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Back in November, 2012, the New York Times ran a story, Mountaintop Town Is a Diverse Haven From Syria’s Horrors. By Janine Di Giovanni.

MALOULA, Syria — In a country clouded by conflict, where neighbors and families are now divided by sectarian hatred, this mountaintop town renowned for its spiritual healing qualities and restorative air is an oasis of tolerance. Residents of the ancient and mainly Christian town — one of the last places where Western Aramaic, the language of Jesus Christ, is still spoken — vowed at the beginning of the Syrian conflict 20 months ago not to succumb to sectarianism and be dragged into the chaos.
Mr. Diab said that tolerance had been a tradition since St. Takla, the daughter of a pagan prince and an early disciple and possibly the wife of St. Paul, fled to these mountains in the first century. She was escaping soldiers sent by her father, who was threatening to kill her for her religious beliefs. Legend has it that, exhausted and finding her way blocked by the sharp, rocky sides of a mountain, Takla fell on her knees in desperate prayer, whereupon the mountains parted. Hence, “Maloula,” meaning “entrance” in Aramaic.

Here in these mountains are all different people, different religions. But we decided adamantly that Maloula would not be destroyed,” Mr. Diab said.

“It’s my country,” said Antonella, a Syrian-American who left Los Angeles and Miami three years ago to return to her birthplace and start a cafe.

[snip]

“There were 50 tour buses a day here when I first came back,” she said wistfully, looking around her empty cafe, where she serves American-style food.

[snip]

But Antonella said, “The truth is, even if Maloula is quiet, no one knows where this is going,” adding that her allegiance was largely with Mr. Assad. “The rebels have destroyed our country.”

This is the beginning of World War III,” predicts her brother Adnan, also a returnee. “It is starting in Syria, but it will engulf the region. This is a proxy war.
Yesterday, the Washington Post, ran this article: Al-Qaida-linked rebels stage hit-and-run attacks in ancient Syrian Christian village
The fighting in Maaloula, a scenic village of about 3,300 perched high in the mountains, began early Wednesday when militants from Jabhat al-Nusra stormed in after a suicide bomber struck an army checkpoint guarding the entrance.

The group — listed as a terrorist organization by the U.S. State Department — is one of the most effective fighting forces among Syrian rebels. The suicide attack triggered battles that terrorized residents in the village, famous for two of the oldest surviving monasteries in Syria — Mar Sarkis and Mar Takla.

Some of its residents still speak a version of Aramaic, the language of biblical times believed to have been used by Jesus.
The nun who spoke to AP said there were reports that the militants threatened villagers with death if they did not convert. The report could not be independently confirmed.
The plight of Syria's Christians: 'We left Homs because they were trying to kill us': In the civil war, they have tried to stay neutral. But despite this, many are now facing persecution and death.
The Haddad family had no doubts about why they had to escape from Homs. "We left because they were trying to kill us," said 18-year-old Noura Haddad. She is now staying with relations in the town of Zahle in the Bekaa Valley. "They wanted to kill us because we were Christians. They were calling us Kaffirs, even little children saying these things. Those who were our neighbours turned against us.
Syrian violence drives 50,000 Christians from homes
Almost all Christians in the conflict-torn Syrian city of Homs have fled violence and persecution, amid reports that their homes have been attacked and seized by “fanatics” with links to al-Qaida.

With ninety percent of Christians having reportedly left their homes, the violence is driving fears that Syria could become a “second Iraq” with church attacks, kidnappings and forced expulsions of believers.

The exodus of 50,000 or more Christians has taken place largely in the past six weeks. It is part of al-Qaida-linked militant Islamic groups’ “ongoing ethnic cleansing” of Christians, according to Catholic charity Aid to the Church in Need.

Islamists have allegedly gone from house to house in the Homs neighborhoods of Hamidiya and Bustan al-Diwan and have forced Christians to leave without giving them a chance to take their belongings.

