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We're all waiting anxiously for the jury's decision in George Zimmerman's trial.  I've followed the trial as avidly as most.  However, in these last days, my anxiety over the outcome has waned.  It's waned because I've realized that the justice that Trayvon cried out for and deserved has already been done.

We may not know whether Zimmerman will be convicted and be going to prison for killing Trayvon.  What we do know is that the presumption that was first applied to this case - the presumption that it's okay to shoot a black kid walking down the street and no questions will be asked - was rejected.

Think about this.  Initially, Zimmerman was going to walk away from this incident unscathed.  It was going to be assumed by the police that either Trayvon deserved what happened or, at the least, it was a perfectly understandabe, if slightly regrettable, mistake that Zimmerman made.

And people stood up and said NO.  And because people stood up and said no, there was an actual investigation into the killing, Zimmerman was arrested, he was charged, and he was prosecuted.

No one can foretell how a jury will read the evidence presented.  We all know that trials do not always result in justice.  Sometimes the innocent are convicted and sometimes the guilty are found not guilty.  And the same might happen in this case, whichever Zimmerman is.  So although so many will become more emotional about the verdict in this case, whichever way they believe and whichever way the jury decides, I think we need to keep in mind that the real goal - that of holding the life of a young black man as valuable as that of other people, and providing him with the same level of dignity, of respect, of investigation, of prosecutorial vigor - has already been accomplished.  We have won.

Neither you nor I will ever know the actual facts of what occurred that night and even the jury can make only an educated guess.  I can easily envision two scenarios, one involving Trayvon initiating the first physical contact, one involving either both parties or Zimmerman initiating it.

Under neither scenario do I see Zimmerman having planned the killing of Trayvon.  I doubt he was "hunting" him to kill him.  However, under both, I see Zimmerman's own personal ego, carelessness, negligence, and lack of thought and common sense being the direct cause of the altercation that happened.  And for that, whether he seriously believed his life was in danger at the time he pulled the trigger or not, he should pay a price.

The initial facts seem pretty clear.  Zimmerman followed Trayvon.  Trayvon realized he was being followed and had no idea who was following him or why.  He got creeped out, as I believe every single one of us would have.  In fact, he got scared.  He found a place to hide out for awhile.  Then, he ventured back out, hoping he'd lost the guy and hoping to get back home safe.  Unfortunately, his effort resulted in him meeting up with Zimmerman once again.

At this point, Zimmerman might well have been so angry at Trayvon for having "gotten away" from him previously that he wasn't going to let it happen again, and so attacked Trayvon.  Or the meeting might have been so unexpected by both of them while the adrenaline and fear levels of both were sky high that neither saw a way out other than a fight.

It's also possible that Trayvon saw no way of getting away again - or might have seen that Zimmerman had a gun - he might well have thought HIS only option was to go on the offensive.  It's possible that he did indeed attempt to disable Zimmerman, thinking his own life was on the line.  His adreneline would have been sky high, his fear level at this point sky high.  He has no idea who Zimmerman is, no idea the cops have been contacted.  I've been in those situations, and in those, you just react.

So we'll never know.  I find it hard to believe Zimmerman thought he had no option but to shoot and kill the boy, particularly knowing the cops were on their way.  But the jury has to choose between those various scenarios, and Trayvon isn't there to present his story of what happened.  And if they choose the scenario that Zimmerman initiated the fight, they all have to decide the evidence proves that scenario beyond a reasonable doubt.  Or if they decide that Trayvon might have, whether out of fear or not, but that Zimmerman's shooting of him was still not justified under the circumstances, they have to make that decision unanimously beyond a reasonable doubt as well.  That's a high bar.

Remember, if found not guilty, Zimmerman will not be found innocent.  He will only be found not guilty - which means the jury did not believe BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT that he was the initiator of the altercation or that they could not determine that he was not justified in shooting his gun.  It does NOT mean they believe Trayvon was the initiator.  Or that they believe Trayvon was a "punk" who deserved this.  It simply means they were not able to agree that they didn't have a reasonable doubt that it was Zimmerman.

