 2013 at 06:24:17 PM PDT

  •  So the take home is (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    eps62

    that republicans are bad for your health. DUH!

  •  You know, fuck em (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    eps62

    If they are too stupid to vote in their best interest, fuck them. They deserve what they get.

    Hillary Clinton 2016

    by artr2 on Mon May 27, 2013 at 06:49:04 PM PDT

  •  Maybe we'll have another (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    eps62

    The world is not interested in the storms you encountered, but did you bring in the ship.

    by Hanging Up My Tusks on Mon May 27, 2013 at 07:19:44 PM PDT

  •  Somehow poor US citizens in red states need to (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    eps62

    immigrate to states (blue and purple) where they can receive their full citizenship rights. Many red states are simply an economic drain on our union.

  •  The Red Staters made their bed. Now let them (0+ / 0-)

    sleep in it.  They need to learn the hard way.

  •  Not irony. They don't care about healthcare. (0+ / 0-)
    The defining irony of the never-ending debate over Obamacare is this: health care is worst in those states where Republicans poll best.

    "Mr. President, I'm not saying we wouldn't get our hair mussed. But I do say no more than ten to twenty million killed, tops." General Buck Turgidson

    by muledriver on Mon May 27, 2013 at 08:20:32 PM PDT

  •  To paraphrase Atrios- (0+ / 0-)

    good public policy is simple. Medicare for all would have solved our healthcare problem. Instead we got a complicated million page bill with carve outs for the rich and powerful corporations that rule us and a medical caste system. But maybe it's not such a bad thing that Obamacare only has to open in 21 states. That gives the ACA more time and money to really make it work so well in my state (CA) and other blue states that red staters will be demanding to know why their rulers refused to implement Obamacare.

    48forEastAfrica - Donate to Oxfam> "It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness." Edna St.V. Millay

    by slouching on Mon May 27, 2013 at 08:56:36 PM PDT

  •  Idiots get the government they deserve (0+ / 0-)

    I continually question Lincoln's decision to keep the north/south united.

  •  So why was the rejection option included in the (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nance

    law?  How did that happen?

    The elevation of appearance over substance, of celebrity over character, of short term gains over lasting achievement displays a poverty of ambition. It distracts you from what's truly important. - Barack Obama

    by helfenburg on Tue May 28, 2013 at 03:29:21 AM PDT

  •  We Are Always Amazed At People Who Vote Against (0+ / 0-)

    their own interests. The rubber will hit the road in these red states when those anti-gummint voters realize what they are losing out on. This is an opportunity to break some away from the anti-gummint zealotry.

  •  Required Insurance Without Subsidy (0+ / 0-)

    Are people in the states that have refused to expand Medicaid still required to have health insurance?

    Will they be subject to the financial penalties associated with lack of insurance coverage?

    I haven't been able to figure this out yet from the articles I have read.

  •  The usual suspects of forced & unprotected labor (0+ / 0-)

    Several of these states grew on the back of slaves, and oh do they miss those "good ole days...", thus they're trying to relive those days in a form or another.

    What's "forced and unprotected" labor if not being contemporary legal slavery?

    Oh, we keep hearing "they have the choice to quit if they dont like it" which they equivalent of putting gun to someone's head, yell "your wallet or your life", and then argue that you gave that person the opportunity "to choose"...

  •  Not new (0+ / 0-)

    This isn't some new response to "nothing connected to Obama."

    Note that "Romneycare" was passed in blue Massachsetts." (And Hawaii has something similar.)

    the conservative states need the Medicaid expansion most because they have government coverage of medical needs least.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site