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Attorney General of Virginia Ken Cuccinelli speaking at the 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland.
Sorry, Establishment Republicans: It doesn't get any better than this guy.
This is kind of cute, and by cute, I mean laugh-out-load naive (my emphasis):
Leaders of the Republican establishment, alarmed by the emergence of far-right and often unpredictable Tea Party candidates, are pushing their party to rethink how it chooses nominees and advocating changes they say would result in the selection of less extreme contenders.  [...] The party leaders pushing for changes want to replace state caucuses and conventions, like the one that nominated Mr. Cuccinelli, with a more open primary system that they believe will draw a broader cross-section of Republicans and produce more moderate candidates.
Nice try, but replacing state caucuses and conventions with primaries won't fix the GOP's problem. In the case of Virginia, Cuccinelli was selected by a convention, but as Ed Kilgore points out, Cuccinelli would have won a primary: Cuccinelli led "establishment" Republican Lt. Gov. Bill Bolling by a 51-15 margin in a hypothetical GOP primary matchup.

Moreover, primaries didn't stop Republicans from nominating awful candidates like Richard Mourdock in Indiana, Todd Akin in Missouri, Sharron Angle in Nevada, Christine O'Donnell in Delaware, and Ken Buck in Colorado. Why? Because the Republican Party's problem is ... drum roll please ... the Republican Party!

If Republicans are serious about fixing their nomination process, there is one idea that they should consider trying, because it just might work: They ought to try banning Republicans from picking their party's nominees. If they did that, then maybe they'd finally be able to offer up a slate of candidates that doesn't scare the daylights out of the American public.

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:45 AM PST.

Also republished by Virginia Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  i am voting in the republican primary in Indiana (5+ / 0-)

    my vote in the general has no hope of counting for much.

    In the event that i could help get a moderate (?) or a less crazy rep, i am going to try to do so.

  •  Your team (8+ / 0-)

    When your team consists of racist, homophobes, women haters, greedy old white men. you pretty much know what kind of play you get on the field.

    "help police" Catch-22 Joseph Heller 1961

    by rageagnstmach on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:50:38 AM PST

  •  This has sigline written all over it (13+ / 0-)
    Because the Republican Party's problem is ... drum roll please ... the Republican Party!
    I actually think at some point they're going to try to change their name and re-brand themselves. But beyond the party the problem is their ideas. They could call themselves the Whigs, the American Party, or the Fraternity of United Christian Knights and their ideas would still suck and lead them to nominate "winners" like the Cooch.

    Spite is the ranch dressing Republicans slather on their salad of racism

    by ontheleftcoast on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:50:41 AM PST

    •  Or they could call themselves... (9+ / 0-)

      "Knights of Liberty and the American Nation", a.k.a. KLAN.

      “When it comes to this, I shall prefer emigrating to some country where they make no pretense of loving liberty—to Russia, for instance, where despotism can be taken pure and without the base alloy of hypocrisy.” —Abraham Lincoln

      by Pragmatus on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:57:13 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I can see the argument... (4+ / 0-)

      ... that Republican primary voters are, as a group, less batshit-crazy than Republican conventioneers and less likely to nominate a Cuccinelli.  

      It's almost certainly true, as far as it goes, but as we've seen in California, it's not a fail-safe plan because GOP primary voters often nominate crackpots pulled right out of the loonie bin.  The reason we have this "open primary" system in California now is because "mainstream Republicans" wanted to try and save the GOP from its own primary voters.

      •  Another thing I've seen happening is many (5+ / 0-)

        of the so called "moderate Republicans" are switching to registering as Independents. They don't want to openly associate with the Republican party. They'll still vote straight Republican in the election but treat it as sort of "don't blame me, I didn't nominate <crazy Republican X>"

        Spite is the ranch dressing Republicans slather on their salad of racism

        by ontheleftcoast on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:08:28 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  We see that more with conservatives, I think (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          JeffW, ontheleftcoast

          A Democratic candidate for congress in San Diego County in 2006 (who didn't win) commissioned a poll of district voters that she initially thought was encouraging because of the large percentage of independents in the district.  

          It turned out to not be so encouraging because, when you looked at how the poll respondents answered other questions, most of the district's "independent" voters were actually more conservative than most Republican politicians, and are likely self-declared independents because the GOP isn't conservative enough to pass their own personal far-right purity test.