Something went wrong with my computer and I wasn't able to access Dkos for the last couple of weeks and so have followed other sites.  Reading the comment threads regarding this trial on those sites has truly made me sick to my stomach.  I can not believe that so many people are so ignorant and just plain evil that they've resorted to the kind of name calling and victim bashing as they've done to this poor unfortunate young man.  If anyone believes that racism has even been tempered, they need to just read one of these threads.  My heart goes out to every person of color, be they black, brown, the dreaded Muslim, or anything else other than the lily white, as reading those threads has given me a slight understanding of the horrible amount of discrimination they have to live with every day of their lives.  It's there, in front of them, every day.  While they (as so many of us do just to survive sometimes) can try to avoid it, close their eyes to it, try to let it roll off their backs, it's still always there and always affecting them to some degree.  They can avoid reading the crap that's written most of the time if they try, I hope, but they can't help but know it's out there - all the time.

What has struck me is a total lack of understanding of someone like Clarence Thomas and his ilk.  How can people like that stand to be anywhere in the same vicinity, politically, as people like these commenters?  How can they not want to use the positions they've reached to try and staunch some of the effects of these racists assholes?  How can anyone try to claim affirmative action is no longer needed when the proof of discrimination is screaming at them constantly from these assholes?

But that's all a bit off the subject of George Zimmerman.  I just wanted to put out there that, as we're sitting waiting for the verdict in this case, we need to keep it in perspective and recognize that the verdict itself is relatively irrelevant to the case.  The fact that is was investigated, he was arrested, he was charged, and he was vigorously prosecuted means we've already won.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (21+ / 0-)

    "If you trust you are not critical; if you are critical you do not trust" by our own Dauphin

    by gustynpip on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 03:30:24 PM PDT

  •  huh? (10+ / 0-)
    Remember, if found not guilty, Zimmerman will not be found innocent.
    Trials never determine innocence.  Why would anyone assume this one is any different?
    The fact that is was investigated, he was arrested, he was charged, and he was vigorously prosecuted means we've already won.
    That's a ridiculously and, dare I say, desperately low standard.

    Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

    by corvo on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 03:37:52 PM PDT

    •  Ummm. The fact that trials never determine (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ZappoDave, ferg, akmk, mookins

      innocence was the point.  My suggestion is that if the verdict is other than they're hoping, to remember that fact at that time.

      So you don't think it's better that this incident was investigated, that Zimmerman was arrested and charged, and that this case was prosecuted vigorously, even if he's not convicted, is not significantly better than the manner in which it was initially handled before people proclaimed that treating it as a nonincident was unacceptable?  I do.  I think it's a tremendous step foward.

      There's no way to guarantee that a guilty person will be convicted.  I hope Zimmerman is convicted of something.  There's little question he is the cause of this altercation.  However, we have to accept whatever verdict the jury comes back with.  And even if that's a not guilty, I'm very happy that the police ultimately pursued it and the prosecutor vigorously prosecuted it.  And that there was a more than competent judge overseeing it.

      But thanks for your input.

      "If you trust you are not critical; if you are critical you do not trust" by our own Dauphin

      by gustynpip on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 03:47:44 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I'm with you (4+ / 0-)

        the people rose up and demanded Zimmerman be at least arrested, brought before a Grand Jury (which didn't happen) and brought to trial.

        That part is a definite win. No matter what happens.

      •  I don't think it was a "step forward." (9+ / 0-)

        This ain't To Kill a Mockingbird ferchrissakes.  This is the twenty-first century, and vigorous prosecution is the very least we should expect.

        Competent prosecution would've been even better, and the second least thing we should have expected -- but the deceased victim didn't get that, now, did he?

        Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

        by corvo on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 03:52:18 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Why are you so angry with me? (5+ / 0-)

          Yes, a thorough investigation and a vigorous prosecution is the least we should expect.  But it wasn't happening initially, was it?  And wouldn't have, had people not come forward and MADE it happen.

          I simply wrote out a way of looking at the uncertainty and the lack of control we have over a jury's verdict that is providing me with some comfort.  I suggest you take your anger over to those who are making personal attacks against Trayvon rather than heaping it on someone who would dearly love to see Zimmerman in prison for many years.  It's a bit out of control.

