Skip to main content

As with all things Dyslexia can be described by others under a wide "tent" of symptoms and effects, but its beauty lies in the eye of the beholder. Hence this is my view of what others cover under the headline banner of "Dyslexia".

Some think it has to do with spelling and mere jumbling up of letters my experience of how I view the world goes far beyond the mere written word. It is part of everything I do and the way I relate my experience of the world to others.

I have what is referred to by some as an extreme form of what some would term as a handicap. However, once understood, it has in my experience been an advantage that arose from extreme frustration. I sometimes relate my world view as being looking at a kaleidoscope in motion and until you can fix the image, it is difficult to interpret. Without my tinted glasses the written page is a migraine inducing flux.

On bad days assembling the written word into comprehensible blocks [to others] can be a trial and error process [I don't have an internal editor]. Without rigorous attention as to what some would term left and right I can find myself in places others would term of as lost, though I'm quite content that I'm where everyone else should be.

On bad days my diaries here can cause confusion, although I'm quite happy with the overall flow. Punctuation can be a mystery and I have never held it as significant since it merely superfluous to the overall picture, like cherubs floating around Venus if you like.

After spending many years learning from people who actually understood my worldview, and heaven knows how many that didn't have a clue. I have finally found the beauty in my gift; and forgotten the rage, tears and frustration of the past.

Some say picture paints a thousands words, and if all you see are images on the page of a book, then you can assimilate it very quickly. That is how I read, by block with sometimes amusing misconception until looked at again. That when I wander and am apparently lost, I can find something completely unexpected and rewarding in itself. Don't worry down which road you have gone, rejoice in the fact you have arrived at all.

Writing can be exhausting on a bad day, so if this is a bad day, I ask your indulgence and organize the image in your own way, and see if you can see the world through my eyes.

I'll probably write about Dyslexia again sometime, and maybe even on a good day.

Love

A

3:01 AM PT: A video you might enjoy

Originally posted to LaFeminista on Fri Nov 08, 2013 at 02:23 AM PST.

Also republished by Barriers and Bridges.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar. I hope I was clear? (20+ / 0-)

    "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

    by LaFeminista on Fri Nov 08, 2013 at 02:23:27 AM PST

  •  Oh, and if you have any questions; just ask (8+ / 0-)

    "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

    by LaFeminista on Fri Nov 08, 2013 at 02:24:32 AM PST

    •  Have you had a look at the technical side (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Wee Mama, LaFeminista

      of dyslexia ?

      Eyes movement patterns, called saccades ?

      Aiming the eyes is what gets you sharp images. These movements fire at 3 per second and the range of factors that can interfere with performance might surprise you. E.g., kids hitting puberty or boys getting moved to a new school -- notorious.

      Heavily technical, but important for hitting each of the major contributors:

      Neural Control of Saccadic Eye Movements - in Neuroscience, 2nd Edition

      And interesting to get an accurate inventory for problems, plus exercises to help out:

      Eye Can Learn

      Large print books, generally, of course. Using a colored line-tracking card. Or doing the audio book together with reading the print book.

      There's a lot out there. Unfortunately the psychologists have colonized the problem and they have no solutions, ever. They're not trained for the neuroscience. "Counseling" is a mess compared to scientific responses. You have to get to a physiological psychologist and/or a neurologist to make the proper repairs possible.

      Good luck !

  •  I always feel inadequate in your presence (6+ / 0-)

    But I was squeezed into the school box and fit quite nicely.
    I'm a little late getting ready for work. I hope today turns into a good one.

  •  Not only clear, (7+ / 0-)

    but beautifully descriptive.  I'm particularly fond of the cherubs around Venus image.  :-)

    When I was teaching, I had to be extra attentive to my dyslexic students.  If not, I'd miss the richness of their experience.  Every dyslexic child had enormous creative abilities and once I learned to interpret/decode things properly, I was able to reap ample rewards.

    Thanks for explaining this so well!

    -7.62, -7.28 "Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken winged bird that cannot fly." -Langston Hughes

    by luckylizard on Fri Nov 08, 2013 at 03:15:53 AM PST

    •  I'm so happy teachers now have the knowledge (4+ / 0-)

      to spot it right away

      "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

      by LaFeminista on Fri Nov 08, 2013 at 03:21:56 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  It can still be (0+ / 0-)

        a trick to spot, but the best news is that we have ways to deal with it so that kids don't feel stupid from the beginning.  That is SO important!

        -7.62, -7.28 "Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken winged bird that cannot fly." -Langston Hughes

        by luckylizard on Fri Nov 08, 2013 at 05:51:50 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  my experience as a speech-language (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        LaFeminista, luckylizard, chimene

        pathologist is that it is frequently not diagnosed in our local schools.  I get the kids referred to me at hospital outpatient therapy and the parents can't even get the kid to be evaluated at school.   One local parent was in the news a few years back relating her frustration over lack of services in the schools and they had to go outside the system to get both the diagnosis and treatment.  The definition for learning disabilities in the schools is very narrowly defined by requiring a certain pattern of discrepancies in test scores.  Many kids with dyslexia don't fit the pattern or they can't even get past the screening tests to get to the psych eval.  

