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United States diplomacy may now have an interest in Edward Snowden staying where the world can keep an occasional eye on him.  Not that we want him in the spotlight, but if he were to disappear, almost everyone would assume we were responsible.  He wouldn't be the first person "renditioned" to a CIA black site prison that we tried to pretend didn't exist.

This means any government or organization that wants to stir the pot could kidnap him and dodge the blame.  They'd just need to spirit him away without being detected.  

Mr. Snowden himself might want to try that tactic, if he's willing to drop off the face of the earth for a decade or so.  There may be several countries that would be happy to help him do just that.  In fact, maybe he's done it already.  We haven't heard from him in a few days.  We could hardly expect him to leave a message, "Bye now, I'm going into hiding."  Presumably the Guardian and The Washington Post now have all the juicy tidbits he could give them, though they may trickle out the stories bit by bit.  So what does Edward Snowden need to stick around for?  He could just kick back and watch from anywhere on earth that has an internet connection.  After all, any time he sticks his head up the debate tends to shift from whether our government should spy on us back to whether he's a hero or traitor.  He even said he doesn't want to be the subject of the debate; he wants us to look at what the NSA is doing.

For Snowden to disappear might be our intelligence agencies' worst nightmare.  My guess is that they're still trying to piece together what information he has, or might have.  There are probably plenty of things they could quit worrying about if they could "interrogate" him.  If he's holed up in an airport in Moscow, our spooks at least have some chance of keeping track of who he's talking to.  If he were to disappear, they'd have to assume the worst.  

If our intelligence folks had been sly enough to pretend from the beginning that Snowden was a low-level computer geek who didn't really have access to anything important, we likely could have let him go and then made arrangements with his host country to quietly keep tabs on him.  But we can't sell that story now.  

I don't think it's very likely that Edward Snowden will just disappear.  But I could believe the CIA and NSA are already asking the Russians to please keep a close eye on him and make sure he doesn't.  

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78%11 votes

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dumbo, Dianna, Einsteinia, CroneWit

    We're all pretty strange one way or another; some of us just hide it better. "Normal" is a dryer setting.

    by david78209 on Wed Jul 03, 2013 at 08:58:45 PM PDT

  •  I think they would be quite adept (4+ / 0-)

    at making up some horrible cover story if something did happen to him.  "Was Snowden killed by transvestite hookers in Bangkok?"  

    Actually, I think the worst thing that could happen to the Obama administration might be for them to get exactly what they're wishing for: Snowden back in the US, with all the human rights concerns around the world that would raise.  They caught a lot of shit over Bradley Manning, a lot over Julius Assange, but this might be the one to make people say enough is enough.  

    For all the talk about treason and rule of law, etc., the fact remains, Snowden leaked to the American people.  To most people outside the US, that makes him a politicial dissident, not a spy.

    •  That's even more ironic than my idea (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dumbo, CroneWit
      Actually, I think the worst thing that could happen to the Obama administration might be for them to get exactly what they're wishing for: Snowden back in the US, with all the human rights concerns around the world that would raise.
      His trial would be a long-running international relations nightmare.  

      We're all pretty strange one way or another; some of us just hide it better. "Normal" is a dryer setting.

      by david78209 on Wed Jul 03, 2013 at 10:10:06 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  It looks a bit like he has disappeared . (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    david78209, jayden, CroneWit

    If they really thought he might be on that little airplane ,
    that means they don't really know where he is .
    If they really knew where he is , they would know if he was on the little airplane .
    Of course the airplane thing might all have been about something else .

    I have not seen / read / heard of any sightings .
    He might be on a Chinese ship on the high seas .
    He was not seen on the airplane from Hong Kong ,
    the reporters who have looked for him at the airport haven't seen him as far as I know .

    The standard you walk past is the standard you accept. David Morrison

    by indycam on Wed Jul 03, 2013 at 10:12:19 PM PDT

    •  I didn't realize he hasn't been seen since China. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jayden, CroneWit

      (Since Hong Kong, actually, but that didn't fit in the subject box.)  That would be a hoot if even the 'trip' to Moscow was a deception.  Whether he's in Moscow, Hong Kong, or someplace else, it seems he's already got a good head start on disappearing without a trace.  

      We're all pretty strange one way or another; some of us just hide it better. "Normal" is a dryer setting.

      by david78209 on Wed Jul 03, 2013 at 11:11:18 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The only person making claims of (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        david78209

        speaking directly with him is Assange.  Who even told Snowden's father to shut up and that he may only speak to his son through an intermediary.  And then we get that Assange-esque statement "from Snowden" full of non-American writing styles ("the United States have", "1st June", etc), some of which Wikileaks silently changed after the fact.  

        I for one:

         * Don't really know what to make of Snowden, since everything that's come out about the guy thusfar is fuzzy and inconsistent
         * Find the whole situation intriguing and am indeed wondering what's going on with him right now and why he seems to have become little more than an appendage of Julian Assange since Hong Kong.

  •  Depends on where he disappeared. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    david78209

    Right now, I'd suspect KGBish types.

  •  Snowden was INFRASTRUCTURE analyst (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    david78209

    Another diary up right now explains what tn infrastructure analyst does, and offers and explanatoin why the US response wasn't as smart as your statement:

    If our intelligence folks had been sly enough to pretend from the beginning that Snowden was a low-level computer geek who didn't really have access to anything important, we likely could have let him go and then made arrangements with his host country to quietly keep tabs on him.  But we can't sell that story now.  
    The infrastructure analyst job is explained in this diary --

    http://www.dailykos.com/...

    A person in this position 'cracks' the systems to test them for weaknesses.  It's been said that the 'systems analyst' position (which Snowden has been reported as doing at Booz) has 'god privileges' in terms of access.  Well, if SA's have god privileges, then IA's have God's Mama privileges -- which means she can clean out his pockets and search under the bed.

    They can't know what Snowden took, because he would have known how to clean up his tracks.  He could have everything.  And everything cold be in his widely distributed 'dead man's switch' files.

    No wonder USA has gone so crazy over this.  He could publish their internal emails. IF he took them -- and nobody knows whether he did or not.

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