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Dear Edward Snowden,

Thank-you for standing up for our rights.

Now that you leaked that the NSA has installed malicious software on computers and hacked into webcams, I'm starting to get worried.

When the first revelations about NSA surveillance came around, I wasn't that worried.  I'd read enough to know that Facebook and Google have been stealing our data for years.  I was by no means shocked or surprised that they were forwarding that data to the government.

Since things are starting to get more complicated, I am asking that you just release everything else you know about government surveillance now.  I understand that releasing information about these programs one at a time may allow for prolonged news coverage of this, but I'd prefer to know now if the NSA is tapping my cheap, prepaid phone; or looking at every paper on my computer.  

If we know the full extent of NSA surveillance now, we'll be better able to guard the little privacy we have left.

Thank-you again for taking such great risks for the sake of government transparency.

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Comment Preferences

  •  PS: For a long time I was losing faith (22+ / 0-)

    …in USians -- and I was questioning whether they deserved the rights and freedom they believed they had. I wished, with all my heart, I was in a position to empower them with the facts about the fragile reality they live in.

    I knew it would take an intelligent and consciousness young person -- without a family to worry about -- to make the kind of sacrifice necessary to bring an awareness to the world about where all of us -- as a technologically advanced species -- were headed. And, about what was at stake for all humans who dream of a future in which they can self actualize to their unique potential.

    What I didn't expect was that I would see this kind of self sacrifice in my lifetime.

    For that, I am humbled and grateful.

    Thank you, Mr Snowden, and best wishes for a new life for you in smarter and more aware world that you helped to create.

    yr frend,

    Pluto

  •  The Greenwaldian approach has indeed had its probs (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kyril, doroma

    The drip-drip strategy is good for only one thing: giving people enough rope to hang themselves with.

    But it's been a complete disaster in that either (a) the large majority of journalists don't realize that a hanging has taken place and continue pumping out stories oblivious to the fact (tech-company "ignorance" being the most persistent case of obliviousness -- see here for a quick demonstration); (b) no hanging has occurred at all because the threads of rope are too tangled in the amnesiac waters of time.

    •  The reaction of the US public isn't (9+ / 0-)

      what's going to bring about change.  It's the reaction of the EU business community that's going to be the real test.  They don't have to use American tech products like Microsoft and Dell and Apple and Cisco and HP.  They can choose less tainted products.  If the whole thing "blows over" with the American public but corporate security in other businesses around the globe won't let the front office buy Dells because of security concerns, that's long term economic disadvantage with no benefit gained.

      •  Agreed (6+ / 0-)

        Loss of business in China and loss of face in China won't register with the administration which has adopted a cold war posture, so not matter how much business IBM, Cisco, Juniper et al lose there, it will just be collateral damage, politically.

        But I think the US still sees the EU as allied territory and of strategic economic and political importance, so as this mess continues to impact business, economic treaty negotiations and EU laws that discourage US business, I think (hope) the Administration and Congress will li$ten.

        It probably irks the establishment that the European Left has embraced Snowden and invited him to testify, something unlikely to happen, but the longer this drags on without reforms, the more credibility and leverage the EU Left will get and it starts to affect business as usual.

  •  I agree with most of your diary (15+ / 0-)

    However, I'm still of the opinion that a slow drip is more beneficial in the long run.

    This strategy is responsible for the degree to which this story still remains on the public's radar.

    It's been six months, and we're still talking about it. Once the information "runs dry," it will likely be seen by those on the receiving end of the "bad publicity" as the beginning of the end of their "PR problems." The process of sweeping this under the rug then becomes much easier for them.

    At this point, imo, we should all assume the worst IS happening and plan accordingly.




    Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ J. Garcia

    by DeadHead on Tue Dec 31, 2013 at 10:05:15 PM PST

    •  I also agree with the slower pace... (15+ / 0-)

      ... of releasing the info as the best strategy to keep people aware of what is going on and keep on talking about the crimes and unconstitutional actions involved.  Otherwise it would go down the black hole and never be mentioned again (1984 style).

      That also gives Greenwald and others a chance to completely vet the papers to make certain (at least to the best of their ability) that no one is put in danger or loses their life when the info about crimes and wrongdoing is released.