        There are also various flavors of dyslexia, and I deal with three of the types:
        problems with phonological awareness and ability to segment and blend individual sounds auditorily
        problems with symbol imagery (mentally picturing the letters and their sequence)
        problems with concept imagery (mentally picturing the concepts associated with the meaning of the text, often found with hyperlexia, a child who reads the words accurately but does not comprehend the text)
        and an accompanying problem of word-finding deficits that if severe and combined with one of the above makes the dyslexia much more complex.  

        purely visual problems are much, much less common, but seem to be the popular notion of dyslexia as "seeing letters and words jumbled up".  

        and incidentally we see stroke patients with acquired dyslexia/alexia.  One person I am seeing now has to look at the print for awhile and read it several times and then it starts to make sense to him and eventually he gets it all, but it takes him a long time. This person has word-finding deficits primarily.  

        •  My dyslexia goes far beyong the written word (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          luckylizard

          and fashions my whole vision of the world and how I interact with it

          "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

          by LaFeminista on Fri Nov 08, 2013 at 09:37:55 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  well, dyslexia by (0+ / 0-)

            definition is something relating to processing of written language.  It can well be accompanied by other brain differences that go beyond the written word.  For example autism for one, (and I have seen this frequently, but obviously not all people with autism also have dyslexia, although the language impairment in autism certainly can affect dyslexia if it is present) but there are countless variations in brain functioning in individuals that I think we still have very little understanding of.  Right now we have limited categories to describe these variations and do the best we can with labels such as "dyslexia" "hyperlexia" "autism spectrum disorder" "central auditory processing disorder"  "nonverbal learning disabilities" "sensory processing disorder" etc.  but I think by no means are these labels adequate and there are a lot of people that don't fit neatly into them.  

        •  My experience may be (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          LaFeminista

          unusual.  In Iowa, the Area Education Agencies are excellent resources for schools and parents.  They are especially good with speech, language, and hearing problems of toddlers.  A lot of kids get screened out  in this way before they ever reach Kindergarten.

          Also, I worked in Catholic schools.  There was a lot less red tape to navigate in order to get a kid seen and diagnosed.  One of the biggest hurdles we faced was getting parents to realize that their kid was not lazy, but had special challenges to be dealt with.  Some parents would rather have their kid struggle than admit he/she has a problem.  That's really sad.

          -7.62, -7.28 "Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken winged bird that cannot fly." -Langston Hughes

          by luckylizard on Fri Nov 08, 2013 at 03:45:10 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I worked for an Iowa (0+ / 0-)

            Area Education Agency in 1977-78 my first year out of graduate school.  They were very advanced even then in their speech-language pathology services in terms of caseload size, early intervention for preschoolers etc.  In fact my job was about 90% early childhood ages 3-5.  Working for a special education agency is entirely different from the usual situation such as we have here in Kentucky where you work directly for the school system.  The school system mostly sees special education as a bunch of rules they have to comply with and try to do the minimum to do so.  

    •  Your writing flows with apparent effortlessness. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      luckylizard

      In fact I've often thought, I wish I could be that prolific.  Maybe if I could think that fast?

      You're the last person I would ever dream was dyslexic.  Your compensation is nothing less than amazing.

      Ted Cruz president? Pardon my Vietnamese, but Ngo Pho King Way.

      by ZedMont on Fri Nov 08, 2013 at 02:17:18 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I've got ADD so I'm sympathetic (4+ / 0-)
  •  Cheers from another dyslexic! (3+ / 0-)

    I hear you just fine.  Reading is slow, but listening works great.  ;)

    Isn't it time for the US Govt to give Leonard Peltier back his freedom? ** "Throwing a knuckleball for a strike is like throwing a butterfly with hiccups across the street into your neighbor's mailbox." -- Willie Stargell

    by Yasuragi on Fri Nov 08, 2013 at 03:43:38 AM PST

    •  Sight and sound are two distinct functions. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Yasuragi

      I'm not sure why that's not obvious in our educational system. Nor why it is not appreciated that touch is yet another function, which may or may not be coordinated with the others.
      One of my children simply could not learn to write. The small motor capacities of his fingers were inadequate to holding and writing instrument and drawing the necessary lines. Computer keyboards were a god-send and he's happily ensconced in the IT industry. Funny thing is when he does carpentry, his work is very precise. Perhaps it was the impulse towards precision that kept him from writing. It always looked wrong.
      "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good," is easy to say. :)

      I'm reminded that dictation was a core component of the educational system I experienced in South America. Perhaps they relied on it because they hadn't a lot of books. But, as I remember, it certainly helps with learning a foreign language. Think I'll try it with the grandson who's taking Spanish.

