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A bee killing pesticide is banned in Oregon (albeit temporarily)! And sadly, a memorial service for the bee deaths (explained in detail below) is to be held today, Sunday, June 30th, 2013, in what is possibly the first in history to be held for the massacre of our friends, the pollinating bees. It is surreal that in our times we have come to this; that we now find ourselves saying farewell to 50,000 dead bumblebees killed by the hand of mankind. And it is time for us all to ask ourselves, are we not all complicit? Have we done enough to hold our elected officials accountable? Can we not stop the assault on our little friends who give so much to us?

msgd1sdzm7zmilvm1qha Two recent incidents involving pesticide-induced bee deaths in Oregon, including one  (previously diaried here) in which thousands of pollinating honeybees and bumble bees were killed in a Willsonville Target parking lot, as well as another occurrence of hundreds of bee deaths in Hillsboro, has prompted the Oregon Department of Agriculture to place a 180 day ban on the use of dinotefuron, a pesticide based on neonicotinoids, a type of pesticide notoriously associated with recent annual massive honey bee die-offs related to Colony Collapse Disease (CCD). -4792002803fe5cb4

In brief, the bumblebees and honeybees were attracted to the nectar-secreting linden tree blossoms which were located in a Target store parking lot. Tens of thousands of bees were foraging on the blossoms of 55 trees when a landscaping crew sprayed the pesticide over the trees to kill aphids, and the bees thus took a direct hit of the poison. An estimated 50,000 bees were massacred, which were seen dropping from the flowers onto the asphalt parking lot. Biologists from Xerces, an environmental group whose mission includes insect pollinator conservation, were notified, who arrived on the scene to investigate.

The Xerces Society is a nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of invertebrates and their habitat.
The Willsonville incident is being called "largest event of its kind ever documented, with an estimated impact on more than 300 wild bumble bee colonies," according to Rich Hatfield, a biologist at Xerces, an Oregon Based environmental group, who estimates that over 50,000 bumble bees were killed. According to Hatfield,  
“Each of those colonies could have produced multiple new queens that would have gone on to establish new colonies next year. This makes the event particularly catastrophic.”
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Safari, the brand name of the toxic pesticide, has been confirmed by the Oregon Department of Agriculture to be the cause of the bee deaths.

ODA has confirmed that the bee deaths are directly related to a pesticide application on the linden trees conducted last Saturday, June 15 to control aphids. The pesticide product Safari was used in that application. Safari, with its active ingredient dinotefuran, is part of a group of insecticides known as neonicotinoids. According to investigators, the insecticide was originally applied to control aphids, which secrete a sticky residue while feeding, and can be a nuisance to parked cars. Dinotefuran and other neonicotinoids are a relatively new group of insecticides that are long-lasting in plant tissues. Because of this, the scientists are now concerned about whether the trees will still be toxic next year when they flower again. Emergency measures to prevent further bee deaths were taken today by staff from the ODA, Xerces, and the City of Wilsonville. By the end of the day all of the trees will be covered with large nets to prevent bumble bees and other pollinators from reaching the flowers. http://www.xerces.org/...
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Licensed-pesticide operators would be in violation of the regulation if they use the pesticide during the temporary restriction. The restriction will be reassessed after the investigation of the incidents is completed, which could take as long as four months.

Scientists knowledgeable about the threats to pollinators are expressing heightened concerns about the significance of the Wilsonville bee massacre.

“The cost of losing pollinators far outweighs any value of controlling aphids on ornamental plants,” said Mace Vaughan, Pollinator Conservation Director at the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation. “After the events of last week, and based on the overwhelming science demonstrating the harm that these products can cause, we are calling on city and county governments to immediately stop the damage.”

The University of Minnesota’s Dr. Marla Spivak, a leading global authority on bee health, echoed Vaughan’s sentiment. “The Oregon bee poisoning is a clear warning. We have to stop pesticide use in cases where human health or food security is not at risk.”

Spivak points out that neonicotinoids are now the most widely used insecticides in urban and agricultural areas. “They are long-lasting in soil and they readily move into water. If the Oregon event is an indication of what is happening more widely, we will begin to see catastrophic threats to food security and the pollination of wild plants.”  http://www.xerces.org/...

The ban, despite being quite limited in scope and duration, is a step forward, and is good news to environmentalists and beekeepers, who have been pressuring to no avail the Food and Drug Administration to ban the neonicotinoids, which have been implicated in numerous studies to contribute to Colony Collapse Disease, which has caused unprecedented yearly die-offs in bee colonies around the world. Many commercial beekeepers lost 50% of their hive inventories during the 2012-2013 winter, which is devastating to the bee industry. While the causes of the problems bees face are complex, the evidence, supported by a number of studies, points to the neonicotinoids as a major factor in declining bee populations. Beekeepers and environmentalists have filed a lawsuit against the FDA to compel them to act.

Maybe if enough states step in, the FDA will be compelled to take notice.

Meanwhile, the European Union has banned three neonicotinoid-based products for two years, while the situation is assessed. The three neonicotinoids are clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiametoxam.

“It is time to take a stronger stance on pollinator protection. The European Union has put restrictions in place on several neonicotinoids, and Ontario, Canada has gone further and banned all pesticides for cosmetic use,” said Scott Hoffman Black, Executive Director of the Xerces Society. “We need a similar response here.”
http://www.xerces.org/...
Memorial Service

A memorial service for the bees is to be held this Sunday at the Willsonville Target parking lot.

On Sunday June 30, 2013 at 2:00 PM, please join us at the site where an estimated 50,000 bees were killed by humans who sprayed the toxic pesticide, Safari. We will memorialize these fallen lifeforms and talk about the plight of the bees and their importance to life on Earth. If you are passionate, concerned, or curious about this situation, this will be a good opportunity to communicate with others.

As you may know, this is a very crucial moment for bees, as they are dying in the millions, unnaturally, worldwide. Their unnatural deaths are being caused by humans applying chemical pesticides to the earth and its plants. In addition to the injustice and brutality of this situation for the bees that are being killed, there are far-reaching effects for humans, who rely on bees to pollinate our crops. It is widely agreed that the endangerment and extinction of bees will have devastating consequences for humans and other lifeforms, which makes this an urgent opportunity to honor them and advocate for them.

