Skip to main content

T.M.A. Too many Asians. It’s a concern discussed in hushed tones or coded language. Not in the fields of government, pro sports or Hollywood movies, but rather in the case of high school and college admissions — most frequently, at America’s most elite educational institutions.

At Harvard, the 2011-’12 incoming class was 18% Asian American. It was the same percent at Princeton, Stanford and Columbia. At Yale, it was 15% and at the University of Michigan, 13%. A purely merit-based analysis suggests these numbers should be higher. But that would be T.M.A.

Even at some select public high schools around the country, the number of Asian Americans has been a hot-button issue. The most famous case is Lowell High School in San Francisco, where the Chinese American community has had to battle a series of policies that have aimed to manipulate the racial composition of the school. (Guess which way they want to change the numbers.) There have also been similar complaints at places like Thomas Jefferson High School in Alexandria, VA and Boston Latin in Boston. All of these public high schools are highly competitive because they are perceived to be feeder schools to the elite colleges.

In New York City, the issue resurfaced in 2012 with a legal complaint filed by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Legal Defense Fund (NAACP LDF). The complaint targets the admission policy used by the city to determine who gets into one of the city’s eight “specialized,” top-ranked public schools, e.g., Bronx Science, Brooklyn Tech, and Stuyvesant. (The complaint is supported by a group of civil rights organizations including LatinoJustice PRLDF, the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, DRUM – Desis Rising Up and Moving, and more.) The coalition charges that the admissions policy followed by these eight schools discriminates against blacks and Hispanics. They don’t specifically cite overrepresentation of Asian Americans, alluding instead to rich families who can pay for private prep programs. However, the reality is that it’s poor Asian American immigrants who will be most adversely affected by any proposed changes.

To catch you up to speed on the particulars in NYC: Each year, roughly 28,000 take the SHSAT, the sole determinant of admission into eight of the city’s specialized high schools, or SHS. (The ninth specialized school, La Guardia, is known to most of us as the school in Fame; it requires auditions to get in.) Fewer than 6,000 nab a spot. In the city, 70% of all 8th graders are black or Hispanic. At the top school, Stuyvesant, they make up 1% and 3% respectively. Meanwhile, Asian Americans make up 72% and whites 25%.

While most of us will agree these numbers are appalling and unacceptable, the disagreement lies in how to gain a better balance. Is it simply by changing the admission policy, as suggested by the NAACP LDF and other groups, or does fairness require a more rigorous examination of why the numbers look the way they do?

For instance, is the situation simply about poverty and poorer neighborhoods? This would seem not to be the case: Over 50% of the students at Brooklyn Tech are Title I, which means their family income is low enough to qualify for free lunch. The figure at Stuyvesant is 30%.

What about family involvement and support? Many immigrant families who don’t speak English at home are very successful in getting into the specialized schools, despite the inclusion of an English section on the SHSAT.

These issues of fairness in the NYC SHS admissions process have been bubbling since as early as the 70s, when the first legal challenge to the policy was made. Back then Jewish-American families, who felt they were the target of the same types of downplay-the-test policy changes being floated today, were able to codify the test-based, race-blind admissions policy into state law. Thus, the city could not change the policy on their own. Even if they could, this was not going to happen under Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who was supportive of the one-test policy.

But there’s an upcoming election in New York City in November and the prohibitive favorite, Democrat Bill de Blasio, has voiced his support for changing the system. He has since been joined by State Assemblyman Sheldon Silver and other state legislators, so it seems the city may be on the verge of making big changes to the SHS admission policy.

It’s vitally important to explore ways to improve the educational opportunities available to black and Hispanic youth in the city. Too many kids tragically miss out on a shot at the top-notch education that every last one of them deserves, the kind of education that allows kids to reach their full potential and build better lives. This excellent education for all — not just for a select few fighting over limited resources — is what a just, equitable, and globally competitive society must demand.

As the American education system gets shaken up, it’s important to take into account all disadvantaged minorities, including poor immigrant Asian American families, who probably shouldn’t be lumped in with those considered to have unfair advantages when it comes to academic success. Maybe in reality it’s not a case of T.M.A. after all, even if policymakers perceive things that way.

The issue is complicated, but that doesn’t mean solutions can’t be found that will be fair to all kids and not pit one minority against another to fight for scraps. Access to high-quality education has to be a given for every single kid, both in New York City and in every other city and town across the country.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  Documentary on the subject (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ban nock, wader

    I'm currently working on a film about this. To check out our teaser (and support our kickstarter campaign), please go here: kickstarter campaign. We're 75% of the way there with 9 days to go. Thanks!

