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Scientist continue to make progress in transmitting information at the speed "instantaneous".  Are we witnessing cracks in Einstein's Special Relativity Theory?  Check out the links.

http://www.pbs.org/...

http://www.natureworldnews.com/...

Update:  

Lot's of great comments!  I agree with Doc2, everyone deserves a consolation prize.  You guys and gals are priceless so I'd like to give you some "priceless moments".  You are all winners in my book.  Enjoy!  
http://www.youtube.com/...

Poll

Human Teleportation Will Be Realized In

2%3 votes
2%3 votes
33%34 votes
61%63 votes

| 103 votes | Vote | Results

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (9+ / 0-)

    When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

    by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 05:57:19 PM PDT

  •  what link? eom (4+ / 0-)

    "We didn't set out to save the world; we set out to wonder how other people are doing and to reflect on how our actions affect other people's hearts." - Pema Chodron

    by teacherken on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 05:59:09 PM PDT

  •  No Optimists? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffSCinNY

    Wow.  This is Kos, the land of possibilities.

    When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

    by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 06:09:56 PM PDT

  •  Listen, I'm taking a nap right now. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    xxdr zombiexx, Cat4everrr

    This couldn't wait?

    Warren/3-D Print of Warren in 2016!

    by dov12348 on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 06:34:37 PM PDT

  •  Quantum entanglement doesn't transmit information (10+ / 0-)

    The PBS article itself says for an entangled pair, the best that can happen is that the particle randomly chooses one state, and the entangled distant particle then instantly assumes the same state.  Okay, fine, but that doesn't transmit any information.

    Say a scientist on Mars waits for the pre-arranged time, looks at his particle and sees State 1.

    What does state 1 mean?  What does state 2 mean?  That information would have to be sent ahead of time, with the particle, traveling at sub-light speed.

    Quantum entanglement doesn't allow any information to be sent to Mars faster than light speed.  Thus the laws of physics stand.

    Sorry, I want a sub-space radio also, but quantum entanglement isn't it.

    •  You state (0+ / 0-)

      Okay, fine, but that doesn't transmit any information.

      You lost me a bit.   The first sentence in the second article points to the fact that "For the first time, physicists have succeeded in teleporting information from one place to another in a solid state system".

      When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

      by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:13:49 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  BTW (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        LordMike

        I'd like a sub-space radio also [flashing my winning smile]

        When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

        by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:15:43 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  The article also states the following: (6+ / 0-)
        "Quantum teleportation is comparable to beaming as shown in the science fiction series Star Trek," says Wallraff. "The information does not travel from point A to point B. Instead, it appears at point B and disappears at point A, when read out at point B."
        This stuff is totally fascinating but way way beyond my reptile brain.  Einstein was well aware of "spooky action at a distance".  Everything I've read which did not make eyes glaze over doesn't speak to this as a crumbling of Einstein's theories.  

        I wouldn't be surprised though if in 500 years everything we know about quantum physics is all wrong or we still don't even begin to understand it.  Go back and look at what the great minds had for theories in science and we laugh.  In 500 years they might laugh at us.  

        Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.

        by thestructureguy on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:54:37 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  The quantum non-demolition experiments that (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Cat4everrr, barleystraw

        were a constitutent of Haroche's Nobel prize work, might (I am not sure) be thought of as teleportation, inasmuch as an entangled photon exits a resonant cavity, carrying with it information concerning the state of the cavity, which is read out by detecting (and destroying) the state of the photon, but without destroying the remote cavity state.  

        Nothing here (nor in quantum entanglement generally) to disturb special relativity.  The only recent (non)  event in that category was the (now debunked) report of a faster-than-light neutrino.  This had nothing to do with entanglement or teleportation.  One reason I thought it bogus from the start was that the excess speed was quite tiny, which suggested some sort of systematic error, rather than new physics.

        I am not a physicist by training, but I publish my work in physics journals (Physical Review, Journal of Chemical Physics).