[snip]

The comparisons with Iraq are also ominous. Anti-Christian violence in Iraq has helped drive the Christian population from 1.4 million in the late 1980s to less than 300,000 today.

The bold faced emphasis in the blockquotes was mine.  

Clearly, fanning the flames of violence in the Middle East has achieved the aim of ethnically cleansing the Middle East of Christians and destroying ancient Christian monasteries, churches, and religious sites.  

These stories of ethnic cleansing and attacking Christian monuments are relegated to the back pages of the MSM, along with evidence that implicates the "rebels" of possessing chemical weapons and pointing to them in past CW attacks in Syria, and seldom appear if at all in the MSM, as opposed to the mountains of stories falsely reporting that Saddam had WMDs and falsely reporting the allegation that Assad was proven with "incontrovertible" evidence to be behind the August 21 chemical weapons attack against his own people as fact, which on the face of it makes no sense whatsoever, because Assad was winning and had nothing to gain and everything to lose by allegedly crossing the "red line," exploited as the casus belli for the world's super power to jump in with their "rebel" allies and launch a "limited strike."

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Comment Preferences

  •  Have the Christians attacked anyone? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cotterperson, catullus

    If not, maybe we should give them control of Syria and bomb everyone else?

  •  Here's who I predict this will go. (9+ / 0-)

    1. The House will reject Obama's plea for ineffectual bombing
    2. 6-12 months down the road, it's clear that Assad is losing anyway, Alawites and Christians start to get massacred in large numbers, a new civil war breaks out between secular and Islamist rebels
    3. Some of the people who are against intervention now will start to clamor for intervention then

    The whole thing is just a clusterf--k.

    "It is, it seems, politically impossible to organize expenditure on the scale necessary to prove my case -- except in war conditions."--JM Keynes, 1940

    by randomfacts on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 01:14:28 PM PDT

    •  You seem to be saying that Obama (6+ / 0-)

      will abide by Congress' vote.  I thought he had been saying recently that he had the authority, but was asking Congress as a formality.

      •  With regard to Syria, (5+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Garrett, ColoTim, judyms9, SixSixSix, catullus

        the Obama Administration will abide by the Congressional vote. The posturing they are doing with the use of the words "we have the authority without Congressional approval" is for future instances of this type, not with regard to the Syria situation.

        The Obama has very little support among the G-20, Europe, Great Britain, the American People, Congress, etc etc.

        It will not happen. This resolution and issue is DOA, and Obama's not an idiot.

        -4.75, -5.33 Cheney 10/05/04: "I have not suggested there is a connection between Iraq and 9/11."

        by sunbro on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 02:14:09 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Maybe.... I hope you're right... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          aliasalias

          But again, I would just say that Obama has had little hesitation in going against the wishes of the people on some issues. Until the UK vote, it very much appeared the American people would not be getting a say in this.... It was damn near a done deal.

          Now, I hope you're right. It's certainly possible that Obama is looking for a face-saving way of aborting his "red line" when it comes to the use of chemical weapons in Syria. I still think that's very much a possibility, but it's definitely not guaranteed that the President will defer to Congress and the American people.

      •  President Obama made a mistake with the "red line" (3+ / 0-)

        statement. Bringing it to Congress was his way of getting off the hook for not doing anything. Kerry's lobbying around the world is just wasted effort, and we will not bomb Syria.

        -4.75, -5.33 Cheney 10/05/04: "I have not suggested there is a connection between Iraq and 9/11."

        by sunbro on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 02:18:27 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Agreed. This is just the least painful way out IMO (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ColoTim, sunbro

          I don't believe it was a "mistake" to draw a red line. And I feel Obama feels he is morally obligated. But this to me just seems like the least painful way out of a mess.

          All of my OFA sponsored sock puppets and I approve this post.

          by NoFortunateSon on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 02:55:43 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  It was naive for him to have said it (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          sunbro

          Again he got rolled. Every side was pushing him as to when the US would intervene. Obama probably thought that no way Syria would use "a whole bunch" of chemical weapons. Wrong! With sponsors like Putin and the Ayatollahs backing him, Assad has nothing to fear. Add China winking at Syria in the UN, how is there a way of getting an international imprimatur on what to do.