      [Goodness knows, Dickie & his evil cohorts were not so careful when they released Valerie Plame's name and occupation!  I still wonder if she and her team were planning a sting operation and getting too close to discovering crimes committed by Halliburton and other corporations near and dear to Dickie, Dumbya, and their criminal cohorts, and that's why they sent Wilson overseas and then released Plame's name and occupation after he wrote that article.]

      Meanwhile, a slow, steady drip of info released over time will keep the subject in the headlines and sooner or later (I hope) the legislators will be forced to rescind, repeal, or otherwise invalidate the fake "legal" laws they created that were never constitutional in the first place.

      "Legalizing" something that's always been illegal does not mean it's constitutional.

      And you're correct: assume the worst is happening even if that info has not come out yet, and live or plan life accordingly.

      I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

      by NonnyO on Tue Dec 31, 2013 at 10:26:44 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Precisely my point: (8+ / 0-)
        And you're correct: assume the worst is happening even if that info has not come out yet, and live or plan life accordingly.
        At this point, wrt to this issue, if you can imagine it happening, there's a reasonable chance it actually has, is how I look at it these days.

        The confirmation of any given suspicion, if and when it comes, will be less jaw-dropping if you're braced for it.




        Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ J. Garcia

        by DeadHead on Tue Dec 31, 2013 at 11:03:18 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Greenwald vets the risk of release? (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mr Robert, CJB2012

        How can he make a decision about how the release of information is going to put people at risk? Does he somehow magically know everything about all of the programs? Do you realize most things are classified for a predetermined number of years and then downgraded or only downgraded after review by experts in the field? Is Greenwald now an expert in all of those fields? Does he really know all the activities of all the players?

        If someone hoovered all of my work files, they would find an illegal project in a proposal. The next revision of the proposal had the project removed because my boss and the program manager both pointed out that it could be considered illegal. I pulled it based on their urging and upset some coworkers in the process. I still have the older revision and my handwritten phonelog to backup the cutting, but you would have to pour through my phonelog related to that program to track the timeline.

        It would be easy for someone to point out the illegal project that never started, release it to the public as how we are breaking the law and paint me and my coworkers as criminals.

        •  vetting = preventing ID of individuals (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cybrestrike, NonnyO

          Journalists vetting leaked classified documents usually are only concerned with preventing release of info that would expose specific agents. Information that is embarrassing or damaging to governments is fair game for exposure. That's a much lower burden than a gov committee declassifying docs.

          SOME news agencies, such as the NYT, will further censor their journalists to prevent embarrassing revelations about governments because they are pressured or outright threatened. That's why Snowden released the docs the way he did so that no government could supress every journalist. It's worked out pretty well so far.

          "Tell the truth and run." -- Yugoslav proverb

          by quill on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 10:45:59 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  I fully realize many things... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          DeadHead

          ... didn't need to be, and should never have been classified in the first place.  Too many things are classified to protect the criminal activities of our own government, or protect those who authorized the criminal activities.  Aside from legal and constitutional concerns, the lack of ethical and moral behavior on the part of our elected and appointed officials leaves much to be desired.

          Do you realize most things are classified for a predetermined number of years and then downgraded or only downgraded after review by experts in the field? Is Greenwald now an expert in all of those fields? Does he really know all the activities of all the players?
          I trust Greenwald far more than I trust any of our elected or appointed officials.  At least the things that come out of Greenwald's head and written in his articles sound like he treats other adults as equals.

          Our elected officials talk down to us in a condescending fashion and treat us as children who can't be told that Santa is a fictitious character, even as some of the classifications protect their campaign donors; they carry that condescending attitude over to the papers they've classified that should not have been classified in the first place.

          That started ages ago, but became irritatingly obvious under Dumbya & Dickie, and every time I hear Obama start a sentence in a huffy and exasperated tone of voice: "Well, look..." I take offense.  I'm a senior citizen on Social Security and I resent being talked to like I'm a child with a low IQ (I know my IQ number and it's not in the stupid range).  I'm only old, not senile or hard of hearing.