          "If you trust you are not critical; if you are critical you do not trust" by our own Dauphin

          by gustynpip on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 04:03:57 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I'm not angry with you; (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            RainyDay

            however, I think you're too easily satisfied.  And the fact that you have to concede this

            But it wasn't happening initially, was it?  And wouldn't have, had people not come forward and MADE it happen.
            just goes to show how poorly justice is being served.  I don't see how this advances your argument at all; rather to the contrary.

            Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

            by corvo on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 04:06:11 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Then I'd hate to think how you talk to people (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              thestructureguy

              when you are angry with them.

              Okay.  You win.  Rather than taking a measure of satisfaction from what WAS accomplished in this case, if it's a not guilty ve.rdict, I'm going to scream and cry and jump up and down and stamp my feet.  Because at least I'll be proving my bona fides and won't be too easily satisfied that way.

              I mean, what's your point?  Of course I won't be satisfied.  But there won't be anything I can do about it, will there be?  So I'm going to accept it, just as I've accepted a zillion other things in life I haven't been satisfied with.  And I'm going to be happy that at least the killing wasn't ignored and his life wasn't treated as meaningless.  You go right ahead and stamp your feet.  In the end, it will be the same.  I just hope that, after the initial disappointment, his parents will be able to adopt my way of thinking of it, as it will definitely make their lives more bearable than will yours.

              "If you trust you are not critical; if you are critical you do not trust" by our own Dauphin

              by gustynpip on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 04:19:51 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  huh? redux (4+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                JoanMar, blueoasis, RainyDay, protectspice
                Rather than taking a measure of satisfaction from what WAS accomplished in this case
                How can you be satisfied with anything less than justice?  And then you turn around and say
                Of course I won't be satisfied
                so this is in part a problem caused by your rather careless use of language.  In any case, I find this appalling:
                I just hope that, after the initial disappointment, his parents will be able to adopt my way of thinking of it, as it will definitely make their lives more bearable than will yours.
                I would never presume to suggest how the parents of a murdered youth should feel, especially because we supposedly had gotten well past the "Well, at least it went to trial" stage in race relations in this country at least two generations ago.

                Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

                by corvo on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 04:28:08 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Let's see: "a measure of satisfaction"; (0+ / 0-)

                  "satisfaction".  Do you not understand that the words "a measure of" actually changes the meaning?  I'd say the problem has been caused partly by your rather careless reading and interpretation and partly by your anger.  

                  You handle the situation the way you chose; I'll handle it the way I chose.  I prefer my way; you prefer yours.  Perhaps we could leave it at that rather than your continuing to have to try and prove that you're somehow superior to me?  

                  "If you trust you are not critical; if you are critical you do not trust" by our own Dauphin

                  by gustynpip on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 04:40:52 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Last I checked, (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    mikejay611

                    either justice is served, or it isn't.  So I don't understand a "measure of satisfaction" when justice isn't being served.  This isn't horseshoes, you know.

                    And really, advising Trayvon's parents as to how they should cope with their grief?  You got a degree in counseling or something?

                    Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

                    by corvo on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 04:43:01 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                •  "Justice" (6+ / 0-)

                  is never an outcome but a process, since the outcome can never wholly be predicted or known, not without pre-jugements that are outside the justice system.

                  All you can expect when you ask for "justice" is that the process be respected, followed, competent and transparent. You can't expect a particular outcome to = justice.

                  I think that this the larger point that the diarist is trying to make.

                  you are arguing that only one outcome = justice and that's the fallacy that so many folks makes about our justice system.

                  Words can sometimes, in moments of grace, attain the quality of deeds. --Elie Wiesel

                  by a gilas girl on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 06:20:07 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  oh, dear, you said "competent." (0+ / 0-)

                    Well, if the prosecution had indeed been competent! . . .

                    You can't expect a particular outcome to = justice.
                    Actually you can, given impartial and complete access to the facts.

