Skip to main content

Money swirling into a black hole
The U.S. will spend $52.6 billion in fiscal year 2013 on intelligence efforts, according to documents obtained from Edward Snowden by The Washington Post. That budget summary and report reveals that the U.S. intelligence agencies "remain unable to provide critical information to the president on a range of national security threats."
The $52.6 billion “black budget” for fiscal 2013 [...] maps a bureaucratic and operational landscape that has never been subject to public scrutiny. Although the government has annually released its overall level of intelligence spending since 2007, it has not divulged how it uses those funds or how it performs against the goals set by the president and Congress. [...]

Among the notable revelations in the budget summary:

•Spending by the CIA has surged past that of every other spy agency, with $14.7 billion in requested funding for 2013. The figure vastly exceeds outside estimates and is nearly 50 percent above that of the National Security Agency, which conducts eavesdropping operations and has long been considered the behemoth of the community.

•The CIA and NSA have launched aggressive new efforts to hack into foreign computer networks to steal information or sabotage enemy systems, embracing what the budget refers to as “offensive cyber operations.”

•The NSA planned to investigate at least 4,000 possible insider threats in 2013, cases in which the agency suspected sensitive information may have been compromised by one of its own. The budget documents show that the U.S. intelligence community has sought to strengthen its ability to detect what it calls “anomalous behavior” by personnel with access to highly classified material. [...]

The NSA was projected to spend $48.6 million on research projects to assist “coping with information overload,” an occupational hazard as the volumes of intake have increased sharply from fiber optic cables and Silicon Valley Internet providers.

Here's some free advice: stop vacuuming up so much random data, and use that $48.6 million to figure out how to target better so you don't have information overload. The budget also details how little success the intelligence community has had in two particular areas: North Korea, where it details five "critical gaps," and "the emergence of 'home grown' terrorists who plan attacks in the United States without direct support or instruction from abroad [...]."

Tim Shorrock, author of Spies for Hire points out where a huge percentage of the money has gone:

ODNI confirmed that 70% of the intel budget goes to contractors. With the new WaPo numbers, that's $36.8 billion in 2013 to BOOZ SAIC et al.
@TimothyS
It's sustaining the intelligence/industrial complex, much like the grift that made plenty of millionaires out of the Iraq war. As with so many of the military contractors in Iraq, this is happening with very little oversight from Congress and—until now—no scrutiny from the public.

Originally posted to Joan McCarter on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 11:14 AM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (40+ / 0-)

    "The NSA’s capability at any time could be turned around on the American people, and no American would have any privacy left, such is the capability to monitor everything. [...] There would be no place to hide."--Frank Church

    by Joan McCarter on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 11:14:39 AM PDT

  •  No universal healthcare, but we're cool with this! (10+ / 0-)

    The tent got so big it now stands for nothing.

    by Beelzebud on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 11:21:11 AM PDT

    •  And cutting school budgets to their knees (7+ / 0-)
      And Social Security is on the chopping block every 5 mins
      And the middle class is going Detroit
      ALL BUDGETS SHOULD BE TRANSPARENT

      so, that We, THE PEOPLE, can vote on how we want to spend OUR hard earned dollars, which for most now means: no vacation, no benefits, no pension, part-time 8.75 an hour, no security.

      Separation of Church and State AND Corporation

      by Einsteinia on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 11:59:31 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You really want budget items set by popular vote? (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        hmi, Onomastic

        So, if folks just decide not to, say, maintain roads for a year or fund Pell grants this year, that's just how it played out?

        No thanks.  I think that we have more than enough examples of the effects of direct democracy (think ballot initiatives - Proposition 13 in California, for instance) to sink that notion.

        The word "parent" is supposed to be a VERB, people...

        by wesmorgan1 on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 12:13:49 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Perfect example. I LOVE Prop. 13! (0+ / 0-)

          The poor and the elderly with homes used to be tyrannized by annual property tax increases.

          Yet the implementaiton of Prop 13 in California (that caps the increase of property taxes to 2% per year) did expose a HUGE dark underbelly of our education system that is based on the wealth of local neighborhoods, which is not an egalitarian way to provide education.

          How about a 1 size fits all budget for ALL that is not based on local revenue to fund schools?  This way poor people might have a chance to the same quality of schools that wealthy communities were once provided.

          Separation of Church and State AND Corporation

          by Einsteinia on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 12:30:02 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  My point being... (0+ / 0-)

            ...do you really trust both the general population AND the electoral process to handle the multiude of issues presented by a budget?