          Thanks, but no thanks.  I'll take Greenwald's judgment over any of our political "leaders" any day.  I appreciate being talked to and treated like an equal adult, and I don't buy the illogicality of "Well, they must know more than we do so I'll take their word for it."  I'm one of those people who says "Show me the info you know so I can figure out for myself if your actions are justified."

          Now that we know some of this stuff, we know damned good and well that "over-classification" only means they're hiding something that's illegal and/or unconstitutional, and if they were ever tried for their crimes, a great many of our elected officials (both Repukes and Dems) would be in federal prison for the rest of their unnatural little lives.

          I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

          by NonnyO on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 10:54:43 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  Also, It Feeds The Establishment More Rope (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DeadHead, cybrestrike, NonnyO, Pluto

        How many times have they gone through this cycle:

         1. Tell Lie A
         2. New disclosure refutes Lie A
         3. Shift to Lie B
         4. Lather-Rinse-Repeat

        On the Internet, nobody knows if you're a dog... but everybody knows if you're a jackass.

        by stevemb on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 11:19:33 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  I guess we have to keep repeating (18+ / 0-)

    Snowden has no NSA files. He doesn't control the release of information.
    http://www.nytimes.com/...

    I'm a Vietnam Era vet. I'm also an Erma Bombeck Era vet. When cussing me out and calling me names please indicate which vet you would like to respond to your world changing thoughts.

    by Just Bob on Tue Dec 31, 2013 at 10:11:39 PM PST

  •  Of course, there's a more daunting possibility (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Tortmaster

    And that's the possibility that we truly have already seen the worst of the material -- in which case, any unconstitutionality reduces to the supposedly 'constitutionally ambiguous' metadata program, a handful of LOVEINT abuses, and other things that strike me as pretty low priority in the grand scheme of current domestic problems and government abuses. Probably the best bet for a smoking gun in that case would be the Five Eyes cooperation, but I don't really see that story having legs.

    I'm speaking, of course, purely from the American perspective. I believe foreign citizens are indebted to Snowden and have a right to give American companies the middle finger (and should), but the NSA's activity in this regard is essentially "spies doing spy stuff."

    If this is the case, if there really is nothing else, then I would have to concede that I've been completely wrong the whole time and that there really isn't a 'there' there beyond unsubstantiated speculation and a legitimate but non-vindicated fear based on historical abuses.

    •  To add to that... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Tortmaster

      It's worse: If that's all there is, if that's all the NSA has been doing, even with extremely weak oversight and rubber-stamping procedures available, then I'd even have to concede that the NSA has shown a remarkable level of restraint, at least relative to Americans.

    •  Perhaps... (5+ / 0-)
      I believe foreign citizens are indebted to Snowden and have a right to give American companies the middle finger (and should), but the NSA's activity in this regard is essentially "spies doing spy stuff."
      But I think the reaction of foreign businesses to the US spying is more important in bringing about change than the actual constitutionality of what they are doing.  The history of Total Information Awareness, in all its different incarnations, shows us that they'll always manage to keep it going somehow, even if it requires lying to the public, to the president, to the congress, to the courts, etc.  Actual constitutionality is irrelevant in such circumstances.  Even if the recent battle of the two district courts ends up before the Supreme Court, we'll never have a real and complete Supreme Court judgment on it because there's just too much that hasn't come out yet because they don't want it to and so can't be judged one way or the other.

      ON THE OTHER HAND...  All those EU businesses that are indebted to Snowden can send a simple, cold lesson in business ethics to the US government by simply doing what is in their rational best interest.  They have more choices than we do, here in the US, because we have no choice but to use products and services that are of geographical necessity within the scope of secret NSA subpoenas.  EU businesses aren't restricted that way.  

      I think money trumps constitutionality.

      •  The only possible hope for USians (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ek hornbeck, Dumbo, cybrestrike, koNko

        …comes from outside the US.

        •  Indeed. It's the only optimistic light in this. (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Pluto, koNko, cybrestrike

          You and I can't boycott NSA products.  Every product and service you or I can purchase is within the scope of what the NSA can get to.  But if you had a business outside the US, your corporate security would probably be telling your purchasing department, "Don't buy those routers from the USA."  If they're aren't any decent non-US options to replace American products, there will be eventually.  