          Keep fightin' for freedom and justice, beloveds, but don't you forget to have fun doin' it. Lord, let your laughter ring forth. Be outrageous, ridicule the fraidy-cats, rejoice in all the oddities that freedom can produce.---Molly Ivins

          by never forget 2000 on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 03:02:03 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  it wasn't his line. International law demands (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Louise, Texas Lefty

          .such measures for a good reason

          "Corruptio Optimi Pessima" (Corruption of the best is the worst)

          by zenox on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 03:06:52 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  International law "demands" nothing. n/t (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Johnny Q, JesseCW

            Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

            by corvo on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 04:27:58 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  I thought you were being snarky (0+ / 0-)

            for a minute there.

            I beg to differ. That sounds like a political meme parroted by the administration and created using focus groups, sort of like "the terrorists hate us for our freedom".

            I myself don't believe the "red line" served the Administration, the American People, nor the world well.

            -4.75, -5.33 Cheney 10/05/04: "I have not suggested there is a connection between Iraq and 9/11."

            by sunbro on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 05:53:49 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Read the UN law against the use of (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              ColoTim

              ...chemical weapons. There IS a law forbiding the use of chemical weapons.There has to be consequences. Thats what the president is talking about. It is not his ' red line.'

              Comparing this issue to ' they hate us for our freedoms' is some fucked up logic...

              Sorry but that's what I see...

              "Corruptio Optimi Pessima" (Corruption of the best is the worst)

              by zenox on Mon Sep 09, 2013 at 04:25:55 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  They will impeach him if he does (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ColoTim, judyms9, sunbro

        Maybe McGovern is right and he should withdraw his request for authorization. Everyone is against him on this. What is the moral thing to do: leave it alone?

        Keep fightin' for freedom and justice, beloveds, but don't you forget to have fun doin' it. Lord, let your laughter ring forth. Be outrageous, ridicule the fraidy-cats, rejoice in all the oddities that freedom can produce.---Molly Ivins

        by never forget 2000 on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 02:46:45 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  25th Amendment time (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ColoTim, sunbro

        Listen, Obama could go bezerk, and launch an attack after Congress says no, but we're in very different territory then.

        It's important, domestically and internationally, for Obama to remind people that as the CiC, he does have the power and responsibility to act without Congressional approval (IMO, only to defend the United States from an imminent threat).

        The perception that Obama can never call for force, without Congressional approval, is a dangerous one.

        All of my OFA sponsored sock puppets and I approve this post.

        by NoFortunateSon on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 02:54:29 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Right now, assessment is that Assad is not losing. (9+ / 0-)

      In fact, he's gaining in the war.

      The meme is simple enough: "Regarding Syria, If you support the President, you end up supporting al-Qaeda." No politician, of any party, persuasion, or clique, wants an opponent who will be able to say this in an advertisement.

      by Superskepticalman on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 01:53:35 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The "proxy war" stuff is making me nervous ... (6+ / 0-)

      I am completely against US military intervention. However, at the same time, Syria is becoming something that has a non-trivial chance at morphing into an Archduke Ferdinand kind of thing: Israel and Iran, the US and Russia, and on and on. Especially since all of the major players are in the middle of differing political/governance crises and are all susceptible to really stupid decisions by somewhat desperate leaders.

      The potentials are gut wrenching, to say the least.

    •  Nope. The house will approve; (0+ / 0-)

      the massacres of Christians and Alawites will take place; we won't hear about it; we will declare victory.

      Go Team Blue!

      Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

      by corvo on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 04:27:24 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I take "the msm doesn't care about Christians" (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sunbro, happymisanthropy, radmul, Louise, TomP

    diaries with a giant grain of salt.