Please participate in this memorial, and help us to spread the word by inviting others. Please message the event organizer, Rozzell Medina, at wilsonvillebees@gmail.com if you can help to coordinate the event by volunteering an hour or two during the week leading up to the event. Also, please post if you are driving from Portland, Eugene, etc. and have space available in your vehicle.

Some closing thoughts...

As an Oregonian beekeeper, this news story is particularly of great concern to me. These incidents occurred in the greater Portland area, which is where I have my bees located, and thus it demonstrates the degree to which the neonicotinoids are used in my general environment. 50% of my bee colonies perished last winter, which is a personal loss to me.

I'm a third generation beekeeper, was raised by a beekeeper father, and have been intimitely involved in bees since I was 4 years old, when my father took me up the winding forest roads of the Puerto Rican mountains to his apiaries. I grafted bee larvae into queen cell cups when I was 5 or 6, helping my father with his queen raising business.  And now, in my 50s, so many years later, I have had hopes of expanding my small inventory of hives to a commercial operation in order to have a secure income as I get older in the years to come, in a job market that doesn't promise to rebound for years, especially for older people. I await no pension, no possibility of retirement, and recently lost just about everything. So this affects me profoundly.

I have a great fondness for beekeeping and bees, and love the work, which allows me to be outdoors in a natural, stress-relieving environment, tending my bees under the coniferous trees of the spectacular Oregon countryside.  The experience of opening a hive, smelling the aroma which wafts upward, a blend of the fragrances of beeswax, floral nectar, pollen, royal jelly and brood, and the pheromones of bees, transports me to the hive's inner sanctum of this wondrous insect.

So, do we want the price of melons, berries, pears, apples, almonds, and a long list of other food crops to shoot through the roof, becoming unaffordable to average people? Will we relegate one third of our food supply to the province of the wealthy class, out of reach of the pocketbooks of the rest of us? Is that the future we want?

Haven't the 1% been indulged enough? Must the bees be sacrificed too, in the name of capitalism and profiteering? Is there not one thing on this planet we can save from corporate destruction? Can we not agree, in the name of all that we believe to be good and just, to draw the line here, if no where else?

President Obama, order the FDA to ban the bee-killing pesticide! Please fight for their survival. You're the only one who can give the order to the FDA. Please act now.
Thank Xerces for their great work in protecting pollinators by signing their Pollinator Protection Pledge

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All photos credited to Motoya Nakamura/The Oregonian

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (124+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    katiec, blueoasis, DRo, cordgrass, mollyd, cama2008, mightymouse, Tinfoil Hat, davelf2, Burned, sewaneepat, expatjourno, nuclear winter solstice, most peculiar mama, Anastasia Castro, carpunder, missLotus, Cassiodorus, Carol in San Antonio, OutcastsAndCastoffs, temptxan, One Pissed Off Liberal, dance you monster, Edward Adams, CitizenOfEarth, Lady Libertine, priceman, marleycat, sb, SoCalSal, Johnny the Conqueroo, flowerfarmer, cyncynical, J M F, DawnN, artisan, CroneWit, Matt Z, melo, wilderness voice, Darwinian Detrius, Crider, Horace Boothroyd III, Zinman, freeport beach PA, PhilJD, martini, Darryl House, BigAlinWashSt, Powered Grace, joanneleon, addisnana, Panacea Paola, SteelerGrrl, The Gryffin, Ageing Hippie, Amber6541, wonmug, Glen The Plumber, zerone, newpioneer, Trendar, slowbutsure, Gowrie Gal, Christin, ricklewsive, Ice Blue, jan4insight, quagmiremonkey, Azubia, Karl Rover, zerelda, leonard145b, madame damnable, SpecialKinFlag, Debs2, OregonOak, Milly Watt, OldDragon, blueoregon, subtropolis, susakinovember, Hayate Yagami, OldSoldier99, triv33, enhydra lutris, SuWho, chrississippi, Alfred E Newman, cynndara, Lefty Coaster, DrCoyle65, midwesterner, AaronInSanDiego, renzo capetti, katrinka, SouthernLiberalinMD, lostinamerica, Lorikeet, psnyder, Geenius at Wrok, letsgetreal, ichibon, markdd, AZ Sphinx Moth, middleagedhousewife, kharma, OllieGarkey, kmoore61, Lily O Lady, tegrat, peachcreek, tgypsy, poligirl, lcrp, also mom of 5, side pocket, PeterHug, marina, chimene, KenBee, radical simplicity, Heart n Mind, Magnifico

    "In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

    by ZhenRen on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 03:27:08 AM PDT

  •  We can't let this happen. (50+ / 0-)

    I wish I could write better... well enough to jar people from complacency.  I'm tired, up all night again. Writing this makes me feel helpless. I suppose keeping my hives alive is something. I'm contributing in my small way.

    "In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

    by ZhenRen on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 03:44:29 AM PDT

  •  At the moment very stunned (25+ / 0-)

    that those trees were sprayed to keep aphid sap from dripping on parked cars.
    If there was a hell we would all be going there.

    •  Exactly. The trees could have been trimmed back (17+ / 0-)

      so they don't over hang the parking lot.

      50K bees killed so a few car owners don't have to wash a car.

      It says a lot about our society when the only solution considered is to water cannon the environment with poison.

      No longer Hoping for Change. Now Praying for a Miracle.

      by CitizenOfEarth on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 06:03:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Linden trees are notorious for aphid honeydew (15+ / 0-)

      They are beautiful trees, and when they are in bloom they fill the air with a sweet perfume, but I am stunned by the fact that a shopping center developer would choose Lindens to landscape a parking area.

      A single Linden tree, though, when in bloom has more nectar rich flowers on it than an acre of wildflowers.  Not only bumblebees, but honey bees flock to the Lindens, and the honey made from Linden blooms is highly prized.

      There are several Linden trees in my Portland neighborhood, and everyone who has one in their yard or curb strip knows not to park underneath them.

      Cause he gets up in the morning, And he goes to work at nine, And he comes back home at five-thirty, Gets the same train every time.

      by Keith930 on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 06:03:43 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  really? i want to buy them. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SuWho, ZhenRen, chimene

        that is what i am going to do this week!
        i am across the country - but i will find Linden trees to plant.
        bad time to plant, i know.

        but every time something happens that pisses me off.
        i make my SO go buy a tree to plant.
        we have this huge emm effin willow that is taking over the neighborhood.

        after hurricane sandy, my neighbors took down some trees that were healthy. that was five huge trees that came down.

        so i made the SO plant two ginko's, two cherries, and one pear (yes i know the bad about them, but they grow quick) and one unidentified tree still waiting to be planted

        my lot is small. but i don't care.