    •  good luck with your project (0+ / 0-)

      will you be tackling the semantics of representation since Asian Americans are often not included or deliberately excluded in the so-called "underrepresented" population in higher education which is in itself skewed because of the differences among disciplines

      Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013

      by annieli on Thu Oct 17, 2013 at 08:54:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Under-representation of Asians (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ban nock, lina, murrayewv

    You mentioned in your article:

    A purely merit-based analysis suggests these numbers should be higher. But that would be T.M.A.
    I have another possible explanation.  This may likely come across as racist, but here goes nonetheless.

    I went to a high school that was more than 33% Asian-american.  As you might imagine, they were very well represented among the top 25 in our class rankings (I wish those did not exist, BTW).  However, many of these kids did not get into the elite schools they expected to, despite stellar grades and SAT scores.  Why not?  Distinct lack of extra-curriculars, such as sports, band, language clubs, etc.  This is a very important criteria that elite schools use in choosing their student body that is often overlooked, even though their applications and advertising materials clearly state that building a well rounded student body with extra-academic interests and skills is a high priority.

    "Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it... unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense." -The Buddha

    by Brian A on Wed Oct 16, 2013 at 06:57:44 AM PDT

    •  I don't think it's fair to generalize about (7+ / 0-)

      an ethnic group like that.  I'm sure there are some Asian students who did not participate in extra-curricular activities, but I'm also sure that there are some who do.  

      Perhaps that was the explanation in some cases, just as it may have been the explanation in some cases for students of any other ethnicity who had the grades and test scores but did not get in their first choice school.  But unless you have data showing that Asian students participate in extra-curricular activities at a statistically significant lower rate than students of any other ethnicity, I don't think it's fair to generalize.  

      •  I agree its not good to generalize (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cryonaut, lina

        However, this is what I observed in my high school, and there was a very clear correlation between the high-ranking students, asian or not, that participated in extra-curricular activities, and acceptance to elite universities.

        "Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it... unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense." -The Buddha

        by Brian A on Wed Oct 16, 2013 at 07:57:20 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Cultural bias (7+ / 0-)

      Consider the single most important factor in a child's education is the involvement of the parent(s). I believe that Asian communities value education more than most and view it as a means to success. The Asian communities have their Tiger moms. I do think parents of all races are trending more in that direction, but there is still a big divide.

      •  Tiger Moms (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ban nock, Torta

        it's true. we've been following Tiger moms from all different communities - Russian Jewish, Puerto Rican, etc.

        •  This is hot topic among parents: Tiger Mom balance (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          white blitz

          Where's the healthy boundary between trying to bring out the best in your kid, and going too far (helicopter-parenting, refusing to accept your kid's limitations, and/or making your kid need a decade of therapy post-college to get over you).

          My own parents were more laissez faire.  On the plus side, I never needed therapy and we're good relationally.  On the minus side, I sometimes wish they'd noticed I was finger-picking melodies on the basement piano at age 8, and steered me toward lessons with a good music teacher.

      •  I heard a suggestion recently that goes like this: (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        murrayewv

        Most latino immigrants come from farmworkers, families who have not ever had much exposure to education. They walked here.

        By contrast, Asian immigrants are more likely to have come from relatively educated traditions, that the shopkeeper in San Francisco may well have been educated as a doctor but could not get a license to practice in the US. Many were political refugees.

        You could test this by comparing some of the different Asian groups (it's kind of weird to lump together Chinese and Hmong and Thai as if they were one) and their varying experiences.

        Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

        by elfling on Wed Oct 16, 2013 at 07:59:20 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I've read statistics on different SEAsian (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          annieli

          communities giving percent on public assistance etc.

          There were large differences. The Vietnamese scored much higher, Hmong and Cambodians fairly low. Culturally Vietnamese are Chinese, I know I'll get blasted for saying it, but it is what it is. Prior to the war most of Vietnam had schools even in small villages

          Hmong have a tradition of no written language etc. No schools. Cambodians often came without intact families, and education in the countryside was mostly monks studying Pali text at the temple.

          I think too how disrupted families are when they come matters.

          Thais often seem to be advanced degree students that stay on.

          Generalizationa all on my part.