        The hungry judges soon the sentence sign, And wretches hang, that jurymen may dine.

        by magnetics on Sun Aug 18, 2013 at 12:12:36 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  A real is a treat (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          barleystraw, magnetics

          and an honor to have youand a few others post on this thread.  Quantum Physics is a hobby of mine.  Do you hold out any hope for tachyons being discovered OR is it possible that tachyons and the higgs boson particle are the same?

          When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

          by Cat4everrr on Sun Aug 18, 2013 at 04:27:26 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Bell's Telephone. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cat4everrr

      It's an idea that's been around since Einstein's time, with a lot of thought experiments and attempts to explain it in different ways.

      Here's a paper I found at SETI explaining it.

      http://www.seti.org.au/...

      Nobody is trying to break the laws of physics.

  •  Please explain how this effects Einsteins (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    freerad, Cat4everrr, wilderness voice

    theories.  The links didn't set down how this is the beginning of the crumbling of his theories.  

    Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.

    by thestructureguy on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 06:40:11 PM PDT

    •  The just is (0+ / 0-)

      Firstly, are we on the brink of transmitting matter over a medium.  Secondly, is it conceivable that this matter might possibly have the capability of being transmitted faster than the speed of light (instantaneously) in the near future.

      When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

      by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:23:02 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  If all that happened it would still (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Cat4everrr, jgnyc

        be in accordance with Einstein's Laws. If matter is accelerated to velocities faster than light, there will be other dimensions involved. I've never heard of anybody who is challenging either the Special or General theories.

        •  Wait a minute (0+ / 0-)

          adding "other dimensions" to the equation still changes his theory.  

          When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

          by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:51:37 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  You must have read something I didn't, (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Cat4everrr

        because I read nothing anywhere about transmitting matter over a medium.

        •  It's Speculation (0+ / 0-)

          Starting to feel like prying open a coffin.  

          When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

          by Cat4everrr on Sun Aug 18, 2013 at 04:22:47 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Trying to explore (0+ / 0-)

            the possibilities.  With 55 voting 'never' I'm guessing there aren't too many trying to jump on that bus with me except the two brave kossacks who voted for 10 and 20 years.  Is there anyone who is beyond questions.  Why does it seem Einstein gets a pass?

            When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

            by Cat4everrr on Sun Aug 18, 2013 at 04:34:31 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  It's not going to "crumble" (8+ / 0-)

    any more than Newton's laws of motion have "crumbled".

    Newton's laws are very good approximations of special relativity for most real-world circumstances. Special relativity is a very good approximation of general relativity for most real-world circumstances. General relativity is a very good approximation of a yet-undiscovered grand unified theory for most real-world circumstances.

    Now if at some point scientists can reliably carry out faster-than-light transfer of information using quantum effects, it can probably be used to totally fuck with causality, and that would have some interesting effects. But there's no guarantee that any such thing is possible.

    warning: snark above

    by NE2 on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 06:41:57 PM PDT

    •  Oh, and human teleportation (5+ / 0-)

      doesn't follow from any of this. What we're talking about here is transfer of information. We'd need to be able to reliably read the state of every subatomic particle in a human.

      warning: snark above

      by NE2 on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 06:45:50 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  barleystraw's special case of teleportivity (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        quarkstomper, subtropolis, Cat4everrr

        still working on the draft- there's some naseating details to the proof.

        But the outline is like this:
        * Barry Manilow is Music- he writes the songs
        * Music can be encoded as information
        * this danged encryption stuff is a form of encoding
        * we can apparently transmit Barry Manilow in encrypted form
        * nobody really wants to decrypt Barry Manilow anyway
        * so we're done

        We can't test it because we run the risk that we might end up with a combinatorial explosion of Barry Manilow clones permeating the air waves at all know space and time points.

        That could trigger another "Some Body Done Somebody Wrong" incident and possibly even intergalactic war.

    •  I'm an optimist (0+ / 0-)

      I got a feeling we are close to a working gut theory also.

      When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

      by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:35:24 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  You State (0+ / 0-)

      " it can probably be used to totally fuck with causality".  Faster than light would essentially mean time travel, no?