        We consume the carcasses of creatures of like appetites, passions and organs with our own, and fill the slaughterhouses daily with screams of pain and fear. Robert Louis Stevenson

        by Christin on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 08:21:07 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Lindens are also quite long lived (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ZhenRen, peachcreek, Christin, KenBee

          There are specimens in Europe that are in the neighborhood of 700 years old.  They live for centuries.

          Google the Linden tress at the gardens of Versailles, or Berlin's "Unter Den Linten" roadway.  They are ancient.

          Cause he gets up in the morning, And he goes to work at nine, And he comes back home at five-thirty, Gets the same train every time.

          by Keith930 on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 11:18:20 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  apparently lady-bugs can control the aphids with (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ZhenRen

          no toxins involved! came across that while reading up on this...

          "real" work : a job where you wash your hands BEFORE you use the bathroom...

          by chimene on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 07:13:16 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  a memorial for the Bees... (18+ / 0-)

    can't be there in body, but with you all in spirit. Bees are wonderful in so many ways.

    We are all pupils in the eyes of God.

    by nuclear winter solstice on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 04:31:59 AM PDT

  •  This is so sad. (13+ / 0-)

    Why couldn't they have just released thousands of lady bugs for the aphid problem?  It wouldn't of been a 100% solution and most would of just flown away, but it's better then spraying poison everywhere on ornamental trees.

    Pesticides on ornamental plants and trees should be banned.

  •  As regards your question: (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    flowerfarmer, DawnN, ZhenRen, KenBee
    So, do we want the price of melons, berries, pears, apples, almonds, and a long list of other food crops to shoot through the roof, becoming unaffordable to average people? Will we relegate one third of our food supply to the province of the wealthy class, out of reach of the pocketbooks of the rest of us? Is that the future we want?
    It's probably just the future we acquiesced in, after not having considered it at all.

    Jason W. Moore has an interesting piece on hisessays page about cheap food -- that updated technologies of food production will not usher in any new era of cheap food and, thus, will not extend the life of the capitalist system.

    "It's not my fault reality is marxist." - Che Guevara

    by Cassiodorus on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 04:55:11 AM PDT

    •  It seems to be fait accompli (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      protectspice, Cassiodorus, KenBee

      Especially considering climate change.

      "In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

      by ZhenRen on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 09:43:02 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  We will still be able to feed everybody -- (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ZhenRen, KenBee

        just not under capitalism.  Even the most devout global warming activists act as if they have no clue about how destructive the capitalist system is of efforts to do something to mitigate, or even to adapt to, global warming.  

        "It's not my fault reality is marxist." - Che Guevara

        by Cassiodorus on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 12:02:54 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yes (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Cassiodorus, KenBee

          We could do so much better if mutual cooperation was the basis of society, rather than mutual economic warfare, which is turning out to be MAD, an economic form of mutually assured destruction.

          It may not be nuclear winter that destroys us, but the economic implosion that gets us in the end via the pathway of ecological ruin.

          "In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

          by ZhenRen on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 12:41:05 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  It's banned in Oregon (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DawnN, Amber6541, ZhenRen, peachcreek, KenBee

    so how effective is the law?  There are plenty of laws that aren't enforced.

    "It's not my fault reality is marxist." - Che Guevara

    by Cassiodorus on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 04:58:54 AM PDT

    •  Ban gives grounds for lawsuits. (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Amber6541, Ice Blue, ZhenRen, peachcreek

      So, if you, trying to save a few bucks, hire some guy and his cousins, rather than going to a professional landscaping service, and they use a banned substance, because they happen to have some and it is faster and easier for them, you can, and in the present political climate likely will be, be sued and prosecuted.  

    •  Not sure how effective (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cassiodorus

      I'm glad they were willing to do it at all. I'm skeptical about any real effect the ban will have, I'm sorry to say.

      And I don't think it applies to other classes of neonics used by farmers on crops.

      "In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

      by ZhenRen on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 09:47:12 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thank you for this story (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sb, flowerfarmer, Amber6541, ZhenRen, KenBee

    I like the details about bees. Hadn't thought about the future queens and all

    The deeper that sorrow carves in to your being, the more joy you can contain ~ Khalil Gibran

    by SisTwo on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 05:22:46 AM PDT

  •  Just Criminal that FDA has its thumb up (15+ / 0-)

    its butt on this. Thanks for this diary.



     Cool Image

    No longer Hoping for Change. Now Praying for a Miracle.

    by CitizenOfEarth on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 05:43:23 AM PDT

  •  These poisonings show (8+ / 0-)

    callus indifference toward the health and wellbeing of both insects and humans- the linden is THE bee attracting tree.

    Farmers who are not even beekeepers know this and often plant them in the windbreaks or edge of the garden spot to attract pollinators.

    These bee killings are pure negligence and ignorance.

    When i find my next piece of land, i will be in touch with you, ZhenRen, for advice on setting up top bar hives.

    'A scarlet tanager broke the silence with his song. She thought of the bird hidden in the leaves somewhere, unseen but nevertheless brilliant red. Nevertheless beautiful.' Barbara Kingsolver/ Prodigal Summer

    by flowerfarmer on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 05:51:00 AM PDT

    •  I'd be glad to help! n/t (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      flowerfarmer, KenBee

      "In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

      by ZhenRen on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 09:49:47 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I hope to have a new homestead (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ZhenRen, KenBee

        by next year.

        My grandfather kept bees in his tiny garden- couldn't have been more than a 1/2 acre property- in the middle of a small New England town.

        He and my grandmother produced enough fruit and veggies to fill the cellar shelves with gleaming jars of deliciousness to last the winter.

        I will keep you bookmarked and thanks.

        'A scarlet tanager broke the silence with his song. She thought of the bird hidden in the leaves somewhere, unseen but nevertheless brilliant red. Nevertheless beautiful.' Barbara Kingsolver/ Prodigal Summer

        by flowerfarmer on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 01:09:43 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  You write well enough to make this fellow (11+ / 0-)

    beekeeper tear up. Wish everyone could experience the smell, the beauty and the energy emanating from a hive.

