Skip to main content

Shredded paper with word
Despite a White House veto threat, the Republican House passed CISPA in April. The White House had a number of reasons for opposing the cybersecurity bill, including (ironically) privacy, making the House bill essentially dead in the Senate. So now the Senate has started work on a narrower bill, with the hangup still being whether they should make private industry take any responsibility for its own protection.
Lawmakers in both chambers and parties agree that Congress must act to protect businesses and vital computer networks from hackers, but they have deadlocked on the question of whether to impose new regulations. [...]

The Commerce Committee's draft bill would task the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) with developing voluntary cybersecurity standards and best practices for critical infrastructure, such as banks and power plants. The legislation also aims to improve cybersecurity research, education and public awareness. [...]

Meanwhile, on the Senate Intelligence Committee, leaders Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Saxby Chambliss (R-Ga.) have been trying to hammer out a measure that's aimed at improving information sharing about cyber threats between industry and government.

That last one is the one to worry about, the closest counterpart to the House bill, coming from the Intelligence Committee, and from recent experience we know how little protecting individual privacy matters to Feinstein and Chambliss. As always, stay tuned.

Originally posted to Joan McCarter on Mon Jul 15, 2013 at 02:09 PM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (16+ / 0-)

    "The NSA’s capability at any time could be turned around on the American people, and no American would have any privacy left, such is the capability to monitor everything. [...] There would be no place to hide."--Frank Church

    by Joan McCarter on Mon Jul 15, 2013 at 02:09:24 PM PDT

  •  Thank you for yet another great revelation! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    maryabein
    Lawmakers in both chambers and parties agree that Congress must act to protect BUSINESSES!!!

    [emphasis added]

    Why not just do it for the non-WallStreet slobs?

    What are we, chopped liver?  as they say!

    Separation of Church and State AND Corporation

    by Einsteinia on Mon Jul 15, 2013 at 02:24:08 PM PDT

  •  DiFi's gotta go, she has become a blot on the (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cosette, Brown Thrasher

    Democratic Party, the US Senate and the people of the US who she is supposed to be serving. Her oath of office requires her to protect the Constitution, not eviscerate it for the benefit of corporations and the spreading cancer that is the surveillance state.

    "Intelligence is quickness in seeing things as they are..." George Santayana

    by KJG52 on Tue Jul 16, 2013 at 06:48:20 PM PDT

  •  And this comes JUST as... (0+ / 0-)

    ...I get an email from MoveOn saying their servers had been the target of a DDoS attack.  If I were of the tinfoil hat persuasion, I'd smell a rat.  Oh, wait...

    I'll believe corporations are people when one comes home from Afghanistan in a body bag.

    by mojo11 on Tue Jul 16, 2013 at 06:50:05 PM PDT

  •  My favorite part (0+ / 0-)

    will be when the biggest voices thundering about national security and damning all leaks and leakers as being a cancer on the body and soul of our great nation then leak a torrent of classified information themselves.

    For the only noble reason to leak, to damn their enemies and bolster their cases for damning leaks and leakers who are not them.

    I am a Loco-Foco. I am from the Elizabeth Warren wing of the Democratic Party.

    by LeftHandedMan on Tue Jul 16, 2013 at 07:00:40 PM PDT

  •  haha- I love the last quote in that article (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Brown Thrasher, midwesterner
    "Snowden has made [passing] anything next to impossible. That's the reality," one technology lobbyist said.
    Boo f*cking hoo. CISPA was a horrible bill.

    And Lieberman's effort in the Senate sounds pretty pointless:

    The Commerce Committee's draft bill would task the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) with developing voluntary cybersecurity standards and best practices for critical infrastructure, such as banks and power plants. The legislation also aims to improve cybersecurity research, education and public awareness.
    Voluntary standards and best practices? Why is legislation even needed for this?

    Just another reminder that passing a bill != actually achieving something.

  •  I think (0+ / 0-)

    that Congress must act to protect hackers from businesses and vital computer networks.  At least until the scales are balanced.

  •  NSA (0+ / 0-)

    Well, I am sure that by monitoring my phone calls, reading my emails and examining my credit card statements they must have got some great ideas.  I'm sure they was all manner of great ideas there on how to win wars, if only you could find them. They probably read between the lines and saw things that even I didn't see and extrapolated from there using some kind of matrix computer array going at warp speed. That must be it.

    War, war, war 'til the congress takes his funding away!

    by straycatinpdx on Tue Jul 16, 2013 at 07:54:01 PM PDT

  •  Time for the Senate to reign-in Facebook? (0+ / 0-)

    LOL

    All your passwords are ours. Make your time.

    400ppm : what about my daughter's future?

    by koNko on Wed Jul 17, 2013 at 12:21:05 AM PDT

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site