      When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

      by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:36:47 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  It's complicated (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Cat4everrr, Dumbo

        Here's something I wrote a while back:

        A long train moving at a constant velocity fails to trigger the gates at a level crossing, and hits a car. At that instant, the engineer activates a fail-safe that sends an instantaneous (in the train's frame) message back to the caboose. The conductor, riding in the caboose, transfers the message to an instantaneous (in the track's frame) messaging system embedded in the track. The message is then sent to the crossing gate, which lowers. But due to the relativity of simultaneity, this happens before the train reaches the crossing, so no crash occurs.

        So if we assume all inertial frames of reference are equivalent (something which has been borne out by experimentation) we get messages sent back in time from simply being able to send messages faster than light, and yes, being able to send an object faster than light would result in backwards time travel being possible.

        warning: snark above

        by NE2 on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:06:34 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  hmmm (0+ / 0-)

          I hadn't thought of it that far out.  I'm gonna have to let that one marinate a bit.  Really, really interesting though.  Thank you.

          When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

          by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:41:32 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Consolation Gift (0+ / 0-)

          You made a solid case and deserve a super special consolation prize- A free subscription to quarkstomper's webcomic-  http://www.kurtoonsonline.com/

          When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

          by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 09:03:34 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  That doesn't mean it's impossible, (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Cat4everrr

          though.  Causality may have a somewhat exaggerated importance to you and me because of how we're used to thinking about things.  

        •  problem: causes derailment with train behind you (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Cat4everrr

          so your caboose saves the day...but there is a possibility of a cascading reaction racing throughout the rail system.

          Another train, following quickly behind you has to 'caboose' it too to avoid hitting your own caboose...with finite tracks and multiple trains we can encounter scenarios where its "damned if you do, damned if you don't"

          in fact, multiple trains may now be colliding with your train when you pop out of hyper caboose braking or whatever.

          Or worse, Johnny Cash might get hit by a cow catcher as the Orange Blossom Special avoids the Orient Express.

  •  Crumble? Not! (12+ / 0-)

    Alas, I don't have time this evening to discuss it, but there is nothing here that indicates anything wrong with special relativity.  Quantum mechanics and special relativity were put together 60 years ago .... (I teach relativistic quantum mechanics).    It is the most successful scientific theory in human history and nothing contradicts it.  Yes, quantum teleportation has been seen, but nobody has ever figured out a way to send information from point A to point B faster than light using it.   Correlations between random strings of numbers can go faster than light, but random strings of numbers convey no information ... One can only tell when getting together afterwards.   It is still cool, though...

  •  These dilithium crystals are no good. (10+ / 0-)

    You were ripped off, Scotty.

  •  Tough Crowd Tonight (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    magnetics

    [smiling]

    When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

    by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:03:46 PM PDT

  •  Transporter Talk (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Cat4everrr, wilderness voice, jayden

    This reminds me of a lovely bit of technobabble from Spock Must Die! , the very first original Star Trek novel written by James Blish:

    "It is and it isn't," McCoy said.  "It goes like this.  If I understand Scotty aright, the transporter turns our bodies into energy and then reconstitutes them as matter at the destination..."

    "That's a turrible oversiplification," Scott objected.  ... "What the transporter does is analyze the energy state of each particle in the body and then produce a Dirac jump to an equivalent state somewhere else.  No conversion is involved -- if it were, we'd blow up the ship."

    Read my webcomic, "Hannibal Tesla Adventure Magazine" at http://www.kurtoonsonline.com/

    by quarkstomper on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:24:10 PM PDT

    •  Beauty (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      quarkstomper

      at it's best.  Strange and quarky.

      When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

      by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:29:50 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Hey Quarkstomper! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      quarkstomper

      I'm a fan of your webcomic.  It looks like it's free.  I hope you don't mind that I used it as a super special consolation gift.  If so let me know and I can change it up.