          “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

          by ban nock on Wed Oct 16, 2013 at 08:51:50 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  I have to say, as a kid, I simply didn't consider (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      lina, serendipityisabitch, fumie, BachFan

      all of those 'extracurriculars'.  I only did them because I was expected to by parents, or pushed towards them by teachers.  I never would have considered that they actually would impact my ability to get accepted to college.

      'Well rounded' is one of those all or nothing phrases.  It can actually mean something, or it can be simply faked by joining lots of clubs.

  •  Hmm. Touchy subject, indeed! (5+ / 0-)

    And one that is not frequently discussed. I work in academia, and I don't believe I've participated in any such conversations.

    Thanks for something interesting to chew on.

    -5.38, -2.97
    The NRA doesn't represent the interests of gun owners. So why are you still a member?

    by ChuckInReno on Wed Oct 16, 2013 at 07:04:28 AM PDT

    •  not a problem at my university.... (0+ / 0-)

      we would welcome more Asians (and Africans, and Indians and Middle Easterners, and Latin Americans- oh heck Europeans too).  In fact, we started a partnership to recruit more foreign students and I look forward to the diversity my mostly WV students will be exposed to in their classes.  I think the challenge of TMA is one of the elite schools, not those of us teaching at affordable midsize state universities.  Research doesn't show that attendance at elite universities confers that much advantage on earning power.  And at a mid-size school, an ambitious, motivated student will get a lot of personal attention.  

      You shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you mad. Aldous Huxley

      by murrayewv on Wed Oct 16, 2013 at 08:48:54 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  A minor technical correction: (7+ / 0-)

    You wrote that LaGuardia HS is known to us as the school from Fame.  Yes and no.  Fame was written about the High School of the Performing Arts.  Back in the 70s and 80s, NYC also had another school, the High School of Music and Art.  There was intense rivalry between the "MAs" and the "PAs".  The two schools completed a merger in 1984 and moved at that time into the LaGuardia facility across the street from Lincoln Center.

    With the Decision Points Theater, the George W. Bush Presidential Library becomes the very first Presidential Library to feature a Fiction Section.

    by Its the Supreme Court Stupid on Wed Oct 16, 2013 at 07:05:36 AM PDT

  •  A quick look around Harvard Square tells a story (7+ / 0-)

    the people on the street aren't just harvard students but MIT, BU, etc.

    The same discrimination has been going on with white poor people for a while. Barack Obama actually discussed it once that I remember. The way he put it was he used his own kids as an example saying that they will have many advantages that other kids don't. Increasingly advantage is based on income more than many things.

    One reason I've supported public education by enrolling my kids in the public schools instead of the charters.

    “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

    by ban nock on Wed Oct 16, 2013 at 07:14:23 AM PDT

  •  Global pressure from Asia re top US universities (7+ / 0-)

    is an additional part of this.  The pressure among some families in Seoul, South Korea for example.  It's intense.  I worked at one of the top private boarding prep schools here in the US for a couple of years -- won't say which one but it is in the Top 10 on any list -- and the # of applicants from Asian families has skyrocketed over the past 15 years.  I mean "Asian" as in from Asia itself, not Asian-American.

    And from there, the pressure those parents put on their kids to get into Harvard-Yale-Princeton (hyphens deliberate) is so extreme in some cases as to be dysfunctional/toxic.  One child age 17 was told "do not come home next summer, you have shamed our family" because after all they put up for tuition and room and board at this ultimate college-prep academy, after all they did to push her to succeed and nail a spot at the top of the US higher education system, she did not get accepted Ivy.  Like Tufts and Rochester are horrible schools.  When I heard that, I felt horrible for this girl.  I hope she succeeded and thrived at whatever university she ended up attending.

    •  "Asia’s parents suffering 'education fever'" (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Torta, murrayewv, ban nock

      By Yojana Sharma

      . . .

      Families cut back on other household spending "across the board," said Michael Seth, professor of Korean history at James Madison University in the US and author of a book on South Korea's education zeal. "There is less money to spend on other things like housing, retirement, or vacations."

      . . .

      The education obsession is so all consuming that the South Korean government has unsuccessfully tried to curb it, concerned about family spending on extra-curricular lessons and cram schools for ferociously competitive exams.

      . . .

      This is particularly an issue as record numbers of students graduate, seven million this year, and an overseas degree no longer has the status it had in the past. Many graduates languish in non-graduate jobs.