          In fact, it would make sense for businesses like Apple, etc., to offshore everything, software, hardware and firmware, so they can get it out of range of the legal reach of the NSA.

          •  We have reason to be optimistic (5+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ek hornbeck, koNko, Dumbo, stevemb, cybrestrike
            If they're aren't any decent non-US options to replace American products...
            Oh, but there are. Much finer.
            …it would make sense for businesses like Apple, etc., to offshore everything, software, hardware and firmware...
            They are scrambling like mad to do so.

            But it is too late for them. They can never be trusted again.

            The important thing for the world to do right now -- is to pull out of the Internet backbone that is running through the US. The entire architecture of the Internet is currently being rebuilt to marginalize the US as much as possible.

            And, thank god for that.

            And, they are doing it much faster than I ever dreamed was possible.

            Sell your tech sector stocks.

      •  Grr, I wanted to rec you, but I'm too late n/t (0+ / 0-)
  •  I'm of two minds, especially in my drunken state. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Pluto

    One of my minds says, yes, yes, put it all out there.

    My other mind says let it drip, drip, drip.

    As it happens, both of my minds are spinning in circles rather wildly at the moment.

     

    An HR from a member of the RKBA is like an F rating from the NRA
    ---We Shall Overcome (12/3/13)---

    by earlybird on Tue Dec 31, 2013 at 10:59:41 PM PST

    •  Did you ever get the feeling that you wanted (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Pluto, Just Bob

      to go, but you still had the feeling that you wanted to stay?  You knew it was right, wasn't wrong.  Still you knew you wouldn't be very long.  Go or stay, stay or go, start to go again and change your mind again.  It's hard to have the feeling that you wanted to go, but still have the feeling that you wanted to stay.

  •  No. Without leverage he's just just a target, (7+ / 0-)

    and I don't mean for criticism.

    Dick Cheney 2/14/10: "I was a big supporter of waterboarding"

    by Bob Love on Tue Dec 31, 2013 at 11:32:52 PM PST

    •  He was never a fool. (7+ / 0-)

      Nor did he ever try to exploit his information or position for money.

      He is a humanitarian -- and I really sometimes wonder if USians deserve such a kindness.

      I certainly know that the rest of the world will be a better place once the US is bypassed -- once and for all -- by global digital communications.

      Thank you Mr. Snowden, for the loud klaxon of the bell that can never be unrung.

      •  Heh. (0+ / 0-)

        Your premise that Americans are awful is really the only consistency.

        I can't tell if you really think Snowden helped awful people who didn't deserve it, or if you really think Snowden fucked around with awful people who did deserve it.  

        I'm going with the latter, since you seem to think the best of all possible worlds is one where the US is bypassed, as if there's a country that doesn't spy on other countries.

        If Hobby Lobby is against contraception, why does it buy its inventory from China, the country that limits the number of children by law?

        by Inland on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 08:42:44 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Heh, heh, heh .. (8+ / 0-)

          And you are pretty clueless about the ultimate impacts of this on the US economy and its prestige and influence in the world.

          NSA is making the USA a loser. That's pretty sad, American deserve better.

          Keep laughing.

          •  Not rooting for the USA to be a loser, anyway. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MBNYC

            It's not a difference in strategy, it's a difference in goals.  Pluto wants the US to be hurt. I don't.

            If Hobby Lobby is against contraception, why does it buy its inventory from China, the country that limits the number of children by law?

            by Inland on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 11:30:38 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  No, you just like twisting people's words (5+ / 0-)

              And creating extreme, hyperbolic misrepresentations of them.

              That's what people who aren't debating in good faith do.




              Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ J. Garcia

              by DeadHead on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 12:57:59 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Eh. We already had a discussion about you. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                MBNYC

                It's still up in Ray's diary.  Let's just let everyone read your pearls there, and you save time by losing your shit right now.

                If Hobby Lobby is against contraception, why does it buy its inventory from China, the country that limits the number of children by law?

                by Inland on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 01:06:09 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Yep, the one where you got pwned. (3+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Just Bob, triv33, TheMomCat

                  I remember vividly.

                  I've got that diary bookmarked, in fact.