          And this was before the "Tea Party", even before McCain made Failin' Palin a GOP star.  I'd guess the trend of conservatives who think themselves too pure to be Republican is even more pronounced now than it was in 2006.

      •  Right, because (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mmacdDE

        The Tea Party is still a minority within the broad GOP electorate. They're just the minority most impassioned, and most likely to turn out for primaries, especially off-year primaries. The most likely voters are also the elderly, with time on their hands to vote, and with far too much time on their hands to wallow in the cesspools of Fox and talk radio.

        The Republican establishment is probably swayed by the fact that, election after election, Republican primary voters tend to vote moderate - at the Presidential level. Goldwater was an exception, whose crushing loss kept primary voters pragmatic for several cycles. Reagan, and perhaps Dubya, though he promoted himself with a lot of "compassionate conservative" centrist talk, were exceptions. But Bush the elder, Dole, McCain, and Romney were all from the party's reasonable wing.

        It was the less engaged Republicans, though, who come out only in Presidential cycles, and who are not terribly savvy about just how crazy particular down-ballot candidates might be, who created those respectable POTUS nominees. So while going to primaries over caucuses is likely to help a little with the craziness problem, it's not likely to help a lot.

  •  That's also why I love John Boehner. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, shoeless

    As long as we have Boehner as Speaker, that bruised, squishy, flyblown banana of a man, he is the face of the Tea Party/GOP.

    He is the perfect emblem of a Party that can't say no to craziness.

    “When it comes to this, I shall prefer emigrating to some country where they make no pretense of loving liberty—to Russia, for instance, where despotism can be taken pure and without the base alloy of hypocrisy.” —Abraham Lincoln

    by Pragmatus on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:52:36 AM PST

  •  The GOP's best hope is (6+ / 0-)

    that all of their nominees fall into that sinkhole down in Assumption Parish, LA.

    I'll believe corporations are people when one comes home from Afghanistan in a body bag.

    by mojo11 on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:54:30 AM PST

  •  Your Solution Will Fail (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, shoeless, eztempo, JeffW

    What the Republican idiots need to do is ban Republicans from running as Republican candidates.

    More seriously, the problem faced by the Republican establishment is that the other side has the votes, much of the time, and will therefore do what American political parties are supposed to do: Run the candidates that their people support.

    Restore the Fourth! Save America!

    by phillies on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:56:57 AM PST

  •  That's also .... (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lostboyjim, drumwolf, lyvwyr101, JeffW, mmacdDE

    ...going to start a huge intramural pie fight.  Die-hard activists really don't like it when the "establishment" tries to change the rules and disenfranchise the grassroots.  (Would probably be true on our side, as well.)

    All the children of your children's children, do you ever think what they're going to find? Make tomorrow, today...

    by willy mugobeer on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:57:20 AM PST

  •  It goes way, way deeper than that (8+ / 0-)

    The radical, racist, right-wing, redneck, religious zealots that comprise the GOP must become better people.

    The internet has exposed to the masses just who and what these people (the GOP) really are and it is killing them, or at  least their influence.

    This is why net neutrality must be preserved.  If big business can take over the internet as they wish, they can re-establish a strangle hold on information dissemination.

  •  Good luck guys, you'll need it. (9+ / 0-)

    Tea Party photo tea-party-010_zpsac526946.jpg

    Daily Kos an oasis of truth. Truth that leads to action.

    by Shockwave on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:58:08 AM PST

  •  Democrats need to keep demonizing Tea Party (9+ / 0-)

    Can then argue that every GOP Candidate is actually a Teabagger Nutjob like Cuccinelli was.

    To win Florida Charlie or whomever must first run ads demonizing Tea Party then make sure everybody knows Rick Scott is one of them.  It worked in Virginia with a even with Dems running a questionable candidate.

  •  Reasonable people would be embarrassed (6+ / 0-)

    today to be identified as a registered Republican.

    ...the Republican Party's problem is ... drum roll please ... the Republican Party!
  •  they need a smoke filled back room (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, eztempo, JeffW

    they need the Party Committee of leaders, say the Party chairman, and say the deacons of the party to crack open
    a bottle of scotch and make the nominations.