      Thanks!
      Cat

      When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

      by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 09:07:40 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Always Glad to Meet a Fan (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Cat4everrr

        Yes, the webcomic is free.  I've been working on getting a dead-tree compiliation published to sell, but keep getting distracted.

        If you enjoy the comic, there is a link on the site for donations which are always cheerfully accepted; and I am going to be adding a page to the site for ordering commissioned art.

        And I really need to update the comic; I've let that slide for a couple weeks.

        Read my webcomic, "Hannibal Tesla Adventure Magazine" at http://www.kurtoonsonline.com/

        by quarkstomper on Sun Aug 18, 2013 at 06:11:50 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  This is a very short diary - so this will be a (5+ / 0-)

    This is a very short diary - so this will be a very short answer:

    No

    And an answer longer by 50%:
    EPR

    Queror Ergo Sum. -- Rene Descartes Shakshuka

    by The Revenge of Shakshuka on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:24:37 PM PDT

  •  Quantum Entanglement was known by Einstein... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Cat4everrr, FlyingToaster

    he called it 'spooky action at a distance'.

    I think if C is truly a limit and not just a barrier then quantum entanglement is likely caused by a extra dimension of very small size that touches the whole universe allowing information to appear to travel FtL.

    The problem is there is nothing else that isn't at the quantum level to test, so it could just be the way it works, our perceived laws limitations be damned lol.

    The greatest shortcoming of the human race is our inability to understand the exponential function [Albert A. Bartlett]

    by fToRrEeEsSt on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:25:23 PM PDT

  •  Einstein fought this fight personally in the 1920s (4+ / 0-)

    claiming that Quantum Mechanics could not possibly be true. He lost. But Special Relativity did not.

    Every time he came out with a supposed impossibility derived from the wave equation, the experimentalists said, "Gosh, thanks, Albert!" and went to the lab, where it turned out that the "impossibility" was real. We cannot distinguish waves from particles. There are not, and cannot be, hidden variables in a field theory. Quantum entanglement is real. "Spooky" action at a distance is neither spooky nor action at a distance, according to the actual equations, in which the only thing that exists is the wave function of the entire system, not separate functions for components.

    The fuss over "action at a distance" is like Kepler wondering whether the moon has something to do with the tides, and Galileo shouting, "Occult influences!" But Newton derived the tides from inverse-square gravity, which cannot be denied given the orbits of planets, comets, and the rest. That, too, turns out not to be action at a distance once we have General Relativity. It's just the shape of spacetime.

    In Relativity, Matter tells Space how to curve, and Space tells Matter how to move.

    The Heart of Gold told space to get knotted, and parked itself neatly within the inner steel perimeter of the Argabuthon Chamber of Law.

    Douglas Adams, HHGTTG

    None of the above has ever had anything to do with Special Relativity, which remains equally true macroscopically, no matter who claims to have found a hole in it. The speed of light in a vacuum is constant, motion causes predictable changes in mass, length, and proper time of any object, and E=MC2, always and forever, within the limits of quantum indeterminacy, which is not in question in this case. The experiment is about quantum entanglement, which remains even when the entangled photons or particles are separated.

    It is understood that Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity cannot both be true beyond a certain level of approximation in situations like the Big Bang and the interior of a Black Hole. It is understood that there is more physics to be discovered. But what has been established within certain limits of approximation is not going to become unestablished. Ptolemaic astronomy and celestial navigation are as approximately correct as ever, and the same for Galileo, Newton, Einstein, and all of QM from Max Planck, Einstein, and Niels Bohr to the Higgs boson.

    The rest is crankery.

    Ceterem censeo, gerrymandra delenda est

    by Mokurai on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:42:27 PM PDT

    •  Thank you for the thoughtful comment (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Gooserock

      I'm holding out hope that there's got to be more.  If C.E.R.N can discover a "god particle" anything is possible.

