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Here is a quote from Harry S. Truman, 33rd president of the United States.

To me this quote sounds an awful lot, like the country the Republicans in general, and the Tea Party in particular want us to live in.

Once a government is committed to the principle of silencing the voice of opposition, it has only one way to go, and that is down the path of increasingly repressive measures, until it becomes a source of terror to all its citizens and creates a country where everyone lives in fear.

Harry S Truman, August 8, 1950

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (12+ / 0-)

    Some times you're the pretzel and some times you're the beer

    by Sorta Randle on Sun Oct 20, 2013 at 07:33:00 AM PDT

  •  "Never kick a fresh turd on a hot day"Harry Truman (6+ / 0-)

    Happy just to be alive

    by exlrrp on Sun Oct 20, 2013 at 07:35:09 AM PDT

    •  I like that !!! (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      exlrrp, Linda1961

      Some times you're the pretzel and some times you're the beer

      by Sorta Randle on Sun Oct 20, 2013 at 07:36:09 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The bucolic Mr. Truman, one of our under- (3+ / 0-)

      rated presidents to be sure.  Peppery and quotable, he.  I agree with Oliver Stone's assessment that Truman's decision to drop the A-bomb had everything to do with sending a warning to Stalin with stopping the Japanese as secondary.  There is no way to know how things would have gone for us had Stalin not been forced to reassess his options at that time.  He had to be content with taking over eastern Europe and additional areas of Asia.

      Building a better America with activism, cooperation, ingenuity and snacks.

      by judyms9 on Sun Oct 20, 2013 at 07:58:44 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Oliver Stone is mistaken. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ssgbryan

        There is considerable history in detail about the decision to use the bomb.
        It entirely had to do with ending the war with Japan.

        •  It was the Russian invasion of Manchuria (0+ / 0-)

          on August 9, 1945 that caused the surrender of the Japanese.

          Soviet invasion of Manchuria

          You need to watch Oliver Stone's "Untold History".

          Oliver Stone & Crew - Untold History USA - Left Forum 2013
           Published on Jun 10, 2013

          Oliver Stone & Crew at Left Forum 2013 in Pace University, New York City.
          Also shows segments of the Untold History USA, a 12 part Documentary out in Oct.2013

        •  I believe Truman told Stalin about the bomb (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Sorta Randle

          at Potsdam hoping to keep Stalin from going after Japan and other parts of Asia, but Stalin did anyway.  Less than a week later Truman ordered the bombing at a time when MacArthur had just gotten word of it.  Prior to that the US could have accepted surrender from Japan though what was offered was not unconditional.  They wanted to keep their emperor.  As it turned out their unconditional surrender resulted in them keeping Hirohito in place.

          Building a better America with activism, cooperation, ingenuity and snacks.

          by judyms9 on Sun Oct 20, 2013 at 09:06:05 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Truman never made the decision (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Sorta Randle

          Although as president he could have stopped it, the bombs were being made and delivered as a matter of course, based on planning he wasn't even part of until he became president on FDR's death. FDR had never told him about The Bombs, he'd been outside the loop. No one ever really came to him and said; "Yes or No?" It was assumed he would say yes and he would have.
          Part of history's problem is he said different things later about it at different times, doing some asscovering to cover the fact that he never actually decided, just let the process take its course that had been started long before he got there or even heard about it. There's really no doubt FDR would have done the same, allowing the process to continue, if he hadn't died.
          It was delivered by the same people who'd been firebombing Japan and was just an extension of that process, The Next Big Thing.

          The Russian smash into Manchuria further hastened the end but the  war actually ended when the emperor called the cabinet together and told them it must end, due to the bombs. And even then a lot of Japanese wanted to continue into the inevitable Armageddon that was being prepared for them, same as happened to Germany.

          The US told the Russians they were in no way getting part of Japan, seeing as how they only came in during the last weeks. Russia had maintained a Non Aggression pact with Japan throughout the whole war, giving Japan a free hand in Manchuria and China.
          The Japanese are lucky America stood up and demanded Russia not get a chunk of them, other than that they would have had a West/East Germany type situation.

           

          Happy just to be alive

          by exlrrp on Sun Oct 20, 2013 at 02:34:43 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  middle initial is for Shipp. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sorta Randle

    ( i know you don't wanna know how i know, but i know and i like knowing it. )

    Addington's perpwalk? TRAILHEAD of accountability for Bush-2 Crimes. @Hugh: There is no Article II power which says the Executive can violate the Constitution.

    by greenbird on Sun Oct 20, 2013 at 07:54:57 AM PDT

    •  I have to ask....how ? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      greenbird

      Some times you're the pretzel and some times you're the beer

      by Sorta Randle on Sun Oct 20, 2013 at 07:56:27 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Not according to his biographer. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Buckeye54, greenbird

      David McCullough, historian and Truman's biographer, points out that the 'S' in Truman's name stood for nothing; it was just 'S'.

      •  You're correct, I remember reading that in (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        greenbird

        McCullough's book as well. And the "S" is properly not followed by a period, as would be necessary if it were the abbreviation for "Shipp."

        Wiki says: "They chose "S" as his middle initial to please both of his grandfathers, Anderson Shipp Truman and Solomon Young. The "S" did not stand for anything, a common practice among the Scots-Irish."--David MuCullough, "Truman."

        •  yippee ** (0+ / 0-)

          even better !!
          my dad had no middle name, either.
          had to 'pick one,' for being an undergraduate at Texas A&M, so he chose 'Barrett.' why, yes, it is !! it's for his admiration of William B. Travis, who had written this letter.

          my dad's great grandfather was Richard E. Shipp of Georgia. Harry's great grandfather was Richard Shipp of Virginia. Dad and Harry were 7th cousins, once removed.
          (Harry's was 1 generation prior to Dad's.)

          (cue fluttering of breast feathers puffing out...♥)

          well, i must confess to having been the recipient of an 'official' textbook-cum-comicbook version of Texas history, multiple decades ago, and therefore perhaps have an unfortunate tendency to rely on poorly-vetted sources of so-called facts, but i do know about beans.

          and will continue to be proud for my family, but not for everything. these family stories are never 'true' or 'right' or wrong: they are a continual discovery.

          i believe i may have relied on a genealogical book for the reference for Harry's "S" and will GLADLY defer to David McCullough (and probably interlibrary his "Truman" for a good read!) -- 'Big Boy' and 'Little Boy,' anyone ?

          well what a big ball of green feathery words this turned into. apologies.

          Addington's perpwalk? TRAILHEAD of accountability for Bush-2 Crimes. @Hugh: There is no Article II power which says the Executive can violate the Constitution.

          by greenbird on Sun Oct 20, 2013 at 12:49:46 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Truman was actually my favorite President (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sorta Randle, Wee Mama

    I also liked how he didn't throw Herbert Hoover under the bus and appointed Hoover to serve in his important role in combating poverty in light of the aftermath of the Great Depression.

    Hoover by the way was one of the great Republicans who actually gave a damn about poverty and would be proactive about combating it.  He wasn't an effective president but he was no Dubya by ANY means.

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