    Money doesn't talk it swears.

    by Coss on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 01:15:31 PM PDT

    •  Understandably. (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Coss, acerimusdux, skohayes, TomP

      Fox News is likely to tie this story in with the "War on Christmas", and say that the Obama Administration is supporting the ethnic cleansing caused by Al Qaeda versus the Christians in Syria. Obama's a socialist Muslim, don't you know...

      -4.75, -5.33 Cheney 10/05/04: "I have not suggested there is a connection between Iraq and 9/11."

      by sunbro on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 01:23:06 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  No, you are taking the true story about Christians (13+ / 0-)

        being ethnically cleansed from the Middle East by the "rebels" and falsely equating it with the "War on Christmas" for reasons of your own.

        Information is the currency of democracy. ~Thomas Jefferson

        by CIndyCasella on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 01:53:00 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Cindy, what I am saying is not contradicting (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          blueoasis

          your diary.

          I am merely agreeing with Coss that the MSM, of which Fox News is unfortunately a part, tends to report things from a biased, conservative Christian perspective in news stations across the country because there are so many Christians, especially in the Bible Belt.

          If anything, the progressive, anti-war non-religious perspective is under-represented in the media.  Part of that is the desire by the Military Industrial Complex to go to war. War is profitable for plane-makers and bomb-makers, and yes, they influence the media's reporting as well.

          But there are so many war-weary Americans opposed to the Syria bombing, that the media is forced to soft-sell their preferred pro-war stance, in order to remain somewhat relevant.

          -4.75, -5.33 Cheney 10/05/04: "I have not suggested there is a connection between Iraq and 9/11."

          by sunbro on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 02:01:57 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  But this is also being talked about at Mass (12+ / 0-)

            on Sunday by Catholic priests who are antiwar.   People around here continually underestimate how important Catholics are in the vote across the all those blue states from the east coast through Minnesota.  There are your cultural values Catholics and your peace and social justice Catholics and the latter elect tons of Democrats.  And the Lutherans and Catholics in the north aren't your Rapture folks either.  They don't see war in the middle east making Israel safe for the Rapture.  They're more concerned about the Christians who are in the middle east now and wondering why all our high minded bullshit about keeping people safe in the middle east never seems to apply to them.

          •  Then why haven't we heard more about the religious (12+ / 0-)

            cleansing and persecution of Christians in the Middle East as an outcome of the Iraq War and the Syria Invasion by jihadists?

            You need to take a primer about Hagee if you want to understand how the Christians have been brainwashed to back these horrific wars.

            These Christians you speak of are ignorant of the facts that I present in this diary and their heads are filled with talk of the rapture and loving these wars based on lies, which is completely against the doctrines of their religion.

            I had a bumber sticker on my car which said, "No War in Iran," a few years ago and a guy in the car dealership where I was getting my car fixed came out and screamed at me while I was getting in my car for having that bumper sticker.

            Completely brainwashed to desire a war with Iran by his Christian fundamentalist church to the point of unprofessionally screaming at the top of his lungs at a customer for a bumper sticker on her car against war, which is what the Christian faith is supposed to be about: peace.

            The mass exodus of Christians from the Middle East due to these wars is a fact that is downplayed in the MSM, because if it were widely known it would vastly weaken the support for these wars that the MIC and other special interests have worked so hard to obtain through their Office of Special Plans and their PR propaganda lie generating firms.

            Information is the currency of democracy. ~Thomas Jefferson

            by CIndyCasella on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 02:19:20 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  "Ethnic cleansing" of Christians (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              dinazina

              would have the opposite effect on people who think like John McCain. Harm brought to Christians, for John McCain, is further "proof" of the need for war!

              -4.75, -5.33 Cheney 10/05/04: "I have not suggested there is a connection between Iraq and 9/11."

              by sunbro on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 02:23:08 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Except the Christians supported Assad (0+ / 0-)

                and McCain wants to support the people Bandar sent to Syria as mercs to fight against Assad.  These are the people doing the ethnic cleansing.  Christians didn't fare well in Egypt under Morsi, but when  the coup happened in Egypt, McCain seemed to be supporting Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood.  McCain, Bandar and some very strange bedfellows make up the characters in this very twisted story.