    If we do not permit the earth to produce beauty and joy, it will in the end not produce food, either. - Joseph Wood Krutch

    by DawnN on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 05:56:45 AM PDT

    •  Yes, the energy emanating (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      peachcreek, DawnN, KenBee

      How true. It's like a city of thousands, just smaller inhabitants. And all working together, "without anyone telling them what to do, and yet everything gets done." (paraphrasing Lao Tzu, I admit).

      "In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

      by ZhenRen on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 11:01:59 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  One small correction (5+ / 0-)

    Saying that neonicotinoids are long-lasting in soil makes the assumption that the soil is not healthy.  A healthy soil, one that is full of white-rot fungi, can metabolize this pesticide.  

    Unfortunately, tillage and overuse of pesticides, herbicides and fungicides has wiped out much of the soil biology on agricultural land and landscaped areas.  Healthy soil biology still exists, but only in areas where man has not decided to "improve" the land.  

    These trees should be heavily mulched with a mulch that has been inoculated with a white-rot fungus.  Then the dinotefuran that continues to wash off with each succeeding rain can be degraded.  But if this Target parking lot is like most that I have seen, most of the dinotefuran is going to be washed over a lot of asphalt to the nearest storm sewer.

    •  The pesticide class (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      midwesterner, KenBee

      is also used systemically, and is poured on the roots of fruit trees, for example, or coated on the seeds. The systemic pesticide is then expressed in the pollen and nectar. With repeated applications on the roots, certainly it must buildup.

      "In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

      by ZhenRen on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 09:32:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Unless there is mycorrhizal fungi (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ZhenRen, OllieGarkey, KenBee

        It will build up unless there is from metabolic pathway (mycorrhizal fungi) to degrade it.  

        There are two paths to take here: (1) promote beneficial fungi and let the plant grow strong enough to withstand a burden of insect pests, or (2) every time you think there is a problem, reach for a bottle of toxic chemical.  We all know which path has an advertising budget.

  •  The saddest thing... (11+ / 0-)

    The saddest thing about this is that all it takes to kill aphids is soapy water - coating them with the fatty acids in soap suffocates them.  Soapy water spray, and keeping ants out of the trees with sticky-traps because ants and aphids have a symbiotic relationship, is what organic orchardists do.

    •  it's heartbreaking. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ZhenRen, chimene

      it's so damn heartbreaking that this is all it took.

      We consume the carcasses of creatures of like appetites, passions and organs with our own, and fill the slaughterhouses daily with screams of pain and fear. Robert Louis Stevenson

      by Christin on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 08:25:58 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  My asshole boss thought he was funny (7+ / 0-)

    when he made a joke about this. I just stared at him. He is currently pouting (a regular occurrence).

    Loyalty to petrified opinion never yet broke a chain or freed a human soul in this world--and never will. Mark Twain

    by whoknu on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 06:23:12 AM PDT

  •   neonicotinoids used against bed bugs (7+ / 0-)

    Neonicotinoids are also being used residentially and in businesses against the current epidemic of bed bugs.   Neonicotinoids should be banned not just for agricultural use, but also for hotel/motel (and other tourism-related) industries, and for apartment/condo rental sites.  In particular, HUD should issue an immediate ban on all use of  neonicotinoids in Federally-funded housing.

  •  Monsanto won't be happy until we are reduced (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Christin, Debs2, protectspice, ZhenRen, KenBee

    to using q-tips and going from stamen to stamen.

  •  How much killing of the other beings of the Earth (6+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Amber6541, Christin, Debs2, SuWho, ZhenRen, KenBee

    will occur before we intentionally stop this useless slaughter.  So glad to hear of the memorial service for the bees that were killed in Oregon.  It is a step toward our natural respect and humanity for other beings on this Earth.

  •  Accountable? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Christin, ZhenRen
    "Have we done enough to hold our elected officials accountable?"
    The obvious answer is: NO.

    Because our idea of accountability doesn't actually include (except in rare cases, such as Lieberman) trying to punish elected officials.  And, as we see time and time again, without punishment there is no accountability.

    >> Side note on Lieberman:  And what exactly was the outcome?  Oh - that's right - he continued to be supported by the Democratic Party even though we, the base, "kicked him out".  Supported to such an extent that - after being kicked out of the party, after campaigning for McCain / Palin.. the Democrats gave their buddy Lieberman Chairmanship of the Homeland Security Committee in the Senate (Waking up yet?  Smelling the coffee yet?)

    There will be no Change.

    Oh sure, letter-writing campaigns, angry e-mails, etc..

    But then, at the end of the day, well - we're encouraged to line up like good little citizens and vote the same guys right back in because you wouldn't want the other guys to get in.

    And our Corporate 1% controlled government moves along nicely in the same direction, without even hitting a speed bump on its merry way towards environmental and economic destruction (the later only for the working class, obviously).

    My only question:  How much environmental, economic, militaristic destruction and police state tactics will it take for folks to wake up and decide no more?  That they will no longer dutifully clap at the Kabuki Theater of the Absurd?

    The excuses for Obama's behavior have long since passed the point of predictability neccessary to qualify as an absurd production of Kabuki Theater.

    by Johnathan Ivan on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 08:12:51 AM PDT

    •  most people only care (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      GreenMother, ZhenRen

      about their paychecks. their mortgages. their rent. their families.
       i know very few people who give a crap outside of that.
      i've worn myself out trying to explain to them whey they need to care about Global warming and bees.
      they just don't. they don't believe it will affect them and walk away.

      We consume the carcasses of creatures of like appetites, passions and organs with our own, and fill the slaughterhouses daily with screams of pain and fear. Robert Louis Stevenson

      by Christin on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 08:25:16 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Mold on Grass (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ZhenRen

    We have fungus growing on our grass.
    This morning we saw white fuzz on it. Took pictures.
    Confirmed it.
    Anyone know of a natural, or non killing to bees etc, way of getting rid of it?
    every year it gets worse, and every year it comes back.

    We consume the carcasses of creatures of like appetites, passions and organs with our own, and fill the slaughterhouses daily with screams of pain and fear. Robert Louis Stevenson

    by Christin on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 08:38:37 AM PDT

    •  Is it killing the grass? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Christin, ZhenRen

      Mold is usually present where the soil is acidic. Maybe you just need to replace the grass with moss  and be done with it.