            The word "parent" is supposed to be a VERB, people...

            by wesmorgan1 on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 01:17:54 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Yes I do. Here's how I imagine it: (0+ / 0-)

              The voters would be able to see online EVERY single line item on the budget.

              BUT hat we would vote on would be a pie chart allocating what portion of our budget.  For example, it might look like this:

              30% - National Defense/Security (military, snoops and police)
              30% - Education (preschool through college)
              10% - Infrastructure (bridges, roads, airports)    
              10% - Safety Net        
              10% - Research & Job Development (future economy)
               5% - Administration (Congress, etc., and no lobbyist $$$)
               5% - Environmental and Consumer Protection

              Separation of Church and State AND Corporation

              by Einsteinia on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 02:26:21 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  And you really think that people... (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Onomastic

                ...will make choices from enlightened self-interest?

                Consider red states and the paradox of their consistent voting for "kill the entitlements, no socialism" politicians even as they consistently receive more Federal funding than they pay in taxes.

                Heck, my state includes the second-poorest Congressional District in the country--one in which 1 of every three households receives SNAP, for starters--and they've been electing a benefits-cutting GOPer for the last 25 years.  Do you really think those folks are going to step up and vote for a workable budget?

                Do you believe that folks are going to vote for "research and job development" when their area gets neither?

                I'll give you credit for belief in the potential, but human nature suggests that yours is a rather utopian view.

                The word "parent" is supposed to be a VERB, people...

                by wesmorgan1 on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 04:58:19 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  The reality this IS what is going on (0+ / 0-)

                  with midnight pork added to bills.  The alternative is to turn the lights on, and make adult decisions on how we want to divvy up our precious taxpayer dollars.

                  And while we're at it, we need to the corporate welfare, H1 Visas, and other give aways, that are not on the General Ledger.

                  When it comes down to it, I suspect people -- red or blue states -- fundamentally want the same things -- even if they quibble on the details.

                  Separation of Church and State AND Corporation

                  by Einsteinia on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 07:13:14 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

    •  marcy's got her black-budget copy. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Tool, Beelzebud

      emptywheel is dissecting it now. excellent brain power.

      time spent there, quietly, humbly, will prove far better than commenting -- anywhere. at all.

      @Hugh: There is no Article II power which says the Executive can violate the Constitution. * Addington's perpwalk? TRAILHEAD of accountability for Bush-2 Crimes.

      by greenbird on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 01:30:14 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  this was an accidental leak? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    charliehall2, JML9999, Matt Z

    Given Snowden, etc? It could be

    a. disinformation
    b. an honest accounting accidentally released
    c. an honest accounting deliberately released
    d. other.

    What we call god is merely a living creature with superior technology & understanding. If their fragile egos demand prayer, they lose that superiority.

    by agnostic on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 11:24:45 AM PDT

    •  all of the above /nt (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      charliehall2, JML9999

      Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013

      by annieli on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 11:30:37 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Did you read the article? n/t (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      emal, 3goldens
    •  It was part of the Snowden... (7+ / 0-)

      ...docs, but WaPo vetted it through the government and withheld lots of information that the gov't deemed sensitive to National Security.

      all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.

      by 4kedtongue on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 11:33:02 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Vetting Public Documents? (0+ / 0-)

        "The Snowden docs" were published by Snowden through Wikileaks, the Guardian and others. What's the point of removing some of that info for publication in the Washington Post? Any bad guy will get the missing info from the unvetted release. Indeed, the vetting could highlight the value of some info that can be gotten anyway but could have been lost in the haystack.

        Unless the value in vetting is precisely the worthless exercise simply in loyalty to the Pentagon.

        Or else perhaps "the bad guy" is the American people, who won't bother to read about it anywhere but the Washington Post and its subsequent syndication.

        "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

        by DocGonzo on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 01:17:31 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Really? (0+ / 0-)

          I wasn't aware that the documents were published.  Encrypted data has been posted to WikiLeaks website, but it just sits there as insurance.  I think that so far only certain documents have been used in reporting -- the entire cache has not been published.

          all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.

          by 4kedtongue on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 01:33:27 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  WaPo Access (0+ / 0-)

            The Washington Post has not been given any documents directly by Snowden or by anyone else. Only Wikileaks, Greenwald, the Guardian, and now the NY Times in partnership with the Guardian have received any Snowden docs that haven't been published.