      When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

      by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:49:20 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  You seem to know a lot about this stuff. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cat4everrr, Gooserock

      Say you actually could transport a human at speeds approaching the speed of light. Wouldn't this be moot as the person would surely die? While you could accelerate him slowly so that G forces would not be a problem, at some point I would imagine he would expire, from just going too fast. Maybe his limbs would break from Lorentz contraction, or his heartbeat would slow to zero as time dilated. What do you think, would it be survivable?

      •  Far fetched (0+ / 0-)

        But what about teleportation involving a state other than solid.  A sort of animation, the possibility of uploading a consciousness into an inanimate object. Possible?  

        When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

        by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:09:21 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I don't know if you really have to recreate (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Cat4everrr

          the person at the subatomic level, where the uncertainty principal would limit what you can do. At the atomic and molecular level you'd have to be able to replicate most of what is there. It is the brain that would be the toughest. Not only do you have to recreate, to great precision, about a trillion neurons; you have to connect them in 100 trillion ways to other neurons, and get all (or substantially all) of the interconnections and synaptic weights right. And you'd have to recreate electrons all over the place, because the brain at all times has a complex electric field it self-generates, with charges running all over the place and pulsing at 40 hertz or so. I hate betting against technology, but it seems pretty impossible to me.

          •  Well (0+ / 0-)

            You really open the door to another possibility related to the article- quantum computing.  Surely you won't deny this opens the door to a sort of subluminal computing?  Can't get much faster than that.

            When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

            by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:38:28 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  If all they do with quantum computing (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Cat4everrr

              is to make computers faster, I'm not sure I'd see that as revolutionary. If quantum computing is used to create much more robust neural network computers, then that would be a revolution. Computers that start out, like our brains, as just a bunch of neurons (or simulated neurons). They are then taught, as humans are, a sizable vocabulary, as well as how to solve problems. Such computers would really change the world as we know it. They have them already, but they are tiny relative to the human brain. When their scale of neural interconnections rivals that of the human brain, watch out.

              •  You make a solid case also (0+ / 0-)

                Super special consolation prize- free subscription to quarkstomper's webcomic- http://www.kurtoonsonline.com/

                When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

                by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 09:05:19 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  It's revolutionary because it changes complexity (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                doc2, Cat4everrr

                The phrase "make computers faster" is misleading.  Yes, making a computer 10 times faster or 1000 times faster or any constant factor k times faster would not be revolutionary.

                But quantum computing changes the complexity of computation.  An exponentially complex computation in classical computing (that means that for a problem of size N, the time is of the order e to the power N) can become a polynomial computation in quantum computing (meaning that the time is of the order N to some power k).  As N gets larger, the advantage of the quantum computer over the classical computer approaches infinity.  And that is revolutionary.

                The most well-known example is Shor's algorithm, which on a quantum computer can find the factors of an N-bit integer in time proportional to N to the 3, which for large N is significantly faster than the best algorithms on a classical computer.  This renders public key cryptography (which is based on the assumption that factoring very large numbers is impractically hard) breakable, which I would call revolutionary, particularly in the context of the discussions we've been having here lately about keeping your communications secure from government snooping. Other problems in searching and simulation that are currently impractically hard would become feasible.

                So if someone can build a computer based on quantum entanglement that can scale to a non-trivial number of qubits, that would be a BFD.

                I don't believe the original statement that this overturns special relativity, but that can be a separate discussion.

      •  I Think He's Not Compressing Within Space But (3+ / 0-)

        the space he's embedded in is compressing, so his electrons and molecules etc. do not experience a change in relationships within their frame.

        Same for time, so yes his heartbeat slows but so do all the negative consequences of it, because they're all in the same frame.

        We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

        by Gooserock on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:22:55 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  That may be what the theory says. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Cat4everrr

          But until we can strap an astronaut into a suit and hurl him at speeds approaching c, we can't say that we have any experimental evidence that it wouldn't have some physiological or psychological affects we can't envision today.

          •  I Guess (0+ / 0-)

            I'm not getting why the thought of the possibility isn't as exciting as it would seem to be.  