                  Doesn't change the fact that my comment to you in this subthread, in this diary, is about you and your word-twisting of Pluto's comment in this subthread, in this diary, however.




                  Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ J. Garcia

                  by DeadHead on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 01:41:05 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Oh look! (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    WB Reeves

                    It's DeadHead in, wait for it, "Meta Fight – Serially Boring!"

                    Out of curiosity, when's the last time to contributed something of actual value, instead of attacking other users?

                    Fuck me, it's a leprechaun.

                    by MBNYC on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 02:00:55 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Well, the conversation about deadhead (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      MBNYC

                      was insightful, smart and entertaining. But as you may have guessed, he decided it wasn't for him and left. Which only improved the quality of the conversation.  

                      If Hobby Lobby is against contraception, why does it buy its inventory from China, the country that limits the number of children by law?

                      by Inland on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 02:31:07 PM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  Yeah.. (0+ / 0-)

                        ... entertainment in spite of itself, of the Kim Kardashian variety. Without the conversational brilliance and/or philosophical depth, of course.

                        Fuck me, it's a leprechaun.

                        by MBNYC on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 02:40:48 PM PST

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  Yes. He just runs away to pull the SOS in another (1+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          MBNYC

                          diary as if he can start anew and it will turn out better the next time.  What's that definition again?

                          If Hobby Lobby is against contraception, why does it buy its inventory from China, the country that limits the number of children by law?

                          by Inland on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 02:49:18 PM PST

                          [ Parent ]

                          •  Well, it could be (0+ / 0-)

                            that mom and dad came home and inquired about the fate of their Cheetos, the ones they put aside for the Rose Bowl, and that awkward trail of crumbs leading into the basement.

                            But enough brain cells wasted on trivial stuff. Like him. Be well :-)

                            Fuck me, it's a leprechaun.

                            by MBNYC on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 03:12:22 PM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  Hardly surprising (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            poligirl

                            You guys are two of a kind.




                            Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ J. Garcia

                            by DeadHead on Thu Jan 02, 2014 at 12:54:55 AM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                        •  lol (2+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          poligirl, TheMomCat

                          Yeah, those last two diaries of yours were clearly the work of an intellectual heavyweight.




                          Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ J. Garcia

                          by DeadHead on Thu Jan 02, 2014 at 01:04:19 AM PST

                          [ Parent ]

                          •  Snort. (0+ / 0-)

                            I know, I know, if only I were able to equal the epochal

                            Open Letter to our DailyKos Spammer Troll
                            by DeadHead
                            ...but I decided to spare myself the catastrophic embarrassment of writing a letter to robotically generated link salad. Anyone not species-survival-endangering illiterate made the same choice.

                            THat left, well, you. By the way, while I have you, "dog shit" is two words.

                            You're welcome.

                            Fuck me, it's a leprechaun.

                            by MBNYC on Thu Jan 02, 2014 at 10:34:32 AM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  Snort. (2+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            TheMomCat, 4kedtongue

                            I'm glad you liked my most recent diary.

                            Perhaps you'll like this one even better:

                            Diversity in the Federal Judiciary: Obama Achieving it at Twice the Rate of Bush

                            I wrote that one back in the days before my disillusionment with the president you hold in such high regard had completely solidified. I keep it handy for those times when douchebags accuse me of having always been some kind of "Obama hater."

                            See, you're the one who runs around acting like your shit don't [sic] stink, not me. I just happen to get on the nerves of people you consider smart. Like Inland, for example, who just so happens to have experienced yet another of his catastrophic failures. This time it was in MB's front-paged diary about that Snowden dude. You know, the cause of your recent flip-flopping.

                            Getting back to you, you're also someone who, on at least three different occasions in the last several months, mysteriously arrives in dead threads to do your little dance routine with your friends.

                            Magic!

                            As for "dogshit," well, I prefer to use the single-word version. Sort of like how "bullshit," and "horseshit" are commonly used.

                            That you focus on whatever little grammatical and spelling-related nitpicks you can find in my comments is, indeed, rather pathetic.

                            So much so, in fact, that I'm considering making as many of these types of mistakes as I can in any future replies I might make to you, just so you can spend your time correcting me, rather than, you know, posting something of value to the community.