      •   it's turning it yellow brown.... (0+ / 0-)

        some areas are slowly dying some not.
        can't do the moss...it's right in the middle of the lawn. would look really strange.

        We consume the carcasses of creatures of like appetites, passions and organs with our own, and fill the slaughterhouses daily with screams of pain and fear. Robert Louis Stevenson

        by Christin on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 09:11:30 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Sure you can (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ZhenRen

          If the lawn is shaded or if you live in area where moss is indigenous, you can do a bird bath of sorts, with some stepping stones and moss. Moss is cool, you can take an old blender and put chunks of moss in there with milk, blend it, and then pour the mixture on the area you want the moss. It will take over. You can even make old chunks of concrete look cool with it, if you cannot afford stones.

          In the SW, I cannot do moss unless we are in a deep ravine or cave, it's just too hot. So here, bare spots are covered with mint, clover or buffalo grass.

  •  The landscape crew was in violation (6+ / 0-)

    of the product label instructions, which carry the weight of law. Safari label:

    This product is highly toxic to bees exposed to direct treatment or residues on blooming crops or
    weeds. Do not apply this product or allow it to drift
    to blooming crops or weeds if bees are visiting the
    treatment area.
    I didn't see if they were charged with a violation, but they should be. In fact, somebody should be losing their license to apply pesticides.

    At any rate, Safari is a systemic product; the immediate non-presence of bees doesn't necessarily preclude bee deaths at a later time.

    This Rover crossed over.. Willie Nelson, written by Dorothy Fields

    by Karl Rover on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 08:42:47 AM PDT

  •  Thanks for a great diary (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ZhenRen, chimene, KenBee

    We are in Southern Oregon and have a garden and small orchard, about 30 fruit trees of many varieties. We are having a good year for fruit set but I noticed the bees arrived VERY late this year and there didn't seem nearly as many as usual. I contacted the local extension service and they didn't offer any advice. But in view of the word-wide die offs it was very concerning as we live in a major agricultural area and produce most of the USA's Comice and other types of pears. Thanks Oregon for banning this bee killer. Let's see this move go nation wide!

    Fox Business Channel motto, "Woman have baby, make sandwich"

    by madame damnable on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 08:58:39 AM PDT

  •  It only takes 4 days to wipe out a full colony (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ZhenRen, KenBee

    of honey bees, when they visit neonic treated crops/trees. I am sure it takes less time to kill a colony of Bumble bees.

    A mature colony of honey bees contains 40,000 to 80,000 bees.

    A bumble bee colony contains 15 to 250 bees.

    Other eu-social and solitary bees and wasps have less than 6 to2 bees per burrow meaning the female and her offspring. Entire local genomes have been completely wiped out with this.

    Good that they are throwing nets over the trees.

    Be looking for sick humming birds, dead beetles, butterflies, and potentially bats.

    •  Imagine how many bumblebee colonies (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      GreenMother, KenBee

      were wiped out. As the Xerces biologists said, this has more than short term impact. And this is just one or two incidents that were witnessed by city folk. Imagine how many such incidents don't get reported. I think this is the tip of the iceberg in terms of direct spraying on flowers and bees.

      This exemplifies the need for people to be able to visibly see environmental damage caused by toxins. It has to be concrete, or its off the radar screen. So the systemic toxicity that causes low grade, sublethal affects are ignored, and harder to prove, especially with all the other (related) pathogens that are part of the overall affects.

      In terms of policy, pesticides need to be guilty until proven innocent. Pesticides don't have rights, as if people. And after all the studies, enough has accumulated in knowledge that we know the neonics are guilty.

      "In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

      by ZhenRen on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 11:14:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Believe me I know. I am just so glad I am not the (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ZhenRen, KenBee

        only civilian [winks at you and your readers] who understand this too.

        Bayer and others are dumping all of their neonics on our American Market because of the EU ban, so if you look at any local chain store, more and more neonics are on the shelves with NO effing warning whatsoever as to what that means!

        If others are reading this commentary and want to learn more, Check out Michael Schacker's Book, A Spring Without Bees. It came out in 2010 and it is packed with tons of info, and is very accessible to non-Entymologists.

  •  Valent Professional Products, Walnut Creek CA... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ZhenRen, chimene

    has issued two press releases regarding the "incident" in Wilsonvile. The first says, in essence, THERE IS A LABEL! and the second says, in essence, we are WORKING TO OVERTURN Oregon's temporary restriction on Safari. Oh, yes, and we bought nets for the trees.

    Here are the two press releases:

    Valent Issues Statement on Dinotefuran Temporary Use Restriction in Oregon

    This page will be updated as events warrant.

    June 28, 2013

    WALNUT CREEK, Calif.—Valent U.S.A. Corporation received notification that the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) put a temporary use restriction on insecticides containing the active ingredient dinotefuran.

    This restriction applies to applications on landscape trees and shrubs, nursery and greenhouse plants, turfgrass, forests and agricultural crops for 180 days, effective June 27, 2013.

    More information on this rule can be found on the ODA web site:  http://www.oregon.gov/...

    Valent is in communication with state and local authorities and has responded swiftly to requests for information. We do not believe the scope of these measures is necessary with the information available, and we will work to get the restrictions lifted as soon as possible.

    The rule does not restrict sales of insecticides containing dinotefuran in the state of Oregon.

    However, we are committed to product stewardship and are taking the following action:

    We have notified our distributors in Oregon to ensure they are aware of the temporary use restriction on dinotefuran applications
    A temporary hold has been placed on product shipments to Oregon of Valent insecticides containing dinotefuran
    Valent products are extensively tested according to rigorous scientific guidelines and are labeled to protect the health and safety of consumers, workers and the environment, including pollinators.

    We are actively conducting outreach with our customers and industry partners to reinforce the importance of responsible use according to label guidelines.


    ....and here is the first attempt at Corporate asshat flackery!
    Valent Issues Statement on Safari Bee Incident in Oregon

    June 25, 2013

    WALNUT CREEK, Calif.—Valent U.S.A. Corporation has issued the following statement regarding the recent event in Oregon involving Safari® Insecticide:

    "Valent is awaiting results from the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) investigation regarding last week’s unfortunate incident in Wilsonville, Ore.  The Safari label includes language to protect pollinators, specifically directing applicators not to apply this product or allow it to drift to blooming crops or weeds if bees are present in the area. According to the timeline of the application, the trees in question were in bloom.