            When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

            by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:32:59 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Did you read about (0+ / 0-)

            The hyperloop system?  LA to NY in under 45 minutes  http://www.businessweek.com/...
            What if Elon Musk was pessimistic?  

            When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

            by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:35:09 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Well, it could be that instantaneous (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Cat4everrr

              teleportation just ends up not that big a desire since the Hyperloop can get you there almost as fast. If they could run the Hyperloop through the center of the Earth, it would open up rapid transportation to Asia and Oceania from North America (or enable Arctic explorers and Antarctic explorers to switch places quickly).

      •  That's a misunderstanding (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Cat4everrr, guyeda

        If you observe him traveling at a velocity approaching c relative to you, you will observe he has a very small size and an enormous mass. He will observe the same thing about you (you, after all, are traveling close to c with respect to him as well).

        But within his frame of reference, everything will seem normal.

        If you're traveling on a train, the sound of the wheels is constant to you, but varies in pitch for an observer standing next to the track. Conversely, when you pass a signal that's clanging, it changes in pitch as you approach and pass, but a stationary observer next to the signal hears a constant pitch from it ('stationary' meaning the observer and signal are moving at the same velocity, just as you're moving at the same velocity as the train).

        No matter how cynical you become, it's never enough to keep up - Lily Tomlin

        by badger on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 11:44:42 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Nice Visual (0+ / 0-)

          I could map out in my mind what you convey.  Anyone who can break down quantum physics on an elementary level is ok with me.   Thanks so much!

          When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

          by Cat4everrr on Sun Aug 18, 2013 at 04:19:16 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  all action is action at a distance (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cat4everrr

      when we grasp something with a hand it seems like we are "touching" it, but at the microscopic level electrons are repelling each other and never "touch".

  •  I'd like to give a shout out (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Gooserock

    to the one person who voted for 10 years; and the one person who voted for 20.  Everrr the optimist.   :-)

    Thank you for all the thoughtful comments!

    When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

    by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 07:55:03 PM PDT

  •  22 Nevers? (0+ / 0-)

    C'mon kossacks.  What if Elon Musk, Howard Dean or Oprah thought that way???

    When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

    by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:15:56 PM PDT

  •  Tangled up in blue, you say? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Cat4everrr

    So as long as I got tangled up as a Democrat nothing could untangle me as a republican, right? They said we'd never make an atom bomb and now politicians threaten the nuclear option all the time.  If dogs and cats can get entangled and survive science will follow.

    Our money system is not what we have been led to believe. The creation of money has been "privatized," or taken over by private money lenders. Thomas Jefferson called them “bold and bankrupt adventurers just pretending to have money.” webofdebt

    by arealniceguy on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:20:52 PM PDT

    •   I like this guy (0+ / 0-)

      "If dogs and cats can get entangled and survive science will follow"  

      Good point...lol

      When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

      by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:24:23 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  30 Nevers? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wilderness voice

    So much for the Elon Musk/Howard Dean/Oprah inspiration speech.  

    Okay, you guys win.  You can stop voting now [waving white flag]

    When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

    by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 08:29:55 PM PDT

  •  ~Diary Updated~ (0+ / 0-)

    Thanks to all who participated!

    When my cats aren't happy, I'm not happy. Not because I care about their mood but because I know they're just sitting there thinking up ways to get even. -Percy Bysshe

    by Cat4everrr on Sat Aug 17, 2013 at 09:19:47 PM PDT

  •  Interesting post, but the poll options are stupid (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Cat4everrr

    there's a galaxy-sized difference between 10 and 20 years on one end and "Never" on the other, and "Hold that thought" is meaningless and useless as a polling option. Why not some intermediate options like 500 years or a thousand?

  •  If we can just get raw materials (0+ / 0-)

    Teleported that would be a big deal.

    Humans need to live, but raw materials can be broken up without any harm.

    Food, not so sure about.



    Women create the entire labor force.
    ---------------------------------------------
    Sympathy is the strongest instinct in human nature. - Charles Darwin

    by splashy on Mon Aug 19, 2013 at 09:50:44 PM PDT

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