                            I apologize for such a lengthy comment. I know you're busy with other things more important than inserting yourself into dead thread meta arguments taking place between others.




                            Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ J. Garcia

                            by DeadHead on Fri Jan 03, 2014 at 12:29:46 AM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  Adorably defensive. (0+ / 0-)

                            But then, you have so much to be defensive about. Grammar is the least of it.

                            Getting back to you, you're also someone who, on at least three different occasions in the last several months, mysteriously arrives in dead threads to do your little dance routine with your friends.
                            Oh, you mean like how MomCat and my other fan suddenly show up to rec your comments in this dead thread. Believe me, in person, she's rather less of a toady to her intellectual inferiors. That's why she has a standing dinner invite at my house, and you don't.
                            I just happen to get on the nerves of people you consider smart.
                            No, what you do is insult good people when you know you have the backup to do so without consequence, shit-stir meta-wars and pick meta-fights wherever you can – but again only when there's some toadies to make sure you can avoid hiddens, which I find almost exquisitely cowardly – and ultimately, in your own small, tawdry little way, keep the personal animosities dividing the site alive.

                            Us against them, that's your world. You thrive in it, to the extent that pedants can thrive. And why you've been in near hysterics ever since I showed that it doesn't need to be that way. Which was, as I recall, a few months ago.

                            That you focus on whatever little grammatical and spelling-related nitpicks you can find in my comments is, indeed, rather pathetic.
                            Nah. Acquaint yourself with the concept of metaphors and how useful they are in making larger points. I merely use your sad defeats at the hands of grammar and spelling to illustrate your broader, much sadder delusions of adequacy.

                            Fuck me, it's a leprechaun.

                            by MBNYC on Fri Jan 03, 2014 at 10:59:12 AM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                    •  Hahahahahahahahaha (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      poligirl

                      That's some funny shit, coming from you.

                      Go write another one of your very sincere "bridge-building" diaries or something.




                      Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ J. Garcia

                      by DeadHead on Thu Jan 02, 2014 at 12:50:09 AM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  This ^^^ vapid blather ^^^ (0+ / 0-)

                        eleven hours after the fact, posted at almost 4 AM. Hmm.

                        Pathetic or cowardly, no matter, well played.

                        Fuck me, it's a leprechaun.

                        by MBNYC on Thu Jan 02, 2014 at 11:09:52 AM PST

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  Hmm... (1+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          TheMomCat

                          I'm sorry, you just aren't one of my priorites.

                          Apparently you think everyone lives in your part of the country.

                          In Washington State, my comment posted at 12:50 AM PST.

                          Mommy said I could stay up late. So there.




                          Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ J. Garcia

                          by DeadHead on Fri Jan 03, 2014 at 12:49:08 AM PST

                          [ Parent ]

                          •  Hmm. (0+ / 0-)
                            I'm sorry, you just aren't one of my priorites. [sic]
                            Yeah, that's why you bring up diaries I wrote in August 2013 in January 2014.

                            But at least you've mastered the concept of time zones, bravo. We'll work on absolute time elapsed some other day.

                            Fuck me, it's a leprechaun.

                            by MBNYC on Fri Jan 03, 2014 at 10:38:26 AM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                  •  Yes. After you ran away in defeat, Hudson Valley (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    MBNYC

                    said things about you that were so funny and yet so insightful that I had to doff my cap to him.  You putting your tail between your legs and scampering off always leads to good times.  You should leave more often as a public service.

                    If Hobby Lobby is against contraception, why does it buy its inventory from China, the country that limits the number of children by law?

                    by Inland on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 02:38:51 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Oh, so you guys are dead-threading? (0+ / 0-)

                      I didn't "run away," I just haven't checked the thread again yet.

                      Thanks for the reminder.




                      Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ J. Garcia

                      by DeadHead on Thu Jan 02, 2014 at 01:06:55 AM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                    •  Okay, I checked. (0+ / 0-)

                      Stop lying, Inland:

                      sure enough, I wouldn't do that

                      I always thought the Snowden meta war was full of fail. He's a hero! no, he's a traitor! he fled! he defected! It's only human to be interested in forming and comparing opinions about other people, but it shouldn't become a cosmic derail.