    •  ...ah, back to the time-honored basics. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      patbahn

      The Republican Party has no core value of democracy, and it's organized to protect the interests of business, so restricting voting in the candidate selection process to "corporate persons" with one dollar=one vote should not be a stretch for them.

    •  Guarantees the teabaggers go 3rd party... n/t (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      eztempo
      •  The only way to keep the Tehadists in t' Party... (0+ / 0-)

        ...is to give them the Party.  I doubt the Brahmins will ever sign the trust fund over to that bunch.

        I'm guessing that after the wacko birds are discredited and separated from leadership positions after the mid-terms next year, a rump bunch of Tea Partiers will split off for a replay of George Wallace's American Independent Party, while the rest of 'em fade into the blogospheric haze, nearly irrelevant to 2016 and an historical footnote by 2020.

    •  Re: they need a smoke filled back room (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      eztempo

      That was my thought.  Undermining democracy begins at home.

      If it's good enough for the state of Texas, it oughta be good enough for the Texas Republican Party, you know?

  •  Open primaries would help I think nt. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101

    nt

    •  didn't help in TX (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      lyvwyr101

      I'm (SIGH) registered as a Republican in TX because I want to try to reign in the Tea Party craziness for my rep.  I also got to vote in the Republican senate primary for Anyone But Cruz.  You see how that went for me.

      Still, when the Democratic opponent for the House seat was an anti-gay fucktard, I'll try to do damage control from the right so we only have a bad rep, as opposed to bad AND stupid.

      Minority rights should never be subject to majority vote.

      by lostboyjim on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:04:44 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  They tried that with the clown show leading up to (10+ / 0-)

    the last Presidential election and who did they get: the Texas Governor with a memory problem (Ooops), the serial adulterer with the $300,000 charge account at Tiffany's,  the Nein, Nein Nein pizza czar with a sexual harrassment problem, the Texas libertarian anarchist, the frozen faced, frozen brained religious zealot from Minnesota, Senator Man on Dog, and they settled with the 47% guy who looked like the lost Osmond brother.  

    Yeah, the primary system really worked well for them the last time.  The biggest winners of the Republican Presidential primary process were Comedy Central and SNL.

    And it feels like I'm livin'in the wasteland of the free ~ Iris DeMent, 1996

    by MrJersey on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:01:19 AM PST

    •  Best description of 2012 Clown car members (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      lyvwyr101, Egalitare, JeffW
      who did they get: the Texas Governor with a memory problem (Ooops), the serial adulterer with the $300,000 charge account at Tiffany's,  the Nein, Nein Nein pizza czar with a sexual harrassment problem, the Texas libertarian anarchist, the frozen faced, frozen brained religious zealot from Minnesota, Senator Man on Dog, and they settled with the 47% guy who looked like the lost Osmond brother
      You nailed this, MrJersey, exactly !

      Keystone Liberals on Twitter @ KeystoneLibs , Join PA Liberals at http://keystoneliberalsforum.aimoo.com/

      by wishingwell on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:15:36 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  'Lost Osmond brother' -- excellent! (0+ / 0-)

      And he does!

  •  GOP needs to cancel all primaries and a board (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, shoeless, a2nite, JeffW

    of billionaires select their nominees..but I have a feeling even if they did this, they would still nominate some crazies here and there. As more and more, the entire GOP consists primarily of Nuts and Looney Toons.

    Keystone Liberals on Twitter @ KeystoneLibs , Join PA Liberals at http://keystoneliberalsforum.aimoo.com/

    by wishingwell on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:01:30 AM PST

  •  they are lying about their motivations (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, shoeless, a2nite, JeffW

    This is the Republican establishment we're talking about. Ignore whatever stupid rationale that comes out of their mouths, the establishment is trying to wrest control from the mob that is their base.

    They don't want

    a more open primary system that they believe will draw a broader cross-section of Republicans

    they want a process where only the candidates that the establishment approves are able to run. This is about control.

  •  Open primaries in VA would make a difference . . . (6+ / 0-)

    for the GOP.

    A guy like E.W. Jackson never would have won the nomination solely on the basis of a convention speech, as happened this year.

    Cuccinelli might have led in polls in late 2012, but Bolling would have had a huge influx of money and there are moderate independents and Republicans in northern Virginia who would have voted for him.

    The GOP's closed conventions have lead to crazier candidates going all the way back to Ollie North.