                Shine like the humblest star.

                by ljm on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 08:07:36 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

            •  Thanks for addressing these issues. (0+ / 0-)

              “liberals are the people who think that cruelty is the worst thing that we do” --Richard Rorty Also, I moved from NYC, so my username is inaccurate.

              by jeff in nyc on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 07:16:26 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  pah. Given that we don't give a damn (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        JesseCW

        about the only Christians living between Lebanon to the north, Jordan to the east, and Egypt to the west, why should we start caring about Christians now?

        Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

        by corvo on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 04:29:55 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Unfortunately, it's often used as an (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Tamar, Coss, SixSixSix

      axis of attack by the Right toward Obama. That doesn't mean it isn't happening, though.

      "We need to put the jam on the bottom shelf where the little people can reach it.” - Ralph Yarborough

      by Zutroy on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 01:45:33 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I take what you just said with a grain of (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      chuckvw, SixSixSix, aliasalias, corvo, katiec

      depleted uranium.

      Information is the currency of democracy. ~Thomas Jefferson

      by CIndyCasella on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 01:51:03 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  That's reasonable, but (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      mickT, chuckvw, Kevskos, corvo, JesseCW

      the MSM has never cared about Palestinian Christians.

      Reasonable suspicion? How can being wrong 98.6% of the time ever be reasonable?

      by happymisanthropy on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 02:14:12 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  We Should Resettle (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Roadbed Guy, corvo

    Arab Christians, Druze, etc. from Syria in Israel where they can be safe.

    "I'll believe that corporations are people when I see Rick Perry execute one."

    by bink on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 01:31:11 PM PDT

  •  The warmongers don't want Americans to know (11+ / 0-)

    that the wars they foment are ethnically cleansing Christians out of the Middle East and are in essence a "War on Christians" and a "War on Women" and a war on "Secularism."

    Equating this true fact with Fox's "War on Christmas" is  disingenuous, which fails to hide ugly facts about these amoral wars based on lies and subterfuge.

    The news stories I cited about the brutality against Christians in Syria were published in the Washington Post and the New York Times, not Fox News.

     

    Information is the currency of democracy. ~Thomas Jefferson

    by CIndyCasella on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 02:01:24 PM PDT

    •  well, actually a war on whatever religious (0+ / 0-)

      (or non-religious) groups are the minority. It's not only women, Christians, and secularists who are targeted in these wars, it's Sunnis by the Shi'a, Shi'a by the Sunnis, Kurdish by non-Kurdish Muslims.
      That's why this is so important:

      First they came for the communists,
      and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a communist.

      Then they came for the socialists,
      and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a socialist.

      Then they came for the trade unionists,
      and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a trade unionist.

      Then they came for me,
      and there was no one left to speak for me

      While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

      by Tamar on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 02:50:13 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  It's not that easy (0+ / 0-)

      Christians aren't a distinct real ethnic group in Middle Eastern countries.  They're a minority portion of the population that happens to be adherent to Christianity.  Often they're not really distinguishable from their Islamic compatriots.  

      Women and secular liberals are being suppressed, but they're going to win in the end after the Islamic religionists settle whatever older business they're out to settle.

      Christians and other minority religions from prior to the Islamic takeover are pretty much doomed for the foreseeable future.  They've been in this position for centuries, continuing to exist out in the open because Islamists chose to tolerate them.   The Copts, Syrian Christians, Iraqi Christians, etc are holdovers from the Ancient World.

      It's an unfortunate general thing about Modernity that when its pressure becomes great in a society, the anti-Modern people suppress its proponents (i.e. the small number of post-theist liberals) but feel themselves under a terrible time pressure.  They then turn on each other and fight out all their horrible pre-Modern group differences and scores, in the process destroying each other and their institutions and discrediting themselves.  It's an ugly bankruptcy.  Much as pro-Moderns would wish they didn't, it's rare that they can be stopped.  