    Valent is committed to pollinator protection. Immediately after being alerted to this incident, Valent dispatched a company entomologist to Wilsonville to work with the ODA. Additionally, we’ve committed a donation to the City of Wilsonville toward the purchase and installation of protective netting for the trees in question.

    Valent also promotes the responsible use of our products, and we are actively conducting outreach with our customers and industry partners to reinforce the importance of responsible use according to label guidelines. An incident report will also be submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency, as required by law.

    We await more complete information from the ODA investigation and continue to actively monitor the situation."

    The issue is really this: Should such a product even be PRODUCED, let alone MARKETED and SOLD given the chance of misuse by "trained professionals?"

    This Safari stuff has the potential to destroy the nation's food supply, and the European Union has already banned it, because they still have a functioning democracy.  

    Its time for Congress to get off their collective ass and do business of the people, and protect their food supply. If you stand in the way of legislation banning this class of pesticide, Congresspersons, start looking for a new job.  I have not been this angry since 1989, when Exxon decided hire a drunk to pave Prince William Sound. See you at the Memorial in Wilsonville at 2pm. And thank you, Xerxes.

    Figures don't lie, but liars do figure-Mark Twain

    by OregonOak on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 10:05:39 AM PDT

  •  The FDA is a complete industry CAPTIVE (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ZhenRen, chimene, KenBee

    "If Wall Street paid a tax on every “game” they run, we would get enough revenue to run the government on." ~ Will Rogers

    by Lefty Coaster on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 10:22:56 AM PDT

  •  Because . . . (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ZhenRen, chimene

    "aphids . .  secrete a sticky residue while feeding, and can be a nuisance to parked cars."

    Because keeping the goddammed fuckin' CARS pretty is more important than 50,000 wild pollinators.  I am just speechless with disgust.  At least the state of Oregon is willing to SOMETIMES do something to protect the environment, unlike my own state of Virginia, which likes to sell pretty pictures of its countryside to tourists, so long as it doesn't have to actually stop people from destroying it for profit.

    Thank you for diarying this, Zhen.

  •  Neonicotinoids (0+ / 0-)

    While neonictonoids have come under suspicion, there is as yet no proof that they cause bee colonies to collapse when used as intended. (which these incidents certainly were NOT.)

    So what is the best thing to do when the evidence is inconclusive? Several other things have also been implicated in colony collapse, such as invading mites that kill bees.

    Banning neonics for a trial period certainly seems sensible, as does funding more research.

    Finding funds for research is tough in the present economic climate, where people feel so besieged that even if they can afford it they are hesitant to pay taxes to be used for "common good" projects like publicly funded research. (Full disclosure: I work for a university division that does exactly that, so I have a personal interest in the level of funding;)

    Neonicotinoids are a synthetic attempt to tap the power of a natural pesticide, nicotine. Neonictonoids in carefully measured doses can attack pests that cannot be targeted any other way, such as woodboring beetle larvae, which are inside the tree and therefore can't be sprayed or removed by hand. Less harmful treatments that can accomplish that task would be very welcome.

    •  Pesticides don't have civil rights (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      chimene

      Even the Bayer researchers admitted the neonics are toxic to bees, which was learned from a leaked memo.

      The sublethal affects include disorientation and impairment of immunity. Bees rely on an uncanny ability to navigate long distances to nectar sources and back to the hive, which can be as much as a ten mile loop. Dissoirientation would be devastating to honeybees.

      There is enough evidence to implicate the pesticides. Mites have been around awhile, and are not the cause, as a single factor, of the plight of bees. It's the combination of neonics and the other pathogens (to which neonics expose the bees by impairing immunity) that research is pointing to as a cause.

      Regardless, enough is known to ban the pesticide, and to place burden of proof back on the makers of the pesticide. It should be removed until there is certainly that the pesticide doesn't harm pollinators, and at this point, that would be almost impossible to establish, since so much research has implicated the toxin. And that is why the EU and other nations have begun to restrict usage.

      "In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

      by ZhenRen on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 12:10:28 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  We actually do know that Neonics have an effect (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ZhenRen, chimene, KenBee

      in colony collapse, and Bayer's own scientists knew that bees were going to be badly affected.

      There are some circumstances where pesticides are necessary, yes, but there are other ways to target pests.

      What could be really interesting is finding a way to make a synthetic Diatomaceous earth, because it will kill any insect or bug that comes in contact with it, but is harmless to humans and other animals, and doesn't have the side effects that neonics have.

      There's just not enough of the stuff in nature for it to be an effective large-scale pesticide, but if we could manufacture it, it'd be interesting.

      If there was a way to give trees a good dusting of D-Earth, it would kill any parasite infecting the trees, but it wouldn't have the same drastic effect on pollinators.

      I've mixed it into water and used it as a spray to kill leaf scale. I gave my apartment a good dusting, and it took out the roaches that kept climbing up the garbage chute in the hall. It's even been used to wipe out bedbug infestations.

      You mix it into water, and spray down your dog or cat, and it will kill fleas.

      It's a food-additive that was once used in toothpaste. Some people drink it on a regular basis because it makes your nails and hair grow.

      D-earth is just one of a couple of non-chemical solutions that I'd like to see tried.

      It doesn't have the dramatic results that neonics have, but we've seen from this incident that dramatic results aren't really what we need, though certain consumers might want them.

      You don't cure tapeworm with a nuclear weapon. Nuclear weapons are perfectly capable of killing tapeworm, but there are some better options.

      An Fhirinn an aghaidh an t'Saoghail. (The truth against the world.) Is treasa tuath na tighearna. (The common people are mightier than the lords.)

      by OllieGarkey on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 12:37:05 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I live near the Wilsonville Target (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ZhenRen, OllieGarkey

    Last time I past there, all the Linden trees were covered in black netting.

    “that our civil rights have no dependence on our religious opinions, any more than our opinions in physics or geometry.” Thomas Jefferson

    by markdd on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 11:37:27 AM PDT

  •  People don't realize how important bees are (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    OllieGarkey, ZhenRen, chimene

    Do you like eating....anything?