            "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

            by DocGonzo on Fri Aug 30, 2013 at 02:02:40 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I thought Bart Gellman -- (0+ / 0-)

              -- at WaPo was given docs by Snowden (along with WikiLeaks, Greenwald, and Poitras).  Of course, since Poitras and Greenwald were with him in Hong Kong, I assumed she was one of those given a copy directly by Snowden.

              I think I may have misunderstood your original comment.  I though you said the docs had been published.  Some of the documents have been published, but not all of them.  It only stands to reason since Booz Allen / NSA still haven't determined exactly what Snowden took with him.

              all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.

              by 4kedtongue on Fri Aug 30, 2013 at 03:33:41 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  Quote from the article: (8+ / 0-)
      The summary describes cutting-edge technologies, agent recruiting and ongoing operations. The Washington Post is withholding some information after consultation with U.S. officials who expressed concerns about the risk to intelligence sources and methods. Sensitive details are so pervasive in the documents that The Post is publishing only summary tables and charts online.

      all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.

      by 4kedtongue on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 11:35:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  By My Calculations... (5+ / 0-)

    ...if a toilet takes one minute to refill between flushes and can accomodate 100 $100 bills per flush, it would take ten toilets running 24/7/365 to accomodate the black budget (and produce the same results in terms of keeping the nation safe).

    On the Internet, nobody knows if you're a dog... but everybody knows if you're a jackass.

    by stevemb on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 11:25:02 AM PDT

    •  You must have super-efficient toilets in your home (0+ / 0-)

      100 bills in one flush?  I'm pretty sure that's a lot more than my commodes could handle.

      I'm sure there is an answer to this question somewhere, though.  Perhaps some government contractor somewhere has been paid to figure out how many hundred-dollar bills can be flushed in one flush without backing  up the toilet.  Would be useful information for the likes of Booz Allen, Lockheed, and Xe to have, no?

      Please help to fight hunger with a donation to Feeding America.

      by MJB on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 12:27:54 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  $400 Toilet Seat (0+ / 0-)

        It's takes a hell of an expensive Pentagon toilet to flush our tax dollars in the volumes the Pentagon does it for us. Victory!

        "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

        by DocGonzo on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 01:19:01 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  It's A Guesstimate (0+ / 0-)

        On the other hand, "one minute" may err on the pessimistic side -- maybe 50 bills every 30 seconds is more realistic on both counts, and comes down to the same answer.

        On the Internet, nobody knows if you're a dog... but everybody knows if you're a jackass.

        by stevemb on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 02:23:03 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Shorrock's number may be low. (6+ / 0-)

    According to the article:

    Spending in the most recent cycle surpassed that amount based on the $52.6 billion detailed in documents obtained by The Post, plus a separate $23 billion devoted to intelligence programs that more directly support the U.S. military.
    So the total budget is $75.6 Billion which would mean that it is roughly a $50 Billion contractor cash cow.
  •  But remember - the MiC doesn't control shit. (9+ / 0-)

    Jeebus.

    1) Bomb Syria 2)???????????? 3) Lives saved!!!!!!

    by JesseCW on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 11:27:40 AM PDT

  •  Lucy.....chu got some splainin to do. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    annieli
  •  As I noted in bobswern's diary on this... (13+ / 0-)

    All this technology and spying and listening and reading and, yet, they still "remain unable to provide critical information to the president on a range of national security threats."

    Figures.

    But they can check to see if their spouses are cheating or what their ex-girlfriends are up to.

    Too fuckin' funny.

    At least we can count on their general incompetence. But you can be damn sure the companies supplying the incompetence are being very well paid.

    Calling other DKos members "weenies" is a personal insult and therefore against site rules.

    by Bob Johnson on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 11:29:11 AM PDT

  •  and who benefits: MIC for cost overruns (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    3goldens, Involuntary Exile
    U.S. intelligence agencies "remain unable to provide critical information to the president on a range of national security threats."

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013

    by annieli on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 11:29:45 AM PDT

  •  Thank goodness we have the House and Senate (9+ / 0-)

    Intelligence Committees who I'm sure will account for every dime.

  •  Too many contractors. Period. (12+ / 0-)

    The GOP is fond of saying that "government is bad."  What they mean is, "there'$ $o much profit to be made, it $hould be made by my friend$ and, e$pecially, my contributor$ in the private $ector."

