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The State Corporation Commission has approved Dominion Virginia Power's proposal for a new gas-fired power plant in Brunswick County, rejecting arguments from the Sierra Club and others that ratepayers would be better served by a combination of low-cost energy efficiency and price-stable renewable energy.

The decision in the case (PUE-2012-00128) reflects the same discouraging themes we have seen from our regulators before: a tendency to believe everything Dominion tells them, coupled with an absolute refusal to acknowledge the climate crisis bearing down upon us and the changes in the energy market that make fossil fuels increasingly risky.

As the SCC put it in its order, "The relevant statutes... do not require the Commission to find any particular level of environmental benefit, or an absence of environmental harm, as a precondition to approval." (Note to legislators: How about fixing that?)

The SCC's state of denial is not just about the future. Since at least the 1980s, Dominion has consistently overestimated future demand growth.

A little skepticism might be in order when Dominion projects the same level of demand growth that keeps not materializing.

But the SCC is not skeptical. Its order declares Dominion's load forecasts "reasonable."

Evidently one can be both reasonable and wrong. Demonstrating this in real time, only a few days after the SCC issued its order this month, Dominion CEO Tom Farrell had to explain to shareholders why electricity demand has not grown this year in line with company predictions.

Amnesia was also in evidence at the public hearing on the case, where proponents of the gas plant - everyone from Dominion employees to the SCC staff - kept insisting on the environmental advantages of natural gas.

But congratulating each other that at least it wasn't a coal plant seemed odd to those of us who recall the fanfare surrounding the opening of Dominion's newest Virginia coal plant, all of one year ago.

My, how quickly things change. No one is proposing to build coal plants any more. Now that natural gas costs half what coal does, people have suddenly noticed that burning dirty black rocks to make electricity is a terrible idea. "Look at all that pollution!" they say in wonderment. "How last century!"

But in this century, natural gas is already wearing out its welcome - and not just among unhappy landowners who say fracking has spoiled their drinking water. Scientists measuring methane escaping from extraction wells warn that high levels of "fugitive emissions" may make natural gas a major contributor to climate change.

The SCC takes no notice of climate change, but it ought to consider that others do, presenting a financial risk for any fossil fuel plant. A national plan to reduce carbon emissions could make gas very expensive.

Yet building the Brunswick plant commits Dominion ratepayers to paying whatever the market price is for natural gas for the next three decades. Worse, it's effectively a baseload plant, designed to burn gas 24/7; it can't ramp up and down quickly to supply power when needed on a short-term basis, such as to fill in around the power supplied by wind and solar.

Analysts predict wind and solar will increasingly become the first choice for new generation, as these renewables get steadily cheaper and offer long-term price stability as well as environmental benefits.

Indeed, wind turbines beat out natural gas plants as the largest source of new generating capacity nationwide last year. Companies are designing natural gas turbines now that integrate with renewable energy, allowing utilities to hedge their bets on gas.

Well before the end of its 36-year life, a 24/7 baseload plant like Brunswick may be reduced to a giant concrete paperweight.

It would seem wise to hold off on building this gas plant, and we could. Investments in energy efficiency would more than meet the demand the Brunswick plant is supposed to serve, at a lower cost.

The SCC brushed aside this argument, pointing out that it consistently swats down good energy efficiency proposals - and intends to continue doing it.

So Virginia ratepayers, prepare yourselves: You've already been stuck with one of the last coal plants to be built in America. Now get ready for 30 years of paying for a natural gas plant. As for your dreams of wind and solar, keep dreaming.

Originally published in the Hampton Roads Virginian-Pilot on August 29, 2013.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Nail On Head. Natural Gas Expansion is Wrong but (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Bob Love, radarlady

    reasonable, while climate change claims are right but extreme radical.

    We're 45 years into picking reasonable over right in every instance. Our party has given us at least 2 presidencies on that principle.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Tue Sep 03, 2013 at 06:34:43 PM PDT

  •  Possibly The Most Efficient Option (0+ / 0-)
    "...Yet building the Brunswick plant commits Dominion ratepayers to paying whatever the market price is for natural gas for the next three decades. Worse, it's effectively a baseload plant, designed to burn gas 24/7; it can't ramp up and down quickly to supply power when needed on a short-term basis, such as to fill in around the power supplied by wind and solar..."
    Even a cursory glance at the announcement on the approval for this plant reveals that it will be a combined cycle plant, which gives lie to the claim that it is not designed to quickly follow demand changes from the grid.  If the diary author did not know that a combined-cycle plant is a combination gas turbine/steam turbine system designed to extract as much energy from every burned BTU, then they should not have written this diary.  While such a plant can be used as a base-load facility, it can also act as a mid-range or even peaking power provider, just not as efficiently.  A quick look at the drawing in the link shows three stacks, which suggests the plant will have three large gas turbines, any one or two of which could be taken off line as system demand dictates to achieve that integration with renewable power sources the author cites.  Spouting mis-statements does not help assist the advocacy for energy efficiency or renewable power sources.  

    "Love the Truth, defend the Truth, speak the Truth, and hear the Truth" - Jan Hus, d.1415 CE

    by PrahaPartizan on Tue Sep 03, 2013 at 11:53:05 PM PDT

  •  Base load? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    unfangus

    Gas-fired power plants make pretty good peaking plants. While they don't operate at their most efficient that way, they are still relatively clean.

    The focus should be on the statutes. Why is the SCC not required by law to consider environmental benefits, in addition to economics? I think this is fixable.

    -5.38, -2.97
    The NRA doesn't represent the interests of gun owners. So why are you still a member?

    by ChuckInReno on Wed Sep 04, 2013 at 04:21:16 AM PDT

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