    I always tell people if they enjoy any fruit or part of a flowering plant, they better think twice about calling me a flaming liberal for not liking pesticides.

    "Hatred is never appeased by hatred in this world. By non-hatred alone is hatred appeased. This is a law eternal."

    by sujigu on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 12:19:25 PM PDT

  •  Okay, I totally support a protest, (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ZhenRen

    but a memorial service?

    That's the kind of theater of the absurd that makes the green movement look like loons.

    They're going to call us tree hugging hippies no matter what we do, but we shouldn't give them extra ammunition.

    We could talk about how important these pollinators are to agriculture, and the wine industry in the Willamette Valley, and how this kind of destruction hurts the economy of Oregon, and is dangerous to our ability even to grow food.

    There are people on the fence that we can get off the fence.

    I'm not sure that a Memorial Service is going to get them to come off the fence on our side.

    What do the rest of you think?

    An Fhirinn an aghaidh an t'Saoghail. (The truth against the world.) Is treasa tuath na tighearna. (The common people are mightier than the lords.)

    by OllieGarkey on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 12:23:27 PM PDT

    •  I thought about that... (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      OllieGarkey, OregonOak, chimene, jayden, KenBee

      But no, we must stop worrying about what the opposition thinks about our respect for the environment. We must stop kowtowing to them. We've been doing that in electoral politics for decades, caving in on anything they ridicule, as if we are embarrassed to be who we are. And that is one big reason electoral politics have failed us over the decades.

      Read what the Xerces biologists have said about this occurrence, and how devastating it is to bumblebee populations. This is a really, really big deal. There is nothing wrong with memorializing the bees.

      And the deaths memorialized are really the tip of the iceberg. Since these two events happen to have occurred in an urban setting, more people are paying attention, but its a virtual certainty that this is occurring all over, and is not an isolated incident. These pesticides are ubiquitous.

      And get used to it. As climate change continues, we will seeing requiems composed for the entire planetary ecosystem before this century is over. This is just the beginning.

      Fuck the people who ridicule us. And fight back. Don't be ashamed to believe in respect for the ecological balance. Don't change your behavior. Don't conform to the ignorance. Stand proud for the bees, for the planet. It's the only world we have, and its going down fast.

      "In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

      by ZhenRen on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 12:34:56 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You know, I totally agree that we need to fight. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ZhenRen

        And the douchecanoes who ridicule us need to get called out for being the lying dicks that they are.

        But there's a way to use language, to use protest, and to use our collective voices to convince people who might not agree with us.

        There are the assholes who lie, and they're never going to agree with us. They've started believing our lies.

        But we have an opportunity to convince people on the fence, here. Those are the ones I'm worried about.

        I don't want them reading a headline and thinking "Wow, the hippies just had a memorial service for a bunch of bugs!"

        I want them thinking "Wow, I had no idea that so much of Oregon's economy depended on Bees!"

        Brocolli, Snap-Beans, Orchards, Wine, all of that stuff happens because of bees. Killing bees is a threat to the Oregonian way of life.

        That's the message I want heard.

        Look, I don't live in Oregon. I don't know how this is going to go over there. For strategic reasons, I'm going to be watching, and I'm glad this issue is being taken seriously, I'm just unsure about a memorial service as a tactic.

        You don't have to convince me how important bees are, btw. I grew up in Florida, and I remember how delicious orange honey was, and how everyone who grew citrus also had multiple apiaries out in the groves.

        An Fhirinn an aghaidh an t'Saoghail. (The truth against the world.) Is treasa tuath na tighearna. (The common people are mightier than the lords.)

        by OllieGarkey on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 12:55:23 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Ollie I understand your point... (5+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          OllieGarkey, ZhenRen, chimene, jayden, KenBee

          but when you call it a Protest, then the Protesters are labled DFH's. When you call it a Demonstration, they call it a Love-in. When you call it an Action, they call in the military.

          It doesnt matter any more what we call ANYTHING. The smirking, leering ignorant clowns will debase the language. That is all they do.. debase the language. So, ignore what its called, forget about branding and just organize. Stick a finger in  their eyes, and laugh.

          We are going to be called Loons no matter what. Best get used to it, and work toward people accepting Loons as their neighbors and friends.

          Figures don't lie, but liars do figure-Mark Twain

          by OregonOak on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 01:04:59 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I hear what you're saying. (0+ / 0-)

            And I'll absolutely agree that we shouldn't let fear paralyze us into refusing to act.

            A silly and ineffective protest is always better than no protest at all.

            An Fhirinn an aghaidh an t'Saoghail. (The truth against the world.) Is treasa tuath na tighearna. (The common people are mightier than the lords.)

            by OllieGarkey on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 04:21:58 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  But these sentiments should not be suppressed (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          OllieGarkey

          There are activists who create solidarity this way. Suppressing it would backfire. This is what can divide us.

          We need to build strength in our own communities, and work from that basis. It may be the most important approach at the moment, rather than negating the ones who may have the clearest vision.

          Let's not let them drag us all to the right by conforming to the status quo. It takes all kinds to populate a movement.

          I think one of the reasons we fail is because people respect authenticity, and Democrats lack that deep sense of comfort in their own skins that is attractive to independents. They're looking for spunk, and people who stand their ground, proud to be who they are. They can't stand the airy, ivory league liberals who talk down to them, who seem to artificially shape themselves into what is thought to be the image that will work. They sense bullshit when they smell it. Time to try another tack.

          "In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

          by ZhenRen on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 01:19:15 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I could make an argument that (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ZhenRen

            theater of the absurd is stuff that we've been doing since the 60's, and I also kind of resent the idea that I'm not "being who I am" by wanting to have a primarily serious issues-based conversation. We're not trying a different tack when we continue with the theatrics.

            I think we're having some trouble communicating, because I don't think you're trying to accuse me of anything, and I'm definitely not trying to suppress anything.

            I'm the guy who stands up and says that the overuse of pesticides and the death of pollinators are a serious threat to our economy, our way of life, and our ability to feed ourselves.

            But these sentiments should not be suppressed.
            There are activists who create solidarity this way. Suppressing it would backfire. This is what can divide us.
            I have no interest in suppressing anything. If people want to go ahead and have an event, by all means, they should do it.