                    Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

                    by corvo on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 06:37:28 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

          •  Zimmerman will probably walk, but (0+ / 0-)

            at least the whole world can see (if they choose to open their eyes) what kind of man he is, and I doubt he'll ever again know a moment of real peace.

            "God sees the truth, but waits."-- Tol'stoi

    •  Agreed (8+ / 0-)

      All-white Jim Crow juries routinely found killers of black people not guilty. That was not "winning." This trial, btw, also has no black juror.

      Sunday mornings are more beautiful without Meet the Press.

      by deben on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 03:50:06 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Agreed. However, I apparently did not make (5+ / 0-)

        my point very well.

        What made people rise up in anger over this case was that the fact that the police had no intention of even investigating it initially.  They were simply going to accept Zimmerman's word.  

        People standing up was what caused this to be investigated and ultimately prosecuted.  We can't control what a jury will decide, but we did affect the part we had the power to affect.  And that's the win part.

        That wasn't what was happening in the Jim Crow days.  It is what happens now.  And I'd think anyone would have to agree that it's at least improvement.  

        "If you trust you are not critical; if you are critical you do not trust" by our own Dauphin

        by gustynpip on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 04:09:52 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I was at the protests in Sanford (5+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          corvo, buffie, RainyDay, allensl, mikejay611

          It took a month of international effort just to get the guy arrested. I'd hold up on the "we have won" pronouncement. If Zimmerman's acquitted and goes on a book tour and starts showing up as poster boy for right-to-stand-your-ground...

          Sunday mornings are more beautiful without Meet the Press.

          by deben on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 04:33:08 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Completely Agree.. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      allensl

      If Zimmerman walks, try telling Travon's mother justice was done.

      ...the GOP seems perfectly willing to hold their breath until the whole country turns Blue.

      by tommy2tone on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 07:43:23 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I appreciate your points (9+ / 0-)

    But I think finding Zimmerman guilty is hugely important.

    I followed this story pretty closely but I didn't follow the trial itself. I did listen to various reportings on the trial and nothing seemed to jump out during the trial from what I heard that proved Zimmerman acted in self defense or that Trayvon Martin was looking for trouble. Zimmerman created the situation, from beginning to end, and he needs to be held responsible for his actions.

    If he is found not guilty, it will be a tragedy in my eyes. I can barely stand looking @ photos of Trayvon Martin. It just saddens me so to see his life end at the hands of a man who had no business confronting him.

    And I can't imagine his parents having to sit in a court room and hear "not guilty".

     

    •  I agree that a not guilty will be a tragedy. But (9+ / 0-)

      the case not having been investigated or prosecuted at all would have been a much greater tragedy.

      Guilty people are found not guilty all the time.  It's part of the manner in which our justice system is established, to try to ensure the innocent are not wrongly convicted.  It's always sad and always a tragedy when that happens.

      But it's far worse when a victim is not believed or is valued so lightly that the police don't even care to investigate or the prosecutor refuses to prosecute.

      And remember, that's what almost happened in this case.  Instead, a jury got to hear all the facts that could be gathered.  Not all the facts - some of those died with Trayvon.  

      The initial fight was not to convict Zimmerman.  It was to get the police to investigate the matter.  And that was accomplished.  Not only that, but a vigorous prosecution in front of an excellent judge was put on.

      I sincerely hope it results in a conviction.  But even if it doesn't, Trayvon's parents will know it was not just swept under the rug, that their son's life was not considered so inconsequential that his death didn't even justify an investigation, that no one cared.  I just hope that everyone can hold onto the knowledge that people proved they did care, that he did matter, that because of their voices, Zimmerman was called to account for his actions, whether a jury finds him guilty or not.

      "If you trust you are not critical; if you are critical you do not trust" by our own Dauphin

      by gustynpip on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 03:57:00 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Not sure about this (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mikejay611

    Decades later, and a whole lot of white people are still pissed off that OJ was found not guilty because the jury felt that the state did not prove beyond a reasonable doubt that he murdered two people.