      But it is not easy to dampen education fever. In South Korea as in other East Asian countries, "it is deeply embedded in the culture. It's also based on reality that there is no alternative pathway to success or a good career other than a prestige degree, this was true 50 years ago, and it's just as true today".

      "So, please stay where you are. Don't move and don't panic. Don't take off your shoes! Jobs is on the way."

      by wader on Wed Oct 16, 2013 at 07:27:45 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  obviously, Asians are . . . (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wader, annieli, BachFan

    genetically superior to everyone else.

    I can see the racist redneck heads exploding already.

    (snicker)

  •  Interesting topic (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wilderness voice

    It should all be merit-based, who cares about race?

    •  Well, that presumes an equal base... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      whenwego, BachFan

      Some races are historically disadvantaged, in which case race plays a role, and it still requires racially sensitive institutional efforts to bring them up to that equal base that will allow 'race blindness'.  But I don't think that applies here.  So I think TMA isn't a real 'problem'.

    •  Well, when you see a group that is (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      whenwego, ban nock, BachFan

      essentially not represented, as in latinos at Stuyvesant, we need to ask ourselves why that would be and how we can correct it. It's a tragedy for our culture and for wasted talent if you're drawing from a population that is 70% black or latino and they're only taking up 1% of the slots at Stuyvesant. The solution is not necessarily "just admit more latinos" but to understand exactly what is going on. Is the test screening out latinos that would be successful? Is there something going on earlier that keeps these kids from being academically focused? Is it in the school or the community?

      These are tough questions to answer, sometimes.

      I only know Stuyvesant through its alumni and reputation, but my understanding is that it is a highly specialized school and kids need to have a certain mindset and inclination to be successful there. It's not going to be the case that you can drop in any ordinary 9th grader and expect them to survive, let alone thrive, at a school like that. But if the test is screening out black and latino kids who could be successful, then a test that more closely collects the students into that group and then perhaps chooses by lottery would be more appropriate.

      And if there are more kids who would benefit and would thrive at Stuyvesant than there are slots, then they should make a second one. It might not have the same exciting name, but what's important is what goes on inside.

      Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

      by elfling on Wed Oct 16, 2013 at 08:09:31 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  it's a case of Asian American families (6+ / 0-)

    doing the right thing, not any unfair advantages.

    Asian-American families place a much higher emphasis on education compared to all the other ethnic groups groups in US, including whites. It's a distinguishing factor in addition to high average IQ levels for Asians in general.

    Parental involvement in education in Asian-American families is so high that it outweighs whatever problems the schools they go to are having. It's no surprise that their educational achievements and test scores are so high.

    Is it a problem of TMA? I think it's a problem of all the other groups not placing enough emphasis on educating their kids.

  •  Finally got around to reading the Jobs bio (0+ / 0-)

    and was reminded that both Jobs and Gates dropped out.  

  •  Eh? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cryonaut, wilderness voice

    If they're American citizens, who cares what their ancestry is?

  •  This is an opportunity for education. (0+ / 0-)

    For example, it looks like poor Asians are going to learn what happens to the children of people who inconvenience a more valuable ethnic voting block.  (For the record, Asians in NY vote 86% Democratic)

    Seriously, opponents of Affirmative Action couldn't hope for a better example than this.

    How are you to go on about "those considered to have unfair advantages" when your school is only 25% white?

  •  TMA could be the faulty work ethics elsewhere (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ban nock

    How about mentioning the higher proportion of Jews at Lowell as well as the GPA /exam score requirement for transfer from the other high schools like Galileo, Washington, Lincoln, Mission, Wilson, Balboa, McAteer and from direct middle school entrance

    Even at some select public high schools around the country, the number of Asian Americans has been a hot-button issue. The most famous case is Lowell High School in San Francisco, where the Chinese American community has had to battle a series of policies that have aimed to manipulate the racial composition of the school. (Guess which way they want to change the numbers.) There have also been similar complaints at places like Thomas Jefferson High School in Alexandria, VA and Boston Latin in Boston. All of these public high schools are highly competitive because they are perceived to be feeder schools to the elite colleges.
    ....Critics of affirmative action generally argue that the country would be better off with a meritocracy, typically defined as an admissions system where high school grades and standardized test scores are the key factors, applied in the same way to applicants of all races and ethnicities.
    But what if they think they favor meritocracy but at some level actually have a flexible definition, depending on which groups would be helped by certain policies?
    ....Specifically, he found, in a survey of white California adults, they generally favor admissions policies that place a high priority on high school grade-point averages and standardized test scores. But when these white people are focused on the success of Asian-American students, their views change.
    The white adults in the survey were also divided into two groups. Half were simply asked to assign the importance they thought various criteria should have in the admissions system of the University of California. The other half received a different prompt, one that noted that Asian Americans make up more than twice as many undergraduates proportionally in the UC system as they do in the population of the state.
    When informed of that fact, the white adults favor a reduced role for grade and test scores in admissions -- apparently based on high achievement levels by Asian-American applicants. (Nationally, Asian average total scores on the three parts of the SAT best white average scores by 1,641 to 1,578 this year.)

    Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/...
    Inside Higher Ed

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013

    by annieli on Wed Oct 16, 2013 at 08:29:59 AM PDT

  •  This argues against Affirmative Action based. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ban nock, fumie, BachFan

    on race, I think.  In some instances, advantages given to some minorities (African American, Hispanic) come at the expense of other minorities (Asian). And that cannot be a good thing.  

    I've long been in favor of shifting Affirmative Action in educational settings to focus on socio-economic background rather than race or ethnicity.  After all, there's no reason that, in considering admissions to an elite school, the President's daughters should be given some preference over a poor white boy from Appalachia based on race.  Certainly, in that kind of situation, the President's children will be far more advantaged than the poor boy from Appalachia.  For example, if they have roughly the same scores and grades, a poor child born to uneducated parents (of whatever race) has had a far more difficult time achieving those scores/grades than the child of the President of the United States (of whatever race).  

    Focusing on socio-economic status has the added benefit of targeting those who need -- and deserve --  help the most while eliminating the resentment many people have to programs that consider race/ethnicity, in and of itself, to be a "plus" in admissions.  

    •  There is another aspect to this, and that's (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      BachFan

      critical mass.

      When your numbers of any one demographic get too low, those students may not be able to exist in the community without sticking out. For some personalities, that is fine: they thrive on it. For others, they cannot thrive.

      I attended a small, elite science university, and our numbers of young black males were single digits. Most of those who chose to attend did well, probably in higher ratios than the general student body. But I talked to many prospective students who chose other schools because they wanted to be part of a larger crowd.

      When you have no mentors that grasp your experience, it matters. When you have no peers it matters too.

      Those factors in turn prevent young, talented people of underrepresented races from growing their numbers.

      Certainly Asians have faced this as well and have build an admirable network and that critical mass. I'd like our education system to learn from that success and to try to apply it to kids in other groups.

      I'm with you, though, it making it much more about socioeconomic status. You might similarly make it about education level of the parents. Certainly being the child of a graduate student or post doc is not at all the same for one's educational future as being the child of a farmworker, even if the pay is similar.

      Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

      by elfling on Wed Oct 16, 2013 at 09:53:14 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  as an engineering manager (0+ / 0-)

    responsible for hiring engineers capable of doing the work, I would administer a test with 5 questions to all applicants. Asians excelled disproportionately and were hired accordingly.  We need to hire and promote the best and the brightest lest we become any more a society of know nothings than we already are.

  •  not TMA, but JNEEE (0+ / 0-)

    TMA, what a joke - just not enough everybody else, period, end of story and why even use elite private schools as a measure, given the other constraints (legacies like GWB, etc)

    The world is made up of thousands of ethnic groups. Han Chinese represent about 18% of the global population
    At Harvard, the 2011-’12 incoming class was 18% Asian American. It was the same percent at Princeton, Stanford and Columbia. At Yale, it was 15% and at the University of Michigan, 13%.
    http://i37.tinypic.com/...

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013

    by annieli on Wed Oct 16, 2013 at 01:30:05 PM PDT

  •  No perfect solutions --esp at HighSchool&College (0+ / 0-)

    At front-end:
    There is most room for improvement by supporting poorer schools, teachers, students and families at pre-school and primary levels. De Blasio has lots of aggressive positions to do this.

    At the back-end:
    Reducing the income of the 0.01--1.00% percentile (the investment bankers and their lawyers etc. who are recruited mainly from the most prestigious colleges), would lower the stakes of college admissions competition.

    In the middle-stretch of high school and college:
    Very difficult to avoid intense competition for prestigious tracks, and resulting ethnic disparities and tensions, and very difficult for kids to catch up if they fell behind in pre-school or primary school.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site