    These companies are not subject to oversight, and MUST be reined in.

    "It ain't right, Atticus," said Jem. "No, son, it ain't right." --Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

    by SottoVoce on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 11:33:15 AM PDT

  •  Intelligence....is the earth warming yes or no?... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    WheninRome

    Inquiring minds would like to know.

  •  The amount is about what many have speculated (0+ / 0-)

    and unfortunately so is the amount spent on contractors. :(

    Maybe the Snowden incident will get people to realize that intelligence gathering and analysis should be done mostly by people who actually work for our country.

    Oh, I forgot. The purpose of the government is to make the private sector wealthy. My bad.

  •  Can't afford food stamps for our children, though. (15+ / 0-)

    Our priorities are upside down. We could easily provide basic health care to all Americans. If we wanted to.

    Why aren't we in the streets by the millions? With an attitude.

    What is so unnerving about the candidacy of Sarah Palin is the degree to which she represents—and her supporters celebrate—the joyful marriage of confidence and ignorance. SAM HARRIS

    by Cpqemp on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 11:44:04 AM PDT

    •  All this $$ and they can't stop two morons (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      emal, Tool

      with Grannie's pressure cooker from Wreaking havoc at a major city marathon......

      While the more rabid members of the GOP are going after stuff like food stamps

      I want 1 less Tiny Coffin, Why Don't You? Support The President's Gun Violence Plan.

      by JML9999 on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 12:18:52 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Edward Snowden is going to turn out to be (13+ / 0-)

    a real live hero despite the administration's and others  in the intelligence-addicted community's attempts to demonize him.  Anyone who does less to damage this country than George W. Bush and his crew deserves to escape any punishment at all.  Snowden's employment pledge shouldn't limit his actions any more than a president's oath to preserve, protect and defend the Constitution.

    And now, to add insult to injury, the DOJ is pushing the federal court in San Francisco to grant immunity from war crimes prosecution to Bush, Cheney, Rumsfeld, Rice and Wolfowitz.  It's outrageous.

    "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

    by SueDe on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 11:47:16 AM PDT

  •  Jesus (0+ / 0-)

    It's amazing to me that anyone can ever get anything done, in any endeavor.

  •  I mean (0+ / 0-)

    how did a low level contractor employee like Snowden get access to this? It's like EVERYTHING.

    •  It's difficult to administer a computer system... (0+ / 0-)

      ...without having fairly extensive privileges.  Someone has to have sufficient privilege to configure the privilege system, right?

      The word "parent" is supposed to be a VERB, people...

      by wesmorgan1 on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 12:18:37 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Computers are tricky things (0+ / 0-)

        I spend 9 hours of my day in front of my computer. I'm tech support. I can't get into certain system by design but if someone wanted to destroy a company from the inside being a computer tech is probably the best way to do it.

  •  This is good at least: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Onomastic

    "The budget also indicates that the intelligence community has cut the number of contractors it hires over the past five years by roughly 30 percent."

  •  This is a counterproductive news release, IMO (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Drocedus

    It fails to advance the Snowden/Greenwald narrative, which is, we must remember, purportedly about domestic surveillance of an illegal/unconstitutional scope. These journalistic diversions into foreign surveillance and non-illegal/unconstitional activity are unhelpful.

    I think the "there" will be found in the PRISM loose ends, but those loose ends now seem to be casualties of this supposedly ingenious drip-drip strategy, a strategy that I consider desensitizing (boiled frogs), diluting (details spread thin and at risk of being overlooked, losing the impact of a consolidated presentation), and downright confusing.

    They have not sufficiently grilled the tech companies on these aspects of PRISM (which I posted elsewhere):

    The tech companies are still trying to frame PRISM as a case of receiving old-style legal requests.

    I call BULLSHIT.

    1. It doesn't cost 20 million a year (PRISM slides) for old-style legal requests, and you don't need to reimburse millions for old-style legal requests (recent revelations).
     2. It doesn't take five years (PRISM slides) to implement old-style legal requests.
     3. You don't need government interception equipment on company premises (PRISM slides + WaPo details) for old-style legal requests (or for parceled SFTP delivery, for that matter).
     4. Old-style legal requests don't take into account PRISM's real-time capabilities (PRISM slides).
     5. The companies feigned obliviousness during the initial round of denials -- obliviousness doesn't square up with government interception equipment on company premises and hefty costs. This means the companies can't be assumed to be honest actors, making their statements dubious.