      •  Good idea. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Wee Mama, hannah

        There are all kinds of unexpected benefits in technology.  I find that, while I miss holding an actual book, the Kindle has changed my life.  Truly.  

        Because I can adjust the size of the font, the spacing between words, the distance between lines, I read -- without exaggeration -- about ten times faster than I used to.  

        Early on, I had to come to terms with the fact that I'd never manage to read most of the books I wanted to (reading a book is a major time commitment), but with the Kindle I'm way ahead of where I ever thought I'd be.

        Happy for your son that he found work that worked for him.

        Isn't it time for the US Govt to give Leonard Peltier back his freedom? ** "Throwing a knuckleball for a strike is like throwing a butterfly with hiccups across the street into your neighbor's mailbox." -- Willie Stargell

        by Yasuragi on Fri Nov 08, 2013 at 04:18:11 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  I had a friend (he died a couple of years ago) (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LaFeminista, Wee Mama

    who had a photographic memory. I watched him read books by turning pages slowly. He was a wonderful resource, much like Google. One could bring up any topic and whatever he'd read about it came out of his mouth. What took me many years to realize was that the information was all un-processed. It came out in the same form it had gone in, without any analysis or connecting having taken place. Even contradictions were not recognized. It was very difficult to have a face to face discussion because, I now realize, the discrepancies were frustrating. Written communications were better, largely because much could just be left out of any response.

    I don't suppose there are all that many speed readers, but many brains seem to lack a processing function. They don't catch anomalies.

    The old codger that stayed with me for a while used to say "in one ear and out the other because there's nothing in the way to stop it." That could also be the case with "in the ears and out the mouth."  Really clever parrots. I often thought poor Dubya just rattled off whatever the last person who'd talked to him had said. Some people take on the demeanor and the verbiage of their interlocutors. It's hard to detect because we all like hearing someone say what we already think.

  •  Dyslexia plagued my school years. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    waterstreet2013, Wee Mama

    Fortunately for me, the experimental school I was in in 5th grade tried teaching us Evelyn Woods Reading Dynamics (AKA Speed Reading) and it happens to be the same exercises that help dyslexics overcome some of the reading issues. I went from functionally illiterate to 2500 words/minute with testable comprehension.
    It's not a "cure" but it is a useful tool.
    Writing is still tough, though the advent of word processors has been a godsend. I can review and correct before I hit send, spelling checkers are my friend!
    Dyslexics UNTIE!

    If I ran this circus, things would be DIFFERENT!

    by CwV on Fri Nov 08, 2013 at 04:49:45 AM PST

  •  I think you are one of the better writers here:) (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    waterstreet2013, LaFeminista

    Never would have even suspected you had anything wrong with you:) Plus you seem to be one of the few left here that understands wit, sarcasm, humor with the written word;) I miss that. Nowadays people hype their 'over-sensitivity' and PC stuff to the point one doesn't dare say anything 'funny' or really truthful.

    I worked in a lot of customer service positions, and occasionally ran into someone who couldn't read or hear, but knew something was 'off', fortunately I've always had a knack to ask the right questions (or figured out the 'handicap') and then deal with their need. It was always met with relief and gratitude by both customer and self. It'd be easier if we could read minds and save a lot of embarrassment, discomfort etc., or be brave enough and unashamed to just accept and tell the person you are dealing with right off the bat.

    I have become extremely hard of hearing and always tell whoever starts speaking with me instead of guessing what they are saying, to please speak loudly.

    "Life without emotions is like an engine without fuel."

    "It's said that the honest man has nothing to hide. Not true. The honest man has to hide himself, because honest men are the prime targets of those who lie."

    by roseeriter on Fri Nov 08, 2013 at 05:07:28 AM PST

  •  aw geesh, apologize for a poor choice of words.. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    waterstreet2013, LaFeminista

    I don't think there's anything 'wrong with you' per se.
    I call our brain malfunctions Quirks and I don't know anyone who doesn't have a quirk of some kind, including Moi.

    "Life without emotions is like an engine without fuel."

    "It's said that the honest man has nothing to hide. Not true. The honest man has to hide himself, because honest men are the prime targets of those who lie."

    by roseeriter on Fri Nov 08, 2013 at 05:15:34 AM PST

  •  Looking at the video I wonder if some of those (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LaFeminista

    folks have a different difference, nonverbal learning disability. That also can lead to delays in reading but for different reasons. My son (and almost certainly my brother) have NLD, and it was a long road while we figured out what he needed and how to help him flourish.

    Your writing here is beautiful -



    Is it true? Is it kind? Is it necessary? . . . and respect the dignity of every human being.

    by Wee Mama on Fri Nov 08, 2013 at 06:00:34 AM PST

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site