    Time is of no account with great thoughts, which are as fresh to-day as when they first passed through their authors' minds ages ago. - Samuel Smiles

    by moviemeister76 on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 03:56:11 PM PDT

    •  You think it's only white people? I'd think (0+ / 0-)

      anyone who believed he was guilty would be pissed off.  I know I get pissed off whenever anyone I think is guilty is found not guilty - and I end up pissed off a lot.  

      It's also more pissable when a conviction is lost because of an incompetent prosecutor.  Which OJ was fortunate enough to have.

      "If you trust you are not critical; if you are critical you do not trust" by our own Dauphin

      by gustynpip on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 04:13:14 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I think it's more complicated (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        nellgwen, blueoasis, mikejay611

        I think the only people who are still pissed off today to the point that they regularly bring it up as a tragedy of epic proportions come from white people. As for when the verdict was first announced, I think far more people of color had reasonable doubt due to the fact that the prosecution was dumb enough to let a proud racist cop take the stand. A lot more white people tend to believe that cops never lie than people of color due to life experiences.

        Time is of no account with great thoughts, which are as fresh to-day as when they first passed through their authors' minds ages ago. - Samuel Smiles

        by moviemeister76 on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 04:22:50 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  You might be right. I have to admit, the only tim (3+ / 0-)

          I hear it referenced anymore are an occasional late night joke, so I really don't know who's pissed off how much.

          I'll definitely agree on the naivete of white folks.  Although even they seem to be getting it - a little bit.  

          "If you trust you are not critical; if you are critical you do not trust" by our own Dauphin

          by gustynpip on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 04:37:28 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I live in the South (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            mikejay611

            And I'm white. So white people down here often assume that I agree with their racist views. Not a year has gone by in the 16 years I've lived down here in which it wasn't brought up at least three or four times.

            But, yeah, I have hope that we white folks are learning a bit.

            Time is of no account with great thoughts, which are as fresh to-day as when they first passed through their authors' minds ages ago. - Samuel Smiles

            by moviemeister76 on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 04:47:54 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  Not Me, I Wasn't At the Time. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mikejay611

        Our system is designed to err in this direction under certain circumstances, enough of which were present in this case that he got off.

        The system worked as designed and as intended in the 1st OJ trial.

        Of course it was a blow to the victims' families and friends but it is the kind of outcome that must happen periodically to keep the justice system in line.

        We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

        by Gooserock on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 05:30:03 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Zimmerman seems to have been a not-too-bright, (19+ / 0-)

    wannabe cop, self-appointed vigilante who spent his days prowling armed hoping like hell to have a "make my day" opportunity - and by chance one evening Trayvon Martin turned up with skittles...

    The truly alarming thing is that we live in a society that condones the likes of Zimmerman prowling armed - and all the more so if Zimmerman is pronounced not guilty.

    We're shocked by a naked nipple, but not by naked aggression.

    by Lepanto on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 03:59:50 PM PDT

  •  We have not really won until our country learns to (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JoanMar, corvo, gustynpip, mikejay611

    value young Black men and they can get an education and
    a good job.  But within the framework you have laid out Trayvon Benjamin Martin did get his day in court, too bad he wasn't there to enjoy it.  Poor education and lack of jobs among young Black men are a scourge on America and until this changes there will be many more in jail than in college.  Our prisons are jam packed with young people, many from minority communities.  This is what must be  changed or Trayvon Benjamin Martin will have died for a much smaller purpose then he really did.

  •  The verdict is irrelevant? (5+ / 0-)

    I mean, many think that the media coverage was over-the-top. But nobody thinks that this case is irrelevant. It is relevant precisely because it ties into larger, society-wide issues. And whether in this country an armed cop wanna-be who profiles, follows, approaches, and kills a totally innocent 17-year old is held accountable is indeed relevant. And I'm an older white guy from S. Fla and every other white guy I know feels the same way. This creepy guy, who after the fact has shown no remorse whatsoever (in fact, his brother and father have been vociferous at saying that he did nothing wrong at all), deserves to be punished mightily. If not here then in a civil trial.

    •  Don't think the diarist meant irrelevant, and (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      gustynpip, petesmom, jts327, freerad

      maybe the word "won" could be replaced with "have made significant progress".