                      Gurnt's "Death Star" comment summed up my own opinion. If Ray wants to harness "the rage and power of a thousand suns," he really ought to leave the Dalai Lama out of it. The diary intro not only invites snark, it resembles snark.

                      "I am not sure how we got here, but then, I am not really sure where we are." -Susan from 29

                      by HudsonValleyMark on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 11:36:47 AM PST

                      If anything, he was concurring with me, not "defeating" or saying "funny things about me."




                      Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ J. Garcia

                      by DeadHead on Thu Jan 02, 2014 at 01:15:54 AM PST

                      [ Parent ]

    •  Youre right---he needs the leverage (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cybrestrike, 4kedtongue, koNko, Bob Love

      without that leverage he's toast.
      If they were going to release it all at once they would have done so by now

      Happy just to be alive

      by exlrrp on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 04:59:56 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Afraid I Disagree (9+ / 0-)

    Firstly, Snowden is not in control of the disclosures.

    He rather purposely and wisely handed over the information to the press (WaPo, Guardian, Der Spiegal) since:

    (a) They have the resources, legal, productive and financial, to manage the task of vetting and deciding what to release

    (b) They have (at least in USA and Germany if not UK) the legal standing to handle the information as protected source information, and to disclose it under press freedom rights

    (c) To remove himself from the direct line of decision making which could prejudice his case should he ultimately face charges in court

    Secondly, a massive, indiscriminate dump would have negative effects:

    (d) Could result in careless disclosure of information that could lead to human harm, which would backfire

    (e) Would give the appearance of a punitive act rather than a principled act in the cause of public interest

    Lastly, the best strategy to avoid disclosing no more than necessary to put adversaries on the defensive, and let them paint themselves into a corner if they are so inclined. So far, the pacing of the disclosures has kept up the pressure and if beginning to have its effect.

    Let the acid drip. Corrosion weakens the strongest steel.

  •  It's against his interest to let you know that (0+ / 0-)

    the NSA only installed spyware on laptops ordered by certain people already on their "watch list".  He wants people to get the impression that that operation is being done in "bulk" like the phone metadata program.  

    In reality, bugging electronic equipment belonging to "persons of interest" has been going on since Truman created NSA in the first place.  Such activity has always been their prime directive, in fact: electronic spying on persons of interest.  Nobody cared until they crossed the line into doing surveillance in a "bulk" manner.  

    But the installing of spyware on laptops isn't a "bulk" operation.  But Snowden wants you to think it is.  He learned from the best at putting out half-truths to let readers form the worst impression possible: Greenwald.

    •  Of course, now that Snowden disclosed this (0+ / 0-)

      activity, he's taken away a valuable tool we have to keep tabs on terrorists.  When you hear in the news about "increased chatter" involving communications among possible terrorists, how do you think we're able to judge the amount of "chatter"?  By things like bugging electronic communications systems used by those on the watch list, including bugging laptops.  Snowden took it upon himself to disclose how that was done, just because he thinks such activity is against his own sense of morality, regardless of the fact that nobody elected him to a position to make that call.  So now it will be harder to bug those laptops.  His sycophants will applaud Snowden's taking away of that tool, since they applaud anything he does.  

      I'm guessing that had Snowden publicly disclosed the operation to take down OBL the week before it happened, because he objected to the US violating Pakistan's sovereignty, there would be some among his fans who would excuse or even applaud that.

      •  The Metric (0+ / 0-)
        When you hear in the news about "increased chatter" involving communications among possible terrorists, how do you think we're able to judge the amount of "chatter"?
        Personally, I think they're judging it as a function of how badly they need a distraction from some political or personal embarrassment, but maybe that's just me.

        On the Internet, nobody knows if you're a dog... but everybody knows if you're a jackass.

        by stevemb on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 11:24:29 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  What? Lose all that attention? (0+ / 0-)

    He wont' be in the spotlight anymore. Rolling it out piece by piece means they get to keep hearing their names in the news.

    O great creator of being grant us one more hour to perform our art and perfect our lives. ::: Jim Morrison :::

    by Kevanlove on Wed Jan 01, 2014 at 11:08:27 AM PST

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