    So, a more open nomination process probably would result in some more moderate candidates.

    However, the risk is that the nuts then take their frustrations out in the general election by staying home.

    In Virginia politics, the career of Marshall Coleman is a case study in this dynamic.

    Do you want to select a guy who the nuts love, but who is nonviable in a general election?

    Or do you select a moderate who the nuts dislike, and then lose the general election because the nuts stay home?

    •  Open Conventions can be gamed, though. (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      lyvwyr101, shoeless, a2nite, NotGeorgeWill

      If the other party shows up in force you may be saddled with someone that really don't have that 'appeal' the ballot data suggests.

      Happy little moron, Lucky little man.
      I wish I was a moron, MY GOD, Perhaps I am!
      —Spike Milligan

      by polecat on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:11:19 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I'm skeptical that this happens often . . . (0+ / 0-)

        For a convention you still need to be selected as a delegate, so there is a point of control which limits the opportunities to game the count.

        With open primaries, we may have seen this during the 2008 presidential campaign with Republicans attempting to prolong the campaign, but for most local and state elections, I'm much less worried.  Most people aren't motivated to cast these kind of votes.  If there's a case where one candidate is clearly much stronger than the other, it seems more likely the votes from party regulars will be more than enough to cancel out votes cast in bad faith on the margins.  With primaries you have voter inertia, combined with problems of organization that tend to impact these kind of efforts.  

        The other option is to move to a run-off system along the lines of what California has, or to have a system where voters can register a 1st, 2nd, and 3rd preference.

  •  Their problem is with guys like Rush... (5+ / 0-)

    Talk Radio and how it gives people one perspective and a lot of rage, for hours and hours and hours and hours and hours and hours and hours and hours and hours on end...

    Guys like Rush make the base of the GOP nutty.

    If you want that on the left, come out here to San Francisco and flip on KPFA. You'd be surprised to hear some of them - Rush in reverse. Stuff nobody anywhere else has heard since the 60s, that would make Castro, Lenin, and Mao think "those guys a tad too leftist and need to be reigned in"...

    But on the right, they let the dogs loose. Rush, Ann, et all - have been giving control of right wing media for a very long time now.

    The Teahadists are simply the natural reaping of what the GOP has sown.

    Changing the selection method won't fix it. It you take a dump in the pool, it doesn't matter how you sample the water - its still going to come back full of ...

    The roaches always win if you turn out the lights.

    by Jyotai on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:02:20 AM PST

    •  How many people listen to Rush? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      lyvwyr101, shoeless

      Not that many, and they don't matter. They vote the way they vote, but they won't vote for a Democrat.

      LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

      by dinotrac on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:09:53 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Oh thet matter... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        JeffW

        They form the base of our enemy.

        Not our opponents - the GOP of old... but the Tea Party movement.

        Its riled up by people who are riled up by people who are riled up by Rush.

        That influence spreads a lot wider than just those who listen to him. Once they hear the words of their prophet, they spread them.

        Same thing with writers like Ann Coulter and the former Ann Rand.

        How many people actually "listened" to Bin Ladin, and how many listened to those who had listened to him, and talked about him, when ranting up their emotions into greater and greater levels of fury.

        That's how influence works - not just who's ear who get into, but how well it spreads.

        Guys like Rush have been paid to spread the memes dreamed up in think tanks like the Federalist Society. They take very complex concepts, package them down to simple buzzwords to trigger emotions, and let it loose.

        And now they're stuck with it.

        The roaches always win if you turn out the lights.

        by Jyotai on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:45:42 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Absolutely- (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Jyotai, JeffW

      you can polish a turd---but it's still a turd.

      "The people who were trying to make this world worse are not taking the day off. Why should I?”---Bob Marley

      by lyvwyr101 on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:26:04 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Exactly. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Jyotai, JeffW

      It's been a great ride for the past couple of decades, whipping up the base into a frenzy via every button of fear, hate, and insecurity that Rush, FOX, Murdoch, etc. can push.  It served the purpose of winning elections for them.  

      But in doing so, they've sown the wind; now they're riding the whirlwind of a crazy base that actually believe the crap that's been fed to them.