      Christians are an Ancient World atavism in the Middle East.  In the West they've reformed to Enlightenment Age forms (Protestantism and modern Catholicism) and largely crushed out Ancient World religions and sects/denominations.  You do see a similar ideological crushing out in the Western political arena, though- obsolete ideologies both Left and Right are pursued and crushed with similar glee by modern conservatives.  Who themselves don't have much future- which is indeed why they're so fervent about crushing their old opponents out of the game entirely.  That's the amusement of asking conservatives or reactionaries just how much back they would have us turn the clock: they do an awful lot of cruel bridge burning.  For example, we can in a sense never have a real aristocracy in the U.S. again because conservatives themselves have annihilated the aristocratic culture in this country once imported from Britain.

  •  We can expect the same for Syria as happened (5+ / 0-)

    in Iraq after the US invasion. The Christians in Iraq are continuing to be persecuted. When Christians invade and occupy a Muslim country then it is local Christians who will pay the price.

    Just imagine if a Muslim country bombed and invaded the US. There would not be a mosque left standing in the entire country.

    Can Christianity Survive in the New Iraq? (Teule)

    In fact the Christian population once thrived in Iraq, despite being in the minority. Unfortunately, since the ouster of Saddam Hussein in 2003, their population has crashed. According to the latest figures from the CIA World Factbook, the number of Christians may have dropped by as much as 50%. Teule estimates an even more dramatic decline of 70% — from 850,000 pre-war to 250,000 today. Even more staggering is the decline in the number of church buildings – about 57 are left of the approximately 300 that were in existence before the dictator was overthrown.

    •  Not about who invaded who (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Claudius Bombarnac, Kevskos, corvo

      Saddam kept the Muslim extremist factions in check, and Christians never caused him any problem, so they were fine. With Saddam gone, the Muslims are now free to persecute Christians in the New Iraq.  

      The same is happening in Egypt, and we have never invaded there.  But, with the dictator gone and the Muslim Brotherhood in power, Coptic Christians were persecuted, and the generals now in charge turn a blind eye to it as well.

      The same is true in Indonesia, another country we've never invaded. The government is now turning a blind eye towards persecution of Christians by Muslims.  Last year, when the courts there ruled that non-Muslims were permitted to use the word Allah (which had been banned by an unconstitutional law, despite the fact that Allah is a word that pre-dates Islam), there were dozens of Christian churches bombed and riots all across the country.

      Liberalism is trust of the people tempered by prudence. Conservatism is distrust of the people tempered by fear. ~William E. Gladstone, 1866

      by absdoggy on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 02:53:32 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  That's who the Kerry administration wants (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mickT, Lepanto, aliasalias, corvo, CIndyCasella

    to side with.

    "When dealing with terrorism, civil and human rights are not applicable." Egyptian military spokesman.

    by Paleo on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 02:08:40 PM PDT

  •  Here is my question : is Assad fully in control of (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    corvo

    ...his chemical weapons and if not, are we ready for tbese rebels to get hold of them? And why not US go in and disable these weapons in case Assad doesn't last? Why do we trust Assad so much and why do we allow the existence of such weapons in an area where vulnarable minorities do exist?

    "Corruptio Optimi Pessima" (Corruption of the best is the worst)

    by zenox on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 03:05:20 PM PDT

  •  All of this makes me eager for the Martian (3+ / 0-)

    invasion, perhaps the single thing that might make the unity of mankind a real possibility.  Religion seems to divide us in ways that even national identities don't.

    Building a better America with activism, cooperation, ingenuity and snacks.

    by judyms9 on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 03:07:05 PM PDT

    •  I'm siding with the Martians. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Johnny Q, JesseCW, CIndyCasella

      Could hardly be any worse.

      Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

      by corvo on Sun Sep 08, 2013 at 04:32:22 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Shhhh you're spoiling the meme (0+ / 0-)

    Al Qaeda are our friends remember? In this next war they'll be fighting by our side.

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