            And I'm not there. I don't live in Oregon. I'm not going to ever tell anyone they shouldn't have a peaceful direct action, no matter what it is. We need to use every tactic available to us.

            I was just arguing that there's probably more effective messaging. But if this is an internal move to drum up internal support and build solidarity, rather than an attempt to educate the public, it does make a kind of sense.

            To be completely honest, if we're weak enough that having a frank discussion on messaging and strategy is the sort of thing that can divide the movement, then we're already fucked.

            I think one of the reasons we fail is because people respect authenticity, and Democrats lack that deep sense of comfort in their own skins that is attractive to independents.
            I can totally agree with that, but I don't see anything authentic about theatrics.

            I think that most people are smart enough to get what's going on if you just have enough faith in them to lay out the facts of the issues in plain speech.

            I'm just afraid that this is going to be similar to some of the theatrics we've seen in the past where people who don't know the facts or the issues make a big damn absurd noise, and end up turning off people who could otherwise be allies.

            And I think when we're drowning in bullshit as a society, there really is a place for fact-based, plainspoken activism working to inform the public.

            Honestly, if I lived in oregon, what I'd do would be to print up a bunch of fliers and pamphlets about the importance of bees to the Oregon economy and wine production, and start passing them out at wine stores and hanging them up in bars.

            Look, having done activism in Miami and New York I've seen a lot of theatrics, and I've seen a lot of people throw away a golden opportunity to change minds and sweep away the  bullshit by having events like these, and then not focusing at all on education, facts, or the next steps that can be taken.

            It's fun for the moment, but it atrophies quickly.

            I'm not trying to be a naysaying naysayer who naysays. I will even state that it's better that someone holds a memorial for the bees than for nothing at all to happen.

            They're trying something.

            That's awesome.

            I'm just hoping that there is more to this action than the theatrics. I hope that they use this as a jumping off point to create sustainable activism and agitation.

            And by the way, thanks for the excellent diary, thanks for making sure we got this information, and thanks for engaging me in discussion on this point.

            An Fhirinn an aghaidh an t'Saoghail. (The truth against the world.) Is treasa tuath na tighearna. (The common people are mightier than the lords.)

            by OllieGarkey on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 04:06:32 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I attended the event (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              OllieGarkey, KenBee

              There were about 100 people. Speakers were serious, organized, informed, educated. I was one of the first to be handed a mic, and I gave my experience as a third generation beekeeper. A biologist spoke. Many people from the beekeeping community were there. The media covered the event.

              It was a good opportunity to expose the public to the problem. I was interviewed by a reporter.

              By the way, grapes get only minimal benefit from pollination, so I would pick a different crop to use as an example. Grapes are pollinated by wind and gravity. It isn't a major honey plant.

              "In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

              by ZhenRen on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 04:32:40 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  1, that's fucking AWESOME (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                ZhenRen

                and I withdraw my objections.

                2, you know a helluva lot more about bees than I do, but I know something about wine.

                Bees don't pollinate wine, but they're still vital to wine production. Take a look at this picture.

                Shitty soil makes shitty wine. That stuff growing between the vines is clover. Every decent vineyard on this planet either uses clover or mustard or some other flowering plant to enrich the soil's tilth.

                All of those plants need bees.

                If the bees go, the quality of the soil drops. In some cases, those supporting plants are the only reason that the soil is rich enough to grow wine at all. The vines will eventually die without them.

                The only way to make wine is to have a strong ecosystem. Otherwise you'll end up with tiny, wimpy grapes totally unsuited to fermentation. The vines might not have the nutrients they need to make grapes at all.

                Yeah, the grapes themselves aren't pollinated by bees, but bees are an important part of winemaking.

                No bees, no wine. The vineyards will rot without them.

                An Fhirinn an aghaidh an t'Saoghail. (The truth against the world.) Is treasa tuath na tighearna. (The common people are mightier than the lords.)

                by OllieGarkey on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 04:52:01 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

            •  One of the real benefits I saw (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              OllieGarkey, KenBee

              was the community building among activists that was going on. These events bring people together.

              "In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

              by ZhenRen on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 04:34:01 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  You've convinced me. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                ZhenRen

                Good luck at keeping this thing going.

                If there's anything I can do to help all the way over here in New York, let me know.

                An Fhirinn an aghaidh an t'Saoghail. (The truth against the world.) Is treasa tuath na tighearna. (The common people are mightier than the lords.)

                by OllieGarkey on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 04:52:40 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

  •  I'm moving to Oregon soon (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ZhenRen, KenBee

    to a house with lovely roses.  There is a landscaper taking care of them now, probably with this toxic brew.  We'll be doing our own yard work, so I need to know more about roses.  I know ladybugs help with aphids,  but how effective are they?  Are there other non-toxic things to do to protect them?  I've never had roses, and would love to keep them, but not by killing off all the bugs and birds.

    Be bold. Be courageous. Americans are counting on you. Gabby Giffords.

    by Leftleaner on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 01:17:05 PM PDT

  •  Are we sure it's the pesticide? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ZhenRen

    Last article I saw, lab results hadn't come back yet.

    I wouldn't raise the possibility except Linden trees are mentioned... and Linden trees are notoriously toxic to bees.  There was a particular silver one in a house I used to live in in Maryland that was littered with dead and dying bees every time it bloomed.

    •  I have a book (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KenBee

      published in 1920, which lists honey plants. Linden is listed in that book. Linden has long been known as a decent source of honey.

      And yes, according to the Oregon Department of Agriculture, it confirmed that it was the pesticide which killed the bees.

      If you saw dead or dying bees around it, the problem was probably from some other source, such as spray on the plant, or on nearby plants.

      "In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

      by ZhenRen on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 04:20:06 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  yes, the results are definite. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ZhenRen

      clear back on June 21, fer pete sake! google is simple; this was about the 2d result

      "real" work : a job where you wash your hands BEFORE you use the bathroom...

      by chimene on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 07:34:41 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  thx for the diary. I've been meaning to phone (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ZhenRen, KenBee

    local govt pesticide applicators (city, county, school districts) to see if any of THEM are planning to use this junk! it's an on-going struggle around here, what with the forest products people spraying crap all the time...

    "real" work : a job where you wash your hands BEFORE you use the bathroom...

    by chimene on Sun Jun 30, 2013 at 07:36:03 PM PDT

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