      "After the (job losses) and (austerity) they won't be the same human beings you remember. Slaves?. . let's just say, they'll be satisfied with less" -Naomi Klein's Shock Doctrine, as explained by Ming the Merciless.

      by Softlanded on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:36:33 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  tea party populists? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    IM, lyvwyr101, shoeless

    Weren't the tea partiers supposed to be the mass popular uprising against democrats?

    Then, wouldn't this apparent belief that primaries nominate less extreme candidates be an admission that the tea party is actually their party insiders (ie, those that are far more likely to attend caucuses)?

    •  Extreme-less extreme is a silly and short-sided (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      lyvwyr101, a2nite, JeffW

      divider.

      If you are not a political insider, you may be more concerned with whether the party (and/or your own rep) gives a damn about people like you.

      It's actually rational and reasonable (if not altogether comforting) to vote for a "crazy" who seems to be on your side over a "moderate" who cares only when it's time for an election.

      There will always be another election.  Why vote for somebody whose primary interests lie with those who make your life miserable?

      LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

      by dinotrac on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:13:03 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  GOP, like the 'left', is in denial about RW radio (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, shoeless, Odysseus

    GOP is ruled by the talk radio gods and the think tanks that use them to sell their ALEC-type agenda. those candidates are chosen and supported based on their ability to ride the talk radio bandwagon generated by 1200 coordinated unchallenged radio stations.

    all of the looniest and all their teabaggers are all living in that alternate reality that wouldn't exist if those stations weren't getting a free speech free ride.

    This is a list of 76 universities for Rush Limbaugh that endorse global warming denial, racism, sexism, and GOP lies by broadcasting sports on over 170 Limbaugh radio stations.

    by certainot on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:06:17 AM PST

  •  The solution for the Republicans is to embrace (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, shoeless, a2nite, JeffW

    Obamacare or allow Obamacare to move forward without obstruction.  The reason the GOP nominates nut jobs is because a certain segment of the country has become unhinged due to a profound loss of wealth plus a profound sense of a loss of power.  Obamacare, when successfully implemented, means that the government will have significantly changed a key portion of the economy to help working class and middle class Americans.  It will show that government does work when it is allowed to work.  That will begin to stem the anger that drives the tea party movement and make it more possible for a non-extremist to win a primary.  Also, allowing infrastructure and other domestic spending programs to move forward will also help to diffuse the anger that fuels the GOP base.

    Global Shakedown - Alternative rock with something to say. Check out their latest release, "A Time to Recognize": Available on iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, Spotify and other major online music sites. Visit http://www.globalshakedown.com.

    by khyber900 on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:08:17 AM PST

  •  They've got to stop spenidng their money to feed (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wishingwell, lyvwyr101, JeffW

    the gullible the crazy serum.

    The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy;the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness

    by CTMET on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:09:15 AM PST

  •  They're dim, Jed! /nt (6+ / 0-)

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013

    by annieli on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:12:05 AM PST

  •  The GOP en masse, is STILL reeling, (6+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, Odysseus, a2nite, JeffW, bythesea, Matt Z

    by a black man winning the White House.

    The nuts came out in 2010 and "saved" the country from.................????

    And they've lost everything since then.  The irrational racism goes so deep, that they won't admit that they're circling the drain.

    One-term Obama was a fluke of history.

    Two-term Obama may be the end of their sanity.

    And if Dems can't take advantage of this, we don't deserve to be in power.


    "The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance, but to overcome it" - Dr. Lawrence Krauss

    by AlyoshaKaramazov on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:12:12 AM PST

  •  Indeed, in Maine in 2010 Gov. Paul LePage (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, Odysseus, a2nite

    bested a field of seven in the Republican primary, including establishment candidates Steve Abbott (just off from being Sen. Susan Collins' chief of staff), long-time legislator Peter Mills, Matt Jacobson, and ski resort mogul Les Otten.

    LePage only spent about $100,000 on his campaign, but had strong Tea Party support.

    Form follows function -- Louis Sullivan

    by Spud1 on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:13:33 AM PST

  •  They could let Dick Cheney pick their candidates. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101

    Of course, he would always just pick himself.

    The problem with political jokes is they get elected.

    by shoeless on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:14:56 AM PST

  •  They need to get rid of the Rush Limbaugh's (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, a2nite, JeffW

    and the other hate radio and Fox News firebrands.
      Then maybe they could have a reasonable debate where the crazies don't dominate.