      Still, much good food for thought excellently expressed by the diarist.

    •  Civil trial... NG result an impediment (0+ / 0-)

      if he is found not guilty in this criminal trial.  Something I didn't know about Florida's 2005 SYG law. (I am assuming both parts passed the legislature in the same year.)

      776.032 Immunity from criminal prosecution and civil action for justifiable use of force.—

      (1) A person who uses force as permitted in s. 776.012, s. 776.013, or s. 776.031 is justified in using such force and is immune from criminal prosecution and civil action for the use of such force.

  •  no/sale..especially not today. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    blueoasis, mikejay611

    Don Benedetto was murdered.-IgnazioSilone(BreadAndWine)

    by renzo capetti on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 04:41:59 PM PDT

  •  Since the standard... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    johnny wurster, Zornorph

    ...is guilt beyond a reasonable doubt, I'm 99% certain that Zimmerman will be found not guilty.

    Warren/3-D Print of Warren in 2016!

    by dov12348 on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 04:44:01 PM PDT

  •  This is a fucked up comment. (5+ / 0-)

    I am sorry but I have just about had it up to here.
    And after this I have to step away from the computer for at least a little while.

    The fact that is was investigated, he was arrested, he was charged, and he was vigorously prosecuted means we've already won.
    Why should Sabrina and Tracy - loving mother and father of the dead teenager - be satisfied with just that?
    Would you be?
    I am not ascribing malicious intent to you but just think of what you wrote.
    You don't speak for me or anybody I know.

    Maya Angelou: "Without courage, we cannot practice any other virtue with consistency. We can't be kind, true, merciful, generous, or honest."

    by JoanMar on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 05:03:22 PM PDT

    •  It's what the parents have said (5+ / 0-)

      Here is a quote from Trayvon's mother:

      "We just want to have that trial, and let the jury decide," she said. "And whatever decision comes out of that, we're going to accept that."

      It's from this CNN story

      http://www.cnn.com/...

      "let's talk about that"

      by VClib on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 05:39:22 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I never tried to speak for you. Or for Trayvon's (4+ / 0-)

      parents.  I spoke for myself.  

      Of course his parents won't be "satisfied".  However, they have said they will accept the verdict, whatever it is.  And that's what I'm suggesting we do.  That we look at what was accomplished rather than stamping our feet over something we can't control.

      People refusing to let this be swept under the rug resulted in an investigation that would otherwise not have been done.  That was all that was demanded.  Not a guilty verdict, not even a charge.  Just an investigation and then a determination of whether charges were justified once the investigation was complete.  Now people are demanding that a jury make a specific decision.  That's not the way our justice system works.  

      If we decide our system has failed every time someone we believe is guilty is not convicted, we're in trouble.  People who are guilty are found not guilty all the time - because the evidence is not strong enough.  I can envision an acquital in this case, unfortunately.  And if that happens and we let that feel that it constitutes a failure, that also will be a shame.  Because at least Trayvon's parents have the knowledge that enough people cared to fight hard enough to get an investigation done and charges brought - and that's what was being fought for.

      "If you trust you are not critical; if you are critical you do not trust" by our own Dauphin

      by gustynpip on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 07:26:48 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  One person planned to eat Skittles, one person (7+ / 0-)

    planned to kill someone.

    It's what they had in their pockets.

  •  There's much truth in this diary. However, still (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lepanto, alice kleeman, Emmy, gustynpip

    hoping there's a conviction, so a "not guilty" verdict won't be interpreted as "It's okay to profile, stalk, and harass, and then shoot to kill when such action creates a normal reaction.

  •  And even if found not guilty Zimmerman's (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mindara

    lies and cowardice are known by millions around the world and they have been thrown in his face for months and weeks.

    He can't hide from his own failure and cowardice.

    Let's not forget he used hollow point bullets.  He intended to kill  if he shot at another person.

    •  Oh Jesus, I hadn't heard he used hollow (0+ / 0-)

      point bullets...just when you think this case can't get any worse...sigh...poor Trayvon.

      "An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow confines of his individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity" Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr..

      by mindara on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 08:58:06 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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