    We have to assume the slides are the most trustworthy sources of information in this saga, and the more I've seen of the PRISM slides (add in the XKEYSCORE slides as well), the more I'm convinced that "direct access" is exactly that: The NSA "tasks" a selector, and the company servers hand over the details pronto.

    This "legal request" nonsense is smoke and mirrors, IMO.

    "Yes We Can!" -- Barack Obama

    by Sucker Politics on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 11:56:09 AM PDT

    •  You may see higher narrative priorities (4+ / 0-)

      but I disagree that learning about this costs and reach of the national security apparatus is "counterproductive".

      •  WaPo's uselessness (0+ / 0-)

        From what I can see, this WaPo release amounts to "the intelligence community spends a lot of money on foreign surveillance and counterterrorism efforts." I don't really see how it fits into the Snowden/Greenwald narrative. Probably at least 80% of Americans would read this WaPo release and come away with an appreciative view of the intelligence community.

        I've been growing less impressed with WaPo. With all the editorial WTFs, redacting, government consultations, and quote run-bys, they now seem to function as nothing more than a government cushion for the Snowden revelations rather than a press for the people.

        "Yes We Can!" -- Barack Obama

        by Sucker Politics on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 12:16:57 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I see a differnce between "costs and reach"... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Sucker Politics, Onomastic

        ...and the specifics.  Some folks are calling for near-complete transparency, which would wreck our foreign intelligence capabilities.

        There's no question that the intelligence community needs to be cut back--AND HARD--on its operations against American citizens.  That doesn't mean we need to publicly audit everything they do abroad as well.

        The word "parent" is supposed to be a VERB, people...

        by wesmorgan1 on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 12:23:31 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  I don't see how telling other countries (0+ / 0-)

    what we do and don't know is helpful.

  •  money spent on coping w/information overload (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shanikka

    But but wasn't it Clapper who compared, in concerns to questions about having a giant haystack of all electronic information at its disposal, the NSA to a library. He insisted that you can't expect them to possibly read every book in it.

    Well from the amount of money spent on that part of the budget, it looks as though people have tried and stressed out big time while attempting it.

    ....

    On maybe if they insisted instead of only monitoring and collecting information from those really suspected of Terra instead of insisting that all electronic communication be collected, well...coping with information overload may not be such an expensive proposition.

    How much did we just cut from

    Head Start
    Meals on Wheels
    Funding for medical and education research
    Funding for schools

    Yet ..sigh...

    Priorities.

    Government of, for, and by the wealthy corporate political ruling class elites. We are the 99%-OWS.

    by emal on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 12:19:18 PM PDT

  •  Remind me again (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DeadHead, WheninRome

    With the Cold War over, why we even have a "Black Budget"?

    None are so hopelessly enslaved, as those who falsely believe they are free. The truth has been kept from the depth of their minds by masters who rule them with lies. -Johann von Goethe

    by gjohnsit on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 12:26:57 PM PDT

  •  But...Chained CPI is necessary! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    WheninRome

    Because people would much rather go hungry than see the surveillance state inconvenienced.




    Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ J. Garcia

    by DeadHead on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 12:30:20 PM PDT

  •  Cuts to the poor, middleclass, students and (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    WheninRome

    seniors are okay, so we can pour money into private contractors.  Yes, the government is way off tract but not in the spin the Republicans are pushing.  Ordinary citizens and voters don't know this information they only mention welfare to poor or immigrants. The security lobbyists will try to keep it that way.

    Do not adjust your mind, there is a flaw in reality.

    by Shrew in Shrewsbury on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 12:47:16 PM PDT

  •  Intelligence Budget Is Much Bigger (0+ / 0-)

    This report is about $52.6B is secret budgets. The Pentagon will spend far more than that in addition on non-secret intelligence budgets. The CIA, NSA, Army Intelligence, Naval Intelligence, Air Force Intelligence, FBI intelligence, State Department intelligence officers, and many more all get budget money.

    And then of course there's the "double-secret budgets" that aren't in this leak.

    We give the Pentagon a TRILLION AND A HALF dollars a year. It spends a lot more than just 3.5% of that on intelligence.

    We get a lot less useful knowledge than we're paying for.

    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

    by DocGonzo on Thu Aug 29, 2013 at 01:13:28 PM PDT

  •  Where's sequester when we need it? n/t (0+ / 0-)

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site