    None are so hopelessly enslaved, as those who falsely believe they are free. The truth has been kept from the depth of their minds by masters who rule them with lies. -Johann von Goethe

    by gjohnsit on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:15:05 AM PST

  •  The Republican Party was broken by the so (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, a2nite, JeffW

    called southern strategy that the Nixon campaign came up with and they have run with ever since.  The rise of the Tea Party is the result.  The tea party is the majority of the Republican Party and they intend to run the show now.

    •  I sometimes really believe (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Odysseus

      the teaparty came into existence out of sheer hatred for this country---and that is the sole motivator for how the teapartiers vote as well.

      Unless of course they're really just that completely irresponsible--totally enraged----and dangerously stupid.

      "The people who were trying to make this world worse are not taking the day off. Why should I?”---Bob Marley

      by lyvwyr101 on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:31:56 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I think that they should be strongly encouraged (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, JeffW

    to try that strategy. The potential for entertainment value is immeasurable.

  •  Extremists Represent Their Party (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, a2nite, JeffW

    They can't just put lipstick on their pig and send it to DC. The extremists actually represent their party's members, and push for positions their party puts in its platform and makes nonnegotiable in its legislative agenda.

    The only part of their party they could cut out as nonessential is the nonexistent moderates. But pretending they have them is essential to pretending they are them.

    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

    by DocGonzo on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:26:14 AM PST

  •  They Keep Trying Tricks To Pick Up Voters... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, a2nite, JeffW

    On the Internet, nobody knows if you're a dog... but everybody knows if you're a jackass.

    by stevemb on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:27:36 AM PST

  •  Rule changes and voter suppression: (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, a2nite, JeffW

    it's not just for democrats anymore!

    "One faction of one party in one House of Congress in one branch of government doesn't get to shut down the entire government just to refight the results of an election."

    by Inland on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:28:01 AM PST

  •  The California Experience (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, JeffW

    Barbara Boxer is a U.S. senator right now because California's formerly partisan primary kept putting right wing kooks up against her, beginning in 1992 with right wing talk show host Bruce Herschensohn.  Herschensohn beat Republican establishment candidate Tom Campbell and then was taken out by Boxer -- a very liberal Congresswoman at the time -- in the general.

    Since 1992 the California Republican Party has gotten progressively nuttier and unelectable on a statewide basis.

    Business interests responded to this with a series of corporate-funded ballot initiatives that would allow Democrats and Independents to vote in Republican primaries, allowing money to be the main driver in who got the nomination.  These "open primary" initiatives were ruled unconstitutional violations of Republican rights to association.

    So, finally, they passed an initiative that made all California primaries (except the Presidential primary) non-partisan, meaning the top two primary vote-getters were on the general election ballot (and nobody else), no matter which party they were from.  

    This was upheld and that is now one additional way money rules Sacramento.  The top two candidates in the primary are usually the those to whom business gives to most money.

    But the main focus was to keep the California Republican base from picking one of the two general election candidates in any reasonably contestable election.  The Christine O'Donnels of California are still allowed into the general election if no establishment money-backed candidate wants to run.

    This aggression will not stand, man.

    by kaleidescope on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:29:01 AM PST

  •  Leaders of the Republican establishment (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, Odysseus, a2nite, JeffW

    alarmed by the emergence of their own creation of far-right and often unpredictable Tea Party candidates, are pushing their party to rethink how it chooses nominees and advocating changes they say would result in the selection of less extreme contenders.

    Let's not let them pretend this isn't entirely a problem of their own making.

  •  I held my nose (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Odysseus

    while voting for Mr. McAuliffe, so the Democratic party is not doing a lot better in Virginia than the Republicans.  I hope that McAuliffe shows us something besides just being some corporate asshole.  McAulliffe only won by a very few percentage points.  Any crowing that needs to be done should be done by a rooster, not by the Democratic party.  McAuliffe was the lesser of two evils and only just barely.

  •  What the GOP fails to realize is... (5+ / 0-)

    The GOP doesn't understand that the crazies are getting into the party because those crazies are the logical extension of Republican Party logic.  For at least the last 40 years, REpublican policies have been about ideology over reality.  Over ignoring evidence in favour of BELIEF.  Of appearing to be something that you really aren't, orwellian messaging and the ends justifying the means and doing everything they can to get their own base to ignore reality and vote against their own best interests.

    So I don't get why it is so shocking to the GOP that when this has been their political platform for decades, that their base and party is being overrun by crazies who have no connection to reality.  It is what the GOP has been selling for a long time now.  The crazies ARE the face of the REpublican party's policies.

  •  Tell far right nuts to start their OWN PARTY (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite, JeffW

    Otherwise by letting them IN your GOP and LEADING the Party, you are no better than them!

  •  "getting our folks to the polls" (0+ / 0-)

    It sounds like moderate Repubs are in the same boat Dems have been in for a while--we comprise a majority (they within the party, we within the population) but the other side turns out to vote in significantly higher percentages.

  •  Deep divisions (0+ / 0-)

    I really dont see the point in calling people with whom you disagree "crazy". It makes it that much harder to gain any unity on points with which everyone can agree.
    I'm really not taking sides here- just making an observation that this kind of one-word name calling generates useless exchanges in other forums liiiiike:
    "Tell it to your racist wingnut friends, you dumb, redneck bagger"
    "Go back to licking Barry 's boots, you commie O-Bot"

    Ad Infinitum

    But alas, I fear it may be too late and moderation may be a thing of the past.

    "He slept with the special peculiarity of a man who had been hit in the head with a shovel" Mark Twain Reporter for the Territorial Enterprise in Virginia City, Nevada

    by Frederick Ustinov on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 11:10:31 AM PST

  •  It's Time the Pundits Redefine 'Establishment' (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW

    Repugs. If a once discriminant group in a political party repeatedly has its ideas, candidates and positions rejected by the rank and file, they're not really 'established' are they? They're outsiders who dance to someone else's tune, right? That's what I've been seeing since at least 2010.  

  •  The only way the GOP can become sane again? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW

    Expel the people who think that Adam and Eve had vegetarian dinosaurs for neighbors in the Garden of Eden 5,000 years ago. Expel the people who believe that evolution and embryology are "from the pit of Hell." Expel the people who believe that the earth is 10,000 years old. Expel the people who think a large, diverse nation in the 21st century can replace the Constitution with the Bible.

    Of course, getting rid of all of these loons would effectively mean shedding the Republican base, but that's what you get when you devote your party to making these people happy.

  •  At least in the House, they could simply stop (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW

    trying to gerrymander so badly.  You've got two likely choices, and one hard to define sweet spot.  You gerrymander to make yourself 'safe' from the left, and you're making yourself imperiled from the right.  Ditto in the opposite direction.  Somewhere there's that magical 'sweet spot' where you most properly align yourself to be 'safest' from both right and left, but it's still going to be 'less safe' in either a primary or a general.  Which is why politicians traditionally backtrack between primary and general, back towards what they assume is that 'sweet spot'.

    If they want to gerrymander to be 'completely' safe from the left, they're going to remain perfect targets from the right.

  •  I've got a sure fire solution for 'em: (0+ / 0-)

    Adopt a pro-choice plank in their national platform and require all candidates to sign a statement of support for it in order to appear on a Republican Party ballot.

    That, f'sure, will prevent any of their crazies from winning their party's nomination for any office.  (Of course it will force a split and mass exodus from their core activist base, but they'll be better off for it in the long run.)

  •  What did you THINK would happen? (0+ / 0-)

    I love how they're acting like this is all some big surprise despite spending the last 25 years telling the most extreme crazies that they're the majority. And now they want to pretend that they don't understand how this could have happened. Gee, I don't know, maybe it has something to do with the fact that this is what you all said you wanted for years on end. The more conservative the better, right?

  •  Seems like they need ... (0+ / 0-)

    ... to get more moderate Republican voters out in the primaries.
    How about offering same-day registration?

  •  Boy, that didn't take long! (0+ / 0-)

    I predicted that in a comment just a few days ago. OK, it was kind of obvious, but accurately predicting anything those kooks will do is something of an a achievement.

    Voting is the means by which the public is distracted from the realities of power and its exercise.

    by Anne Elk on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 01:39:41 PM PST

  •  They should be supporting open primaries then (0+ / 0-)

    Voting is the means by which the public is distracted from the realities of power and its exercise.

    by Anne Elk on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 01:40:27 PM PST

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